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Global Education Tool-kit

EM202- Culminating Assignment Part 2


Moriah Rose-15034370
Steven Sider
Winter 2018

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Table of Contents
Summary of Activities:................................................................................................................ 3
Activity One: When Disaster Strikes ..................................................................................... 4
Activity Two: Water Collection and Usage ......... Error! Bookmark not defined.
Activity Three: What is a Global Citizen .............................................................................. 6
Activity Four: Privilege for Sale .............................................................................................. 6
Activity Five: Food for All .......................................................................................................... 8
References........................................................................................................................................ 9

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Summary of Activities:
The activities in this tool-kit have been geared towards children that range from grades 6
to 8. This tool-kit will provide examples of learning activities that teachers can use in the
classroom to promote global engagement and understanding. When going through the
activities, each activity will be laid out as follows: the intended learning outcomes,
resources required, and the process/steps. All these activities are just an outline and can be
adapted to make them more challenging for older students or make them simpler for
younger students. The activities will cover a range of topics including; disasters, access to
clean water, global citizenship, privilege and food insecurity.

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Activity One: When Disaster Strikes
Intended Learning Outcomes:
The intended outcome of this activity is for students to understand the different types of
disasters that can occur and the effects different disasters have on people and the
environment.

Resources Required:
 Paper
 Pens/ markers
 Pictures of different disasters from around the world printer out

Process/ Steps:
1. The students will each brainstorm a list of different disasters. The students will all have
about 5 minutes to make a list of disasters.
2. Once all the students have made their lists, the class will come together and the
students will share their lists of different disasters and what they know about each
disaster.
3. Once the list is complete, certain students will volunteer to mime the different disasters
to the class so other students can identify the given disaster.
4. Next the students will be split up into smaller groups of 5 students and each group will
be given a photo of a disaster to discuss.
5. The groups will be prompted with different questions to answer about their
photograph. These question can include any of the following:
 What kind of disaster could have caused the damage in the photo?
 What do you think the impacts are on the people in this area? The environment?
 What kinds of help might people need when these disasters occur? (Immediate,
short term, and long term recovery)
6. The students will have about 15 minutes to discuss their photo and the questions above
and then the class will come back together.
7. Each group will present their photograph to the class and share their thoughts.
8. As a class the teacher will lead a discussion about where these disasters happen in the
world and if these disasters can happen in their home country.
9. Finally as a class, they will create a ‘disasters’ web map to summarize all the key ideas
from the discussion.

Source:
http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/disasters-preparedness.html

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Activity Two: Water Collection and Usage
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Students will become aware of how important water is in their everyday lives and will
investigate factors that limit access to safe water for some people in the world. The
students will learn about and explore the impacts of not having access to safe water has on
peoples lives.

Resources Required:
 Pen/ markers
 Paper
 Calculators

Process/ Steps:
1. The students will make a list of all their daily activities that use water, i.e. water use
for drinking, food preparation, sanitation/ hygiene, and for other day-to-day
activities like washing clothes, dishes, watering the garden, etc.
2. The students will estimate and/or measure the amount of water needed in each of
the daily activities.
3. Once they have found out the approximate amount needed, they will calculate their
total daily water usage.
4. Then they come back as a class and will discuss which activities rely on water and
approximately how much water they use in their daily lives.
5. Then they will be split up into groups to discuss and research the following:
 Where does your water come from?
 What problems would you and your community face if access to safe and
sufficient water was difficult and/or limited?
 Why can access to water be considered a human right?
 Do all areas in the world have equal access to water? If not, which areas face
challenges of receiving water?
6. After the students have had sufficient time to do their research the class will come
back together and discuss their findings.
7. As a class, create a picture, cartoon or graphic contrasting the different levels of
access to water over the world.
8. Then compare the lifestyle of yourself to someone who doesn’t have access to water.
9. Finally, as a class come up with ideas in how the world can help overcome the
differences in access to water between different countries.

Source:
http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/access-to-safe-water-and-
sanitation-up.html

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Activity Three: What is a Global Citizen
Intended Learning Outcomes:
The intended outcome is for students to realize their potential to make a difference. This
will allow the students to gain a sense of importance and self worth and gain respect for
diversity and differences of their fellow classmates. By the end of the activity, the students’
self-esteem should be raised and they will feel important, valued and able to take
responsibility and change things around them.

Resources Required:
 Paper with following 9 points on it:
1. I try to understand what other people are feeling.
2. I am as important as everyone else.
3. Everyone else is equal to me but different from me.
4. I know what is fair and not fair and try to do the right thing.
5. I look after the environment and don’t waste things.
6. I try to help others and not fight with them.
7. I have my own ideas but can alter them if I realize I am wrong.
8. I want to learn more about the world.
9. I think I can change things in the world.
 Blank paper
 Markers/ pens

Process/ Steps:
1. Students will be split into small groups and asked to place the 9 statements in order
of importance to them.
2. The students will need to work with their group mates to decipher, which points are
the most important to their group and give reasons to others in the group for their
individual views.
3. After about 15 minutes bring all the students back together and discuss the activity
as a whole class.
4. Each group will explain to the class what their final order was, how they got to this
order and why?
5. Once each group has discussed their order, the groups will be asked to work
together again to decide what they could do to show how these things are
important.
6. Finally all the students can come back together and as a class they can combine their
ideas together in a ‘Global Citizen’ pledge that can be put on display in the
classroom.

Source:
https://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/resources/global-citizenship-in-the-whole-
school/key-stage-two

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Activity Four: Privilege for Sale
Intended Learning Outcomes:
This activity is intended to show students the privileges they have that they may not realize
or take for granted and how other people in the world aren’t as fortunate to have the same
privileges that they do. As well, the activity is designed to teach students that privilege is
not only a legal construct but also social, religious and economic.

Resources Required:
 Scrap paper
 Markers/ pens
 Paper money
 Handout with different privileges written on it

Process/ Steps:
1. Before the activity begins arrange piles of different amounts of paper money to give
to different groups. The amounts shoulder differ (300, 500, 750, 1000) and ideally
not divisible by the number of people in the group.
2. Split the class into groups of 3-5 people.
3. Explain to the students the following: for the purpose of the activity you do not have
any privileges. Your group will be given an amount of money and collectivity you
will have to decide which privileges you would like to buy. Each privilege costs
$100.
4. Pass out the privilege sheets and the stacks of money to each group.
5. Give the students about 5-10 minutes to decide on which privileges they would like
to purchase as group.
6. Once the time is up bring all the students back together and have an open
discussion.
7. The following is a list of possible discussion questions to talk about:
 What was it like to do this activity?
 What shocked you about the list of privileges?
 What was the process like deciding as a group?
 What do you think the value of doing this activity in groups was?
 What are you going to take away from this activity?
8. Wrap up the activity by connecting the discussion back to the larger issue of
privilege and how not all students get the same privileges, etc.

Source:
http://www.socialjusticetoolbox.com/activity/privilege-for-sale/

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Activity Five: Food for All
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Students will research and become aware/knowledgeable about food security issues in
selected countries and will find out what needs to be done to ensure food security and
access for all.

Resources Required:
 Paper
 Pencils
 Computers

Process/ Steps:
1. In groups of 2 or 3, student’s will chose a country to research- make sure all groups
chose different countries.
2. Once they chose a country they will research that country’s access and availability of
food, hunger, and malnutrition within that country.
3. Then they will explore how the political, cultural, environment and/or economic
factors may have an affect on the status of food availability in the given country.
4. Once they have found these 2 main points they are encouraged to do any other
research on their country to find out more about the country’s access to food.
5. Then they are to put all the information they found into a presentation which will
highlight the main issues relating to access to food and factors that impact this.
6. Each group will present their findings on their given country to the class.
7. Once presentations are done, the class will come together and discuss what they can
do to make sure everyone in the world has access to sufficient amounts of foods.
8. The class will make a list of different things they can do within their community to
make sure everyone has a sufficient amount of food and a list of ways they can help
to make sure people around the world have enough food.

Source:
http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/food-for-the-world-
up.html#activity6

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References
Access to Safe Water and Sanitation. (n.d.). Retrieved March 26, 2018, from
http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/access-to-safe-water-and-sanitation-up.html

Bolger, M. (n.d.). Privilege for Sale. Retrieved March 26, 2018, from
http://www.socialjusticetoolbox.com/activity/privilege-for-sale/

Disaster Preparedness. (n.d.). Retrieved March 26, 2018, from


http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/disasters-
preparedness.html#activity1

Food for the World. (n.d.). Retrieved March 26, 2018, from
http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/food-for-the-world-
up.html#activity6

Global Citizenship for Key Stage Two | Oxfam Education. (n.d.). Retrieved March 26, 2018,
from https://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/resources/global-citizenship-in-the-whole-school/key-
stage-two