You are on page 1of 9

ECLIPSE  TUTORIAL  NO.

 2

(Simple layer sweep efficiency:  viscous, gravity and capillary forces)

This exercise involves adapting file TUT1D.DATA – Make sure that you have completed
Tutorial 1D before commencing Tutorial 2.

A ­ Two dimensional model with high perm in the middle layer.

Create a tut2 folder, make a copy file TUT1D.DATA, and call it TUT2A.DATA

The objective is to make a more detailed cross­section model between the injector
and producer:
Injector Producer
Vertical layers
Geological       Grid cells

5 x 50 cells Layer 1
X 1   1­5
150' 5 x 50 cells Layer 2
Z 2  6­10
5 x 50 cells Layer 3
3500’
2500' 3 11­15

Each   layer   has   5   x   50   cells   to   limit   numerical   dispersion.   Go   through   the


following steps in editing the TUT2A.DATA file:

(a) Set number of cells, NX = 50, NY = 1, NZ = 15, in the DIMENS keyword, and
the maximum number of connections per well = 15, in the WELLDIMS keyword.

(b) Set grid dimensions to DX=70, DY=1800, DZ=10 for all cells.  (Although the
model has the same overall pore volume as in Tutorial 1, it is now only 1 cell
thick in the Y direction.)

(c) There are now 15 layers of grid cells, distributed over 3 geological layers:
o geological layer 1 corresponds to grid layers 1 ­ 5
o geological layer 2 corresponds to grid layers 6 ­ 10
o geological layer 3 corresponds to grid layers 11 ­ 15
Define TOPS for only the first layer of grid cells (layer 1 ­ 1), but all poro/perm
properties   should   be   assigned   per   geological   layer   (i.e.   per   5   layers   of   cells).
Maintain the same PERMX, PERMZ, PORO and NTG values in each geological
layer as in TUT1D.

1
 
(d) Delete PERMY and associated data.

(e)  In the REGIONS section change number of cells in each layer from 25 to 250
when allocating relative permeability tables to cells in SATNUM keyword:
SATNUM
   250*2   250*1    250*2    /

(f)  In the SUMMARY section remove WWCT (PROD), and replace with FWCT,
the field water cut.   Add FWIT (field water injection total) and FOE (Field Oil
Recovery Efficiency) to the list of output variables.

(g) Place injector at (1,1) and producer at (50,1) and complete both over all 15
vertical cells.

(h)   Set   the   injector   to   a   rate   control   of   11,000   stb   water/day   (RATE)   with   a
maximum bottom hole pressure limit of 10,000 psia, and the producer to a liquid
production rate of 10,000 stb/day (LRAT), with a minimum bottom hole pressure
limit (BHP) of 2,000 psia.

(i) Water injection at this rate will result in the displacement of one pore volume
of after 2850 days, so set the time steps (TSTEP) to give ten tenths of a pore
volume:
TSTEP
10*285   /

Save the edited file.

Run Eclipse using the TUT2A data file.   Plot the following:   field oil recovery


efficiency (FOE) and field water cut (FWCT) vs field cumulative water injection
(FWIT) on the X­axis.   Do not, at this stage, save or print this picture.   These
graphs will be recreated in a comparison between parts A to D..

B ­ High perm in bottom layer.

Copy TUT2A.DATA to TUT2B.DATA

Edit the new file to place the high permeability layer in the bottom instead of the
middle, i.e.:

layer 1: PERMX =  200mD 
layer 2: PERMX =  200mD   
layer 3: PERMX =  1000mD   

2
Alter   the   PERMZ,   PORO,   NTG   and   SATNUM   keywords   to   reflect   the   layer
changes also.  Run Eclipse again and plot the same graph as above, but this time
for both cases 2A and 2B.  (To do this you must read in the .RSM (for Excel) or
.SMSPEC (for Office Report) files for TUT2A and TUT2B.)   Inspect the grid
saturations of A and then B using Floviz to identify causes of any difference in
production between A and B.

C ­ High perm in top layer.

Copy   TUT2B.DATA   to   TUT2C.DATA.     Edit   the   new   file   to   place   the   high
permeability layer on top, and run Eclipse.   Use Floviz to investigate the grid
saturations for C.  TUT2C will form the base case, with all the subsequent models
being compared to this one.  The files for the remaining models will all be edited
copies of TUT2C.DATA.

D ­ Slower frontal advance rate.

Copy   TUT2C.DATA   to   TUT2D.DATA.     Edit   the   new   file   so   that   instead   of


injecting   11,000   stb   water/day   only   1,100   stb/day   are   injected,   instead   of
producing 10,000 stbl/day only 1,000 stbl/day are produced, and the timesteps are
increased from 285 to 2850 days each.

On Figure 1 display the field oil recovery efficiency (Y­axis) vs field cumulative
water injection (X­axis) for A ­ D.   On  Figure 2  display the field water cut vs
field cumulative water injection for the four models.  Using FloViz, generate grid
displays of the saturation profiles at time step 2 and time step 5.   In MS Word
create Figure 3 with four saturation plots (A­D) for time step 2 and Figure 4 with
four  saturation  plots   (A­D)  for  time  step  5.    (In  FloViz   use   menu  View­>Set
View­>Front,   exaggerate   by   a   factor   of   10   in   the   z   direction,   then   View­
>Hardcopy colours and then either File­>Save Image­>Image File to save a jpeg
file, or use Alt­PrintScrn to copy bitmap to the clipboard, from where the image
may be pasted directly into MS Word (Ctrl­V).

What are the main differences in production behaviour between the four models,
and why?  How would the profiles in D compare with the other cases if plotted
against time instead of volume of water injected.

E – Increased cross­sectional area away from wells.

Copy TUT2C.DATA to TUT2E.DATA.  Change the thickness of the cells so that
close to the wells they are narrow, but in between the wells they are broad.  To do
this, delete the old definition of DY under EQUALS, and insert a new definition
of DY above the EQUALS keyword:

3
DY

2*140   2*420   2*700   2*980   2*1260   2*1540   2*1820   2*2100   2*2380   2*2660
2*2940 2*3220 2*3500
2*3220  2*2940 2*2660  2*2380 2*2100  2*1820 2*1540  2*1260 2*980  2*700
2*420 2*140

2*140   2*420   2*700   2*980   2*1260   2*1540   2*1820   2*2100   2*2380   2*2660
2*2940 2*3220 2*3500
2*3220  2*2940 2*2660  2*2380 2*2100  2*1820 2*1540  2*1260 2*980  2*700
2*420 2*140

repeat for all 15 layers

These changes will maintain the overall volume of the system, but ensure that
flow speeds in mid­field will be only 4% of the flow speeds in the near wellbore
region.  Run Eclipse and again inspect the saturation profiles using Floviz.  (Note
Floviz will not show a grid with variations in thickness in the Y direction here, but
changing the display properties to Initial: DY will allow you to check that you
have entered the DY values correctly.)

F ­ Increased kv/kh.

Copy TUT2C.DATA to TUT2F.DATA.  Edit the new file so that the model has a
kv/kh  ratio of 1 instead of 0.1 (i.e. make PERMZ 1000, 200 and 200 mD in the
three layers).  Run Eclipse again and inspect the saturation profiles using Floviz.
Do not print the figures.

G ­ Barriers preventing vertical flow.

Copy TUT2C.DATA  to TUT2G.DATA.   Instead  of changing  all the grid cell


vertical permeabilities, the transmissibilities between the three layers are to be set
to zero.   In the EQUALS keyword, between the layer 1 and layer 2 definitions
insert the following:

     MULTZ      0.0            1 50      1  1      5  5     /

4
and between the layer 2 and layer 3 definitions insert:

     MULTZ      0.0            1 50      1  1     10 10     /

This will prevent any flow between grid layers 5 and 6, and between grid layers
10 and 11.  Again run Eclipse and FloViz to inspect the saturations.  Plot the field
oil recovery efficiency vs time for C, E, F, and G on Figure 5.  Create a separate
plot with field water cut vs time for the same four models on Figure 6.  Create
Figures 7 & 8, similar to Figures 3 & 4, but for C, E, F, and G.

What flow regimes will be encountered as injected water moves away from the
wellbore into the formation, and which forces will tend to dominate in each of the
regimes?  Discuss the geological reasons why the kv/kh ratio might vary in reality.
What   difference   does   it   make   whether   the   kv/kh   ratio   is   reduced/increased
throughout the reservoir rock, as in F, or whether transmissibility barriers exist
between layers, as in G?

H ­ Zero capillary pressure.

Copy TUT2C.DATA to   TUT2H.DATA.   Set the capillary pressure in the new


model to zero.  Do this by setting all the Pc values in the SWOF tables to 0.0.

What is the effect on oil recovery of setting capillary pressure to zero, and what
conclusion do you draw about its effect on the reservoir flow behaviour?

I – Grid coarsening.

Copy TUT2C.DATA to   TUT2Ccoarse.DATA.   Here we are going to leave the


same level of grid resolution in the cells around the wells, but coarsen the cells in
the centre of the model from 70 ft in the X­direction to 1,400 ft, and coarsen all
cells in the Z­direction from 10 ft to 50 ft.

Change the number of cells to NX=12, NY=1, NZ=3, in the DIMENS keyword.

In the EQUALS keyword change the DX and DZ values 

EQUALS
-- Keyword value X1 X2 Y1 Y2 Z1 Z2
DX 70 1 5 1 1 1 3 /
DX 1400 6 7 1 1 1 3 /
DX 70 8 12 1 1 1 3 /

DY 1800 1 12 1 1 1 3 /

5
DZ 50 /

Also remember to change the X1, X2 and Z1, Z2 values for all other properties in
the EQUALS keyword to reflect the new grid dimensions.

Change SATNUM to reflect the fact that there are now only 12 cells in each layer.

Change WELSPECS and COMPDAT to reflect the grid dimension of 1­12 cells
in the X­Direction and 1­3 cells in the Y­Direction.

Copy   TUT2Ccoarse.DATA   to   TUT2Hcoarse.DATA,   and   make   Pc=0   in


TUT2Hcoarse.DATA.

Run TUT2Ccoarse.DATA and TUT2Hcoarse.DATA

J– Grid refinement.

Here we refine the model by a factor 5 in the X­Direction and a factor of 5 in the
Z­Direction (all cells will be 10 ft X 1800 ft X 2ft).

Copy   TUT2C.DATA   to   TUT2Crefine.DATA,   and   TUT2H.DATA   to


TUT2Hrefine.DATA, and in each of the refined models add

AUTOREF
   5  1  5  /
   
NSTACK
   100 /

before the OIL keyword in the RUNSEPC section, and

TUNING
/
/
  2*    100 /

before the TSTEP keyword in the SCHEDULE section.

These keywords will automatically refine the model and allocate more memory
space for the calculations.

6
Run TUT2Crefine.DATA and TUT2Hrefine.DATA

Plot   FOE   vs   time   for   cases   TUT2C,   TUT2Ccoarse,   TUT2Crefine,   TUT2H,


TUT2Hcoarse, and TUT2Hrefine on Figure 9, and FWCT vs time on Figure 10.

What is the impact of capillary pressure in the coarse models?  And in the refined
models?     What   is   the   level   of   resolution   required   in   the   cases   with   capillary
pressure, and in the cases without?

SENSITIVITIES

Polymer Flooding
 Model   viscous   oil:    Copy   TUT2C.DATA   to   ViscOil.DATA   and   increase   the
viscosity of oil by a factor of 5 (multiply each of the viscosities in the table by 5).
 Model   polymer   injection   to   sweep   more   viscous   oil:    Copy  ViscOil.DATA   to
Polymer.DATA, and add in the following keywords to inject a polymer solution
with a viscosity = 10 cP:

in RUNSPEC section

­­ Switches on polymer option (no associated data)
POLYMER

in PROPS section

­­ viscosity multiplier vs polymer concentration
PLYVISC
­­ concentration       multiplier
          0.00000                1.0  
          1.00000             12.5/

­­   1.0 * 0.8 =   0.8 cP  (water viscosity) 
­­ 12.5 * 0.8 = 10 cP     (polymer viscosity

­­ 3 keywords switch off polymer adsorption
PLYADS
0.0  0.0
1.0  0.0 /
0.0  0.0

7
1.0  0.0 /

PLYROCK
0.0  1.0  1.0  1  1.0  /
0.0  1.0  1.0  1  1.0  /

PLYMAX
1.0  0.0 /

­­ degree of mixing between injected polymer solution and formation water
TLMIXPAR
1.0 /

in SCHEDULE section, after WCONINJ

WPOLYMER
­­ well name       concentration
         INJ                  1.0   /
/

Does adding polymer improve the sweep efficiency and the recovery in the viscous oil
scenario?  What about in the original low viscosity oil case?

Selective completions
Use   the   COMPDAT   keyword   to   try   and   improve   sweep   efficiency   by   selectively
perforating the wells in only some cells.  Choose between models TUT2B, TUT2C and
TUT2G.

8
9