You are on page 1of 3

5/16/2018 www.lacourt.org/tentativeRulingNet/ui/ResultPopup.

aspx

DEPARTMENT 58 LAW AND MOTION RULINGS

Effective 2-1-16, Judge Treu is assigned to Dept. 59, Family Law.

Case Number: BC682325    Hearing Date: May 16, 2018    Dept: 58

Hearing Date:              May 16, 2018
Calendar No:               11
Case Name:                 Overrated Productions, Inc. v. Universal Music Group, et al.
Case No.:                    BC682325
Motion:                       Demurrer
Moving Party:             Defendants Universal International Music B.V. and Universal Music Group, Inc.
Responding Party:      Plaintiff Overrated Productions, Inc.
 
Tentative Ruling:      The Demurrer is sustained in part.  The Motion to Strike is denied.

 
This is an action arising from Defendants’ alleged breach of contract by intentionally undervaluing royalty
payments due to Plaintiff.  On November 6, 2017, Plaintiff filed the operative Complaint alleging causes of
action for (1) breach of contract, (2) breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, (3)
violation of the UCL, (4) declaratory relief, and (5) accounting.
 
Request for Judicial Notice
Defendants’ Request for Judicial Notice is granted.
 
Demurrer
Defendants Universal International Music B.V. and Universal Music Group, Inc. (“UMGI”) demur to the
second through fifth causes of action for failure to state sufficient facts.
 
(1)   Proper Defendants
Defendants first argue that UMGI is not a Defendant, that the Complaint’s alter ego allegations are insufficient
as against UMGI, and that Universal Music Group (“UMG”) is a non­existent entity.  The parties in part base
their arguments on a ruling issued by a federal District Court in remanding this matter.  However, in construing
the four corners of the Complaint, UMGI is nowhere named as a Defendant in this action and is therefore not a
proper defendant at this time. 
 
Additionally, UMG is not apparently a corporation, but rather is an integrated enterprise comprised of several
entities.  (Opposition at p. 4.)  However, the single business enterprise doctrine is a theory of liability.  (Toho­
Towa Co. v. Morgan Creek Prods., Inc. (2013) 217 Cal. App. 4th 1096, 1108 n.4.)  That is, the entities
comprising an integrated enterprise may be liable for one another’s actions.  This does not, however, mean that
Plaintiff can name an integrated enterprise as a defendant without naming its constituents as defendants and
then plead that they function as an integrated enterprise.  In other words, Plaintiff has put the cart before the
horse in pleading UMG as a defendant.  As there is no corporate entity officially existing as UMG, the Court
strikes UMG as a Defendant. 
 
 
(2)   Implied Covenant
Defendants demur to the second cause of action for breach of the implied covenant, arguing that such claim is
superfluous given Plaintiff’s breach of contract claim.  The Complaint partly premises the second cause of
action on Defendants’ alleged scheme to deliberately undervalue the proper amount of royalties to be paid to
Plaintiff by making certain deductions.  Defendants argue that because the subject contract expressly provides
http://www.lacourt.org/tentativeRulingNet/ui/ResultPopup.aspx 1/3
5/16/2018 www.lacourt.org/tentativeRulingNet/ui/ResultPopup.aspx

for an accounting method as to calculating royalties, the allegations set forth merely comprise a breach of
contract.  Therefore, Defendants argue, the second cause of action is merely superfluous. 
 
However, the parties have not fully briefed whether or not the alleged deductions, even if true, would
constitute a breach of contract. Although the contract expressly provides for certain deductions to royalties and
adjustments based on net sales (see Complaint, Exhibit 1 § 13(f)), it is not clear at this juncture whether the
deductions contemplated would necessarily constitute a breach of contract.  Under the circumstances, Plaintiff
should be able to argue in the alternative that even if the deductions were not a breach of contract, they
unfairly frustrated the contract thereby perhaps comprising a breach of the covenant of good faith and fair
dealing.  (See Guz v. Bechtel Nat. Inc. (2000) 24 Cal. 4th 317, 349.) 
 
Accordingly, the Demurrer is overruled as to the second cause of action.
 
(3)   UCL
Defendants demur to the UCL claim because (1) Plaintiff is not a consumer or competitor of Defendants
within the meaning of the UCL, (2) UCL claims cannot be based on a breach of contract, and (3) the
Complaint fails to plead fraudulent, unlawful, or unfair conduct.
 
Defendants’ first argument is without merit.  Any person or corporation who has suffered an injury in fact due
to an unfair business practice may bring a UCL claim.  (See Bus. & Prof. Code §§ 17201, 17204, 17535.)  The
cases cited by Defendants that purportedly establish that Plaintiff is not a proper competitor or consumer refer
to situations in which a corporate entity asserts a representative claim involving contractual matters.  (See
Rosenbluth Int’l v. Superior Court (2002) 101 Cal.App.4th 1073, 1077­78; Linear Technology Corp. v. Applied
Materials, Inc. (2007) 152 Cal.App.4th 115, 135.)  These authorities are inapplicable as the Complaint does
not assert a representative UCL claim.
 
Next, Defendants argue that there is no fraudulent conduct pled that would support a UCL claim.  Notably,
fraud—for the purposes of a UCL claim—need not be pled with particularity as required by the common law;
rather, such claims need only be pled with reasonable particularity, which is a more lenient standard. 
(Gutierrez v. Carmax Auto Superstores California (2018) 19 Cal.App.5th 1234, 1261.)  However, reliance
must be pled nevertheless.  (In re Tobacco II Cases (2009) 46 Cal.App.4th 298, 206.) 
 
Plaintiff argues that, as in Davis v. Capitol Records, LLC (2013) 2013 WL 1701746 at *5, the Complaint
adequately alleges that Defendants knowingly underpaid royalties to Plaintiff by concealing their accounting
methods, that such accounting methods were difficult to detect based on the royalty statements provided, and
that Plaintiff was misled based on such royalty statements.  However, unlike the pleadings in Davis, the
Complaint does not allege reliance upon Defendants’ alleged concealment. 
 
As to the “unlawful” prong of the UCL, the Complaint fails to plead unlawful conduct whether pursuant to
statute, regulation, or the common law.  Plaintiff points to decisions by the federal courts in which a “broad
scheme” to intentionally breach a contract constituted unlawful conduct (see, e.g., James v. UMG Recording,
Inc. (2011) 2011 WL 519276, at * 4­5), but such decisions are merely persuasive authority which the Court
declines to follow in that these decisions provide a standard that is too amorphous for application pursuant to
the current pleadings.
 
Thus, the Demurrer is sustained as to the third cause of action, with twenty days leave to amend.
 
(4)   Declaratory Relief
The Demurrer is sustained as to the fourth cause of action for declaratory relief because such claim regards an
accrued claim for breach of contract or the implied covenant.  (See Osseous Techs. of Am., Inc. v.
DiscoveryOrtho Partners LLC (2010) 191 Cal. App. 4th 357, 366.)  Plaintiff argues that declaratory relief is
appropriate because the claim seeks a determination as to the parties’ rights moving forward as well. 
However, a ruling on the breach of contract or breach of implied covenant claims would fully dispose of the
http://www.lacourt.org/tentativeRulingNet/ui/ResultPopup.aspx 2/3
5/16/2018 www.lacourt.org/tentativeRulingNet/ui/ResultPopup.aspx

issues ostensibly presented by the declaratory relief claim.  That is, to the extent the Court finds a breach of
contract or a breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing, then Defendants’ identical conduct going
forward would also constitute a breach. 
 
The Court is inclined to deny leave to amend as to the fourth cause of action, at least at this time, without
prejudice, to the extent that perhaps an amendment down the road would be appropriate        should the
landscape change as the case proceeds in a way that would make a difference in this regard, not a likelihood
apparently.
 
(5)   Accounting
Defendants demur to the accounting claim because such is not a cause of action.  But even if true, the Court
will not sustain a demurrer based on a mislabeling.  To the extent Defendants challenge the propriety of such
“cause of action” or remedy, then they can do so by way of a motion to strike or a subsequent demurrer, if it
somehow might make a meaningful difference.  This kind of case might possibly permit the ordering of an
accounting one way or another down the road in any event. 
 
The Demurrer is overruled as to the fifth cause of action.
 
Motion to Strike
Defendants seek to strike all remaining claims because they are time­barred; Defendants also seek to strike
Plaintiff’s request for attorneys’ fees and punitive damages in connection with its UCL claim.
 
The Motion to Strike is denied as to the issue of the statute of limitations.  This is because there is essentially
nothing to strike.  Even if claims premised on royalty payments made more than two years before the
Complaint was filed were time­barred, there are no allegations specific to such royalty payments that might be
stricken.  To the extent Defendants challenge such royalty payments based on a statute of limitations
affirmative defense, Defendants can do so, for example, pursuant to a dispositive motion.  
 
The Motion to Strike is denied as moot in with respect to the requests stemming from Plaintiff’s UCL claim
given the ruling on the demurrer above.
 
 

http://www.lacourt.org/tentativeRulingNet/ui/ResultPopup.aspx 3/3