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GAS LAW

APPLICATIONS
By: Olivia Kaminski & Camryn Heitzenrater
Hot Air Balloons:
◦ They float because the air trapped inside the balloon is heated up by a burner, making it less dense than the
air outside
◦ A hot-air balloon float because air is trapped inside the balloon and gets heated up by a burner, making it less
dense than the air outside.
◦ A hot air balloon has three huge parts:
◦ 1. The burner that heats the air
◦ 2. The balloon envelope that holds the air
◦ 3. The basket that carries the people in the balloon
History Info:
◦ A hot air balloon is a balloon used for traveling through the air in a basket that is suspended
below a massive bag of air that is heated
◦ Balloons work by gravity and also the hot air weighs less than cold air does
◦ These balloons are traveling by wind and air essential
◦ Many people enjoy going on rides in them and also for long distance traveling
How it Works:
◦ The process behind why balloons rise is because
warmer air rises in cooler air. This is because hot air is
lighter than cool air as it has less mass per unit of
volume.
◦ Mass can be defined by the measure of how much
matter something contains. The actual balloon has to be
so large as it takes such a large amount of heated air to
lift it off the ground.
◦ To help keep the balloon in the air and rising, hot air
needs to be propelled upwards into the envelope using
the burner
How it Works:
Gas Law:
◦ Charles’s Law states that the volume of a gas is directly related to the
temperature of that certain gas
-In this case it is when the gas is heated from the hot air
balloons burner
◦ This law states that if a given quantity of gas is held at a constant
pressure, its volume is directly proportional to the absolute
temperature
◦ When the gas is heated the balloon starts to expand, it becomes less
dense and provides the balloon to lift off the ground
◦ Hot air is lighter than cool air because it has less mass of the volume
◦ To keep the balloon up in the air the burner that heats the air inside
of the balloon is using propane
Aerosol Cans:
◦ An aerosol can is a type of dispensing system which creates a mist of liquid
◦ The ideal gas law could be used in an aerosol can problem to determine the number of moles of the
propellant + product
◦ To finish that you would need the entire equation but this would be one application of an ideal gas that
involved the cans and how they work
◦ Boyle’s Law: the cans have a lot of pressure in them, which is what causes the liquid to come out when
pressure is added to the can
How it Works:
◦ Define: Aerosol is really a cloud of liquid and gas that comes out of an aerosol can, not the can itself. In fact,
to be strictly correct about it, an aerosol is a fine mist of liquid, or lots of solid particles, widely and evenly
dispersed throughout a gas.
◦ On the back of an aerosol can it says "pressurized container" and "contents stored under pressure." This is
there so the paint comes out right
◦ When you press the button on the top of an aerosol can, the manufacturers have to squeeze the contents
inside with a compressor
◦ Typically, the contents of an aerosol are stored at 2–8 times normal atmospheric pressure. That's why
aerosols really rush out when you press their buttons.
Continued:
◦ Aerosol cans contain two different substances:
-liquid product that you want to come out
-Pressurized gas called a propellant
◦ This helps to push the liquid product into the air and turn it into an aerosol cloud.
◦ The propellant gas usually turns into a liquid when it's forced inside the can at high pressure during
manufacturing stages.
◦ That makes the propellant and the product mix together
◦ The propellant turns back to a gas when you push the nozzle and the pressure is released. It disappears into
the air leaving behind the product you want.
Gas Laws:
◦ Boyle’s Law is the absolute pressure exerted by a given mass of a gas is inversely proportional to the volume it
occupies if the temperature and amount of gas remain unchanged.
◦ When the volume increases, the pressure of the gas decreases in proportion.
◦ Boyle’s Law: In the aerosol can that have a lot of pressure in them, is what causes the liquid to come out when
pressure is applied to the can.
◦ Avogadro’s Law: equal volumes of all gases at the same temperature and pressure, have the same number of
molecules
◦ Under the same condition of temperature and pressure, equal volumes of all gases contain the same number of
molecules
◦ Avogadro’s Law: Until more pressure or heat is added to the aerosol can, the contents of the can stay the same
◦ Gay-Lussac’s Law:: At the same temperature and pressure, equal volumes of gas contains equal numbers of
molecules
◦ Gay-Lussac’s Law: Until more pressure or heat is added to the aerosol can, the contents of the can stay the same
Avagadro’s Law
Pop rocks:
◦ Pop rocks are made by mixing sugar, lactose, corn syrup, coloring and water.
◦ Carbon dioxide is then mixed with the hot sugar mixture.
◦ The carbon dioxide makes bubbles which causes the candy to break into the pieces you get in the packages.
◦ When pop rocks are in your mouth, your saliva breaks down the candy and releases the carbon dioxide inside.
The popping noise is caused when the bubbles of carbon dioxide popping in your mouth.
Gas Laws:
◦ Pop rocks deal with Charles’s Law and Boyle’s Law
◦ Charles' Law: When temperature increases, volume increases and when the temperature decreases, volume
decreases.
◦ Boyle’s Law: When the volume of a gas is decreases, the pressure increases and when the volume of a gas
increases, the pressure decreases.
◦ Pop rocks use Charles’s Law because it deals with gas and how it expands with heat.
◦ They also deal with Boyle’s Law which states that the pressure of the gas tends to decrease as the volume of
the gas increases.
Submarines
◦ There are oxygen generators used in submarines.
◦ This releases oxygen by a chemical reaction and there are often other devices that are used for emergencies.
Gas Laws:
◦ Submarines relates to Boyle’s Law, Charles’s Law, Avogadro's Law, and Gay- Lussac’s
◦ Boyle’s Law: fixed amount of gas at a constant temperature, the volume of the gas increases as the pressure
of the gas decreases, and the volume of the gas decreases as the pressure increases.
◦ Submarines relate to Boyle’s law because1 the deeper you go in the water, the pressure will increase on the
surface areas on the outside of the submarine.
◦ Charles’s Law: a fixed amount of gas at a constant pressure, the volume of the gas increases as the
temperature of the gas decreases.
◦ as a submarine goes deeper into the water, the temperature will decrease. Since the temperature is directly
proportional to the volume, the volume of the air in the submarine will decrease.
Gas Laws continued:
◦ Avogadro's Law: the volumes of gas at the same temperature and pressure contain equal numbers of
molecules.
◦ There is a limited amount of fresh air in the submarine. They must monitor the amount of fresh air, or else
the people inside would die.
◦ Gay- Lussac’s Law: the volume occupied by a gas at constant pressure is directly proportional to the
absolute temperature
◦ When a submarine goes lower into the ocean, the temperature gets colder and the pressure decreases.
Work cited:
◦ https://www.scribd.com/doc/24147859/Uses-and-Applications-of-the-Different-Gas-Laws
◦ http://www.chymist.com/CO2%20in%20Pop%20Rocks.pdf
◦ https://socratic.org/questions/how-does-charles-law-relate-to-hot-air-balloons