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Acupressure and the “Four Gates”

Posted on May 23, 2013, 8:22 pm, by James Rodowca, under AcupunctureOne Educational.

According to the philosophy of Chinese medicine, the liver is responsible for the smooth flow
of Qi (energy) throughout the body and smoothing our emotions. Anger, irritability, and
frustration are all signs that our Qi is not flowing smoothly.

This is referred to as Liver Qi Stagnation, one


of the most common imbalances treated by Eastern medicine practitioners in the United
States.

Acupressure Points for Moving Qi

A popular treatment for the stress, anger, and frustration associated with Liver Qi Stagnation
is known as the “Four Gates”. The Four Gates are the right and left side acupuncture points
Lv 3-Liver 3 (Taichong) and LI 4-Large Intestine 4 (Hegu).

Together these four acupuncture points are thought to enhance the circulation of Qi and blood
throughout the body and have a calming and analgesic effect.

Large Intestine 4 is located on the padded area of your hand between the thumb and index
finger, between the first and second metacarpal bones. Massage the point with your thumb on
both hands for approximately 30 seconds.

Liver 3 is located in a hollow on the top of your foot below the gap between your big toe and
the next toe, between the bones that attach to the large and second toes and gently knead the
point for approximately thirty seconds. Then switch sides to stimulate Lv 3 on your other
foot.

Favorite Acupuncture Points: The 4 Gates


Posted by Christina Morris
The beauty of acupuncture is the infinite combination of points to achieve harmony, balance,
and health. Here is a favorite of mine: The 4 gates are comprise of two acupuncture points
needled bilaterally: one on the hand and one on the foot. This is a very common combination
of points, believed to redistribute energy and help recirculate stagnant flow.

The hand point is called Large Intestine 4 and is located on top of the hand between the
thumb and index finger. The other point is Liver 3, located on top of the foot between the big
toe and the second toe.

Large Intestine 4 (LI4) is used to boost the immune system and help with pain. It is often
used for colds, infections, or any immune system responses. This point is an adaptogenic
point ,allowing the body to balance itself based on the condition, whether it be an overactive
immune system or underactive immune system, or overactive digestive system or underactive
digestive system, etc. This point also can help with headaches, jaw pain, toothaches, and
general inflammation. Definitely a point we can all use!

The combination point used with LI4 is Liver 3 (Lv3)

Liver 3 is a point used to keep things moving and circulating. In Chinese medicine, the liver
energy is known for getting “stuck” and creating a myriad of health complaints such as
depression, anger, frustration, irritability, PMS, menstrual issues, and headaches, etc. This
point helps unblock “stuck” liver energy and is valued for its calming effect on the nervous
system.

Large Intestine 4 and Liver 3 are super points when used together to keep us free flowing.
These points are great starting points for a little relaxation, immune support, and balance.

Contributor
Acupressure Point LI4: Large Intestine 6 or He Gu
He Gu (LI4) is commonly used for stress, facial pain, headaches, toothaches and neck pain.

Today, He Gu (LI4) is clinically used for stress, facial pain, headaches, toothaches and neck
pain. He Gu (LI4) is located on the highest spot of the muscle when the thumb and index
fingers are brought close together. To use acupressure on this point, (1) locate the point then
(2) use a deep, firm pressure to massage and stimulate the area for 4-5 seconds.

The point is located at the highest point of the muscle when thumb and index fingers are held
together.

Locate the point between the web of the first and second finger.

Massage the point for 4-5 seconds.

When applying acupressure, try to relax and breath deeply as you massage the area. The
massage and the acupressure can be done by yourself, or by someone else who is there to
assist you.

The ancient traditional Chinese medicine text includes a wide range of indications for He Gu
(LI4) from headaches and constipation to general pain and delayed labor. A precaution for
this point is that He Gu (LI4) may induce labor, thus must never be used during pregnancy.

He Gu (LI4) is a point that has been extensively studied through randomized controlled trials
and clinical research. Recent studies from the Journal of Orofacial Pain showed that the
stimulation of He Gu (LI4) significantly reduced myofascial pain of the jaw muscles [2]. A
recent Cochrane systematic review on acupuncture in migraine and tension-type headaches
suggests stimulation of acupoints as an effective and valuable option for alleviating migraines
and tension-type headaches [1].
Acupuncture Point: Kidney 3 4.71/5 (7)
by Dr. Adrian Larsen / 0

Kidney 3 (KI 3) is the source point of the Kidney channel. In Chinese medicine the kidney is
not only related to the kidney organ but it also encompasses your “life source
energy”. That’s the energy you were were born with that declines as you age.
So, Kidney 3 treats goes right to the source to treat all things related to aging such as night
sweats, hot flashes, arthritis, dental problems, dementia, premature ejaculation, infertility,
difficulty with urination (dribbling or incontinence), lower back pain, knee problems, and
hair loss. (Great article on Acupuncture and Hair Loss at this link.)

This is a point you should always remember when you are giving a foot rub. Kidney 3 can
help so many conditions, plus it just feels good. We could all use a little bit of extra love to
help strengthen our life force energy, right?

**********
The following information is from the Points Acupuncture Reference Software:

Acupuncture Point: Kidney 3 (KI 3, KI3)

Chinese Name: Taixi

English Name: Supreme Stream

Location: In the depression between the medial malleolus and the Achilles tendon, level with
the tip of the medial malleolus.

Attributes: Shu-Stream, Yuan-source, and Earth point of the Kidney channel.


TCM Actions: Enriches kidney yin; abates vacuity heat; invigorates original yang; and
rectifies the womb.

Indications: Sore throat; toothache; deafness; coughing of blood; asthma; irregular menses;
insomnia; seminal emission; impotence; urinary frequency ; lumbar pain.

Secondary Indications: Throat bi and swelling of the pharynx; toothache; kidney vacuity
impotence and seminal emission; cold shan; difficult evacuation; mammary yong; cardiac
pain; inversion cold in the extremities; damp itch and sores on the inside of the thigh;
branching fullness in the chest and lateral costal region; kidney disease; heat disease with
copious sweating; gluey sensation in the mouth; repletion dyspnea with fullness and phlegm
tinnitus.

Needle Information: Perpendicular insertion .3 – .5 cun. Moxibustion is applicable.

Want a full acupuncture reference tool? Check out Points Acupuncture Reference Software!
Click here for full details.

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What Are The 4 Gates?


Tags: 4 gates, acupuncture, allergies, anxiety, blood circulation, four gates, headaches,
irritability, Large intestine 4, LI4, Liver 3, liver qi stagnation, LV3, pain, qi circulation, stress

Categories: Acupuncture

Through my time as an acupuncturist I have had many people ask me, “Why are you doing
that point? What is that point for?” I do not always use specific points for specific ailments,
but rather a combination of points tailored to treat the individual.
The 4 gates is an acupuncture point combination consisting of 2 different points needled
bilaterally. One point, Large Intestine 4 (Hegu), is on the dorsum of the hand. The other
point, Liver 3 (Taichong), is on the dorsum of the foot.

Large Intestine (LI4) –Immune Booster/Pain Reliever

This point is great to use for many different conditions. It is used to strengthen
one’s immune system or decrease the duration of colds and/or the flu. It can also be used for
any type of problemwith the face which includes jaw pain, toothache, allergies, acne. It is
also a great point to relieve a headache or to clear heat and inflammation anywhere in the
body.

Liver 3 (LV3) –Keeping Things Moving

In my opinion, this is one of the most commonly needled points on the body.

It can balance, tonify, or disperse stagnant liver energy. It can be used


for any liver energy disharmony. Just a few examples of this include: menstrual
disorders/irregularities, headaches, dizziness, and detoxification. It can also be used to create
a calming effect on the nervous system to alleviate insomnia, irritability, stress, and anxiety.

Together, these points work to circulate the qi and blood through the body. They help to open
all the meridians, increase circulation, and decrease pain anywhere in the body. The 4 Gates
can also be used for emotional issues as well such as feelings of being trapped or stuck in a
situation. This is a great point combination to help maintain the free flow of qi and blood
through our bodies.

Training the Patient

Teaching the patient the common tai chi/qi gong energetic healing exercise of feeling the "qi
ball" is one way for them to perceive their own qi/energy. Simply stated, the patient relaxes
and holds their hands several inches apart and slightly moves their hands toward and away
from each other slightly and slowly. Some patients will feel warmth while others will feel a
magnet sensation. However, any strange sensation is acceptable.

Lesson #1: The Four Gates- Redistributing Qi

There is a common acupuncture point combination called "The Four Gates" (Liv3 Tai Chong
and LI4 He Gu). One point is on the hand and the other is on the foot. This combination often
is used to promote general qi circulation and relaxation and often is used as part of a larger
acupuncture point prescription.

A few energetically aware patients have had the experience of their entire body rotating
clockwise (towards their left) about the area of their solar plexus as the axis and centrifugally
(towards their extremities but not head) when this combination is used alone. This experience
describes a mechanism of how this point combination works and under which conditions
these points work well. Interestingly, the direction of the movement is clockwise and
coincides with the natural direction of movement of the chakras. (Indian energy centers along
the midline of the body.)

Applications include when there is an imbalance of the body's qi, where there is an excess
amount of qi at the center of the body and a deficiency of the extremities. This dynamic is
indicated by symptoms such as nausea, headache or stress (emotions stuck at the
chest/abdominal region according to TCM) with weakness of limbs.

Lesson #2: The Four Gates and Ren12 (Zhong Wan) - Tonifying and Redistributing Qi.

Ren12 (Zhong Wan) is a point used for a variety of conditions and is located on the midline
of the body at the solar plexus region. It often is used to improve digestion and tonify (add qi
to the body). When this is the first point used, the patient experienced increasing "heaviness"
of the upper abdomen with rapid, shallow breathing. In this situation, the body was absorbing
qi via the needled point, but the qi was stuck in the local area, creating a qi stagnation below
the diaphragm and thus interfering with breathing.

When the Four Gates were added, the sensation of heaviness was reduced and proper
breathing restored. The combination of the Ren12 (Zhong Wan) and The Four Gates created
a dynamic where qi was drawn into the body and moved towards the limbs as verified by the
restoration of breathing and the sensation of the limbs feeling "heavier and stronger." This
sensation moved from the arms and legs towards the hands and feet. Ultimately, the entire
body felt stronger and energized. This event illustrates the importance of balancing
tonification with redistribution of qi.

Lesson #3: Tonification Point Variation

There are many acupuncture points that tonify the body, but there seems to be occasions
where one acupuncture point affects the dynamic of other points in unexpected ways. An
energetically aware patient described the rotation sensation of the Four Gates hindered by the
use of St 36 (Zu San Li), (located on the leg below the knee) a very commonly used
acupuncture point often used to tonify the body. This patient felt their upper body was
attempting to move counterclockwise but the legs felt heavy as though "stuck to the table."

Instead, there was a tingling sensation that emanated from St 36 (Zu San Li) along its
associated meridian-the Stomach- towards its associated organ -also the stomach- where
some audible sounds were heard.

Lesson #4: The Four Gates for the Energy Healer

Once the dynamic of the acupuncture points and their combinations are understood, then it is
possible for energy healers to duplicate the dynamic without needles. The energy healer
simply holds their hand about two to four inches from the solar plexus of the patient, feels
their aura (a technique similar to sensing the qi ball), then slowly moves their hand
counterclockwise (respective to the patient) - towards their left, spiraling outward to about 3
feet from the midline of the body. (Beyond this distance the patient will notice a decrease or
elimination of sensation.) The result is a balancing comparable to insertion of needles. This
technique might fall under the category external qi gong.

The energy healer/acupuncturist might find this technique a useful addition to their practice.
The energy healer might add this to the downward sweeping hand movement of general aura
cleansing. The acupuncturist might use this as a quick technique in situations where the
patient feels off balance after the needles have been removed.

It should not be a surprise that when I finish a treatment, I thank the patient. They might not
notice, but I am thanking them for helping me to learn what perhaps the ancient writers might
have thought was just common sense.

Opening The Four Gates


06/01/2016 katrinahanson Leave a comment

One of the most common balancing and stress-relieving treatments is called “The Four
Gates” and it’s just four points: two by your thumbs and two by your big toes. It seems so
simple, but it feels powerful! The 4 gates circulate energy throughout your body, improving
your circulation, and releasing pain and stress out of the body. It works beautifully alone, or
in combination with other points.

Together, these points are a great treatment for pain and stress, especially pain caused or
aggravated by stress (think tight shoulders). We use it a lot for preventing menstrual cramps,
releasing stress and anxiety, and easing headaches, tight muscles, and stress.
Individually, the points by your thumbs enhance your immune system, reduce inflammation,
ease pain, and treat anything to do with the face (headaches, facial pain, TMJ, allergies,
colds, toothaches, acne, etc.) They are found at the place where your thumb rests on the
opposite hand when you shake hands.

The points by your big toes ease pain, calm the nervous system (for anxiety, depression, and
other emotional issues), treat menstrual disorders, and assist your liver in detoxification. They
are found in the depression between your big toe and second toe.

Subscribe to the Prism Newsletter to keep up our articles and news!

All advice on this site and blog is for educational uses only. Always consult your doctor
before taking any herbs or supplements, or schedule an acupuncture appointment with
Katrina to get your own personalized herbal formula and acupuncture treatment. Questions?
Check out the FAQ or resources pages or contact.

For more herbal estrogens, ideas, and resources see my previous posts: Feminizing Herbs
and “The Basics.”

What's The Point?: Liver 3 and Large Intestine 4


Jul 19, 2012 | What's the Point?

This article was initially published on AcuTake.

“What’s the Point” is an ongoing series of blog posts on Qi by AcuTake founding editor and
acupuncturist Sara Calabro.

By Sara Calabro, LAc

Acupuncture devotees are dying to know: Why are you doing that point? It is one of the most
common questions that acupuncturists receive during treatments.

This is the first installment of an ongoing series that explains popular acupuncture points.

Sara Calabro, LAc

The logic behind choosing points varies. Certain acupuncture styles recommend points for
unique reasons. Even within the same style, many points have more than one indication.
Some points can substitute for others in cases where, for example, a needle-sensitive person
prefers being stuck elsewhere. Other points can be left out or added based on the overall
combination.
Recognizing that there are variations and exceptions, certain acupuncture points are used with
a relative amount of uniformity. Across styles, they are known to be especially powerful in
their effects. As a result, acupuncturists use them a lot. If you’re a regular acupuncture goer,
you’ll probably recognize them.

This inaugural article of the “Why Are You Doing That Point?” series is a twofer. We’ll look
at Liver 3 and Large Intestine 4, two points that are popular in their own right and also
frequently needled together in a combination called Four Gates.

Liver 3 Gets Things Moving

Liver 3—also known as Taichong (Chinese name), Great Rushing (English translation) and
LV3 (acupunk lingo)—is located on the foot, between the first and second toes.

Liver 3 is what’s known as a source point. Every meridian has one. Source points behave sort
of like central stations on subway lines. They are hubs where internal and external energies
gather and transform. They are single, high-concentration points that grant access to the
larger system.

Because Liver 3 has such far-reaching effects, it is indicated for a very wide variety of
conditions. John Pirog, in The Practical Application of Meridian Style Acupuncture, says
Liver 3 is “probably the most important point for stagnation of the inner body.”

Liver 3 is used for menstrual cramps, headaches, vision problems, coastal-region pain and
shortness of breath, low back pain, insomnia, and more. The list truly goes on and on. Feeling
stuck? Hello, Liver 3. This point gets things moving.

Liver 3′s extensive effects are palpable. Needling it usually causes a strong achy sensation,
either locally at the site of insertion, throughout the entire foot, or sometimes even up into the
leg along the Liver meridian.

If you’ve had acupuncture, you’ve probably had Liver 3. If you haven’t yet, consider it
inevitable.

Large Intestine 4 Is a Great Bang for Your Buck

Large Intestine 4—also known as Hegu (Chinese name), Joining Valley (English Translation)
and LI4 (acupunk lingo)—is located on the hand, in the web between the thumb and index
finger.

Large Intestine 4, like Liver 3, is a fantastic bang for your buck. If you think about the
location, between the first and second fingers, it’s basically the upper-body version of Liver
3, which is located between the first and second “fingers” on the lower body.

Large Intestine 4 is a source point as well. It is indicated for a wide variety of conditions and
also tends to cause a strong needling sensation.

Probably the best-known use of Large Intestine 4 is to release the exterior. This refers to
treating what are known as Wind conditions—chills and fever, runny nose, headaches, stiff
upper back and neck, too much or too little sweating, sore throat, fever, dizziness, etc. Large
Intestine 4 is the go-to point for these types of symptoms. It is thought to disperse the Wind
and also bolster the body’s defenses against recurrence.

Other common indications for Large Intestine 4 include toothache, sinusitis, rhinitis,
nosebleeds, Bell’s Palsy, and headaches. This is because the Large Intestine meridian travels
up to the face, so almost any symptom related to that region calls for the point.

In addition to these common uses, Large Intestine 4 is used in treatments for everything from
constipation to skin disease to low back pain.

Acupressure point LIV-3


Acupressure point LIV-3. It's location, photograph, use for emotional well-being and
warnings.

LIV-3
Name: Great Surge (Liver 3)
Location: On the foot, on the line between the big toe and the second
toe. The point is located about 3 finger widths from the edge, in the
depression the size of a finger tip you can feel there.
Use: Reduce, so move your finger in counterclockwise direction over this
point.
Warning: Don't use when weak or low on energy (in that case use SP-6 move counterclockwise
instead). (click for video)
Effects: Relaxes and unblocks emotions (especially repressed anger).
Depression.

https://www.miridiatech.com/news/2016/05/acupuncture-point-
large-intestine-4/

Acupuncture Point: Large Intestine 4 5/5 (3)


by Dr. Adrian Larsen / 0

Large Intestine 4 is the number one go-to point for ANY condition related the head, neck and
face. Whether you have a headache, a toothache, nasal congestion, Bell’s Palsy, pink eye, an
ear ache, a sore throat, or vision problem–you should include Large Intestine 4 to your
treatment plan.

Not only is this point great for conditions of the head, it is also an important point for
boosting the immune system, regulating digestive function, and treating pain anywhere in the
body.
Most people think this point is right in the center pf the fleshy triangular area between the
thumb and forefinger, but the actual location is right next to the second metacarpal bone (on
the side wall of the triangle).

**********

The following information is from the Points Acupuncture Reference Software:

Acupuncture Point: Liver 4 (LI 4, LI4)

Chinese Name: He Gu

English Name: Union Valley

Location: Between the 1st and 2nd metacarpals, on the radial aspect of the middle of the 2nd
metacarpal bone, at the highest spot of the muscle when the thumb and index fingers are
brought close together.

Attributes: Yuan-Source point of the Large Intestine channel. Gao Wu Command point. Ma
Dan-yang Heavenly Star point. Entry point. Command point for the face and mouth.
TCM Actions: Frees the channels and quickens the connecting vessels; courses wind and
resolves the exterior; clears and discharges lung heat; frees gastrointestinal downbearing;

relieves pain and quiets the spirit.

Indications: Headache; painful swelling and reddening of the eyes; nosebleed; swelling of
the face; sore, swollen throat; hypertonicity of the fingers; pain in the arm; wryness of the
eyes and mouth; sweating or absence of it in heat diseases; menstrual block; prolonged labor;
dysentery.

Secondary Indications: Wind stroke trismus; malaria with fever and chills; mania; loss of
voice; wind papules; cardiac pain; unilateral or ambilateral headache; great thirst, fever and
aversion to cold in cold damage; headache and rigid spine; tonsillitis.

Needle Information: Perpendicular insertion. 5 – 1.0 cun. Moxibustion is applicable, except


in pregnancy.

Cautions: Do not needle during pregnancy.

https://www.miridiatech.com/news/2016/05/acupuncture-point-
liver-3/

Acupuncture Point: Liver 3 4.85/5 (13)


by Dr. Adrian Larsen / 0

If I had to give Liver 3 a nickname it would be the “Cranky, Irritability, Anger Relieving
Point!” This point is by far the best point for calming emotions related to anger and
irritability. In Chinese Medicine the Liver channel is responsible for moving energy all
directions. When energy gets “stuck” in the Liver channel it then EXPLODES and leads to
symptoms such as anger, irritability, PMS, IBS, twitching eyes, and a throbbing headache.
I like to teach my patients how to give foot rubs to their family members at home. Who
doesn’t love a foot rub, right? Well, a well-done-relaxing foot rub, with the inclusion of Liver
3, definitely leads to happiness for everyone involved. Spread the word! Liver 3 makes
people happy!

**********

The following information is from the Points Acupuncture Reference Software:

Acupuncture Point: Liver 3 (LR 3, LR3)

Chinese Name: Tai Chong

English Name: Great Rushing

Location: Just distal to the junction of the bases of the 1st and 2nd metatarsals.
Attributes: Shu-Stream, Yuan-Source and Earth point of the Liver channel. Ma Dan-yang

Heavenly Star point.

TCM Actions: Extinguishes liver Fire and clears liver yang; discharges damp-heat in the
lower burner; soothes the liver; rectifies qi; courses the connecting vessels and quickens the
blood.

Indications: Metrorrhagia; hernia; enuresis; urinary stoppage; pain immediately anterior to


the medial malleolus; distention ofthe lateral costal region; wryness of the mouth; infantile
fright wind; epilepsy patterns; headache; dizziness; insomnia.

Secondary Indications: Genital pain; genital retraction; saber and pearl-string lumps; fright
wind; swill diarrhea; sore throat; dryness of the upper esophageal opening; lateral knee pain;
weakness and aching in the lower leg; red, painful eyes; lumbar pain; lower abdominal
fullness; pain in the umbilical region; cold feet; difficult evacuation; jaundice; thunderous
rumbling in the abdomen; counterflow retching with no food intake; strangury; vacuity
taxation edema; profuse, incessant postpartum perspiration; absence of menstruation.

Needle Information: Perpendicular insertion .3 – .5 cun. Moxibustion is applicable.

https://www.miridiatech.com/news/2016/05/acupuncture-point-
spleen-6/

Acupuncture Point: Spleen 6 5/5 (6)


by Dr. Adrian Larsen / 0

Spleen 6 is one of the most often used points during an acupuncture treatment. One of the
reason it is so dynamic is because the Spleen, Liver and Kidney channels all cross at Spleen
6. If you want to add a lot of impact to an acupuncture treatment, Spleen 6 is the point to
use. You can treat all symptoms related to digestion, menstruation, and menopause this point.

I like to teach patients how to find this point because it is really helpful to use at home for
family members of all ages. It’s pretty easy to find, and it doesn’t matter how short or tall
your patient is. It’s four finger widths above the inner ankle. So, if your patient has tiny little
hands, its the width of their four tiny little fingers. If your patient is huge and tall, use their
four big huge fingers as the measurement. You’ll know when you find it, because your finger
will fall into a little divot and the point will be tender.

Everyone should know about Spleen 6. It’s the GREATEST acupuncture point EVER!

**********
The following information is from the Points Acupuncture Reference Software:

Acupuncture Point: Spleen 6 (SP 6, SP6)

Chinese Name: Sanyinjia

English Name: Three Yin Intersection

Location: 3 cun directly superior to the tip of the medial malleolus on the posterior border of
the tibia.

Attributes: Meeting point of the Spleen, Liver, and Kidney channels. Group Lou point for
the 3 leg yin.

TCM Actions: Supplements spleen earth; helps movement and transformation; frees Qi
stagnation; courses the lower burner; regulates the blood chamber and the palace of essence;
dispels wind-damp from the channels and connecting vessels.

Indications: Rumbling intestines; abdominal distention; thin stool with untransformed


digestate; irregular menses; metrorrhagia; vaginal discharge; prolapse of the uterus; menstrual
block; non-conception; difficult labor; sem inal
emission; genital pain; hernia; inhibited urination; enuresis; loss of locomotive ability of the
lower extremities; insomnia.

Secondary Indications: No thought of food or drink; untransformed digestate; vomiting


Water after eating; splenic disease with heaviness of the body and impaired movement of the
limbs; women’s concretions and conglomerations; stirring of the fetus; retention of lochia;
blood dizziness; pain in the penis; white turbid urethral discharge; shan pain; shank sores and
foot qi; infant disruption; counterflow frigidity of the limbs; thigh bi with inability to walk;
medial knee pain; diseases of the head; throat bi; fullness in the neck; pulmonary distention
with phlegm cough and inability to lie down.

Needle Information: Perpendicular insertion .5 – 1.0 cun. Moxibustion is applicable.

Cautions: Contra-indicated during pregnancy.

Acupuncture Point: Stomach 36 4.83/5 (6)


by Dr. Adrian Larsen / 0

Stomach 36 is a really GREAT point everyone should know about. It is one of the most
widely used acupuncture points on the body because it is so powerful.

Here’s a little legend about this point, based on the English name translation: Leg Three Mile

Chinese warriors would wear leather sashes with stones hanging from either side of their
waist while they hiked across the vast countryside to protect their nation. When the warriors
became exhausted, to the point where they just couldn’t go any further, they would kneel
down to rest. The stones would naturally land at Stomach 36 on each leg. Upon arising from
this bended knee position, with pressure on Stomach 36, when the soldiers arose they found
extra hidden renewed strength and were able to hike “three more miles”…

Here are some things you should remember about Stomach 36. Treatment of this point will
energize you, boost your immune system, AND help with any digestive disorders. And–if
you need to walk three more miles on the treadmill, it might help with that too!

**********

The following information is from the Points


Acupuncture Reference Software:

Acupuncture Point: Stomach 36 (ST 6, ST6)

Chinese Name: Zusanli

English Name: Leg Three Miles

Location: 3 cun inferior to ST 35, one finger width lateral to the anterior crest of the tibia, in
the tibialis anterior muscle.

Attributes: He-Sea, Horary, and Earth point of the Stomach channel. Command point of the
abdomen. Sea of Nourishment point. Lower He-Sea point, Gao Wu Command point, Ma
Dan-yang Heavenly Star point.

TCM Actions: Rectifies the spleen and stomach; regulates central qi; harmonizes the
intestines and disperses stagnation; breaks thoracic blood stasis; courses wind and transforms
damp; frees and regulates Qi and blood of the channels; supports the correct and banks up the

origin; dispels pathogens and prevents disease.

Indications: Stomach pain; abdominal distention; indigestion; vomiting; borborygmi;


diarrhea; constipation; dysentery; breast yong; dizziness; epilepsy; paralysis due to wind
strike; foot qi; Water swelling; aching knee and tibia.

Secondary Indications: Pain, fullness and distention in the venter; abdominal pain; cholera;
stoppage of the diaphragm and throat; difficult ingestion; wryness of the mouth; eye disease;
pharyngeal bi; fever; enuresis; swelling of the feet; rumbling intestines; heaviness in the head
and pain in the forehead at the outset of heat disease; vexation, oppression and generalized
fever; inhibited urination; lower abdominal swelling and pain; branching fullness in the chest
and lateral costal region; swelling and pain in the extremities; thoracic blood stasis;
palpitations with vacuity vexation and agitation.

Needle Information: Perpendicular insertion .5 – 1.2 cun. Moxibustion is applicable.

Want a full acupuncture reference tool? Check out Points Acupuncture Reference Software!
Click here for full details.

Acupuncture Point: Lung 7 5/5 (10)


by Dr. Adrian Larsen / 0

Lung 7 is a very powerful point. As the Luo point of the Lung channel, this point is used to
treat anything related to the lungs—asthma, wheezing, bronchitis, cough, congestion, etc. The
internal pathway of the lung channel passes through the throat, the lungs, the stomach, and
the intestines so it is very good as a source for digestive issues, including constipation.

Sadness and grief represent the emotions of the Lung. You’ve been around people who are
grieving. They have a hard time taking a deep breath. From an esoteric point of view, this is
representative of not having the strength to “breath life to the fullest”. Lung 7 is a great point
for this person. Treatment of Lung 7 will help the lungs to receive more air, thus “breath
easy” and have the strength to move on to new experiences.

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The following information is from the Points Acupuncture Reference Software:

Acupuncture Point: Lung 7 (LU 7, LU7)

Chinese Name: Lie Que

English Name: Broken Sequence


Location: 1.5 cun proximal to the most distal skin crease of the wrist, proximal to the styloid
of the radius in a depression between the tendons of brachioradialis and abductor pollicis

longus.

Attributes: Luo point, Confluent point of the Conception vessel, Gao Wu Command point,
Ma Dan-Yang Heavenly Star point, Five Star point. Command point for head and neck. Exit
point. Command point of the Yin Heel vessel. Master point of the Conception vessel.

TCM Actions: Diffuses the lung and dispels cold; courses the channels and frees the
connecting vessels.

Indications: Headache and stiffness of the neck; cough and asthma; sore throat; facial
paralysis; wryness of the eyes and mouth; clenched jaws; weakness of the wrist.

Secondary Indications: Headache; hemiplegia; enuresis and frequent voidings; pain in the
arm and elbow; infantile fright epilepsy; penile pain; bloody urine; seminal loss; restless
sleep; generalized wind bi numbness; fever and chills; tension in the chest and back; throat
bi; heat in the palms; inversion counterflow in the limbs; toothache; malarial disease; heat
and pain in the shoulder and back.

Needle Information: Insert obliquely upwards .3 – .5 cun. Moxibustion is applicable.

Acupuncture Point: Heart 7 5/5 (4)


by Dr. Adrian Larsen / 0

The Chinese translation for Heart 7 (HT 7) is Shen Men, which means Spirit Gate. This
acupuncture point is fantastic for calming the mind and helping to resolve emotional related
symptoms such as anxiety, worry, panic attacks, and heart palpitations. Because Heart 7 it is
the source point for the Heart channel it also helps regulate any condition related to the heart
and the circulation of blood throughout the body. Examples include high blood pressure, low
blood pressure, anemia, varicose veins, etc.

**********

The following information is from the Points Acupuncture Reference Software:

Acupuncture Point: Heart 7 (HT 7, HT7)

Chinese Name: Shen Men

English Name: Spirit Gate

Location: At the ulnar end of the distal wrist crease when the palm faces upward, on the
radial side of flexor carpi ulnaris tendon.
Attributes: Yuan-Source, Shu-Stream, Sedation and Earth point of the Heart channel.

TCM Actions: Quiets the heart and spirit; clears Fire and cools construction; clears heart
heat; regulates Qi counterflow.

Indications: Cardiac pain; vexation; mania and withdrawal; poor memory; racing of the
heart; fright palpitations; insomnia; yellowing of the eyes; pain in the lateral costal region;
heat in the palms.

Secondary Indications: Dizziness; feeblemindedness; epilepsy; retching or spitting of blood;


visceral agitation; throat bi; dryness of the throat with no desire to eat; dyspnea counterflow
Qi ascent; red facial complexion and tendency to laugh.

Needle Information: Perpendicular insertion .3 – .5 cun. Moxibustion is applicable.

Acupuncture Point: Kidney 3 4.71/5 (7)


by Dr. Adrian Larsen / 0

Kidney 3 (KI 3) is the source point of the Kidney channel. In Chinese medicine the kidney is
not only related to the kidney organ but it also encompasses your “life source energy”. That’s
the energy you were were born with that declines as you age.

So, Kidney 3 treats goes right to the source to treat all things related to aging such as night
sweats, hot flashes, arthritis, dental problems, dementia, premature ejaculation, infertility,
difficulty with urination (dribbling or incontinence), lower back pain, knee problems, and
hair loss. (Great article on Acupuncture and Hair Loss at this link.)

This is a point you should always remember when you are giving a foot rub. Kidney 3 can
help so many conditions, plus it just feels good. We could all use a little bit of extra love to
help strengthen our life force energy, right?
**********
The following information is from the Points Acupuncture Reference Software:

Acupuncture Point: Kidney 3 (KI 3, KI3)

Chinese Name: Taixi

English Name: Supreme Stream

Location: In the depression between the medial malleolus and the Achilles tendon, level with
the tip of the medial malleolus.

Attributes: Shu-Stream, Yuan-source, and Earth point of the Kidney channel.

TCM Actions: Enriches kidney yin; abates vacuity heat; invigorates original yang; and
rectifies the womb.
Indications: Sore throat; toothache; deafness; coughing of blood; asthma; irregular menses;
insomnia; seminal emission; impotence; urinary frequency ; lumbar pain.

Secondary Indications: Throat bi and swelling of the pharynx; toothache; kidney vacuity
impotence and seminal emission; cold shan; difficult evacuation; mammary yong; cardiac
pain; inversion cold in the extremities; damp itch and sores on the inside of the thigh;
branching fullness in the chest and lateral costal region; kidney disease; heat disease with
copious sweating; gluey sensation in the mouth; repletion dyspnea with fullness and phlegm
tinnitus.

Needle Information: Perpendicular insertion .3 – .5 cun. Moxibustion is applicable.

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