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ISSUE 65 | MAY 2017

www.f11magazine.com

STEPHANIE BOWERS
Ultimate passion

JOEL STRICKLAND
Need for speed

KAI NAGAYAMA
Collecting pebbles
COFFEE U FEEL WELCOME TO f11 MAGAZINE

THE HAVANA COFFEE WORKS STORY


BY GEOFF MARSLAND WITH TOM SCOTT
Issue 65 | May 2017
f11 Magazine
P O Box 37-233, Parnell
Welcome to issue 65! Auckland 1151, New Zealand
We’re featuring two photographers based in Australia, and a www.f11magazine.com
Japanese photographer who now lives in the USA. Publisher/Creative Director:
Tim Steele
Stephanie Bowers is an Australian photographer who calls tim@f11magazine.com
Queensland her home. Her photography business provides the
Editorial:
creative outlet where she channels her passion for inspiring and
editor@f11magazine.com
empowering women. Her mission? Challenging her subjects to
Advertising Sales:
bring out their most sensual, vulnerable, and feminine side by
ads@f11magazine.com
Full Page Advertisement working with them in a collaboration to create beautiful imagery.
Hers is the genre known as boudoir photography, and we’ve Design/Layout:
Donna Hoyle and Adela Lee
curated our own collection entirely from the monochrome section
of Donna Hoyle Design
of her stunning portfolio.
Web Developer:
Joel Strickland hails from Tasmania, Australia and started his David MacLeod
photography career straight out of school. With a strong focus on
Contributors:
automotive photography, Joel regularly services corporate clients Gary Baildon :: Tony Bridge ::
including Lamborghini, Mazda and Subaru as well as leading Ian Poole
automotive publications such as Wheels, Motor, Tarmac, Fast
Havana Coffee is a New Zealand institution. This book tells the astonishing story of Featured In This Issue:
Fours and Motorsport News. Joel’s pictures demonstrate exactly
pioneering Wellington Coffee Baron, Geoff Marsland – a café king, where the rubber meets the road and evoke the smells and sounds
Stephanie Bowers :: Joel Strickland
:: Kai Nagayama
roasting entrepreneur, good bloke and caffeine visionary. of hot machinery.
Kai Nagayama is a fine art photographer currently based in New Notice To Readers and Advertisers:
The publishers of f11 Magazine take
Havana Coffee Works is a visual symphony York City. Originally from Kyoto in Japan, Kai moved to the United every care in the production of each
issue of this title but we are not liable
of cars, cigars, cafes and coffee roasters. States when he was 18 years old. Today, he works as a freelance for any editorial error, omission, mistake
photo retoucher in the city and creates his own black and white or typographical error. In the case of
advertising material supplied, we as
Marsland’s biography of a home-grown photography projects in his free time. Kai says ‘Taking pictures is publishers, make no representation and

business success, from its beginnings in like collecting pebbles, sometimes you find a smooth and beautiful provide no warranty as to the accuracy
of descriptions or offers within. As
one with a perfect shape after looking down for a while and you
Cuba Street, Wellington; importing Cuban publishers we accept no liability for any
feel lucky and glad that you took the time to find it.’ loss, which any person may incur while
coffee; to setting up plantations in the Pacific; relying on the accuracy or description of
any statement or photograph herein. The
to its current coffee empire status, bringing Widely varied content, but all the result of passion, commitment views expressed by all contributors are
Coffee U Feel to the people, is a heady and a single minded focus on each artist's genre. not necessarily those of the publisher.
f11 Magazine reserves the right to
coffee-powered ride from beginning to end. Hope you enjoy these features as much as we enjoyed decline any advertising for any reason.
Copyright f11 Magazine 2017: All of
preparing them. the content published in this magazine
is subject to copyright held either by
It is also a social history of Cuba Street and Tim the publisher in the whole or in part
Wellington over the last three decades, by the contributing photographers.
tim@f11magazine.com Any infringement may incur legal action.
with guts, determination, larger-than-life No part of this magazine may be used in
part or in full in any way without the
personalities and turf wars. express written permission of the publisher.
Under no circumstances is any PDF version
of the magazine permitted to be rehosted,
distributed or shared online in any manner.

Published by Phantom House Books Price: $50.00


www.phantomhouse.com Hard cover & dust jacket f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 1
THE f11 TEAM

GARY BAILDON aka The Shooter was schooled in the dark arts of TIM STEELE is the ringmaster of the travelling circus that is f11 Magazine.
photolithography, before talking his way into a well-known Auckland studio A former high wire artist for corporate masters in the photo industry, he still
in the heady 80’s. Most of the 90’s were spent in a plausibly deniable series has nightmares about delivering the physically impossible, on occasion under
of roles in the photo industry. After his disappointment at Y2K not signaling the whip of the seemingly insane, and almost always for the terminally
the end of the world, as we know it, he returned to shooting people, products unappreciative. A brilliant escape from the last of these gulags left a tunnel
and fast moving objects for filthy lucre. Helmeted and suited, he now spends for other prisoners and led him to consultancy in strategy, advertising and
weekends in his small German racecar, the latest in a succession of fast toys. marketing. Always impressed by the Bohemian lifestyles, cruel wit and sheer
For shits and giggles he plays both drums and bass in bands you’ve never bravado of professional photographers, he now frequents their studios,
heard of, in places you’ve never been to. shooting locations and watering holes in search of his personal holy grail,
outstanding images to share with f11 readers.

TONY BRIDGE is a fine artist, photographer, writer and photo educator –


sometimes performing all of these minor miracles on the same day. When
not hosting seminars or workshops or messing with someone’s mind, this
wandering nomad is usually to be found somewhere around New Zealand,
four wheel driving up hill and down dale in search of new images and true
meaning. Like any modern day guru, he thinks way too much, constantly
reinvents himself and often pontificates on one of his blogs, enriching us all
in the process. Rather than joining the rest of the team in the cult of Mac, he
insists that he has now constructed the ‘ultimate PC’ – poor deluded man. As
far as we can tell, this is his only flaw…

IAN POOLE has been a member of the AIPP since 1976, holding various
positions within the Institute. Truly a trans-Tasman go between, Poole has been
a long term judge of the APPA's and a guest judge in the NZIPP Awards for
many years. Well known for his extensive work as an educator at both ‘In the life of the individual, an aesthetic sensibility is both more
Queensland’s Griffith University College of Art, and Queensland University of authentic and more commendable than a political or religious one.’
Technology, and with a background as an advertising/commercial photographer
- Tom Robbins
in Brisbane, Ian is now turning his hand to finely crafted black and white
portraiture. He is a director of Foto Frenzy, which specialises in photographic
education in Brisbane. Erudite, witty and urbane, or so he tells us, he’s one of
f11 Magazine's ambassadors in Australia.

WARNING – HOTLINKS ARE EVERYWHERE!


Amazingly, some readers are still blissfully unaware that this magazine is a veritable hotbed of hotlinks,
so this is a friendly reminder! There are links to online content such as videos, and to websites which
expand on the ideas on offer here in the magazine. Anywhere you see an image of a computer screen
contains a link, there are highlighted links within articles and all advertisements link to the advertisers
websites so you can learn more about the products you’re interested in. Simply click on the ad.
If this is still baffling, learn more in our expanded instructions on page 142 of this issue.

2 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 3


FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE

Stephanie
BOWERS
Ultimate passion

14 © Stephanie Bowers
COVER IMAGE
© Stephanie Bowers
http://www.stephaniebowers.com

Joel
STRICKLAND
Need for speed

64 © Joel Strickland
Contents
Kai Welcome 1

NAGAYAMA
Meet the team 2
Contents 4
In plain sight 6
Collecting pebbles
Editorial 8

114 © Kai Nagayama


Tony Bridge
APS
10
138
PSNZ 139
AIPP 140
‘I absolutely adore black and white portraits, and would probably AIPA 143
share all of my work as monochrome images if I could! So it’s NZIPP 144
exciting that this magazine has chosen to showcase an entirely The Deep End
Ian Poole 148
monochromatic portfolio.’ - Stephanie Bowers

4 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 5


IN PLAIN SIGHT

20 MINUTES ON ANSEL ADAMS


‘Creating photography when practised in terms of its inherent
qualities may also reveal endless horizons of meaning’ says the
great photographer Ansel Adams in a documentary that was shot
about him and his creative process in 1958. As you’ll see, the man
did not pack light for his photographic journeys. One of Ansel
Adams' other passions was the piano and he plays the musical
background piece for this video.

The Phoblographer via YouTube

CLICK ON THE SCREEN IMAGE TO VIEW THIS VIDEO

BURNING MOMENTS II
Freelance video director Ari Fararooy decided to animate the
images he captured while attending Burning Man in 2014 and
2015. Using experimental techniques in digital animation, and set
to a soundtrack by Chopin, the video portrays the surreal beauty
of this event. Two minutes of bliss…

Ari Fararooy via Vimeo

CLICK ON THE SCREEN IMAGE TO VIEW THIS VIDEO

INTRODUCING THE RONIN 2 FROM DJI


DJI has re-engineered its original Ronin from the ground up, to
give you the stronger, more powerful and more flexible Ronin 2.
With multiple camera options, a customisable design, a slew of
intelligent features, versatile payload compatibility, lightweight
carbon-fibre build, and high mobility - the Ronin 2 is ready to help
filmmakers in any environment realise their creative vision.

DJI via Vimeo

CLICK ON THE SCREEN IMAGE TO VIEW THIS VIDEO

6 | Issue 65 | May 2017


EDITORIAL

NO T H I NG E X I S T S

The death of photography? U N T I L I T I S O B S E RV E D


You, dear readers, are the focus cameras no longer manufactured yet still sought
of what we do and we are after. Seen what a nice clean SX70 fetches
fortunate to experience and these days?
share your enthusiasm,
commitment and passion for There are parallels in the music industry. The return
photography in its many forms. of vinyl, and the increasing popularity of turntables,
especially at the esoteric top end of the market,
Yet some insist that photography has led to material and skill shortages which in
is dying the death of a thousand turn have led to very real scarcity in the volume
cuts, a view sadly held by a available for each new release, or remaster. This,
portion of decision makers in the in a medium long thought dead by all but the most
industry’s manufacturing and distribution sectors. diehard aficionados. Another medium enjoying
Some are calling this a sunset industry. renewed popularity – largely because of its
That’s not what I’m seeing at the creative endearing analogue limitations.
implementation end of the business. You, your And digital? Digital is just fine, thanks. If only some
friends and colleagues are hard at work, or at play, manufacturers would take a good hard look at
creating the stuff of dreams. Your dedication, some of their totally unrealistic expectations about
energy and activity are vital life signs, not how often you’re prepared to update your camera,
harbingers of doom. instead concentrating on defining just what would
There are positive global indicators, if we care to make your next upgrade a really compelling
look for them and take heed of their direction. Yet proposition and making new optics that you simply
the glass half empty position is increasingly have to possess.
adopted by industry. Kudos to those of you who have travelled that
Film use is on the rise, with Kodak exhuming road recently, you know who you are - and that’s
Ektachrome from the virtual grave to rise again. a direction that’s damned hard not to like.
They’re not doing that as philanthropy. It’s not only about the megapixels, but you know
We still find bastions of large format film use, hand that as well.
in glove with traditional black and white printing Hallelujah!  
and the use of some pretty gruelling processes to
produce variations on that theme. TS

Another indicator, higher end pre-loved film tim@f11magazine.com


camera prices are rising again, even medium feedback@f11magazine.com Visit our website for
format gear, after being in freefall for years. So in more details:
some quarters, film is returning to fashion,
surprisingly not in spite of its technical limitations www.worldphotoadventures.com.au
but rather because of them. Instant photography
has similarly been revived, with the folks at The
Impossible Project making film for the Polaroid

8 | Issue 65 | May 2017


TONY BRIDGE

Awash in
black

Possibly one of the most frequently offered


pieces of advice to budding photographers is
to ‘learn to see light, and to understand it in all
its forms and moods’.

I would like to suggest that, in fact, the opposite


is true. We need to understand its complement,
or opposite, darkness, which of course we
render photographically as black. Only then can
we understand light.

The great artist, Leonardo da Vinci, once said


that, ‘A painter should begin every canvas with
a wash of black, because all things in nature are
dark except where exposed by the light.’ He
has a point.

Darkness is not, after all, an absence of light; it


exists in its own right, and has its own reality.
And it is only when light falls upon it, that space,
shape and form are created in a way from which
our eyes initially, and minds latterly, can derive
meaning. Each relies upon the other to give it
substance and meaning. And it is the contrast
of one with the other which allows us first to
detect, and then interpret, this meaning.
The great photographer, Ansel Adams, in
developing his Zone System around 1940,
postulated a range of twelve tones between
pure black and pure white, measures of the
luminance value of each subject element.

© Tony Bridge

10 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 11


ARE YOU A NEW
Lazy thinking would lead us to believe that all
tones in a scene can be attributed to one of
and was only now emerging, coming to the
surface where light could depict it in a f11 READER?
these values. Of course, nothing could be further diametrically opposite, and yet
from the truth. The tones in a scene can be complementary, way.
subdivided infinitely, or at least as far as the ALL OF OUR BACK ISSUES – RIGHT BACK
Was it, I wondered, the same water, or had it, TO NUMBER 1 – ARE AVAILABLE ON
limits of the device used to measure them allows.
in some way which I couldn’t clarify, been OUR WEBSITE. CLICK HERE NOW!
And so, back to darkness - also labelled and changed by its emergence?
known as black. In the Zone System, black is
TB
labelled as Zone O and defined as a tonal area
with no discernible tone and/or detail. tony@f11magazine.com
Formulated in the days of film, it referred to www.thistonybridge.com
that area of the negative which had had no AWARD WINNING PHOTOGRAPHY
exposure because there was insufficient light BUSINESS FOR SALE
to effect a chemical shift in the emulsion and
therefore rendered as a pure black when printed. MOUNT MAUNGANUI,
BAY OF PLENTY,
Black was therefore a measure of the limits of
NEW ZEALAND
the medium rather than a statement of visual
reality. Now that we use the digital process,
Want to take the next step in your photography
where the sensors are far more sensitive than career? Keen to be mentored by one of the best
film ever was, it is possible to subtly separate in the country? Like the idea of stepping into an
and differentiate between different values of established business with a large client database
and guaranteed work?
this one tone.
This is an opportunity for an ambitious photographer
Māori talk about the 12 levels of darkness, and to have their own business based in the fastest
each has its own name and meaning. As part of growing city in New Zealand. Come and live the
my own training, I have been taught about this, dream – get that perfect work/life balance in a
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and to recognise when the first light of day
appears. It is long before the sun has risen, and Plus, you can take over a purpose built studio with
is a very subtle lightening of the darkness, known existing clientele right in the heart of the action.
Additionally, you will be mentored by a Fellow
as te awatea. It is at this time that important of the NZIPP (top accolade for the NZ Institute
rituals take place, the time when night and day of Professional Photographers) with 40 years
are in balance. I have begun to wonder about experience as part of the three month handover.
The business enjoys a reputation based on
this subtle differentiation, and what techniques quality and service. As such, this would suit an
will be required to depict and show it, and if its experienced photographer, or a couple with multi-
even possible to do so. skills. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity…so
call now to change your life!
A few weeks ago, I visited Te Waikoropūpū, a
To learn more about this opportunity, call
famous natural spring at the top of the South Bob Tulloch on +64 274 532 757 or
Island of New Zealand. It is a deeply spiritual email bobtulloch@xtra.co.nz.
place for Māori, and I wondered how to capture
the energy of the water, and the sense of
connection there.

I had begun to think about the nature of darkness


and light. There, before me, was water which
had spent a long time underground, in darkness,

12 | Issue 65 | May 2017


Stephanie
BOWERS
Ultimate passion

Stephanie Bowers is an Australian photographer


who calls Queensland her home. Her
photography business provides the creative
outlet where she channels her passion for
inspiring and empowering women. Her mission?
Challenging her subjects to bring out their most
sensual, vulnerable, and feminine side by
working with them in a collaboration to create
beautiful imagery. Hers is the genre known as
boudoir photography, but in the modern
iteration it’s a world away from many of the
traditional negative perceptions associated with
that style.

Stephanie and her all female team set out to


create an experience which leaves her clients,
for the most part women, feeling beautiful, sexy
and desired. She’s proud of the fact that many
clients report that their boudoir photography
experience with her was one of the best days
of their lives.

In her own words, Stephanie describes her life,


her work and the personal and professional
journey so far.

‘I’m 32 years old, divorced with two amazing


kids, and I currently live in Brisbane where I

Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM


lens. © Stephanie Bowers

14 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 15


have my home studio set up for my boudoir
photography business. I grew up in Ipswich,
Queensland.

During my childhood years, I was always drawing


and working on different art and craft projects.
So the creative gene has always been there.

In high school, I was really interested in graphics,


and would spend a lot of my lunch breaks and
weekends in the classroom, working on projects
and learning new skills. In Grade 12, I won the
Queensland Graphic Design competition in the
Architectural category, and received the highest
marks for Graphics in the state. When I left high
school, I veered off the creative path for a little
while, while I focused on my athletic career and
completed a double degree full time at QUT. By
the time I was 21, I had two degrees in Business
and Applied Science, and was awarded the
Deans Awards from both faculties at QUT, for
the highest overall GPA in both degrees.

I was also an elite athlete for 16 years, training


with the Queensland Academy of Sport
swimming squad, and travelling across Australia
and parts of the world with state and national
swim teams. After university, I started a career
in Market Research, and for a few years account
managed various national and international
research programs for corporate, government
and not-for-profit organisations.

It wasn’t until after the birth of my daughter in


2009 that I had the urge to dive back into
something creative again. I borrowed a Canon
DSLR camera from a friend and taught myself
how to shoot. I primarily did this because I
wanted to take better photos of my own
children. However, after I had my son in 2011,
I started shooting friends and their families, and
decided to begin my photography business Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers
from there.

Over the last 6 years, I’ve built my business from


the ground up, by myself whilst being a stay-at-
home mum raising two kids. For the first few
years while they were young, photography

16 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 17
was a part-time job, but for the last few years pitch, a summary view of her business as she
it has been a full-time business. I’m a one- would describe it to a perfect stranger, in a
woman show, and run every aspect of my limited time frame.
business; from shooting and editing, to
“I’m a boudoir photographer who works with
accounting, marketing, admin, product
everyday women to give them empowering
fulfilment, plus website and social media
confidence-boosting experiences through
management. I don’t outsource anything, except
intimate lingerie portraiture. I want women to
hair and makeup for my photo shoots where I
take the time to pamper themselves, step out
bring in one of my very talented
of their comfort zones, embrace their bodies
professional colleagues.
and express their sexuality through these
I’ve been a professional photographer for almost gorgeous sensual images. My goal is to remind
6 years now, and I’m a fully accredited member women of how remarkable they are, allow them
and associate with the Australian Institute of to see themselves through someone else’s eyes,
Professional Photography (AIPP). I’m a multi- and reinvigorate themselves through this
award-winning photographer across Australia, boudoir photography experience! Gifting the
and was awarded the 2014 Queensland images to a loved one after the shoot, is just
Professional Emerging Photographer of the Year. the icing on the cake!”
I’ve also had the honor of being part of the
judging panel for the Queensland Epson Pressed to further define the essence of her
Professional Photography awards for the past own proposition, she expands:
few years. ‘If I had to summarise what I strive for in my
Like most mums with a camera, I started work in a few words it would be: classy, sexy,
shooting newborns, maternity and families. timeless, evocative, and sensual images. I’ve
About a year into this journey, I began exploring established a reputation for producing tasteful
boudoir photography by shooting some of my and stunning boudoir photography images for
friends. I always liked the look of gorgeous black everyday women, I don’t work with models. I
and white boudoir photography, when done absolutely adore black and white portraits, and
well. Once I started sharing some of my boudoir would probably share all of my work as
images, I began receiving enquiries from past monochrome images if I could! So it’s exciting
and new clients. I soon decided to stop shooting that this magazine has chosen to showcase an
families, and focus my efforts towards that side entirely monochromatic portfolio. It’s like that
of my business instead. Over the last few years, quote says, “The thing about black and white
through much hard work and persistence, the photos is they are more like reading the book,
boudoir photography side of my business grew than seeing the movie”.
to the point where I recently decided to stop
I’m so incredibly passionate about empowering
shooting other genres, and focus all my
everyday women and showing them how truly
efforts here.
beautiful they are. My hope is that they will
Anyone who knows me will tell you that I’m
extremely organised, motivated, driven and a
perfectionist when it comes to most things in
life. These have been characteristics that, no
doubt, have contributed to my successes in
photography and helped me to operate a
successful business to date.’ Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 35mm f2 lens.
© Stephanie Bowers
We asked Stephanie to give us her elevator

18 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 19
not only leave their shoot with gorgeous images, to embrace their body. This is where being a
but have an amazing experience that will give female helps; I can talk about and share my own
them a massive confidence boost, reinvigorate experiences with my clients. When people ask
themselves as women, and quite often change what I do and I start explaining it to them, they
the way they see themselves! Whilst many often comment that they can see the passion
women book their shoots with me with the oozing out of me, and how much I must
intention and purpose of gifting these images absolutely love what I do! And it’s true.’
to their partner, I feel it really does become a
Of course, it’s still a business and Stephanie is
gift for them, more than anything else. A lot of
under no illusions as to what’s necessary to
the time, boudoir photography is about more
drive success, and open about the hurdles she
than the final product they will eventually take
had to overcome in the process.
home, particularly if the client is doing the shoot
purely for themselves. It’s about the experience! ‘As most photographers will tell you, it’s a
constant hustle to make a living and I am always
People often comment that my clients look so
chasing new work and opportunities to grow
relaxed and comfortable in their images, and
my business. Looking back 10-20 years ago, I
that I must be very skilled at getting them into
this comfortable state where they can express guess there was something of a stigma associated
themselves. I’m pretty easy going and with boudoir photography; and that this was
personable, which I think goes a long way toward somehow tacky and distasteful. There’s nothing
creating a quick rapport with clients. As a wrong with admiring the human body, and
boudoir photographer, you have to be confident appreciating a woman’s body as an art form.
in what you’re shooting and how you want to Creating great boudoir images is not just about
direct your client. At all times I am 100% in getting a sexy snapshot. You want to tell a story.
charge and leading the shoot. During a session, People are attracted to stories. I try hard to
I’m often down on the floor or on the bed, posing make it real. As the photographer, you need to
and showing clients exactly the positions I want put yourself in the space and think about how
them to get into. I prefer to work one on one a woman will behave, look and feel. With my
with my clients and not have any other work, I hope to show that boudoir photography
distractions around us when we are shooting. can be done in a tasteful way, that I can empower
This helps create that safe space, an environment women to celebrate their bodies, give them a
where they feel comfortable enough to let go freeing experience and confidence boost, and
and express themselves. remind them how beautiful they are through
someone else’s eyes.
Growing a successful boudoir photography
business obviously has its challenges in terms Whilst I’ve spent many years photographing
of developing a good reputation and trust newborns and families in the past, I always felt
among clients. Word of mouth and referrals are that boudoir photography was going to be my
absolutely essential in this genre. Being a female ultimate passion. At the time when I began my
photographer is definitely a massive advantage boudoir photography journey, there were
in this field of photography - I’m working with
everyday women who are shy and nervous. 95%
of my clients say they would never feel
comfortable doing this type of shoot with a
male photographer. As a boudoir photographer,
you have to empathise with your client’s worries, Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM
insecurity and fears. You can’t just tell someone lens. © Stephanie Bowers

20 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 21
not too many other photographers in Australia school performances, sports days, or their following and drawn to a lot of amazing artists evocative boudoir images, I find what I am most
offering these shoots and experiences to special occasions. At the end of the day, these and photographers across a range of genres. drawn to are the feelings and emotions being
everyday women. Over the past few years it are the important things in life. I don’t think I Obviously fashion is closely aligned with boudoir captured. To me, being able to draw these
has definitely gained momentum though. I’m could ever go back to working for someone photography, so you’ll find me regularly expressions out of my clients is far more
seeing more of an interest among other else. I’m far too independent, motivated surrounded by magazines and fashion books. important than having technically perfect
professional photographers to learn the ins and and headstrong!’ There’s always music playing in my home and images lacking that connection.
outs of boudoir photography; some looking to studio too.
We asked Stephanie to tell us a little about her All of my boudoir photo shoots are done with
add it as a side offering to their existing portrait
clientele, without breaching any confidentiality Boudoir photography is definitely a much more available light. I don’t use any flash or lighting
or wedding work, while others want to dive into
of course! widely accepted and diverse field throughout equipment. For my style of work, I like the look
it head on. For this reason, I also began my
the US and Canada. I enjoy following, interacting that natural light provides. In the future, I may
boudoir photography mentoring program this ‘My ideal clients are those who book me because
with and learning from some of these talented start experimenting with some new looks and
year; sharing the knowledge, skills and lessons they fall in love with my work, and they have to
photographers as my work grows and develops may possibly look at introducing some lighting
I’ve learnt in running a successful boudoir have me!
in new directions. At a time in Australia when equipment, and new camera equipment too.
photography business. Whilst I do enjoy sharing
Seriously though, my clients are women of all many portrait photographers were jumping on
my knowledge with other photographers, my I think some photographers get caught up with
ages, shapes and stages of life. Around half of the Sue Bryce “glamour photography”
number one priority will always be shooting needing to have the latest and most expensive
my clients are brides-to-be, doing the shoot as bandwagon, I decided to stick to my own path
and giving these experiences to everyday equipment. While these things are great to have,
a gift for their partner on the morning of their and focus on creating my boudoir brand and
women. I’m far too passionate as a creative and capturing more intimate portraits of women. they definitely aren’t essential for running a
wedding. The remainder of my clients are
hungry business owner to let that slip away! As there were not a lot of other boudoir successful portrait photography business. I’m
women doing their shoot for a variety of
photographers to follow and model my business really quite a minimalist when it comes to
I’ve only really watched a few other reasons… celebrating their partner’s birthday,
on here in Australia, I feel this was a blessing in equipment. I’ve found what works for me in my
photographers shoot since I started out in this anniversary, Christmas or Valentines Day; some
disguise and helped me to forge my own path.’ workflow and set up, and I stick to that.
industry. One thing I have started doing more women are marking a milestone in their lives
of recently is jumping in front of the camera for (like turning 40 or 50, or having finished having As to my post production workflow, I import
We asked Stephanie for some insight into the
other photographers and peers of mine. Not babies); and some are single women just wanting into Lightroom, making minor adjustments and
technicalities involved with her work:
only is this an amazing opportunity to be to celebrate their bodies and feel sexy! I’ve done culling images there. The majority of my editing
photographed by some of the best in the some couples boudoir shoots in the past, and ‘The first DSLR I borrowed from a friend, and work is done in Photoshop using various actions
industry, but it gives me a chance to experience I’m starting to book more of these shoots again, learnt to shoot with, was a Canon. So naturally and workflow processes I have set up to suit
exactly what my clients go through. I feel so which will be great to dive into. when it came to buying my own gear, Canon my photography. This helps create a consistent
strongly that this is an experience that every felt comfortable and familiar. I’ve also found look and feel with my images and across
It came as a bit of shock to me recently when I
woman should have, that I even flew to Canada that the Canon lens and sensor combination my brand.’
realised that around 20% of my client base is
last year to be photographed by another boudoir tends to produce slightly warmer images, which
currently made up by other female As to the future?
photographer. Learning to let go and trust I love. I started with a Canon EOS 7D with 50mm
photographers, which is incredibly flattering.
another person’s creative process can be f1.8 and 18-200mm lenses for my portrait work. ‘I’m going to be hosting a Boudoir Photography
Repeat clients are also wonderful, because you
challenging and tough as an artist, but I always As my business grew I invested in the EOS 5D Retreat in Queenstown, New Zealand in
know they obviously love your work and highly
walk away having learnt something new, MkIII, and this is still the main camera I use November. The retreat will be for female
value the experience you provide them. I never
whether it's about myself or various innovative today. The lens that is most often on my camera photographers to get together for a few days
take my job for granted, and I’m always so
ways of interacting with clients. I’ve also had these days is my 24-70mm, simply due to the and learn about boudoir photography. The plan
honoured that women choose me to capture
the opportunity to produce boudoir imagery versatility it provides in my home studio set up. is to shoot, relax, explore, network and have
these intimate and precious memories for them.’
for book covers for a New York Times best-selling But I sometimes switch to my 50mm f1.4 and fun! Tickets will be going on sale shortly so see
author, and I’ve been published in the Quizzed about mentors, influences or people 35mm f2.0 as needed. my website!
Huffington Post. who may have had a lasting impact on her work,
Stephanie had this to say. Being self-taught, I’m not what you would call There may possibly be an exhibition or book in
I love the flexibility and freedom that comes a technical photographer. I’ve never studied the not too distant future, so watch this space.
with being my own boss and running my own ‘There isn’t one particular photographer or artist photography, but I know what settings to use My plan is to attend more workshops over the
business. I can structure my days and weeks to that I can attribute with being my influence or on my camera to achieve the look I desire for next few years, continue to network across the
fit around my kids, so that I never miss out on reason for getting into photography. I find myself my work. When it comes to creating beautiful globe with other photographers and artists

22 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 23
(you never know where your next collaboration
and opportunity can come from), and push
myself creatively.

If you’re not constantly trying new things,


experimenting and failing, then you’re not
learning and growing as an artist.

I’m feeling the urge more and more these days


to create images just for me, so who knows
where the next chapter of this journey will take
me, I’m excited to see!’

TS

http://www.stephaniebowers.com

‘During my childhood years, I was


always drawing and working on
different art and craft projects.
So the creative gene has always
been there.’

Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM


lens. © Stephanie Bowers

24 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 25


Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

26 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 27


Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

‘I’ve established a reputation for producing tasteful and stunning


boudoir photography images for everyday women, I don’t work
with models. I absolutely adore black and white portraits, and
would probably share all of my work as monochrome images if I
could! So it’s exciting that this magazine has chosen to showcase
an entirely monochromatic portfolio.’

28 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 29
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

Following double page spread: Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

30 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 31
32 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Petr Hlavacek :: Remarkable diversity f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 33
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

‘It wasn’t until after the birth of my daughter


in 2009 that I had the urge to dive back into
something creative again. I borrowed a Canon
DSLR camera from a friend and taught myself
how to shoot. I primarily did this because I
wanted to take better photos of my own children.’

Following double page spread: Canon EOS 5D MkIII


with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM lens.
© Stephanie Bowers

34 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 35


36 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Petr Hlavacek :: Remarkable diversity f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 37
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

‘…I began exploring boudoir photography by shooting some


of my friends. I always liked the look of gorgeous black and
white boudoir photography...’

Following double page spread: Canon EOS 5D MkIII


with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM lens.
© Stephanie Bowers

38 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 39
40 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Petr Hlavacek :: Remarkable diversity f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 41
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

42 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 43
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

‘I’m a boudoir photographer who works with everyday women to give


them empowering confidence-boosting experiences through intimate
lingerie portraiture. I want women to take the time to pamper
themselves, step out of their comfort zones, embrace their bodies and
express their sexuality through these gorgeous sensual images.’

Following double page spread: Canon EOS 5D MkIII


with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM lens.
© Stephanie Bowers

44 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 45
46 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Jon Davison :: Eye in the sky f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 47
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

48 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 49
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

50 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 51


Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

‘Being a female photographer is definitely a massive advantage in


this field of photography - I’m working with everyday women who
are shy and nervous. 95% of my clients say they would never feel
comfortable doing this type of shoot with a male photographer.
As a boudoir photographer, you have to empathise with your
client’s worries, insecurity and fears. You can’t just tell someone
to embrace their body.’

52 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 53
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

‘All of my boudoir photo shoots are done with


available light. I don’t use any flash or lighting
equipment. For my style of work, I like the look
that natural light provides.’

54 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 55


Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 35mm f2 lens. © Stephanie Bowers

Following double page spread: Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

56 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 57
58 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Petr Hlavacek :: Remarkable diversity f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 59
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 35mm f2 lens. © Stephanie Bowers

60 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Stephanie Bowers :: Ultimate passion f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 61
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with EF 24-70mm f2.8L II
USM lens. © Stephanie Bowers

‘If you’re not constantly trying new things, experimenting and


failing, then you’re not learning and growing as an artist.’

62 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 63


Joel
STRICKLAND
Need for speed

Australian photographer Joel Strickland hails


from Tasmania and started his photography
career straight out of school, registering his
business name Joel Strickland Photographics
only a year later. That’s a high degree of
commitment from a school leaver, and now,
two decades later, Joel and his photographers
supply photographic services to an extensive
range of clients across Australia and to growing
markets in American and Europe. With a strong
focus on automotive photography, Joel regularly
services corporate clients including Lamborghini,
MG, McLaren and the Zagame Automotive
Group as well as leading automotive publications
such as Hooniverse, Motoring, Auto Action, V8
Action and Evo Magazine.
‘My family has a strong background in creativity.
My grandfather was a sign writer and a water
colour artist. My uncle was also a sign writer
and photographer. So with early influences such
as these, there was always a chance I was going
to be creative.

Lamborghini Huracan LP 580-2 at dusk, Phillip Island Grand Prix Circuit, shot for Lamborghini press kit.
Nikon D3s with Tamron 24-70mm f2.8 with a graduated neutral density filter and a four second exposure.
© Joel Strickland

64 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Joel Strickland :: Need for speed f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 65
My passion for photography started around freelance work. I contacted the owner and
1992 when I was at school in Hobart, Tasmania, discussions began.
when I was given a choice between photography,
Two months later, I packed my life into my car,
pottery, and painting. I chose photography and
drove on to the ferry and headed to Melbourne
that was the beginning of my career.
to start my new career. Over the next few years
Over the next few years I spent many hours I covered everything sporting from the Australian
inside the school darkroom honing what would Tennis Open, golf tournaments, swimming,
eventually become my trade with black and Davis Cup Tennis, test cricket and the Goodwill
white film developing and hand printing. I also Games in Brisbane. This was my apprenticeship
helped establish the school’s first photography in photography, as I shot everything on
club and became the school’s official transparency and negative film. There was very
photographer covering sporting events.’ little exposure latitude, particularly when
shooting with transparency film so my trusty
After leaving school, Joel freelanced as a Minolta Flash Meter 5 was crucial to getting my
photographer and studied at TAFE for two years, exposures spot on.’
where he completed an Associate diploma in
Art, Craft and Design, majoring in photography. Feeling the need for a change, Joel headed to
This provided his first experience of studio work in the corporate world.
photography, and an introduction to working ‘I wanted to re-inspire my work. So I began
first with medium format and later, large working in photographic wholesale, working for
format photography. the agency that distributed brands such as Nikon
‘During this time I began to cover Motorsport and Lowepro. This allowed me to work with,
events around Tasmania including V8 Supercars, and experience, some of the latest equipment
Targa Tasmania and the Australian Rally as Nikon released it. I also had the opportunity
Championship for my first ever magazine client to support pro photographers at the Australian
Motorsport News. This led to more work with F1 and Moto Grand Prix.
the local newspaper and an image library Not long after starting that role I was offered
specialising in sporting images.' the opportunity to become part of the team
covering the Australian Rally Championship as
In 2000 he headed to Sydney to work in Press
one of the series’ official photographers. For
Operations at the Olympics. His role was to
the next 6 years I spent all of my annual leave
assist and manage the needs of press
travelling around Australia to all the different
photographers at the Sydney Olympic Park
rounds creating some amazing imagery and
Aquatic Centre. It was a great opportunity to
working in all conditions, from the heat of
network with, and see how some of the best
Western Australian summers to the cold of
sports photographers in the world worked.
Tasmania winters.
‘As my experience grew, so did my network,
and the opportunities soon came along.

So in 2001 I headed to cover the International


Rally of Canberra as one of the official event
photographers. While there, I had a conversation
that would change my career. I learned that Simon and Sue Evans portrait shoot on location in
there was a job going at Sport The Library in Forster, NSW 2007. Nikon D2x with AFS 17-55mm lens
Melbourne, where I had earlier done some and Nikon SB800 off camera flash. © Joel Strickland

66 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Joel Strickland :: Need for speed f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 67
Towards the end of my time of covering the With film, you only had 36 frames on a roll and using the PocketWizards I trigger the flashes in glass, I purchased the wonderful 14-24mm
Australian Rally championship I was asked to it wasn’t cheap, so you had to use your shots using radio signals which work in all conditions, lens which I love to use on the full frame camera.
come on board and the be the official news and every roll, wisely as there was a real danger and no longer need to be used in direct line of In mid 2016 I had to upgrade my D3s after it
photographer for Targa Tasmania. This was a of running out of film when shooting an event. sight. This has been my ‘go to’ set up when the was damaged, it was replaced with a D4s. This
challenging event to cover as it is 6 days of full light is poor, I also like to use the system when camera still amazes me each day with its colour
on activity chasing cars around the state. I bought my first SLR camera the year before I there is good light to help remove shadows. and low light ability. Together with the AFS 24-
left school, it was a Canon EOS 500 with a 28- This set up is perfect as it travels with me 70mm f2.8, this has become my go to kit for
After many years covering rallying, and looking 80mm and 75-300mm lens. I used this for many everywhere and it’s like having an entire studio most things due to the sharpness on offer.
for new challenges for my photography, I moved years before buying a second hand EOS 100 and set up in my camera bag.
into commercial and editorial work. I have shot later, an EOS 1n. I still remember the day, after I also purchased the extremely handy Nikon
for brands such as Ford Performance Vehicles, I had moved to Melbourne that I bought my Another piece of equipment that I love is my 200-500mm lens. I had begun to do more and
The Motor Report, Car Advice, Australian first f2.8 lens. Actually I bought two that day, a Westcott Ice Light, this LED light is extremely more motorsport photography and whilst the
Mustang & Ford Magazine, Zoom, Speed, Ford 70-200mm f2.8 and a 400mm f2.8, both L series. handy and a very bright light source. I use it for team at NPS have been great at lending me
Performance Racing, Hooniverse, Autoblog, I continued to use Canon until I started to work light painting, something I once did with my equipment at times as well as renting, it was
Auto Action, Motoring and Autoweek. I also for the Nikon distributor. At that point, I switched Speedlights where I would walk around the car easier to purchase my own lens. At the Targa
work very closely with different PR companies to Nikon, sold off all my Canon gear and I’ve whilst the shutter was open on a bulb setting High Country Tarmac Rally event last year, I used
and automotive dealerships to provide them never looked back. firing the flash repeatedly from different angles. it quite on often on stages and loved the results
with imagery. The problem with this technique is that it left I got with it.
I also switched to digital at that time, initially hot spots all around the car. So when I saw the
In 2010 a new event appeared on my radar, the with the D1 and D100, later with the D200 and I am a member of Nikon Professional Services,
Ice Light, designed by Australian Wedding
legendary Bathurst 12 hour race, held at the D2H. I bought the D2x when it was released in this has been invaluable in my work as a pro
Photographer Jerry Ghionis, I knew I had to have
famous Mt Panorama circuit in regional New 2004, with a range of lenses which I kept until photographer. It allows me to send my
one. I soon discovered that it needed some form
South Wales. A fellow photographer, and good recently. When Nikon released the SB800 equipment for service or repair and receive loan
of light shaper to help the light spill better. So I
friend who I had worked with at the Australian Speedlight it created something pretty special. equipment to help me keep my business running.
made my own set of barn doors and now I love
Rally Championship, suggested we put together The flash enabled the photographer to place I have also used the service a few times to trial
using it as part of my kit. Creating this style of
a team to cover the event and we offered our the flash anywhere within line of sight to a equipment before buying.
work has led to me doing a series of images for
services to various teams at the event. This is master unit mounted to the camera and used
a client as they loved the style this created. As So in summary, my current kit includes the Nikon
now a major event on my calendar and I have the camera meter to evaluate how much flash
well as using it for photography I love using it D4s, D300 and Nikon D2x bodies together with
covered it the last 6 events. power to output, the system is called CLS, the
when packing my car when darkness descends Nikon AF-S 14-24mm f2.8, AF-S 24-70mm f2.8,
Creative Lighting System and it’s been a
Around this time I began expanding my business after a shoot. I just throw it on a light stand and AF-S 70-200mm f2.8 Series II and 200-500mm
fundamental part of how I work. I loved this
by working with PR companies, more automotive it’s the perfect source to make sure I have f5.6, and 50mm f1.4 lenses. I also have a Tamron
technology and began to use it a lot in my
brands and vehicle dealerships. This has led to everything sorted and packed away 90mm f2.8 Macro lens.’
photography, from shooting drivers sitting in
great relationships and some amazing before departure.
race cars, to the more formal portrait shots of Finally, we asked Joel about the business of
opportunities have presented themselves while
drivers on location. The D2x camera was my work horse for the next photography, where he finds his clients and
working with some of these clients.’
few years, until I replaced it with a D300. This what his plans are for the future.
This also created another style for my work, I
We did a deep dive into matters technical with was a great camera as the low light and colour
began to shoot my feature cars this way. I slowly ‘A fair percentage of clients come from referral
Joel, leaving no stone unturned. was a big step up from the D2x. In 2014, I went
built up my kit of flashes to allow this to be work from my other clients, as you might
full frame with the D3s. Every time I upgraded
‘Of course, I started my photography career easier, my kit now contains 5 SB800s and one imagine, working in the automotive and
I kept the previous camera as I believe in the
working with film, and that was how I shot for SB910 which I added last year. The SB910 is such motorsport space it’s not always what you know
importance of always having a back up camera.
the first 12 years in the business. It was a great an upgrade and it’s superb for corporate events but who you know, that gets the gig. I’m always
One of the first things I pack as part of my kit
way to learn how to capture images and to indoors as the bounce ability is amazing. I also working on building my network. You never
is a back up camera. On the two occasions where
deliver well exposed images to the client. acquired a set of PocketWizard TT5 radio slaves, know when someone you meet might need
I have had a camera go down on a job, I have
Working with film taught me a lot about waiting which work great with my set up. The some imagery.
always had a back up camera with me.
for the right shot and taking my time to perfect disadvantage of the CLS system is that the
the right angle before hitting the shutter. infrared suffers outside in bright light, so by The change to full frame also meant an upgrade

68 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Joel Strickland :: Need for speed f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 69
Social media is a great way to share my work,
and I try to be as active as I can. I use the three
main platforms, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram
to share my work. I like the ability to bring my
followers along with me on my shoots, take
them behind the scenes. Instagram is great for
this. I also like Facebook Live and Periscope, and
how they give your audience a chance to see
what you are up to and interact with you whilst
you are working.

Sometimes it’s simply not practical to share my


work, particularly if there are embargoes in
place with long lead times before I can show
the work in public forums.

What's in store for the future? Continuing to


build my photography business is my focus
moving forward but in saying that, I am starting
to do more work in the video space, as demand
for this content increases, so I’m working on
building my video folio. I enjoy the challenge of
video but it’s the editing part that I find quite
rewarding, it is so satisfying to create a
finished product.

I am also working on my writing skills, as I can


combine this with my photographs to create
features stories to supply to magazines and
online media. This is something I’m already
doing, but there is always room for improvement!’

Now, let’s roll on through Joel’s pictures to see


exactly where the rubber meets the road. 

TS

www.joelstrickland.com.au

Twitter and Instagram @joelstrickphoto

Facebook - Joel Strickland Media -


@joelstrickphoto

Chris Atkinson and Glen MacNeal in their Subaru Impreza WRX STI jumping at Rally Australia, WA 2006.
Nikon D2x with AFS 70-200mm f2.8 lens. © Joel Strickland

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A famous Australian racecar, Peter Brock’s 05 Holden Commodore (1993 VP) for magazine feature, Warrnambool,
Victoria. Nikon D3s with AFS 70-200mm f2.8 lens. A 74 second exposure lit with Icelight LED. © Joel Strickland

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1967 Chevrolet Camaro shot for stock library, Melbourne 2009. Nikon D300 with AFS 17-55mm lens. © Joel Strickland

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‘My passion for photography
started around 1992 when
I was at school in Hobart,
Tasmania, when I was given a
choice between photography,
pottery, and painting. I chose
photography and that was the
beginning of my career.’

Renee Gracie and Simona de Silvestro promotional image for team in lead up to debut race, Winton Raceway,
Benalla, Victoria 2015. Nikon D3s with AFS 70-200mm f2.8 lens and two Nikon SB800 Speedlights off camera.
© Joel Strickland

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‘After many years covering
rallying, and looking for new
challenges for my photography,
I moved into commercial and
editorial work.’

Mazda MX-5 multi-car shoot for website feature, Yarra Valley, Victoria 2012. Nikon D300 with AFS 12-24 f4 lens.
Shot using camera rig attached to the car. © Joel Strickland

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Holden HSV R8 action shot for The Motor Report in Melbourne 2009. Nikon D300 with AFS 12-24mm f4 lens.
Shot using camera rig attached to back of the car. © Joel Strickland

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McLaren 570, 675LT and 570GT on track during a McLaren Melbourne customer track day, Phillip Island
Grand Prix Circuit, Cowes, Victoria, 2016. Nikon D4s with AFS 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Joel Strickland

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1964 Ford Mustang shot for magazine feature, Melbourne 2011. Nikon D300 with 12-24mm f4 lens.
Shot using camera rig attached to the car, then removed in post. © Joel Strickland

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Rex Broadbent with his Porsche 911 tarmac racecar, shot for event press release, South Melbourne, Victoria 2015. Nikon
D3s with AFS 14-24mm f2.8 lens and three Nikon SB800 Speedlights off camera. © Joel Strickland

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1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 for stock library, Melbourne 2009. Nikon D300 with AFS 12-24mm lens. © Joel Strickland

88 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Joel Strickland :: Need for speed f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 89
Renault Clio and Lotus Sunbeam comparison feature
for automotive website, Gipsland, Victoria 2012. Nikon
D300 with AFS 12-24mm f4 lens and two Nikon SB800
Speedlights off camera. © Joel Strickland

‘Every time I upgraded I kept the


previous camera as I believe in
the importance of always having
a back up camera. One of the
first things I pack as part of my
kit is a back up camera. On the
two occasions where I have had a
camera go down on a job, I have
always had a back up camera
with me.’

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TMR Triton on the roads of Halls Gap, shot for The Motor Report, Victoria 2009. Nikon D300 with AFS 12-24mm f2.8
lens. Camera mounted to vehicle roof by suction cup and triggered by remote control. © Joel Strickland

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Dean Fiore with his 2016 Porsche Carrera Cup Car, shot for a team press release for season launch. Nikon D3s with
Tamron 24-70mm f2.8 lens with two Nikon SB800 Speedlights off camera. © Joel Strickland

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Subaru Australia Rally Driver Molly Taylor with her Subaru Impreza WRX STI at Subinats Event at Phillip Island Grand Prix
Circuit, shot as part event coverage. Nikon D3s with Tamron 24-70mm lens with Nikon SB800 Speedlights off camera.
© Joel Strickland

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1965 Ford Mustang shot for magazine feature, Melbourne 2011. Nikon D300 with AFS 17-55mm f2.8 lens.
© Joel Strickland

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McLaren 540C and 570S on location at Levantine Hill Estate , shot at a press event for launch of vehicles.
Nikon D3s with Tamron 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Joel Strickland

100 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Joel Strickland :: Need for speed f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 101
Colin McRae and Nicky Grist in Ford Focus at Rally
Australia in Perth, WA 2001. Canon EOS 1n with
400mm f2.8 lens on Fujichrome Sensia film.
© Joel Strickland.

‘Social media is a great way


to share my work, and I try to
be as active as I can. I use the
three main platforms, Facebook,
Twitter and Instagram to share
my work. I like the ability to
bring my followers along with me
on my shoots, take them behind
the scenes.’

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Jack Atley with his Formula Ford racecar at Winton Raceway, Benalla, Victoria 2014. Nikon D3s with Tamron 24-70 f2.8
lens with two Nikon SB800 Speedlights off camera triggered by PocketWizard TT5. © Joel Strickland

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TMR Triton at dusk on location in Halls Gap, Victoria. Shot for The Motor Report, Victoria 2009.
Nikon D300 with AFS 12-24mm f4 lens. © Joel Strickland

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1965 Ford Mustang shot for magazine feature, Melbourne 2011. Nikon D300 with AFS 12-24mm f4 lens. Shot using
camera car rig attached to the car, then removed in post. © Joel Strickland

108 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Joel Strickland :: Need for speed f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 109
Ford Mustang GT shot for a road trip feature article, Brighton, Victoria, 2016. Nikon D3s with Tamron 24-70mm f2.8
lens and graduated neutral density filter. © Joel Strickland

110 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Joel Strickland :: Need for speed f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 111
Lamborghini Huracan on track during promotional shoot for Lamborghini Melbourne, Phillip Island Grand Prix Circuit, 1965 Ford Mustang GT Fastback shot for stock library, Melbourne 2012.
Cowes, Victoria 2015. Nikon D3s with Tamron 24-70mm f2.8 lens. Image shot from a second car being driven alongside. Nikon D300 with AFS 17-55mm f2.8 lens using Nikon SB800 Speedlights off camera. © Joel Strickland
© Joel Strickland

‘…I am starting to do more work in the video space, as demand for


this content increases, so I’m working on building my video folio.
I enjoy the challenge of video but it’s the editing part that I find quite
rewarding, it is so satisfying to create a finished product.’

112 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Joel Strickland :: Need for speed f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 113
Kai
NAGAYAMA
Collecting pebbles

Kai Nagayama is a fine art photographer I waited for the store to finish developing the
currently based in New York City. He works as films and print them, because I never knew how
a freelance photo retoucher in the city while the pictures would come out. My sister got into
creating his own photography projects in his photography and used an old SLR camera from
free time. Originally from Kyoto in Japan, Kai our father. I saw the camera and I just thought
moved to the United States when he was 18 it looked so heavy and gigantic, and that was
years old. it, I never even touched it. I was not interested
in cameras or photography in general until I
‘My home city Kyoto, was once the capital of
moved to the states as an international student
the country, and is a beautiful and calming place
after graduating from high school in Japan.’
filled with rich histories and traditions that
people still try to preserve and honor to this Later, Kai’s father bought him a compact Canon
day. I never really noticed this before, but I think camera so that he could record his impressions
growing up in such a city made it natural for me of the first foreign country that he visited,
to be attracted to anything naturally beautiful the USA.
since a young age. I have three siblings in Japan,
two older sisters and an older brother. Both of ‘I went to Las Vegas, Nevada to study Hotel
my sisters had gone to a foreign country to study Management, but changed my mind and ended
English when I was still little, and the stories up majoring in Commercial Photography after
they told, along with the pictures that they taking my first photography class in college. I
showed me, influenced me very much to get was mainly taking street-style photographs with
out of Japan to see more of the world. I still the compact camera while I was riding a bicycle
remember the sugary smell of the sheep fur in on my way to a language school. I would say it
a chocolate bar box that my sister brought me was a little dangerous considering how crazy
as a souvenir from New Zealand. Vegas drivers are. Everything around me in a

I used to play with instant cameras from Fuji


when I was little. There was a small printing
store in a department store near my house in
Kyoto, where we always took our film to be Bandage Portrait, Jolan 2016. Nikon D600 with Sigma
processed. It was always an exciting time while 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Kai Nagayama

114 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Kai Nagayama :: Collecting pebbles f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 115
foreign country was just cool and interesting, images are my friends and I interviewed each
it was like I was in a treasure box. Everywhere of them about their personal stories prior to
I went I found something that excited me, I was the shoot. I posed them in ways that incorporate
literally shooting everything. A short time before their stories and gradually peeled off the
I left Japan for the States, I discovered some bandages to express their feelings. But most of
hobbyist photographer online who takes street them have moved on from the pains they had,
style pictures. His pictures were very random, accepting what had happened. Talking about
but on every picture he took, he put a caption sensitive matters with my friends made me feel
on them. It was as if he was telling some story how resilient human beings can be and also
on each picture through riddles, they made me honestly how small my heart is compared to
ponder the meanings and I found it very theirs. I was a little ashamed of myself of not
intriguing. So I decided to do the same, I took knowing these sides of my friends when we had
pictures of anything I found interesting, known each other for long. It’s probably the
uploaded them to a free blog site and put first time I truly realised that a portrait isn’t just
captions on them. I showed the site to my host a picture of people, but of their hearts.
mother and she was laughing her head off,
In this shoot, we put a bunch of bandages on
apparently she found my captions and the
the skin of each model, some half body, some
pictures funny. That was when I truly found
full body, depending on how comfortable they
photography fun because I realised that I can
were about exposing their skin. As we shot more
make someone ‘feel’ something with my images.’
frames with different posing, we gradually
We’re sharing a few images from each of the 4 peeled them off. For the technical side, I used
different series which Kai is currently working a black background and one light with a softbox
on. Kai discusses each of these in turn. that is suspended almost directly above the
models. I shot them digitally with my Nikon
Bandage Portrait
D600 and processed them in Photoshop.’
‘My series “Bandage Portrait” is meant to
No Labeling
explore the state of emotional destruction and
resilience. It is so easy to be ignorant of your ‘The series “No Labeling” is meant to talk about
own feelings even though you are aware of stereotyping or discrimination in society. People
them. I believe that every single person (if not would label you as white or black, boy or girl,
most people) has their own stories that force young or old, gay or straight, Christian or
them to bring out strong feelings. An emotion Buddhist and so on, but those categorisations
that is so raw; whether it is sheer happiness or are merely the topmost of the many very thin
an uncontrollable anger, is something I consider layers of an icy lake. You can easily break them
a very beautiful feature that we humans have. if you choose to, but you will never be able to
There is nothing artificial about it, they are never see what is underneath it if you don’t. Labeling
wrong. I wanted to capture the emotions in keeps us safe because it gives you the feeling
photographs and to show that it is okay to of whole and also individuality at the same time.
express them. As you get older, you see more But it also makes our perceptions biased and
things that you did not see before and, little by
little, one comes to understand why these
emotions happen. Not allowing your emotions
to control you can make you stronger, otherwise
you may end up feeling stuck in a deep hole
Bandage Portrait, Akiko 2016. Nikon D600 with Sigma
when you don’t. All of the models in these 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Kai Nagayama

116 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Kai Nagayama :: Collecting pebbles f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 117
keeps us small-minded. Each individual is I heard these words when I was leaving Japan
different and I do not believe it is possible to for America, from my sister who had lived in
create generality from it. New Zealand. She told me that her friend, who
was a devoted Christian, mentioned it to her.
In this shoot, I digitally created several shapes
My sister found these to be very beautiful words
first, printed them out on paper, traced them
and it had stuck in her head ever since. I had
on a cloth and cut the shapes out with scissors.
not really thought about it when I just heard it,
You could probably guess the race of the models, I probably did not understand it well because
or you would probably have some sort of my English wasn't good at the time. After I
impression of them without looking at their moved to the States, I realised I was starting to
entire face. So you could assume their personality hold on to the past, or wishing for things in
but you can't know what kind of person they certain ways that were not going to happen,
really are just by looking at them through the and that made me very unhappy and depressed.
cloth in the pictures. We probably all get that. And then I remembered these words from
But isn't this what we do when we judge, label, Serenity Prayer, as simple as they were, I found
and discriminate each other because we are them very true, yet realised how little I
ignorant? These draped cloths in front of the understood them. It was so strange to me that
models would be our filters and the shapes of I physically felt the pain in my heart when I felt
the cutout holes on them would be how we sad, because nothing was actually touching it.
assume or label. I do think that categorisation In this shoot, I shot two separate photos and
is something that also unites us, but if we are digitally combined them in post. I first shot the
biased about something or someone in a certain two models together as shown in the picture
way in the first place, that would interfere to with one light almost directly above them, then
actually understand something beyond it.’ I shot the second picture of just the man
Serenity Prayer grabbing a pillow in front of his chest to create
the creased textures.’
‘The work titled “Serenity Prayer” is a portrayal
of the state of acceptance. I was inspired to do Workaholics
create this work from the prayer written by ‘The series “Workaholics” talks about Japanese
Reinhold Neibuhr. work culture where many Japanese businessmen
God grant me the serenity called “Salarymen” are expected to work very
To accept the things I cannot change; long hours each day and to go out to drink with
Courage to change the things I can; clients to get new jobs, basically to do anything
And wisdom to know the difference. for a company to show loyalty. I decided to start
Living one day at a time; this series when I heard that my brother, who
Enjoying one moment at a time; then worked in a Japanese toy company, had
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace; been mistreated by one of his bosses and
Taking, as He did, this sinful world
As it is, not as I would have it;
Trusting that He will make all things right
If I surrender to His Will;
So that I may be reasonably happy in this life
And supremely happy with Him
Forever and ever in the next. Bandage Portrait, Mitch 2016. Nikon D600 with Sigma
Amen. 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Kai Nagayama

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could not step out of his apartment to go to two other lenses, a Nikkor 50mm f1.4G and
work because of the fear and trauma. He was Tokina 11-16mm f2.8. When shooting in the
forced to work so many hours, way past the studio, I usually use Profoto lighting. If I am not
regular work hours and there was bullying from carrying my camera, I shoot with my iPhone. As
the boss at work. I knew that working overtime for software, I only use Photoshop.’
and going out for drinks or to a business dinner
Kai on mentors
with clients was common in Japan because my
father used to do that almost everyday. Even ‘My influences come from many contemporary
then I was upset and angry that my brother was and surreal artists including Robert and Shana
treated in this way. There is a high death toll ParkeHarrison, Rodney Smith, Philip-Lorca
(it’s called Karoshi, meaning death from diCorcia, Gregory Crewdson, Julie Blackmon,
overworking) and a high work related suicide Erik Johansson and Chen Jiagang. I am also
rate in Japan. Although some positive change constantly inspired by stories or words from
has occurred in many work environments, films and books, or real-life people that I meet
Japanese companies still value both quality and everyday. When I took my first photography
productivity, the cost competitive advantage class in college, I came across the term Photo
and the ability to perform as a team. In order Manipulation and I found so many Photoshop
to achieve this, they created the notion of a artists and tutorials on YouTube. The one artist
company as a family and a strategy to bond the who stuck in my mind is Erik Johansson, a
workers to them using systems such as company Swedish photographer who creates surreal arts
dormitories or the notion of lifetime by digitally manipulating photographs. Not only
employment. There are very few protests or are his images visually beautiful but I was
boycotts in Japan compared to other countries inspired even more by the meaning behind each
because we are expected to keep “harmony” image. He wasn't just stitching images together
in society, we should rather keep our mouth to create crazy looking photos but he actually
closed if everyone else is doing the same. Valuing had reasons why each element was there. I was
harmony and peace is a beautiful cultural also amazed by the idea of the unlimited
aspiration, however not being able to adapt a possibilities of creating anything we can imagine
culture makes it difficult to produce as a form of art and being able to tell stories
positive change. with it.’
In this shoot, I have created clone-like Kai on the importance of telling stories
photographs using several shots and digitally
combined them in post production. The cloning ‘I think that as photographers we should always
describes Japanese robotic workers who create visually strong and compelling images.
diligently do what they are told to answer the But I believe that the most important thing when
loyalty and performance expectations from creating images is to have something real
their society. There is one clone who is looking
in a different direction from the others in each
image and this describes the need to vocalise
the situation faced by many Japanese workers.’

Kai on equipment choices

‘My gear primarily consists of a Nikon D600


camera and a Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 lens. This is
Bandage Portrait, Spike 2016. Nikon D600 with Sigma
what I use for 90 percent of my work. I also have 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Kai Nagayama

120 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Kai Nagayama :: Collecting pebbles f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 121
and true in them. Understanding what we are
photographing and why we are shooting in the
way that we are, knowing what we are trying
to say through those photographs needs to be
very much in mind when working on a project.
I also like to get out of the house and roam
around the city for hours to shoot whatever I
find interesting because it makes me go back
to the beginning of how I started photography.
I sometimes walk around for 5 or 6 hours a day
just to see what I can find. I think being able to
do so without getting bored is one of the perks
of living in New York City.
Taking pictures is like collecting pebbles,
sometimes you find a smooth and beautiful one
with a perfect shape after looking down for a
while and you feel lucky and glad that you took
the time to find it.’

TS

http://www.kainagayama.com

No Labeling, Ikumi 2015. Large format camera


© Kai Nagayama

122 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 123
No Labeling, Humphrey 2015. Large format camera
© Kai Nagayama

‘My home city Kyoto, was once the capital of the country, and
is a beautiful and calming place filled with rich histories and
traditions that people still try to preserve and honor to this day.’

124 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 125
No Labeling, Roy 2015. Large format camera
© Kai Nagayama

‘Everything around me in a foreign country was just


cool and interesting, it was like I was in a treasure
box. Everywhere I went I found something that
excited me, I was literally shooting everything.’

126 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 127
No Labeling, Stacy 2015. Large format camera
© Kai Nagayama

‘The series “No Labeling” is meant to talk about


stereotyping or discrimination in the society.
Labeling keeps us safe because it gives you the
feeling of whole and also individuality at the same
time. But it also makes our perceptions biased and
keeps us small-minded.’

128 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 129
Serenity Prayer, 2015. Nikon D600 with Sigma 24-
70mm f2.8 lens. © Kai Nagayama

‘The work titled “Serenity Prayer” is a portrayal of the state


of acceptance. I was inspired to do create this work from the
prayer written by Reinhold Neibuhr.’

God grant me the serenity


To accept the things I cannot change;
Courage to change the things I can;
And wisdom to know the difference.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
Taking, as He did, this sinful world
As it is, not as I would have it;
Trusting that He will make all things right
If I surrender to His Will;
So that I may be reasonably happy in this life
And supremely happy with Him
Forever and ever in the next.
Amen.

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‘The series “Workaholics” talks about Japanese work culture where many Japanese businessmen called Workaholics 1, 2015. Nikon D600 with Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Kai Nagayama
“Salarymen” are expected to work very long hours each day…’

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Workaholics 2, 2015. Nikon D600 with Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Kai Nagayama

134 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Kai Nagayama :: Collecting pebbles f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 135
Workaholics 3, 2015. Nikon D600 with Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 lens. © Kai Nagayama

136 | Issue 65 | May 2017 Portfolio :: Kai Nagayama :: Collecting pebbles f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 137
PSNZ Judge Accreditation Training programme assess which must be done fluently, with
gains momentum sensitivity, respect and in a way that
PSCON 2017 at Forster Forster. His photographic subjects are varied
demonstrates the effectiveness of the image in
but his particular interest is in the ocean and
The Judge Accreditation Programme (JAP), conveying its message whatever the genre. Once
This year the Australian Photographic Society the life it contains.
introduced nearly four years ago by the approved, clubs are notified that the successful
annual convention will be held at Forster about
Photographic Society of New Zealand (PSNZ), applicant is available for club judging.
3.5 hours north of Sydney. As is usual, a complete David Burren APP AAIPP FAPS is an Adobe
has proven to be successful among photographers
program of speakers, workshops, tours and Certified Expert and has spent years teaching
aspiring to become judges. The programme helps the judges to develop
social occasions has been organised. Following Photoshop and Lightroom at a tertiary level and
skills required to, as far as possible, put their
are brief introductions to the speakers and to individuals and groups. David regularly
Initiated by former PSNZ President Shona Jaray own preferences to one side and to provide a
workshop presenters. Full details are on the conducts photographic workshops and tours to reasoned interpretation of images. We do this
APSNZ, and chaired by Wellington based Bruce
Society’s website. destinations around Australia and the globe. He by using a process that, at its heart, identifies
Girdwood FPSNZ, the programme has gone from
has been photographing since the 1970s. As the message, or story in an image, how the
strength to strength with the demand for more
Ron Willems Hon PSNZ FPSNZ FAPS AFIAP ARPS well as winning awards for his photography and workshops to be offered. The next Judge Training photographer expresses that story in their own
has been passionate about photography for teaching hundreds of people his IT background Workshop will be held in Greymouth on Saturday style and how they do this by using the craft of
over 45 years during which time he has won has provided important tools in managing the photography to produce a unique image,
and Sunday, 20-21 May, 2017. The workshops
many exhibition awards in Australia and photography workflow. their art.
are held two days over a weekend and generally
throughout the world. He is regarded by many attract 20 – 25 participants. Members of PSNZ
as New Zealand's most talented colour Jude Conning is a professional photographer The Judge Accreditation Panel has also embraced
and members of affiliated camera clubs are
transparency photographer of all time. specialising in family and portrait photography invited to attend, with a small charge applicable the opportunity to develop a roster system of
but she is a passionate traveller and has fallen to non-financial members only. all PSNZ accredited judges which will be made
Ron’s photographic work and articles have been in love with the icy parts of the planet. She will available to clubs when selecting judges for the
published in books and magazines on three speak on her Arctic Adventures. The workshop aims to provide those attending many salons and competitions in the PSNZ
continents. His relaxed, informative and with a good understanding of the standards calendar year.
engaging lecturing style has taken him all over In addition two of our own well known members, expected for club judging. Participants are taken
Australia, New Zealand and the United States Peter Manchester AFIAP AAPS HonFAPS FTPF through a process of image evaluation and PSNZ expects a lot from its accredited judges
and will be on show to delegates at Forster. and Dr Roy Killen EFIAP APSEM GMPSA, will critiquing which assists them in casting aside and does its best to support them with mentors
speak on their areas of expertise. Three their personal prejudices and bias to give a and training. To do this, good mentors are
Shane Chalker AIPP is an award winning workshops will be conducted by Phillipa balanced and informed critique. essential, as is good training and the supply of
photographer in national and international Frederiksen EFIAP MAPS SSAPS, Sarah on-going support materials.
exhibitions and is an accredited member of Debenham and Dr Killen. The titles of their There are two stages to the programme. During
the Australian Institute of Professional sessions are respectively; Mobile Phone the first stage, the aspirant judge is paired with For further information please visit the PSNZ
Photographers. Photography, Facebook Beyond Social Media a mentor who provides guidance. When the website www.photography.org.nz or send an
and How to be Successful in National and applicant and mentor are happy with the skills email to: PSNZ.Judging@gmail.com
Shane had a unique upbringing as the son of a International Exhibitions. and confidence levels of the applicant the
lighthouse keeper at Seal Rocks. This is where applicant then applies for full accreditation.
his love for the ocean and its surrounds began. Robert Dettman This first stage is very much ‘self-faced’ and can Moira Blincoe LPSNZ
He practices his craft as a professional Chairman Social Media Sub-committee take from six to 12 months. For full accreditation PSNZ Vice President & Councillor
photographer in Tuncurry across the river from Digital Division committee member the applicant is provided with 20 images to for Communications

138 | Issue 65 | May 2017 This APS page is sponsored by f11 Magazine. This PSNZ page is sponsored by f11 Magazine. f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 139
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BUT WAIT – “I’ve been a member of the AIPA
TONY BRIDGE THERE’S MORE… since my early days as an assistant,
and although I haven’t always been
ARTIST, WRITER, PHOTOGRAPHER, an active participant, I knew that
TEACHER, MENTOR I belonged to an organisation of
like-minded individuals that held the
Tony Bridge is one of New Zealand’s lead- HOW TO FIND THE LINKS TO EXTRA same passion for photography that I do.
Half
ing photo Page Vertical
educators with over 30 years CONTENT IN f11 MAGAZINE
Whether you’re looking for a strong
experience as a photographer himself, and
Each issue of f11 Magazine contains dozens of sense of community, exclusive
as a teacher of photography at all levels. business resources and promotional
He is an industry commentator, a blogger hotlinks, all expanding on our content and offering
opportunities, or just the reassurance
and a popular columnist for f11 Magazine. an enhanced readership experience. of knowing that you have the support
of your peers if you’re ever in a bind –
There are links to online content such as videos,
joining the AIPA is a no-brainer if you
Bridge on teaching photography: and to websites expanding on the ideas on offer want to make a living as a commercial
‘Nothing gives me more pleasure than to share here. Passing your cursor over the link usually photographer in New Zealand.”
my knowledge, much of it not available in highlights it.
books, with people seeking to grow themselves Tony Drayton
as photographers’. Anywhere you see an image of a computer screen www.tonydrayton.com

Bridge on his Hokianga Experience tours: contains a link, usually to video content.
‘Learn about the history and culture of
There are links highlighted grey within articles which
Hokianga from one whose roots are in this area,
while discovering places only a local with Māori may provide further explanation or take you to a
ancestry will know.’ photographer’s website.
Bridge on his photography workshops: All advertisements link to the appropriate website
‘Share with others in one of my unique workshops, so you can learn more about the products you’re
designed to get you thinking in new ways
interested in.
about photography.’
Come and visit Bridge’s new gallery Finally, there are email links to many of our
in the Hokianga: contributors so you can engage with us.
Bridge Gallery
1 Clendon Esplanade, Rawene - on the Twin
Coast Discovery Highway, Northland, NZ. HOW TO USE THE LINKS
View and purchase Tony’s evocative images.
Plus there’s often a chance to meet the A single click of the mouse will activate the link
artist when he’s in residence. you’re interested in. Here’s how they behave
depending on how you’re reading the magazine:
Tony’s workshops are always bespoke,
tailored responses to the carefully ONLINE readers will note that these links open in
analysed needs, wants and aspirations of a new tab, or window, in your web browser, so you
the photographer concerned. It all begins won’t lose your place in f11, as this stays open in
with a conversation, and that conversation
it’s own tab or window.
will very likely be an enduring one.
If you’re reading our PDF on your computer, Acrobat/
www.thistonybridge.com Adobe Reader will open the link in your browser
tony@thistonybridge.com while holding the f11 page open for you to return to.
+64 21 227 3985
If you’re reading our PDF on your iPad, iBooks will
ask you if you wish to leave to open the link. Once
you’ve viewed the link contents in Safari, simply
return to iBooks where you’ll find f11 remains open
on the page you were last reading.

Enjoy.
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photographers.
EPSON/NZIPP
20 For a copy of this years rules
17
iris p rofessional
photography awards and categories visit:
https://infocus.org.nz/
epsonnzipp-iris-awards/

Craig Wetjen Huy Nguyen Entries close:


Lisa Saad
31 May
© Emma Hughes

Mark Rossetto Sharon Thompson SimonDevitt


Simon Devitt
Queenstown Centre for IAN POOLE does PHOTOGRAPHY
Continued from page 148...

Creative Photography the context of an environment? Are you making


work to be enjoyed by a client or shared with
a viewer - or peer, or judge – it’s the awards
season after all.

There is no right or wrong answer of course. It’s


your decision, and it is never simply one or the
other. If like Penn, you have a studio, it doesn’t
guarantee you can elicit the transformation
from your clients that he was capable of.
Similarly, photographing someone in their
With an active and long-term membership of environment doesn’t guarantee your viewer will
the Australian Institute of Professional necessarily have a deeper insight into the
Photography (AIPP); a lifetime of photographic
New Zealand Photographic Workshop Specialists – 2017 experience; an extensive role in judging
character of your client.
photographs in Australia and New Zealand; It is worth noting that Newman spent many of
and a post-graduate degree in visual arts; Ian
his formative years of photography working in
Poole is well placed to assist you with your
Jackie Ranken and Mike Langford, both internationally photographic images. Ian’s previous teaching
ph the studio. His lighting and composition skills
award winning photographers, judges and lecturers based experience at university level, as well as strong were well-honed. And for those available light
in Queenstown, New Zealand. industry activity, gives him powerful skills in photographers who think they are emulating
passing on photographic knowledge. Newman when they shoot on location they are
Mike Langford Canon Master, Grand Master NZIPP,
Australian Travel Photographer of the Year 2013, Are you looking for assistance in any of the most definitely not! Newman brought lights to
NZ Travel Photographer of the Year 2012. following? his portrait shoots, and took control of the
Jackie Ranken Canon Master, Grand Master NZIPP, setting often re-arranging spaces to suit. He
NZ Landscape Photographer of the Year 2013 & 2014, • Portfolio construction and development actually preferred to term this symbolic
NZ Professional Photographer of the Year 2012, • Initial advice for a photographic exhibition
portraiture, a world apart from an available light
NZ Creative Portrait Photographer of the Year 2012, • Curatorial assistance with an exhibition
Australian Landscape Photographer of the Year 2012. OUT NOW! (opening night details – even choice of wine) photographer who shoots on location because
Creative Landscape Photography II Fieldguide • Re-assess your photographic output – they cannot access or afford a studio.
Join us for hands-on, practical workshops, where you can use Creative Travel Photography I Fieldguide weddings/portraits
our CANON EOS 700D cameras and/or trial our range of lenses • Writing a strong artist’s statement A portrait is a consensual process and your client
and filters. All camera brands are welcome. Our aim is to teach • Choosing strong photographs for competition is placing their trust in you.
and inspire. We will enhance your camera skills and develop your entry
creative palette. We believe you will leave our workshops totally Remember, as Newman so famously said, a good
inspired and excited about your own photographic future. We Ian works from Teneriffe, an inner city portrait is first and foremost a good photograph.
always run small groups of eight students with two tutors. Brisbane suburb, but there are many ways to
contact and speak to him.
Hone your skills, don’t ignore the value of the
studio portrait and always be the best
Our 2017 event schedule:
SKYPE | EMAIL | SNAIL MAIL | FACE-TO-FACE photographer you can.
April 14 - 17 & 21- 24 Autumn Colours 2
May 25 - 30 Paradise +61 0424 727 452 ~ poolefoto@gmail.com Ian Poole
Fieldguides to Creative Photography. See
June 22 - 27
July 13 - 18
Catlins
Mt Cook 1
Blog poolefoto.wordpress.com (with Lisa Kurtz)
our website or click here for more details.
Aug 17 - 22 Mt Cook 2 Skype poolefoto
Aug31 - Sept 5 Haast Photo Safaris – run from Queenstown, NZ Poolefoto.wordpress.com
Sept 14 - 19 Fiordland ian@f11magazine.com
October 25 - Nov 9 Myanmar One on one tuition: NZ$260 for 2 hours
November 15 - 25 Japan Autumn Colours One to two tuition: $180 per hour.
5 hour Photo Safari: NZ$340 minimum two people.
See: www.photosafari.co.nz

Email: info@qccp.co.nz | Ph + 64 3 4090272 | + 64 27 6722788


f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 147
www.photosafari.co.nz www.qccp.co.nz
THE DEEP END – IAN POOLE THE FINAL FRAME © Stephanie Bowers

The Studio
Useful or outdated space?

This article has been a collaboration with Lisa or the royal. Commissioned for propaganda or
Kurtz, whose assistance was invaluable, enjoyed vanity (or both), portrait paintings and sculptures
and appreciated. were installed in great halls and grand rooms
to be viewed only by the similarly privileged.
Irving Penn argued that taking people out of
The invention of photography saw the portrait
their natural circumstances and putting them
democratised. Suddenly, all classes of society
in front of a camera placed in a studio
could have their likeness recorded.
transformed them into better subjects. A
concept almost completely at odds with the Early portraits were daguerreotypes, filled with
habits of many of today’s photographers, who silver and magic, perfectly suited for their role
continue to ride the trend of environmental as mementos of loved ones. These beautifully
portraiture first introduced by Penn’s hinged cases carried the promise of immortality
contemporary, Arnold Newman. and could be shown and shared with others.
Within a decade of its invention, photographic
For Penn, the studio was a neutral territory
studios in the US alone produced 3 million
where the subject rose to the experience of
daguerreotypes a year. Whilst hardly comparable
being looked at by a stranger with a dignity and
to today’s 20 million Instagram posts a day from
seriousness of concentration which could never
US users (unfortunately we lack local geographic
be achieved in their own natural environment.
statistics to make more relevant comparisons),
For Newman, the environment provided it isn’t too dissimilar a percentage of the
information that added to the understanding population that we could argue were sharing
of the person. What’s interesting is that Penn photographs then and now. However, the
speaks from the sitter’s perspective, of sharing of a daguerreotype with a chosen viewer
transformation; Newman from the viewer’s is distinctly different from today’s social media
perspective, of revelation. world where the portrait is being reduced to a
“like”, a love-heart icon to be clicked - often by
Penn and Newman in their lifetimes both an anonymous, or several times removed user
achieved accolades and fame for their respective who just happens to follow the same hashtag.
approaches so it is clear that there is no one
winning formula. Bringing this back to Penn and Newman, where
do you stand? Are you transforming your clients
This reminds us that the portrait is a complex in the studio or enlightening your viewers with
and significant document. Prior to photography
the portrait was the sole preserve of the rich
Continued on page 147...

148 | Issue 65 | May 2017 f11 for PHOTOGRAPHERS AND AFICIONADOS | 149
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