You are on page 1of 16

 

CANOPY 
CONNECTIONS 
2018  
 
AMONGST THE ANCIENTS: A Place-Based 
Curriculum in the H. J. Andrews 
Experimental Forest 
Designed and facilitated by: 
Ariella Dahlin, Ned Maynard, Riley Olson, Dylan Plummer, Kiana 
Seto, Cahill Shpall, Chelsea Sussman 

Advised by: Professor Kathryn Lynch, Laura Johnson 


   


 

Acknowledgements  
 
We would like to thank our community partners and everyone involved in Canopy Connections. 
Our specific, overwhelming gratitude to the following: 
 
 

                  
 
 

                         
 
 
 
 
We would also like to thank Ivan Miller and his students for participating in our pilot, Mark 
Schulze for his dedication and invaluable information for use in our program, and Laura Johnson 
for being an incredibly organized and supportive team manager. 
Thank you Kathryn Lynch, the Environmental Leadership Program Co­Director, for all your 
guidance and support.  
Lastly, thank you to Steve Ellis and other private donors, without whom none of this would be 
possible.  
 
 

 

Table of Contents 
Introductory Email…………………………………………………… 4 

Student Materials and Itinerary………………………………………. 5 

Pre­Trip Lesson: Stoking the Flame…………………………………. 6 

Introduction to the Andrews…………………………………………. 17 

Exploring New Heights……………………………………………… 19 

Nature’s Calendar……………………………………………………. 22 

Cool, Calm, Conifers……………………………………………….... 36 

Forest Stories……………………………………………………….... 49 

Glossary…………………………………………………………….... 58 

Questing Clues………………………………………………………...62 

Map……………………………………………………………………63 

Teacher/Chaperone Evaluation Form…………………………………. 

Student Evaluation Form………………………………………………. 

Community Partner Evaluation Form…………………………………. 

 
   


 

Canopy Connections 2018 Introductory Email 
 
Hello everyone! 
We are incredibly excited to bring you the curriculum for Canopy Connections 2018. As 
you may know, this is the tenth anniversary of the Canopy program, and we’re hoping it’s a 
memorable one!  
For the students to have the best time on these trips, they will need to be properly 
prepared. We have attached a list of items in the body of this email that the students will need in 
order to have the best time possible. Also attached is a rough itinerary for the day. We understand 
that some schools will be arriving from farther away, and we are prepared to adjust for different 
start times. For teachers, please have your students split into groups by the time they arrive at 
Andrews. We would like to begin immediately upon arrival (after bathroom breaks, of course!). 
Please remember that for the students to participate in the tree climbing portion of the 
day, they will need to have Pacific Tree Climbing Institute waivers filled out and turned in. The 
waivers are on the readiness list, but it bears repeating as we don’t want anyone to be 
involuntarily left out. These waivers can be found attached to this email.  
Also attached is our created map, as we are integrating an all­day quest into the field trip 
curriculum! We want the students to examine the map prior to the trip to create a sense of 
excitement! 
 
If there are any concerns, please let us know, as we are happy to help! 
 
With excitement and sincerity, 
 
Canopy Connections Crew 2018: 
Ariella Dahlin, Ned Maynard, Riley Olson, Dylan Plummer, Kiana Seto, Cahill Shpall, Chelsea 
Sussman 
Team Manager: Laura Johnson 
Program Director: Professor Kathryn Lynch 
   


 

To Bring: 
❏ Rain Jackets  
❏ Rain pants 
❏ Warm Mid­layer (Wool or fleece is preferable to cotton if available) 
❏ Water bottles (we can refill at H. J. Andrews) 
❏ Lunch and snacks (NO peanuts or tree nuts – no exceptions) 
❏ Appropriate footwear (waterproof, closed toe, hiking boots or rain boots are preferable) 
❏ Gloves 
❏ Hats 
❏ Sunglasses and sunscreen depending on weather 
❏ Warm socks 
❏ Extra socks if shoes are likely to become soaked 
❏ Inhaler for any students with asthma 
❏ Epi­pen for each student with allergies 
❏ Pacific Tree Climbing Institute waiver 
 
Itinerary: 
9:00 ­ 9:30 | Bus arrive at H. J. Andrews at 9 a.m., bathroom break, split into groups, orientation 
9:30 ­10:45 | Station One 
10:45­12:00 | Station Two 
12:00­12:30 | Group Lunch ­  (everyone brings their own) 
12:30 ­ 1:45 | Station Three 
1:45­3:00 | Station Four 
3:00­3:15 | Wrap 
3:15 | Students leave H. J. Andrews   


 

Pre­Trip Lesson: Stoking The Flame 
 
Developed by : Riley Olson, Cahill Shpall 
 
Note: Glossary terms are demarcated by italics. 
 
Time: 50 minutes  
 
Overview 
This pre­trip lesson introduces middle school students to the Canopy Connections Team, our 
community partners, and old growth forests. The lesson will illustrate the important web of 
natural cycles operating around the students through  introspective  games and activities that 
highlight the importance of individual observation. These observations will be related to 
traditional ecological knowledge  through the comparison of students’  seasonal rounds  to those 
of the Kalapuya First Nations People.   
 
Learning Outcomes 
By the end of the pre­trip lesson, middle­school students should be able to: 
❖ Define  traditional ecological knowledge (TEK)   
❖ Describe two activities during the  summer  and  winter seasonal rounds 
❖ Define the natural cycle of an old growth forest: Old trees, Woody debris, Layers, Snags 
( OWLS ) 
❖ Describe how to prepare for the field trip  
 
Rationale 
The Canopy Connections 2018 team seeks to tender and stoke the flame of our students’ 
awareness of the natural cycles of old growth forests through exposure to  OWLS  and  TEK . This 
acquiescence of knowledge about both the cycles of Kalapuya people and old growth forests 
harbors a deeper connection of place and understanding. This understanding will spurr 
passionate attitudes aimed at increasing action on environmental issues. 
 
Standards 
❖ CCSS.ELA­LITERACY.RI.6.6 : Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, 
noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.x 
 
Materials Needed  
❏ 4 winter/summer large flip papers 
❏ 6 markers 
❏ Kalapuya seasonal round compass rose (large flip chart paper) 

 

❏ Blank seasonal round compass rose for each group (x4) 
❏ 4 Laminated 8 X 11 photos of H. J. Andrews (attached) 
 
Background Material: 
 
The background material for this introductory pre­trip lesson can be found largely within the 
later context of the station plans. This is done such that the material connects directly with the 
station to which it is most relevant and explored with the most depth. There is also a glossary for 
the entirety of the curriculum. Glossary terms are demarcated with italics. 
 
The following activity is aimed at highlighting the Kalapuya First Nations people and their 
seasonal rounds , which centered around their  traditional ecological knowledge. 
 
  OWLS:  An acronym to remember the four key characteristics of old growth forests. Stands for 
Old trees, Woody debris, Layers, and Snags. 
 
Old trees:  Trees in old growth forests that are 100 years or older. Examples include 
Douglas­firs, western hemlocks, and western red­cedars. These trees provide habitat for a variety 
of animals species. 
 
Woody debris:  Fallen dead trees and tree branches in forests. These structures become habitat 
for forest organisms. An example is a nurse log, a fallen log which provides habitat to mosses, 
lichens and other organisms. 
 
Layers:  Refers to vertical diversity in the forest, such as grasses and ferns, shrubs, understory 
trees, and canopy trees. In old growth forests there are large canopy trees like old douglas­firs, 
understory trees that compete for light such as western hemlocks, and shrub like plants on the 
forest floor. This also references the habitats these layers provide, such that a large degree of 
biodiversity lives in this forest. 
 
Snags:  Standing dead trees that provide significant habitat in old growth forests (i.e. northern 
spotted owls build nests in snags). 
 
Life cycles:  The series of stages in form and functional activity through which an organism 
passes between successive recurrences of a specified primary stage. 
 
Old growth forests:  Natural forests that have developed for at least 100 years. Characteristics 
include towering tree size, accumulation of large, dead woody material, and vertical diversity. 
 


 

Phenology:  The study of cyclical and seasonal natural phenomena. Also is sometimes referred to 
as nature’s calendar 
 
Traditional ecological knowledge:  The evolving body of knowledge acquired by indigenous 
people through millenia spent in direct contact with certain environments. 
 
Species list: 
❖ vine maple 
❖ Pacific rhododendron  
❖ red huckleberry 
❖ Douglas­fir 
❖ western hemlock 
❖ pacific yew 
❖ red alder 
❖ spotted owl 
❖ red backed vole 
❖ pileated woodpecker 
❖ Douglas­fir bark beetles 
❖ cyanide millipedes 
❖ rough­skinned newts 
❖ Lobaria (pulmonaria and oregana), 
❖ Usnea and other tree lichens 
 
 
Kalapuya First Nations People: 
❖ Occupied most of the interior valleys of Western Oregon including the Willamette Valley 
from approximately 14,000 years ago to present day  
❖ Settlement Patterns:  Can be broken down largely into  summer  (March­October)   and 
winter   (November­February)   seasonal rounds . 
❖ Environment(s):  Prairie oak savannah, oak and fir groves, forests, marshes, and lakes 
provided an abundance of food. 
❖ Seasonal Round:  People built and occupied villages and camps to fit the needs of the 
seasons and occupied them in accordance to the seasonal round 
❖ Summer Seasonal Round:   
➢ Winter villages disbanded to increase mobility  
➢ Settlement Patterns: 
■ Set up temporary open camps under oak or pine trees, often did not set up 
shelters. They would construct windbreaks out of brush, boughs, or grass 
if necessary.  


 

■ Usually on valley floors, flood plains, or foothills 
➢ Subsistence: 
■ Harvested nuts, seeds, and berries  
● Camas bulbs first harvested March through April when they are 
most tender, second harvest in June in massive quantities for 
winter stores 
■ Harvested game, fish, waterfowl 
■ Fall fire setting to maintain open savannah areas of the valley floor  
● Provided roasted grasshoppers 
● Cleared out undergrowth from trees to ease access to acorns and 
berries. 
❖ Winter Seasonal Round: 
➢ Winter villages provided the basic social networking system 
➢ Settlement Patterns: 
■ Permanent rectangular often multi­family semi­subterranean lodges with 
bark roofs and central fireplaces that could extend up to 60ft on a side 
■ Related families usually clustered a series of small villages or bands in 
river basin whose territory was shared 
■ Families helped each other form marriage outside the village increasing 
social ties 
➢ Subsistence: 
■ Strong social networks were formed during foraging trips, trading, and 
social visits between winter villages.  
❖ Kalapuya Calendar:  
➢ September ( First Month) :  After the harvest small groups were still living in 
summer camps scattered across the valley, collecting acorns, berries and camas 
roots. Prairie burning begins for tarweed seed harvesting.  
➢ October ( Hair [Leaves] Falls Off ):   Wapato harvest time begins in the northern 
Willamette Valley, the northern Kalapuya groups move to camps in close 
proximity to lakes where the wapato grows. Groups in the southern Valley 
complete harvesting.  
➢ November ( Approaching Winter):  The Kalapuya prepare their winter houses for 
the coming cold weather  
➢ December ( Good Month):  The weather becomes cooler but is still mild. The 
Kalapuya settle into their villages for the winter.  
➢ January  (B   urned Breast):  The winter becomes cold and the elders sit so close to 
the fires that their chests get burnt. Much time is spent indoors tending fires. 
Winter dances begin  


 

➢ February  ( Out of Provisions):  The end of winter has the Kalapuya short on 
stored provisions and is a hungry time. Hunters spend more time in the wood 
trying to find game  
➢ March  ( First Spring):  People begin to leave the winter village, making short 
camping trips to gather food, including the first shoots of camas, which are only 
about finger high 
➢ April  ( Budding Time) : The Kalapuya make more frequent trips into the valley 
floor as camas grows higher 
➢ May  ( Flower Time):  The camas begins to blossom and the Kalapuya leave their 
winter houses to camp out for the summer. The spring runs of salmon head up the 
Willamette River and its tributaries.  
➢ June ( Camas Harvesting) : The camas becomes fully ripe. The women begin to 
gather and dry the bulbs for following winter, continued until September or 
October. Large emphasis on fish and the beginnings of berry picking 
➢ July  ( Half­Summer­Time) : Weather is hot and dry. The Kalapuya begin to collect 
hazelnuts and caterpillars 
➢ August:  (E  nd of Summer) : The weather remains hot as the people continue to 
gather a variety of berries, nuts and roots in preparation for winter.  
(Berg: 2007) 
 
 

10 
 

 
 
Step 1:  Introduction                                                                                          Time: 10 minutes 
❖ Lead facilitator will begin introductions with 2 minutes and each facilitator will go over: 
➢ Name 
➢ Hometown 
➢ Passions in the environment 
➢ Favorite animal 
➢ What they are interested in studying 
 
❖ Lead facilitator opening statement 
➢ “ All of us here at Canopy Connections are really excited to bring the forest to 
you, and we’re hoping you embrace the spirit of the forest and approach learning 
about it with enthusiasm and a sense of adventure” 
❖ Play Spring Bloom game 
➢ Give directions: when we ask a question, bloom (stand) up if it’s true for you 
■ Have you smelled a spring flower yet this year? 
■ Have you ever seen an owl? 
■ Have you ever been in old growth forest? 
■ Have you ever heard woodpecker? 
■ Have you ever felt a slug? 
❖ We are going to talk about natural cycles and different modes of knowledge! 
❖ Introduce community partners:  
➢ Pacific Tree Climbing Institute :  Hopes to change the way people view old 
growth forest and demonstrate the value these forests hold. This is accomplished 
through hands on experience climbing up into the canopy.  
■ Their mission is to kindle enthusiasm within the students. They encourage 
students to find within themselves courage, motivation, and success within 
unfamiliar activities  
 
➢ H. J. Andrews Experimental Research Forest 
■ H. J. Andrews is a 16,000 acre ecological research site in the Cascade 
Mountains, supported by Oregon State University and the United States 
Forest Service 
■ It was established in 1948 as a US Forest Service Experimental Forest, it 
has since been run as a space for outdoor recreation, contemplation, and 
ecological research that focuses on long­term forest changes  
 

11 
 

■ Their research is a part of the Long­Term Ecological Research Network 
funded by the National Science Foundation 
■ Their mission is to support research on forests, streams, and watersheds, 
and to foster strong collaboration among ecosystem science, education, 
and natural resource management 
 
Step 2:  Forest Write                                                                                             Time: 15 minutes 
❖ Break into groups: 2 minutes 
➢ Students break into groups of 4­6 or their pre­assigned field trip groups (if 
pre­prepared)  
➢ Designate a space for each group (correlating to color of helmet to be used at H. J. 
Andrews)  
➢ Have students in that group relocate to that space 
➢ Each group will be given a facedown photo of the old­growth forest at H. J. 
Andrews 
■ Make sure not to reveal the photo is an old growth forest at H. J. Andrews 
until after the discussion 
➢ These groups will stay together through the lesson 
❖ Writing Setup: 2 minutes 
➢ Before writing begins, ask students “When we make scientific observations what 
do we look for?” 
■ Where do you think this photo was taken? 
■ What season do you think it is? 
■ What memories does it make you think of?   
■ What things stick out to you in the photo? 
■ Who can make the most observations? 
■ While students write, facilitator will write these questions on the board 
❖ Free Write: 3 minutes 
❖ Discussion of  OWLS  and evidence of natural cycles   present in the provided photo: 8 
minutes 
➢ Note: OWLS = Old trees, Woody debris, Layers, Snags 
➢ Have students discuss their observations with their group (2 minutes for group, 6 
minutes for class discussion) 
➢ Call on one student from each group, ask for their observations 
➢ Write down these observations on the board. 
➢ Ask : Did anyone talk about how old the trees were in this photo, and if yes, what 
was said about it? 
■ This question is aimed at highlighting the importance of  legacy trees 
which provide habitat for many different species.  

12 
 

❖ Ask : what do you think happens once an old tree falls or dies in the forest? 
➢ This question is geared around the full life­cycle of woody debris in the forest and 
students should be made aware of  nurse logs.  
➢ Snags  should be explained and addressed, with a small note on the  northern 
spotted owl  
➢ Write the acronym “OWLS” on the board. Connect the the students observations 
to t 
❖ Write the acronym “OWLS” on the board. Connect the students observations to OWLS 
by drawing lines to what they correspond to. Talk about OWLS and how these are the key 
characteristics of an old growth forest. 
❖ Conclude:  Now reveal that the photo is from H. J. Andrews and that we’re going there 
on a field trip! 
❖ Transition to next step:  
➢ Why do you think we did this activity? 
■ To talk about the importance of observation in the scientific method 
➢ We are going to talk about another means of knowing 
   
Step 3:  Seasonal Rounds                                                                                     Time: 20 minutes 
❖ Personal Seasonal Rounds Activity: 8 minutes 
❖ Explain who the Kalapuya people are and their association with the land 
❖ Show how the Kalapuya TEK was tied directly to their seasonal occupation of particular 
places  
❖ Write “summer” and “winter” headings on the board 
❖ Pair up students and hand them a paper divided in two, one side labeled “summer” the 
other “winter” 
❖ Have students in pairs write what activities they can only do in winter and then summer 
for about 5 minutes 
➢ Guide group conversations towards foods and activities 
❖ Come back together as a classroom and take examples from students to write on board 
➢ Guide group towards connecting and comparing their seasonal activities with the 
Kalapuyan seasonal activities 
■ Mobility and fresh foods in summer, and permanent dwellings, preserved 
food, social gatherings for winter 
❖ Share group discussion 
❖ Ask: 
➢ How does their personal cycle compare to yours? 
➢ How are they different?  
❖ Introduction to Traditional Ecological Knowledge  

13 
 

❖ Address the class:  The Kalapuya people have been in the Willamette Valley and the 
surrounding areas like the Cascade Mountains anywhere from 6­10,000 +/­ years  
❖ It is important to recognize that Kalapuya people have been on this land for so long, 
much longer than us and still live here today  
❖ The Kalapuya have a connection to the land, and built an amazing storehouse of 
traditional ecological knowledge (TEK)  
❖ Ask: Does anyone know what TEK is? 
➢ A: the evolving body of knowledge acquired by indigenous people through 
millenia spent in direct contact with certain environments is its own form of 
science 
❖ TEK gives the Kalapuya people the knowledge of where and when to live  
❖ Ask: Does anyone know what seasonal rounds are? 
➢  The pattern of movement from one resource­gathering area to another in a cycle 
that was followed each year 
➢ Basically a movement of one area to another. For example, going to a lake every 
summer or Band Camp every summer, school starting every September 
➢ Vitally important to be aware and make careful observations of the natural cycles 
of the world around them. Their survival depended upon it 
 
 
Step 4: Group Agreements/Field Trip Prep/Wrap Up                                     Time: 5 minutes 
 
❖ The facilitators should walk the class through a group discussion on agreements for the 
trip, utilizing inquiry to get a basic list. The facilitator will ask students: 
❖ Q: What do you think it means to be respectful on a field trip in the forest? Call on 
students who raise their hands, or call on students if no one is volunteering 
❖ The final list (for facilitator) should at least include: 
➢ Be safe 
➢ Be kind  
➢ Be respectful 
➢ Stay on the trail  
❖ Lastly, be sure to go over what it means to be prepared and dress appropriately for the 
field trip 
❖ Stress the importance of dressing warmly and bringing layers because it is cold in the 
forest at H.J. Andrews 
❖ It is helpful to bring layers to show students how to dress warmly for the field trip 
❖ Make sure to mention: 
❏ Rain Jackets  
❏ Rain pants 

14 
 

❏ Warm Mid­layer (Wool or fleece is preferable to cotton if available) 
❏ Water bottles (Can refill at H. J. Andrews) 
❏ Lunch and snacks (NO peanuts or tree nuts – no exceptions) 
❏ Appropriate footwear (Waterproof, closed toe, hiking boots or rain boots are preferable) 
❏ Gloves 
❏ Hats 
❏ Sunglasses and sunscreen depending on weather 
❏ Warm socks 
❏ Extra socks if shoes are likely to become soaked 
❏ Inhaler for any students with asthma 
❏ Epipen for each student with allergies 
❏ Pacific Tree Climbing Institute waiver 
❏ Be Safe, Be Respectful, Be Kind to yourselves, one another, and the forest  
 
❖ Lead Facilitator Concluding Statement  
➢ “ At the end of the day, this trip is about all of us forming bonds of friendship 
between ourselves and the natural world around us. From all of us at Canopy 
Connections, The Pacific Tree Climbing Institute, and H. J. Andrews 
Experimental Forest, we are so excited to share this experience with you all and 
we can’t wait to see you soon”  
 
   

15 
 

Resources 
Aikens, C. (1975).  Archaeological studies in the Willamette Valley, Oregon  (University of 
Oregon anthropological papers ; no. 8). Eugene: Dept. of Anthropology, University of Oregon. 
 
Berg, L., & Oregon Council for the Humanities. (2007).  The first Oregonians  (2nd ed.). Portland, 
Or.: Oregon Council for the Humanities. 
 
Carey, A., Gutiérrez, Ralph J, Cooper Ornithological Society, & Pacific Northwest Forest Range 
Experiment Station. (1985).  Ecology and management of the spotted owl in the Pacific 
Northwest : Arcata, California, June 19­23, 1984  (General technical report PNW ; 185). 
Portland, Or.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range 
Experiment Station. 
 
 

   

16 

Related Interests