You are on page 1of 110

FINGERSTYLE GUITAR JOURNAL

ISSUE 5
Feature Stories
Antigoni Goni 5

Andrea Vettorett 37

Julio Azcano 17

Workshops
Troy Gifford 63
Roger Hudson 83
Bill Piburn 67
Steve Herberman 74
Sean McGowan 105
Walter Rodrigues Jr 59
Tim Lerch 102
Dylan Ryche 77
Stephen Davis 89
David Oakes 98
Eric Lugosch 91

Departments
Editor Letter 3
Sight and Sound 109
Dream Guitar Gallery 55
Young Artist Profile 51

Antigoni’s guitar, “La Boda” by Jose Romanillos, 1989


From the Editor
Recently I have been transcribing solos by the legendary jazz musicians Stan Getz and
Chet Baker. They happen to be two of my favorite improvisers who both reached the
pinnacle of their art form. Through doing this, I not only discovered much about their
approach but I also rediscovered my joy for transcribing music.

Through the years, I have transcribed a lot of music but most of it has been work for
hire projects that for the most part felt like working in the coal mine. Each time I sat
at the computer it felt like hearing the principle over the intercom say, “Mrs. Randall
please send Bill Piburn to the office.”

I am sharing my thoughts to encourage you to find music that you love and transcribe
it. No matter how simple or complex it will be rewarding in multiple ways. Besides
the pride you will feel just think of the money you will save on sheet music. In addi-
tion, it has been my experience that the phrasing of the melody is often simplified and
therefore square sounding. I am speaking mostly of popular songs and jazz fake books.
Finally, your ear will improve and nothing is more important in music than your ear.

For those of you who do not read music you can still transcribe music. Transcribing
music in its purist form is repeating what you hear. Pen and paper is only a method to
preserve and pass it on.

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend “music” your ear!

“No matter what style I’m playing, no


matter what guitar I‘m playing with, the
Henriksen perfectly amplifies the sound
I hear from my instrument.”

-Sean McGowan

HenriksenAmplifiers.com

3
Calling All Fingerstylists!

Use Code: FMAG25


to save 25%
Antigoni Goni was born in Athens, Greece. Wow, thank you very much. That means a lot
At the age of ten She began guitar studies to me because it’s a difficult CD I think.
with Evangelos Assimakopoulos at the Na-
tional Conservatory of Athens. At twenty, It’s not only the technique required to
she left Greece to continue her studies at play this music but it’s all the color, dy-
the Royal Academy in London, England with namics, and beautiful phrasing.
John Mills and Julian Bream. While at the
Royal Academy she was personally selected Thank you. I’m glad they came out in the re-
by Julian Bream as the winner of the Julian cording. The colors and dynamics that the
Bream Prize. classical guitar can offer is where it’s beau-
ty lies. For me, this is classical guitar. This
Little did she know that her musical journey is what makes our instrument unique; it’s
would take her to New York in 1991 where voice, the sound and the possibility of chang-
she would completed her Master Degree at ing the timbre. This is what makes the guitar
The Julliard School of Music under the guid- special. If you want to be flashy and fast, pick
ance of Sharon Isbin. Antigoni went on to up the violin, guitar is not that. I do not think
found the Pre-College Guitar Department this is the beauty and character of the guitar.
at Julliard where she was the director from There are other instruments to do that. I do
1995 to 2004. In 1995, Antigoni became the not think that any other instrument can get
first prizewinner of the prestigious Guitar the variety of nuances that a classical guitar
Foundation of America. This led to a tour of can get. I am glad you noticed that because I
sixty-five concerts and a recording contract am working very hard for that.
with Naxos Records. In 2004, she became
the chair of the guitar department at the Roy- Yes, after listening I had a huge inferiority
al Conservatory in Brussels, Belgium. After complex!
twelve years in Brussels, Antigoni has suc-
cessfully found her balance between being a (laughter)
mother, wife, teacher, and concert guitarist.
About a year ago, I driving on a long trip
Antigoni’s latest recording Hymn to the Muse and was listening to Julian Bream record-
is a collection of original works and tran- ings. It was a reminder just how colorful
scriptions inspired by the Greek culture and dynamic his playing was and why he
and its heritage. Antigoni states, “Each and is held in such high esteem. Your CD gave
everyone of the pieces presented in the CD me the same feeling of this color and dy-
represents a very personal journey through namic range.
time and space; a path with images, events
and emotions.” Oh my God! Well I think we can finish the
interview right now. I have arrived!

I’ve been enjoying your new CD. I was very For me Julian Bream, was, is, and will always
impressed with your concert in Nashville be my idol. Listening to him live and hearing
but after listening to the recording, I was him teach is just amazing. The nuances and
blown away! colors he plays all make sense; they are not
6
contrived or planned. They are just hand in If you start listening to the rubato it means
hand with the music. that the piece is outside of you. In my mind,
it’s the same with a great actor. If you can see
I would like to also add that his sense of tim- Elizabeth Taylor and not the character then
ing is amazing. It is his sense of being on the she has failed. If you can take it apart, the
note and not just a millisecond before or af- magic is gone. It has to be all together as one.
ter. For me these qualities have driven me all This is true for the actor and the musician.
my life and I still draw inspiration from his
playing. I cannot think of anyone else who Also, the rubato, the technique, whatever,
inspires me this way. it’s all one. It’s not, now we hear the good
sound, now we hear the rubato, now we hear
The phrasing and rubato I hear on your the phrasing, no! You don’t start from say-
recording seems very natural. Quite of- ing I’m going to do a rubato. You start from
ten, I hear guitarists who use rubato understanding the music. Then you should
that make me feel uncomfortable. It just make it your own in whatever manner you
seems out of time without control and can. I often put words in the music to help
understanding of the phrasing. Will you make it a part of me. I try to understand the
please address this subject? sensations I get, the images and the emotion
behind the music. If this came from outside
Yes, but it is not simple to talk about. I would of me it would fell unnatural and the audi-
say to my students that for a piece of music to ence would also sense it. They would know
come alive it has to be part of you. The same that something is wrong.
as when you breathe and when you speak,
you do not think about it. When you speak, You’re saying that connecting with the
the way you present the words has your own music makes it believable to yourself and
heartbeat behind it. It’s your breathing, your the audience.
coloring, it’s part of you. It’s so much a part
of you that you don’t notice it. You hear Bill Of course, you cannot fake it. Life cannot be
Piburn and that is how he speaks, his humor, faked. This is what makes the difference. If
his timing and his breathing. To me it’s the you can see the actor acting, it’s gone. If you
same way with a piece of music. It has to be see the musician playing, it’s gone. You do
part of you to feel comfortable and natural. It not think about what they are doing, you just
has to float out and carry your own person- enter into their world. Rubato is not rubato
ality while still respecting the music itself. anymore; colors are not colors anymore they
When there is no barrier between what you are just part of the whole. It’s a more holistic
feel and what you want to say there is noth- approach (laughter), the guitar clinic!
ing to solve, you just speak. You do not think
now I am going to breathe, no, you simply This makes me believe that a musician
breathe. You breathe differently when your has to live with a piece for a sufficient pe-
heartbeat is racing and differently when you riod before identifying and connecting
are calm. It’s the same way with a piece of with it.
music. If it’s part of you and you’re one with
it, there is no rubato, that’s just the way it is. Yes, exactly. When I was younger I felt that I
7
was not fast enough in learning and process- taking classes with Julian Bream and eventu-
ing. Then through the process of teaching ally studying the “Tarentella” by Tedesco and
and working with many people, I realized playing it in his competition. Having Julian
that whether you learn slow or fast the pro- Bream sitting two meters from me was the
cess is the same at the end. You need time to cherry on the pie! I was so nervous that I
make something yours. You cannot force it. don’t remember how I played. I do remem-
It’s like trying to make wine mature faster. ber that Bream could not decide between me
and another player, Mark Ashford. He had
Possibly, like the difference between the listened to sixteen or so guitarists play “Tar-
first and third date. entella” and he could not decide. The whole
thing finished and we were waiting for the
(laughter) Exactly! results. Then we saw him coming out and
he talked with the coordinator and the head
I also think there is a process of working on of the department. He then asked Mark and
the music for a recording and a process for I to play the piece again for him. Here we go
working on the music for the stage. The mu- again! We had survived once playing with
sic also changes on the stage. Not so much Bream two meters away and now we had to
the interpretation, but it helps you take it a do it one more time. So, I go back in and he
step further because of the energy you ex- says, sorry to have you play again. Though I
change with the audience. You realize that was ready to faint I said, no problem. I start-
you are fine tuning everything. It gives you ed to play and after about three lines of mu-
one more perspective when you take the mu- sic, he said, yes, yes, I have it. I left and that
sic to the stage and another when you take it was that. Then he announced the prize and
to the studio. It’s a journey, it’s life. I got the prize.

Well said. A few minutes ago we were I was young and I had some competition ex-
talking about Julian Bream. I understand perience but it was overwhelming. When
that in 1990 you were honored with the other teenagers worshipped the Beatles, I
Julian Bream Prize. worshipped Julian Bream. Strange girl! To go
there and play for him took a lot of courage.
Well, that was during my first year at the Roy- It also took a lot of preparation and thinking.
al Academy of Music in London. That year I remember walking in all the parks of Lon-
was amazing for me for many reasons but don the week before singing, “I feel pretty, oh
also because it was my first time leaving my so pretty” (laughter) to pump me up for what
home in Greece. Little did I know it would was about to happen in my life. It worked I
become the first of the next twenty-seven guess.
years that I would be away. It was actual-
ly the first year that I practiced properly. I That same year I won the Stephen Dodg-
was awakened to the possibilities of sound. son Concerto Competition and he was con-
A good sound was always a part of me. My ducting. I went out to coach with him and I
teacher in Greece always had a good sound worked on the piece quite a lot. It was one
but working with John Milles at the Royal of the longest years of my life but one of
Academy was just another level. Then I was the most eventful. That year was also a test
8
But I guess it’s part of my character. I have
never thought about money, awards or priz-
es. Things like that have never impressed
me. It’s not that I don’t care but titles mean
nothing to me. I couldn’t care less how much
money a person has in their bank account or
what they have done if I don’t like them.

When I play concerts I never ask how im-


portant the hall is or who has played there
before me. In general, I don’t pay attention
to these things. London was great and Julian
Bream was the reason I was going there but
it was all a bit outside of me. By the time I
went to Julliard, I was more aware of things.
The first year I was there, I had convinced
the Royal Academy to do this exchange with
Julliard. I would still be a student in the Roy-
al Academy but studying a year in the Unit-
ed States. I was very excited when Sharon
Isbin answered my letter and listened to my
demo tape. She said she was very interest-
ed in making this exchange happen. I was
very happy and Julliard and New York was
spectacular. My work with Sharon was ex-
actly what I needed at the time. It was that
for me because I remember leaving Greece final polishing. She really helped me struc-
questioning myself; do I have what it takes? ture myself and learn what my weaknesses
Not only do I have what it takes but also, do were and worked with me on them. It was a
I want it? Can I put in all the effort and de- fine-tuning of what I had.
votion required? That year answered all my
worries, I loved it. New York must have been overwhelming
at first.
You eventually came to the United States
to finish your Master’s degree at Julliard. It was. I still remember the first walk we did.
Can we please talk about that period of They told us during orientation not to look
your life? up because we would look like a tourist and
not to look at anyone because it might start a
Well, how can I put it? If London was an fight. We did not know where to look!
eye-opener and the beginning of a long jour-
ney then New York and Julliard was huge. It The United States has become a second
was huge for me because at that time I had home. I have met so many friends that have
more of an idea of what it was all about. become like family.
9
You were the founder of the pre-college very talented students. I learned a lot from
division at Julliard and taught there for it. I learned from them and they learned
ten years. from me. I continue doing that. I learn from
students every day.
Yes, that’s right.
To be taught through teaching, that’s very
Tell me how that developed and about the special.
experience.
Absolutely, It’s wonderful. They inspire me
Well now that I am a bit older, I realize that and I inspire them. Now I could not live with-
I have this capacity to come up with proj- out teaching. It is a breathe of life, a breathe
ects and somehow make them happen if I of youth, it is just amazing.
believed in them. Back then I had no idea
this was one of my strengths. I did know Let’s continue our conversation about
one thing for sure; I did not want to leave the teaching and talk about your department
states. The other thing I knew is that I had to at the Royal Conservatory in Brussels.
find a way to stay. Furthermore, the United
States needed serious structured teaching Yes, that was another move back to the old
at the high school level, like what we have in continent. It was a personal decision my
Europe. A place where talented kids could husband and I made. We wanted our chil-
get high quality preparation to study at the dren to be closer to their grandparents, to be
college level. I was blown away that first closer to their heritage. Once the decision
year college students were beginners! Many was made, I started looking for positions in
had not picked up the guitar until the age of Europe and Brussels happened to be open at
eighteen and that is way too late. So, I called that time. I made the contact and ended up
up Sharon and told her that I could not be- taking the job. I’ve been here almost twelve
lieve that the pre-college division at Julliard years now. The department started off quite
did not offer guitar. You have one of the most small and in the beginning I was commut-
respected college guitar departments in the ing between New York and Brussels. I was
world but there is no pre-college, I cannot teaching at Julliard and every other weekend
believe this. I told her that many students I would fly over, teach the students in Brus-
go away because they do not meet the re- sels, and then fly back. I did that for a year
quired standards but I could change this. I and then said, absolutely not for a single day
can prepare them for the college level. We more! But, it was a way for me to check out
had a cup of coffee and talked about it and Brussels - was the beer and chocolate strong
I said, “This is a brilliant idea,” and that was enough? (laughter) Since then, our daugh-
that. Sharon is amazing and if she believes in ters were born here and we recently bought
something, she will support it. She saw the a home. Brussels has become our city. It has
value and the need. She had trust in me and been a wonderful journey.
we worked well together.
The Royal Conservatory of Brussels, the
I loved teaching the pre-college students at Flemish part that I am teaching in is a school,
Julliard. It was a small department but had that in my opinion, combines tradition and
10
innovation in a very beautiful way. In this er and they are friends. The performance
line of thought, I feel that I fit right in and classes are not based on criticism just advice
that I am given all the room I need to teach because I am a bit burned by all the compe-
the way I think guitar should be taught. I titions I have taken part in over the years.
am also given support to bring in guest art- I do not think that you can learn when you
ists to give masterclasses and organize festi- compete because you just proof what you
vals. This is important because we are living already know. You are not open enough to
in a time of information and each student show your weaknesses and learn. The guitar
can take this information and decide what class is very united, free spirited and open to
is best for them. I feel it is important that experiment. Moreover, no attitudes, I have
I teach them how to choose the best infor- very limited patience for attitudes.
mation. What better way than to actually
introduce them to what at least I think they What you are describing reminds me of
should be going for. Then they can go exper- watching the Little League Baseball World
iment further. This mentality has created an Series. I noticed the coaches were always
open-minded department. Last year I had positive and encouraging no matter the
twenty-one students, eighteen of them full- situation. They said things like, you can
time which is huge. It is a large number of do it, I believe in you. The interesting
students for me to handle considering all my thing is that most of the time positive re-
traveling and my family. sults came out of it.

Within the large group of students, they come Exactly, you need to own the moment and
from all over the world and there is no com- give the best you can, then the next moment
petition between them. They are learning comes. This striving for perfection for the
together, they play chamber music togeth- sake of perfection is cold and inhumane.
11
I once made a very aggressive criticism to a that looking back I had no clue. I talk to my
student after a public performance. At the students about this because I believe in the
time, I thought it was a productive comment end it’s essential for the growth of a human
but I’ve learned since then that what I did and therefore the growth of an artist to have
was really unproductive and terrible actual- a family. We should not be choosing one or
ly. As a teacher, I should not have done that the other. We should be asking how to com-
but it took time for me to understand this. bine both. There are phases in life. There
Six years later, I apologized. Looking back, I is a period that we are narcissistic and only
knew it was unacceptable on my part. Even think about ourselves and what we are do-
though it came from a genuine desire to help. ing. There is also a period that we share and
You cannot bombard someone with criticism. create life. We become responsible for life.
Therefore, we hopefully become a better
My daughters were watching the gymnastic human being, a better teacher and develop
event during the recent Olympics and there another layer of depth. I think it’s essential
was a girl whos performance was not per- for our growth as human beings and there-
fect. The girl ran back to her coach and he fore as artists. After all art is an expression
gave her a great big hug. My daughter turned of who we are.
to me and said, “You know what mom? That
is more important than what she did wrong.” https://www.facebook.com/AntigoniGoni
I looked at her and said, “You are absolutely
right.” You learn these things along the way. http://www.timespanrecordings.co.uk/
I’m learning my lessons all the time.

When we talked earlier in Nashville we


discussed the challenges of balancing
your teaching career, touring and family.
You said that you often discuss the topic
of “having it all” with students. Let’s talk
about that please.

Well during my musical studies, no one ever


addressed this subject. It was assumed that
you had to choose one or the other. However,
it is possible to combine a career and family.
Because of my upbringing, I always knew I
wanted to find a way to combine both. Now
I have done that. I have had my children and
I took years off to be with them but I now try
to find the balance for all of it. I often say no
to concert offers because I don’t want to miss
out on their school and personal life being
on the road most of the year. Now that I’ve
been doing this for ten years I’ll have to say
12
Countess Esterhazy
Arranged by from the orchestral suite Gioconda's Smile Manos Hadjidakis
Tulio Peramo (1925 - 1994)

˙
2 4

œ
3 1

œ
4

˙ œ œ ˙
4

V 34 œ œ
2

œ
3

œ ˙ œ1 œ œ
Œ œ œ Œ œ œ Œ œ1
œ 2 1 œ
1

0 5 8 7 3
T 2
1 3 0
0
6
0
5
A 0 3 7
B 1
3 2
0
0 3

˙
4 4
j 1
œ œ.
Gliss. 1

œ œ ‰
2 1
Gliss.

˙ œ œœœœœœœœ
2 2

œ œ ~~
2 3

V œ œ ~~ œ1
5 3

˙ œ œ2 œ3 ˙ œ
‰ ‰ œ1 ‰ J
œ J œ œ J œ
1 ~~ 5 3 ~~ 0 6
5 8 7 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
2 4 0
0 7 2
3 0 2 8
1 3 0

1 4 2 4 1 2 4

œ
2

˙˙ œœ
3 1 3 1 3 1

˙. œœ œœ œœ
2 2 3

œœ œœ ˙˙ œœ
V # ˙˙˙ ...
9 3

œœ
˙. Ó œ
~~~~~

˙. œ œ œ 1
œ 3 œ

0 3 1
0 3 5 6 5 3 1 3 5 0 3
~~~~~

1 4 5 7 5 4 2 4 5 0
2 2
2 0 0
0 0 3 3
.
1 4 3 4 1

Œ ˙˙
2 4 3

˙ œœ œœ
2 2

œœ œœ
V ˙˙˙ ˙˙
13

œ œ œœ œ œ œœ
œ Œ œ œ œ œ
œ 3
1 œ œ Œ
0 0
1 3 5 6 1 3 1 0
0 0 4 5 7 4 2 0 2 0
2 5 2 0 3
3 0 0 5
3 3 3

U . I
Π4 2

œ œ ˙œ œœœ œ
17

V ˙ #œ ˙œ œ #œ œœ œœ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ
œ

0 1 0 1 0 0
1 2 2 0 2 1 2 4 2
2 0 2 2 0 3 0
3 3 0
3 3 1

Used by permisson of the family


V V
4 2
V
˙
3 3 4

œ œ œ œ ˙ œœ # œ œ œ œ
4

œ œ ˙ 3˙ œœ
21

V #œ #œ ˙œ œ œ1 1˙ œ œ œ
œ ˙ 3

5 7 8 7 5 7 5 5 7
5 9
1 5 7 9 7 0 5
4 2 0 5 0
2 0 7 8
0

U Gliss. 3

˙˙ ˙˙ Œ œ œ œœ
1


4

œ
1 3
j
œ œ œ œ
2 4

~
2

˙˙ ˙˙ œ ~ œ
25 4

V œœ ˙ ˙ Œ
œ œ œ œ œœ
˙ ˙ œ Œ 3 Œ 1

4 5
5 ∑ 1 ~~~ 5 5 3
0 6 53 1 3 0
4 5 2 0 0 7
2 7 5 5
7
5 1

4
3

.
4

œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœœ œ œœœ œ
3

œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ1 œ œ ˙
4 4 3

V œœœ œœ 2
29 2 3

œ œ J œ
R ≈⋲ ‰ œœ ‰ ‰ œ
œ
‰ œ ‰ œ1 œ œ
J
1
2 œ
5 8 10 8 7 5 8 7 8 7 0 0
6 8 6 6 8 1 0 0 3 0
5 7 7 0 2 4 5 7 5 7 5 2 0
7 7 7 5 0
5 5 2 0 2
5 1 3 0

U
V

œ œ œ
4

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ # œ œ œ ˙˙
2

œ ˙.
# ˙˙˙ ...
33

V œœ œ #œ œ œ #œ
4

Œ Œ Œ œ ~~~~ ˙˙ . œ
3 Œ ~ . œ
freely
Gliss. Tambor
5 8 5 7 5 4 0 0 1
6 8 6 5 6 5 5 0 3 3
7 5 4 4 1 1
~~~~~
7 7 6 6 2 2
5 2
7 0 0

1
.
Œ œ œœ Œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1

œœœ œ œœ ˙˙
V œœœ œœ
37

œ
1

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
œ Œ
4
~~~~~~

œ #œ #œ œ œ œ
0 0 3 1 0 1 3 1 0 1
13 3 1 0 3 3 3 1 3 5 3 3 1 3
2 2 0 0 0 4 5
2 2 0 2 2 3 3 2 0 232 5
0 3 0 0 3 3
4 2 3 3 3
2

. œ. œ œ
4 3
4 2
V 3/6
œ
3

œœœ œ œ œ œ
V 1 œ œœ ˙˙œ œ œ œ œ
3 4 3 1 2 4

œ œ œ œœœœ
41

œœ œ œ œ
œœ œ œ œ œ œ
3

œ œ œ œ Œ œœ
œ œ
. .
4

010 0 5 7 8 5
1 3 1 0 0 6 8 5
4 2 0 2 0 0 5 7 5 5 5
2 0 2 0 0 3 2 023 7 7 7
0 3 2 0 5 3 7
3
2
V Bar 2 st.

œ œ œ œ n œ1 œ3
4 4

œ œ œœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œœ # œ œ œ œ
1

œ œ œ
3 1

# œ
2 3

œœœ œ
2

œ œœ
1

œœ
45

V ˙ œœœœ œ Œ Œ
œœ
œ # œ
Œ œ œ
œ œ 6

7 5 73 5 7 5 4 5 7 8 7 4 2 0 0 5 7 5 4 5 7 8 10 12 8
3 0 5 10 5 0 3 8 10
7 40 0 5 4 1 9
5 0 3 7 2 2
2 2
0 0

Ÿ ~~~~~~~~~
œ œ œ œ4
1
œ1 œ2 1 j
œ œ3 œ
49 4

V œœ œ œ˙ œ œ # œ œ. œ œ #˙ .
j
˙.
œ œ œ ˙.
˙.
7 8 7 7
Ÿ ~~~~~~~~~
10 8 0
0 7 0 0 2 4 2 1 2 2 21 2
0 9 0 3 0
0
0

. .
. . . . œ ˙ œ
Gliss.

˙ œ œ œ ~~ ˙
œ
53

V œ œ ˙ œ œ œ
œ ˙ œ œ œ œ Œ œ
œ ˙ .
. .
. . .
2
1
0
3 0
0
1 5 8 7
0
8 ~~ 0
0 3 7
0 3 2 0 3
1 3 0

Gliss. V

œ ˙ U œ œ.. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙.
3

œ
Gliss.
˙ ~
2

œ ~
2

œ # ˙˙˙ ...
57

V œ ‰ œ1 1 œ ˙ œ œ œ œ
~~

‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ J œ Œ
2 3

œ ˙˙ .
~~~~~

œ J œ œ J . . .
. . . . freely

5 8 7 3 1 0 1 01 0 1 01 0 1 01 0 1 01 0
~~~~~~

1 5 3 6 0
~

2 4 0 0 1
~

2 7 7 2 2
3 2 0 2 3 5 8 2
1 3 0
L I V E . P L AY. P L AY.

Untitled-1 1 11/19/12 1:06 PM


Julio Azcano is unique in that he is a My mother worked as literature teacher so
skilled improviser as well as a virtuoso Jules Verne, Edgar Allan Poe, and Jack Lon-
classical player. He is a native of Argenti- don fascinated me very early. As a city-boy,
na where he earned his degree in classi- each holiday being in Carlos Casares was for
cal guitar at the conservatory in Mar del me like “The Call of the Wild.” I could walk
Plate. He went on to complete his Mas- in the country, climb trees and so on. I also
ter in Jazz Improvisation at the Universi- enjoyed listening to my grandparents when
ty of the Arts in Zurich, Switzerland. He they talked about the history of various
has toured extensively throughout South countries and how it related to our family
America, Asia, Europe, and the Unit- history. You see in that generation almost
ed States as both a soloist and member everyone in Argentina came from a differ-
of the Eos Guitar Quartet. He currently ent country: Italy, Spain, Poland, Syria/Leb-
lives in Luzern, Switzerland. anon, Germany, etc. One of my grandfathers
was a saddler and had a shop where gau-
chos could buy new reins or maybe an old
I assume you were born and grew up in Spanish man could get a leather seat for his
Argentina. Is this the case and if so what car.
city?
How did the guitar come into to your life?
Yes. My parents lived at that time in Mar del
Plata and I grew up there, near the Atlantic As a little boy, I always did weird imitations
Ocean. However, just a couple days before I of singers that I saw on television, I would
was born some friends of my parents were change the lyrics or just invent melodies.
taken away by the military dictatorship. So, We also had many records at home. I re-
my parents decided to go quickly to a safer member tapes of jazz, and singers such as,
place, where the rest of my family lived in Eduardo Falú, and Mercedes Sosa, which I
Carlos Casares. It is a small city where ev- ruined, with my own voice trying to sing
erybody knows everybody. I was born there along. I broke radios, turntables and speak-
and later that year we returned to Mar del ers in the name of creativity. My father
Plata. used to play some guitar and my sister and
I wanted to learn, so my mother got the
I would like to hear about your family number of a guitar teacher near our home.
and life in general in Argentina.  Will you We were very lucky because we started
please share some memories with us? lessons with Alberto Chain who had been
teaching and playing in Spain years before
I loved Carlos Casares and during my whole we met him. His lessons for children were
childhood and I counted the days to go back great! We learned to play the guitar but we
there each holiday. In Mar del Plata, we also played in a children’s ensemble that
lived in an apartment tower in the center of he conducted. Sometimes we played per-
the city. To stay just at home was boring so cussion and sang as well. We learned a big
I went out every day to play on the streets repertoire of folksongs from Latin America
or at the beach with other children. Some- and Spain. We did many concerts with this
times I would go alone to the public library. group where we integrated improvisation.
18
We played by ear in a very natural way in “Fats” Fernandez and many others have in-
combination with the formal classical gui- fluenced musicians in Mar del Plata.
tar instruction. When I was twelve year old,
he took me a couple of times to play in a duo Some weeks after high school graduation
with him on the radio. I remember that we I went as an exchange student to Sicily. I
played “Lotus” and “Samba em Preludio” by was only seventeen but I decided to stay in
Baden Powell and he let me improvise some Europe after several weeks in Palermo. Al-
solos. though I almost did not have money to eat, I
managed to stay for some months travelling
For my fifteenth birthday, I got a beautiful and visiting all the great museums in Lon-
red electric guitar. With it, I formed my own don, Munich, Rome, Florence, Madrid. I also
band and soon discovered Jeff Beck and saw many great musicians in the Barrio Got-
Jimmy Hendrix. I went on to play a lot in ico in Barcelona, at the Metro in Paris and
the local rock scene. It was a beautiful time on the streets of Sevilla and Granada. It was
but the magic left when we did our first then that I discovered how much I needed
supporting gig for a well know rock band to play music. I resolved myself to go back
from Argentina. It was then that I realized and get a degree in music.
that the whole rock star thing had little to
do with music. Your bio states that you received your
classical guitar degree in the city of Mar
It was at that time I met the great bass play- del Plata, Buenos Aires.  What was the
er Juan Pablo Navarro. Now he is the soloist name of the school and your guitar in-
of the National Tango Orchestra and prob- structor?
ably one of the busiest musicians in Argen-
tina. I am still playing with him in a duo. The only option at that time to get an offi-
At that time he was a young music student cial degree in Mar del Plata was the state
at my high school. He taught me some jazz conservatory Luis Gianneo of Mar del Plata.
standards and invited me to hear his mod- They also offered classical guitar so I pre-
ern jazz band. Everybody seemed so cre- pared myself for the entrance exam. For a
ative and happy. I began to listen a lot of whole year, I did nothing but practice for
jazz and meet local jazz musicians. I met a the test.
cornet player, the arranger of a great tradi-
tional jazz band named Rambla Vieja Jazz Please tell me about your classical gui-
Band and a true jazz freak! He copied tapes tar studies at this school.  I would like
of Louis Armstrong, Django Reinhardt, Joe to know also about your general music
Pass for me. In addition, every Tuesday I studies while there.
went to listen and secretly record Jorge Ar-
mani, a superb blues, and jazz-fusion player. My teacher there was Miguel Amenta, a
disciple of Jorge Martinez Zarate. He had a
Mar del Plata has its own jazz tradition. For great technique and was very strict with fin-
many decades there has been a jazz festival gerings and articulations. However, he did
each year that brings different styles of jazz not give me much information about styles
together. People like Oscar Aleman, Robert or the historic context of the repertoire. I
19
think he wanted me to really work on my The curriculum of the conservatory was
classical playing and thought that this kind very ambitious and we had many manda-
of narrow focus was somehow good for me tory courses, not just classes on chamber
at that moment. I had to prepare a new solo music and performance subjects but also
program by heart and a chamber music pro- on history, psychology, didactic, theory, aes-
gram. That taught me to organize my study thetics, etc. Like many things in Argentina:
and to quickly resolve technical problems. the whole idea was good, but the implemen-
tation sometimes is chaos. If you did not
However, my biggest artistic influence was manage your time, with so many subjects
from Eduardo Isaac. A group of guitar stu- and tests, you could spend your whole life
dents and teachers brought him each month as a student. I also rounded off my studies
to Mar del Plata to give private lessons. He with private lessons that paralleled my time
would come directly from some great tour at the conservatory. I studied with many
or from recording records in Europe with other great teachers who where in the city
music that composers like Dusan Bog- at that time. I learned a lot on musical anal-
danovic wrote for him. His playing was so ysis with Marcelo Giglio who had studied
amazing. This was long before YouTube so jazz harmony in Switzerland with Juan Car-
it was a reference of the international lev- los Cirigliano. I also learned from my peers.
el and a connection to what was happening I played and studied together with Leon-
in the guitar world. He was very generous, ardo Alonso, a great musician who is now
bringing records, magazines, and editions based in Bilbao. At that time he was already
that could not be found in Argentina at that playing internationally and came to Mar del
time. Plata during the summers. We spent days
20
transcribing things or just studying from Besides, keeping the beat for hours while
books like Introduction to Schenkerian Anal- people danced it was also a great comple-
ysis written by Allen Forte and Steven Gil- ment to what I did in the day preparing
bert or essays like Opera Aperta by Umberto for my classical recitals. That background
Eco and Kandisky’s Concerning the Spiritual helps me play with better rhythmic consis-
in Art. tence in my solo programs.

I worked with a Brazilian bossa-nova singer Once I was invited by a friend to hear John
who was based in San Francisco but at that Stowell in a duo with Pino Marrone. They
time was in Mar del Plata because of his just blow my mind! Then some friends
girlfriend. We played in hotels and bars. He from Buenos Aires told me that Pino was
had many jazz books from the USA, books back in Argentina and that he was an excel-
by Nada Brahma and Joachim E. Berendt. lent teacher. So, I started to commute two
He also had many biographies on musi- hundred and fifty miles from Mar del Plata
cians. We worked gigs playing Joao Gilberto to Buenos Aires every two weeks using the
material but he was also interested in con- cheapest connection possible, an old train-
temporary classical music so we listened a line that often broke down. I needed seven
lot to Edgard Varèse, John Cage and Pierre to ten hours to get to Pino’s home in Buenos
Boulez. Aires to take my lesson. Then I had another
seven to ten hours to get back home in Mar
I also did courses in chamber music with del Plata. On my trip home, I would listen to
Jordi Mora who was a conductor from Bar- the recording of my lesson. Studying with
celona that studied with Celibidache. He Pino changed my life. Through the years,
introduced me to phenomenology concepts we have become good friends.
and other literature like Husserl, Heidegger,
Sartre, Merleau-Ponty. In 2000, you won first place in both jazz
  and classical music in the National Bien-
You later began studies in Buenos Aires nale for Young Artists.  This led to your
with Pino Marrone and began to inte- first recording and you began to play
grate elements of jazz and improvisation concerts in your own country, the USA,
into your playing.  Tell me about this pro- and Europe.  This obviously was a major
cess and experience. opportunity and change for you.  Tell me
about this experience and the early days
When I was still in the conservatory I had of recording and touring.
a regular gig working almost every night
with a Jazz Band at Confiteria Orion, a well- That same year I won a position as a teach-
know jazz and tango club in Mar del Plata. er at the conservatory in Mar del Plata and
This place has been in business for over I got my first invitation to play in the Fes-
fifty years. It had a tango orchestra and a tival Guitarras del Mundo. This festival is
Jazz band taking turns the entire evening one of the biggest festivals in the world. I
for the people to dance. They were all sea- met many great guitar players like Juan Falú
soned musicians that had been playing for or Pablo Marquez and learned a lot from
decades and I just loved playing with them. sharing the stage with international guitar
21
players. At the same time I met Carlé Cos- for a couple of semesters at the Geneva Con-
ta, Sebastián Zambrana and Daniel Corzo. servatoire just to learn some French, change
They were already well-know in Argentina. the air and work on my playing. I went there
They invited me to be part of the staff of a and did the admission tests to start a degree
guitar seminar, giving concerts and lessons. in classical guitar the next year. Meanwhile
I also met Quique Sinesi and many other I did some gigs in Lucerne, in the German
great players who where my idols. I shared speaking part of Switzerland and fell in love
concerts with them and they became my col- with a woman there who years later would
leagues and friends. I was in my early twen- become my wife. I did not know that at the
ties and all these great guitar players helped time so I went back to Mar del Plata and took
me figure out how to organize myself for some months to think about this new situa-
touring. They gave me contacts to festivals tion. I decided to go to Switzerland again and
and recommend me to other people. Quique to apply in Zurich, it is also German speaking
Sinesi for example made contacts for my first and near Lucerne. I went to the Zurich Uni-
concert in Berlin and invited people like Pab- versity of the Arts and met the classical gui-
lo Ziegler to come to the concert. Carlé Costa tar professor Andes Miolin, a great guy who
recommend me for my first concert in Swit- encouraged me a lot. I also met the director
zerland, and Pino Marrone told Sid Jacobs of the Jazz Studies. I told him about my idea
about me and we played together and Ross to work on jazz with the classical guitar and
Thompson invited me to play at the classical he was very open to the idea. He suggest-
guitar society in San Francisco. I was very ed the possibility of getting a diploma in jazz
lucky to meet so many great guitar players performance and jazz pedagogic combined
around the world who encouraged me and with the classical guitar. Since I already had
helped me build my career. a degree in classical guitar, I thought it was a
good idea to focus on a degree in jazz.
Since you grew up in Argentina you must
have some influence from folk music and Tell me about your experience while at
traditional music of Argentina.  Would the Zurich University of the Arts and the
you say this is true?  type of instruction you received.

Yes, of course. Argentina has a great guitar It was a very intense time. Each week I had
tradition. I think I really realized that once I
individual classes on jazz guitar, classical
started playing outside of Argentina. guitar with Anders Miolin, composition with
  Kaspar Ewald, the obligatory jazz repertoire
You eventually moved to Switzerland and ensemble and recording session practices.
studied at the Zurich University of the Other ensembles I could choose from such as
Arts.  There you received your Master in Brazil-Jazz, Odd-Metter, the music of Ralph
Jazz Improvisation.  How did this school Towner, the music of John Coltrane, etc. I
become your destination for your stud- also took courses on free-jazz, improvisation
ies? techniques, etc. and did many workshops
with guest such as Paul McCandless and
I played with the idea of taking a sabbatical Chris Cheek. In the classical department, I
from my teaching in Mar del Plata and staying had courses on the Bach Suites, lectures from
22
You had the opportunity to study with
Kurt Rosenwinkel and Ralph Towner. 
What are some of the things you remem-
ber them talking about?
 
The lessons with Kurt were very important
to me. I saw him almost every week for two
years and we worked a lot with Bebop tunes
and on Bill Evans compositions. I will always
remember him saying, “The melody, the
melody.” He put emphasis on knowing each
harmonic structure deeply and he pushed
me to bring each idea to all keys and to all
positions. He also stressed connecting your
fingers with your ears in order to avoid the
automatic gestures that all guitar player use.
And to be able to develop meaningful melod-
ic ideas.

The workshops with Ralph Towner were to-


tally a different thing. He has always been
my hero. I have all of his recordings and
have studied and played everything I could
find on him. It was very reveling and inspir-
ing to see him compose and improvise on the
spot and to have a dialog with himself as he
let it develop.
composers like Isabel Mundry and Wolfgang
Rihm. At the same time I did the jazz peda- Do you improvise within your composi-
gogic subjects. At the end of each semester, tions?
I played solo classical recitals, a jazz concert
of standards with the jazz repertoire ensem- Yes, many of my compositions have sections
ble, an all Balkan music program with the to improvise on.
odd-meter ensemble, another of Brazilian  
music. I finished work for the composition How would you describe your improvisa-
class, did some recording sessions, and pre- tion since it is not what we think of as tra-
sented my own students for evaluating my ditional jazz?
teaching with my jazz-pedagogic mentor. It
was just insane because at the same time I I try to take advantage of the great frame-
was also learning German, got my teaching work of textures and gestures that the clas-
position in Lucerne and kept playing con- sical guitar offers. Besides, much of my rep-
certs and gigs to earn enough money to live. ertoire is in another rhythmic context other
But, I loved it and that helped. than swing or bebop. I actually use a lot of
23
Yes, I work on my playing everyday. I have
my jazz-training to develop improvisations.
Sometimes, like in my composition “Decem- a basic technical program and another pro-
ber” I just improvise over the harmony of gram with exercises to train my improvisa-
tion skills. Then I work on passages from my
the tune as you would do on a jazz standard.
different repertoires or on the particular im-
I just go a third down to add some interest
provisation sections. At the end I play or re-
as many jazz musicians after Bill Evans did.
Some other tunes, like “Luz de Abril” or “Dis-
cord the whole concert program I am work-
ing on, depending on the next gig. I spend
tancias,” have modal sections to improvise.
The improvisations are based on a vamp, a a lot of time improvising, arranging, or just
pedal bass, or a brief chord sequence likereading music for fun. It could be Bach, Sor,
John McLaughlin and other jazz-fusion mas-jazz standards, or repertoire that is just for
me. From that “free” time, I usually develop
ters do. Alternatively, I use other kind of
structures to improvise on like in “Orbits.”
my compositions. Before concerts I use the
time to improvise and make variations on
This piece is a fantasy on a melody by Kurt
Rosenwinkel, and the improvisation on the tunes. This helps me find the sound and the
connection to the music.
bridge is based on a chromatic bass line like
in Kurt’s tune “Brooklyn Sometimes.”  
You play in the Eos Guitar Quartet.  Please
Do you have a practice routine and if so tell me about this group and the music
what are some of the things you focus on? you play.
24
Leo Brouwer, John McLaughlin, Ralph Town- the violin player Volker Biesenbender, a Ye-
er, Sergio Assad and Roland Dyens, to name hudi Menuhin protégé, in Basel. I am work-
a few composers that have written original ing on a project of Astor Piazzolla music with
works for the Eos Guitar Quartet. Paco de the singer Marcela Arroyo. I also travel out-
Lucía, Michel Camilo, Egberto Gismonti and side Switzerland to play with all these and
many other great musicians have also given other projects like my duo with Juan Pablo
music to the Quartet to arrange and record. Navarro. We will play this October in Argen-
These guys have played together for almost tina.
30 years. Besides all the original music they  
wrote, they have recorded an amazing reper- Do you have any advice for up and coming
toire of transcriptions from Vivaldi to Manu- guitarists?
el de Falla, Stravinsky, and even Frank Zap-  
pa for labels such as Deutsche Gramophone, I would say to appreciate and enjoy your con-
Universal. Since I joined the group in 2013 nection with the instrument and the music.
we toured China playing classical transcrip- To understand all the other things such as
tions and new music from Swiss composers. degrees, competitions, recordings, touring,
We played an all-Spanish program with the concerts, teaching, etc. This should serve to
flamenco singer Carmen Linares. Leo Brou- provide a meaningful framework.
wer conducted us playing his composition  
Fantasy for Guitar Quartet and Orchestra. Do you think it is possible to label your a
We have toured Kyrgyzstan playing music music considering you have such a wide
from Piazzolla and Swiss jazz-composers degree of musical influence?
and have played in many festivals around
Europe. Soon we will edit a new CD with a I do not know. Labels are something very
beautiful work that Ralph Towner wrote for complex because they respond more to a
us. consequence of consumerism.

Please tell me about living in Switzerland The guitar repertoire is the result of people
and your life there today. from many centuries who brought different
musical ideas into a dialogue with the possi-
I live here with my wife near the old city in bilities that they found on their instruments.
Lucerne. She also works here as a profes- I like to think that I am a part of this very
sor of art theory at the Lucerne University of long tradition of musicians that combine im-
Applied Sciences and Arts. The city is very provisation, performance, and composition
much in the center of Switzerland. It is in the in a syncretic way of music making.
center of Europe, so it is a practical place for
a musician. With a fifteen minute walk you What are your future goals and hopes for
can be out in nature but you can also be at your career in music?
the Zürich Airport in an hour for an interna-  
tional tour. Besides my own practicing and Just to work effectively so my body and mind
teaching which I do here in Lucerne, I go al- are ready for practicing, enjoying, and shar-
most every week to Zürich to rehearse with ing music for a while.
the Eos Guitar Quartet. I also play often with
http://www.julioazcano.com/
25
Orbits
Julio Azcano

¥ ¥3 ¥ ¥3
¥ ¥
œ œJ1 œj œ0 œJ œ œJ1 œj œ0 œJ
5 3 5 3

V 78 ¥ œ0 œJ1 J J J œ0 œJ1 J J J ..
5 4 0 34 5 4 0 34
0 0
¥ ¥3 ¥
0 0
3

J J J J J J
3 3

T
0 <12 > 0 <12 >
.
.
0 0 0 < 12> 0 0 0 < 12>
0 <12 > 0 <12 >
A 10 10 10 10
B < 12> < 12> < 12> < 12>

j j
3

0 4j j
3

j j 0
3

1j j 4œ 1 j œ 0œ j #œ j œ œ j œj œ j œ œ j j
j œj 4œ j œ
4 0 4

1j
0 4 4 4 0
œ
0

V ..
5

œ œ œ œ œ œ
0 1
œ œ
1

œ œ
˙ œ3. œ. ˙ œ. ˙ œ. ˙

. 0 0 0 0 0

.
0 0 0 0
12 12 11 11 9 7 7
9 9 7 7 5 5 3 3
0 0 0 0

j j j j j j j œj œ j j j
œ œj œ œj œ œ œ œ˙j œ œj œ .. C
0 3

œ
4

j œ 4œ j œ œ j œ
9

œ
0
V
1

œ œ œ œ.
˙ œ. œ. ˙ ˙ œ.
1

0
.
.
0 0 0 0 0 0
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
2 2 3 2 3
0 0 0

j
VC œ j œ œj œ œ œw œ . œ œ œ œ 78 ˙œ . . 1 j œ œ Jœ œ˙ œ œ œ œ œ C
13

œ .. J J J J J
˙ œ. J ˙ . . œ4 J 1
D.S. al Fine
4
D.S to #56 play to ending at #95
0
0 0 0 0 0 0
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
2 3 2 3
0 0

j j
‰ œ. ˙ œ œ
1

œ ˙ œ3 œ0 œ˙ œ œ œ 78
4 4 2 3
0

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .
17 0 1 0

VC œ œ œ
œ4 0 .
1
3œ w
4 3

#œ 2 Œ ‰ bœ
œ
4

5 5

0 5 5 3 0 0
0 3 0 1 0 3
5 5 5 7
4 5 1
0 8

Copyright © Julio Azcano. All Rights Reserved. Used By Permission


4

˙..
4 3
‰ œ.
V 78 œ
2
œ4 œ œJ œ œ œ œ œ C #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
21 1 4

w
4

œ J œ J J J J J
œ J œ
1
2
4

0
0 0 0 3
5 5 5 5 5 5 5
2 3 4
0 0

j œ
1
˙ 3 œ œœ ‰ œ Œ ‰ 14
1

œ œ. œ œ ˙ œ œ œ 78 ˙ œ
œ .. œ Jœ œ œ4 œ œ œ œ C
25

V Œ œ4 œ b œ4
3
œ
4
J J J J J
J œ
1

J J
5 4

5 5 0 0
3 0 0
5 5 5 5 5
2 3
8 6 0

4 3 4

‰ œ. j j
2

œ œ œ œ 78
4 3
œ ˙ œœ œœœ ..
œ œ b ˙œ
2 1

#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
29 4 4

VC w œ œ œ ˙
œ Œ œ 3 bœ
1 J 1

0 0
0 3 3 3 3 1 0
5 5 2 1 1
4 5 3 3 3
0 2 1

4 4

7 ˙ . . 1 œ4
2 4 3
‰ œ. œ
1

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ C #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
33 4
1
V8 œ w
œ œJ J J J J J J J
4

4 œ
4

0 0 0 3
5 5 5 5 5 5 5
2 3 4
0 0

4
j œ4 U j j
œ . ˙ ˙ œ œ
1 3

œ œ œ œ
1 4

˙ 3 œ œ ‰ œ
1 4

œ œœ .. ˙ œ
œ3 # œ
œ œ ˙ # ww 78
37

œ
~~~~~~

V Πw
2

œ4 b œ4 Œ œ w
J
5 5

5 5 5 7 8 10 10 10 8
~~~~~~

0 0 0
7 5 8 8
8 6 10 10
7 7
œ
2
3 œ4 3
œ3 œ1 œ 4 3 4 3 0
4

œ œ 0œ œ2 œ2
4 3 2

œ œ # 1œ œ0 œ2 œ0 œ0
3

7
3

41 0
0 0œ 1 0 0œ œ œ
2 0

V 8 1̇ . . œ œ
2
œ
3

#˙ . . # œ 4
J
3
5

0 0 12 10 8 7 0 0
0 6 0 0 4 0 0
0 10 10 9 0 5 5
7 4 7
5 6

œ œ œ 4œ
3 4 2

# œ3 # œ1 œ œ3 œ4
2

œ
3 0 0 3

œ œ œ3 œ œ
2 3

œ4
45 2
b œ œ œ #œ œ œ
0

V
1

œ œ #œ J
˙..
2
œ

5 5 3 0 2 0
3 6 3 0 0 0 4 4
3 5 0 2 0 5 5
3 1 4
0 3 2

œ j
j œ
4 4 4 5 4

œ œ œ œ
1 4

œ œ œ œ
4

œ œœ œ œ
3 3 4 3 2
4 3
œ 2œ
œ #œ œ
49

V 2 œ #œ œ #œ œ œ C
1 1

œ
2

˙.. ˙.. ˙.. w

3 3 0 5 5 0 7 7 0 10 10 7
1 1 3 3 0 0
0 0 5 8
2 4 4
0 0 0 10
7

j j %
j
4
œ j œ
4
œ œ œ
œ œ œj œ œ j œ
3 2

œ 7 ˙ . . œ4
3 0

œ œ
53 1
œ œ0 œ œ œ
3

V #w w #œ 8
œ œJ J J
1
1

3
5
1
4 w 4

7 5 5 3 1 0
0 0 0 0
4 5 1 5 5
3 2
6 0
0

4 4
4 4 3
‰ œ.
œ
2 1

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
57 4

C œ
1
Vœ J J J J J #œ œ w
4

œ
0
0 0 0 3
5 5 5 5 5 0 5
3 4
0
3

1 4 4

˙ 3 œ œ ‰ œ Œ ‰
1

œ . œ œ œ ˙
2 4 3 4

V Œ œ4 œœ œœ .. œ3 ˙ œ 7 œ4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ C œ œ œ œ œ
60
1
8
4

b œ4 œ1 J J œ J J
J J J # œ
J œ J œ
5 4

5 5 0 3 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
5 5 5 5 5 5
2 3 4 5
8 6 0 0

j œ
1
‰ œ. ˙ 3 œ œ ‰ œ Œ ‰
1

œ
1

œ œ œœ .. œ. œ œ ˙ œ œ œ 7 ˙ œ4 œ œ
65 4

V w œ4 œ b œ4 8 œ1 J J
3

Œ J œ J
5 4

0 5 5 3 0 3 0 0 0
3 3
5 5 5
2
8 6 0

4 3 4

j j
2
4 2 4 3
‰ œ. œ
1
˙ œ œœ œ
œ4 œ œ œ œ C #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
69 4 4

œœ b œœ
1
Vœ J J J J J w œ
œ Œ œ 3 bœ
1 J J
0
0 0 0 3 3 3 3
5 5 5 5 5 2 1
3 4 5 3 3
0 2 1

4 4

œ 78 ˙ . . 1 œ4
4 3

V ˙œœ œ
2

œ bœ ˙ œ œ œ œJ œ œ4 œ œ œ œ C #œ œ œ œ œ œ
73
1

œ œ Jœ J 4
J J J J J œ
1
4

0
1 0 0 0 0
1 5 5 5 5 5 5
3 2 3 4
0 0

‰ œ. j j j
œ œ. œ œœ .. œ ˙œ œ œ j
1

œ
œ œ œ˙
77 4

V w œ. b œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ
Œ œ bœ ˙ ˙
J
0
3 3 3 3 1 0
5 2 1 0 2 2 2
3 3 3 2 2 3
2 1 0 0
3

j
0
œ œ œ4 0 0 3
4 3 0


0 3 2
81
jœ œœ œ œ œ 2
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j
V œœ œœ .. œ œ œ3 œœ œœ
˙ œ
3 1

˙ ˙ w ˙
0 0 7 5 3 0 0
0 0 6 5 0
2 0 5 7 0 2 2 2 2
3 7 2 2 3
0 0 0 0 0

2 3
2

‰ œ œ 4œ œ 1œ 4 0 Œ
3
jœ j
4

#œ œ œ
85

œ
V œ œœ .. œœ b œ œ œ œ œ 1œ 4 œ
2
œœ .. œœ
œ
1 4 2

˙ ˙ w ˙ ˙
0 5 3 0 0
0 6 3 0
2 0 6 3 2 2 2 2
3 5 3 2 2 2 3
0 0 0 5 0 0

89
jœ Œ œ j
œœ
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

V œœ œœ .. œ œ œ œ œœ .. œœ
˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙
0 0
0
2 0 2 2
3 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 2 3 2 3
0 0 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 0

Fine
4 3 0

5 4 0 0 0 0 0

œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ nœ
93 6 5 4 0 3
œœ
0
œ
V œ œœ .. œ œ œ œ œ
2
1

œ œ œ
2 1

˙ ˙ bœ 0 œ ˙ œ. #œ
2 J
2 1 0

0
0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0 5 0 2 2 2
3 0 0 5 0 6
0 0 5 0 6
6 1 1 2

j j j
3
j
j œ œ #œ œ œ œ
1
œ œ œ
1

œ œ œ œ œ j #œ
97 2 3

V œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1

w œ # w4 œ w
w 3

0 0
1 0 1 0 0 0 3 3 2
2 0 1 2
0 0 0 2
0
3 4
j 1
j j œ
4
j1
œ
1

œ j œ œ œ j œ œ œ œ œ j œ œ
œ œ
101 2 4

œ œ . œ
3
V œ
#˙ . œ ‰ 2˙. œ 3œ w ‰ #œ ˙
J
œ ‰
J
1 J 2

1 0 0 0 3 5 1
3 3 0 0
2 0 2 0
3
1 2 3 4

j j 4

j j œ œ œ
1 2

œ œ
4 1 3

œ œ j œ
1
105
œ œ œ j #œ œ
V w œ #w œ œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ œ
2 w 3
5
5

1 5 7 4 5 7 12 10
3 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
0
6 8 8
0

j
œ 1œj œ # 3œ 4 1œ 3 4 1
2 3

œ
œ œ œ œ 3œ œ4 œ œ 1 œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œj 2 j
3 4 1 2 4 4

œ
109

V ˙. œ œ œ #œ œ œ
œ w w
8 10 7 4 1 0
0 9 6 3 0 3 1 0 0 1 2 3 3
0 10 7 4 1 2
3
8 0
0

j j j j
4
j
œ j œ j j œ œ # œ œ œ œj œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ.
113

V
bw œ ˙.
œ
œ œ ˙.
œ œ œ w
0 0
3 1 1 1 0 3 2 0 6
2 2 0 2
3 0 0
1 0 0
1 3 3
2

j j
3

œ # œ œ œ œj j
4 1 4 V
j 1 j
4

œ
4

bœ œ œ 3
4

œ j œ
4 4

œ œ œ œ œ j
œ ˙ œ
3

w œ
117

V 3 bœ w
bw 4
4 w
6

0 6 5 0 8 7 0 10 9 7 0 5
6 0 10
3 5 7
3 5
0
6
4

œ œ
4 4 3

œ œ j j j j
4

œ œ # œ œ œ œj œ
2
œ œ j
3 1

œ œ œ œ œ œ
121 2

V w bœ w1 œ œ ˙
w w
5 8 5 0
5 6 0 3 0 3 2 0 2 3
5 5 0 2
8 3 0
5 0
3

j j j j j
œ œ j 7 œ #œ œ œ .
œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ
125 2 3

V œ ˙ 8
bw œ ˙.
œ
œ œ
œ œw œ ˙. bœ
J
0
3 1 1 1 0 3 2 3
2 2 0 0 2
3 0 0 0
1 0 1
1 3

j j
œ œ œ #œ œ œ . œ œ œ #œ œ œ .
129

V œ œ œ œ
˙. ‰ œ ˙. ‰ ˙. bœ
˙. J
J
0 0
3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3
2 0 0 2
3 0
0 1
1 3
2
2
œ #œ œ œ .
3 4

j j
3

œ œ œ #œ œ œ . œ œ
133 4

V œ œ œ b œ1
˙.. œ œ˙ ˙. J
˙. ..
J 4

0 0 10 9 10
3 3 2 3 3 10
2 0 0
3 0 8
0
1 3

j
4
j
œ
3 3 3
œ œ #œ œ œ . œ œ #œ œ œ .
4 4 2 4 4 2 4

137 #œ
V ˙œ . . n œ . œ2 œ˙ . . œ b œ1
J
J ˙.

5 5 4

10 9 10 9 10 10 12 10 9 5 10
0 8 0
0 0
8
8 10 0
j j 2
œ
3 3
œ œ œ. œ
4 4 2 4 3

#œ #œ œ j #œ
4
141
j œ 1œ œ œ œ
2

V ˙œ . . n œ . œ
2
œ˙ . . œ œ 2 1

J
0
˙..

5 5

10 9 10 9 10 9 10 12 0
0 8 0 10 10
0 0 0 9 9
8 10 0

j # œ2
4
j
œ
4

œ
2 1 0 4 2
bœ œ œ œ
1

œ
145
œ œ
2 œ 0
œ œ
0
j œ œ œ œ œ œ
V .. œ œ œ˙ . . œ
˙.. ˙..

3

0 0 0 0 9 10 12 0
11 11 10 10 10 10 10
10 10 0 0 0 0 9 9
0 8 10 0

j j
œ
149 bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V ˙.. œ œ œ˙ . . œ
˙.. ˙..
0 0 0 0 9 10 0 0
11 11 10 10 10 10 10 10
10 10 0 0 0 0 9
0 8 10 0

j j
œ
153 bœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ j œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V ˙.. œ œ œ˙ . . œ
˙.. ˙..
0 0 0 0 9 10 0 0
11 11 10 10 10 10 10 10
10 10 0 0 0 0 9
0 8 10 0

2 1 3
bœ œ
2

œ
157
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V ˙.. ˙..
˙.. harm. 12

0 0 0 0
11 11 10 10
10 10 9 9 < 12>
3
0
Da Capo

¥ ¥3 ¥ ¥3
¥ ¥
œ œJ1 œj œ0 œJ œ œJ1 œj œ0 œJ
5 3 5 3

œ0 œJ1 J J J œ0 œJ1 J J J ..
160 5 4 0 4 3 5 4 0 4 3
0 0

V ¥ ¥ ¥3 ¥
0 0
3

J J J J J J
3 3

Repeat to measure #5

0 <12 > 0 <12 >


.
.
0 0 0 < 12> 0 0 0 < 12>
0 <12 > 0 <12 >
10 10 10 10
< 12> < 12> < 12> < 12>

Form:
Repeat to #5 and play through #14
Go to #56 and play through #95 where it ends
Through the Looking Glass Today you mentioned you enjoy Ani Di-
Franco’s music. What other genres of
music, besides classical, influence you as
By Joe LoPiccolo a composer and performer?

For a long time I was only interested in clas-


Andrea Vettoretti is perhaps most easily cat- sical music and the classical guitar reper-
egorized as a classical guitarist. However, to toire, from renaissance to contemporary. A
simply label him as such does not encompass few years ago I started to collaborate with
the full scope of his endeavors. An active other composers that draw upon not only
composer and commissioner of new works, classical but also other influences such as
Andrea embraces new mediums previously various world music genres, film scores, and
considered nontraditional for classical gui- popular music. I believe that popular artists
tarists. Walking with his amplified guitar such as Ani DiFranco as well as the other
into an audience experiencing a multime- more “serious” composers have all given me
dia show of his own creation, Andrea strives inspiration for the music I am writing today.
to bring contemporary audiences into the To draw upon other musicians’ diverse iden-
world of classical guitar by enhancing the ex- tities is very important and fundamental for
perience rather than simplifying or compro- me.
mising the music. We spoke in his hometown
of Treviso, Italy this summer prior to the I believe that there is an evolution today
start of his “Festival delle Due Città” (Festi- in classical music. We as classical guitar-
val of Two Cities), now in its fourteenth year. ists need to re-appropriate the potential of
the instrument to be contemporary. In the
When did you start to play the guitar and 1700’s Mozart played the music of Mozart.
where did you study There was an acceptance of new compo-
sitions that we lack today. We can at times
When I was about 9 years old, I had an un- be constrained by the requests of concert
cle that played as an amateur. The sound of organizers to play only the old repertoire,
the classical guitar attracted me greatly. Also particularly here in Europe. For me it feels
the shape of the instrument, I don’t know very natural to compose. I believe we need
why, perhaps the form is a bit feminine? I to redefine our artistic identities to say we
initially started lessons here in Treviso and can play Bach but we can also play our own
then studied at the conservatory in Venice music.
for 8 years. I transferred to, and graduated
from the Conservatory of Giachino Rossini in Tell me a bit about your project Rain.
Pesaro and from there went to Paris to study When I saw the highlights video of the
with Alberto Ponce at the École Normale de show I thought of all the work that must
Musique in Paris. It was wonderful to study have gone into it and was very impressed.
with him. His wife is Italian, and he speaks
Italian fluently. I graduated with two de- Video link for Rain
grees, both in guitar performance. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew0hXrDI-
YSQ

38
Rain started with the idea of collaborating performed with a string orchestra, an aerial
with eight composers. Some were friends artist, percussion and projected imagery in-
and composers I had previously worked spired by the music.
with, such as Simone Iannerelli. I met Sim-
one in Paris while he was studying Roland Your video “Sensations” is also very ambi-
Dyens and we later collaborated on my first tious, particularly for a solo classical gui-
disc, “Italian Coffee”. Others were composers tar composition.
I had wanted to work with but had never had
the opportunity, Andrew York for example. Video Link for “Sensations”
The idea was to unite all the composers on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHn-
one project dedicated to the theme of Rain. lERGayi0
Rain that could be a metaphor for life, a met-
aphor for change. Rain for me is a project The video for “Sensations” is actually a short
that signifies a passage from my prior iden- film that tells the story of a person that is
tity as only a performer to my inception of searching for creative identity and an intense
being a composer-performer. It is not only a sensation that he cannot find. He leaves his
collaboration with composers but also with room in a dreamlike state and goes on a jour-
writers. There are 15 tracks, and we select- ney of discovery and returns with a new abil-
ed 15 different writers to create a short sto- ity to create. It was directed by Davide Del
ry to correspond with each song. Ultimate- Dagan. We were very pleased to receive a
ly we created a multimedia show where I nomination at Cannes. My wife and I could
39
have taken a vacation for the cost of that
video! (laughs)

How did your new project Wonderland


come about?

My wife Alice gave me a copy of Alice in Won-


derland. After reading it, I was very inspired;
you can read it in many different ways. You
can interpret as a child might, very simply,
enjoying the characters and fantastical as-
pects. However, if you dig deeper you can
find a world that speaks also to adults on a
more profound level. I thought it would be
fun to write pieces for each of these charac-
ters, the cat, caterpillar, etc. and to compose
thinking of their diverse characteristics. I
wanted the disc to have some type of linear
thread, but also something in each piece that
would disrupt this continuity and express
the folly of each character.

Tell me a bit about the piece “Through the


Looking Glass.” could remember her every day as I practice
(laughs). Although it is a classical guitar, we
“Through the Looking Glass” is perhaps the mounted microphones inside so I can ampli-
simplest piece of the project. It begins with a fy the guitar when needed. Normally luth-
cell, which is then developed in a minimalis- iers are not happy to do this, but we found
tic manner. Each consecutive phrase creates a very good solution with an American mi-
a bit more tension until it arrives at the mo- crophone company, K&K. We have one mic
ment that signifies the passage through the in the sound-hole and 4 contact mics on the
mirror to another world. Technically, there soundboard. Overall, they are very light;
are arpeggios and tremolo; there are not re- therefore, we had no need to alter the weight
ally scales. The melody is at times together or bracing of the guitar. The system works
with the arpeggio and other times the melo- very well with a wireless transmitter so I can
dy is in the bass. at times walk and play during more theat-
rical concert productions such as Rain and
What guitar did you use on the recording? Wonderland.

The guitar was made by Enzo Guido, an Ital- Tell me about the guitar festival you start-
ian Luthier who names each of his guitars ed that takes place both here in Treviso
with the name of a woman. This guitar is and in Rome.
named Alice, as it was a gift by my wife, so I
40
This is the 14th edition of the “Festival delle to convey your own musical personality to a
Due Città” (Festival of Two Cities). It is a fes- vaster audience. Some of today’s methods of
tival that I started as an international guitar dissemination we may consider banal, such
festival. We have been fortunate to have art- as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, blogs, and
ists such as John Williams, Manuel Barrueco, mailing lists for example. However, these
and David Russell, The Assad brothers, Ka- methods can also be a creative expression
zuhito Yamashita, and Andrew York amongst depending on how they are used.
many others. In addition to the concerts,
we have a luthier exhibit, masterclasses, Can you give an example? 
art show (photography) and a performance
competition. Over time, I had the idea to in- One thing I enjoyed doing recently was a lit-
clude programs that were not just classical tle entry I put on my blog. I collaborated with
guitar, such as concerts by Tango or Flamen- a chef friend and we paired a composition
co groups, string orchestras or events with of mine with a recipe of his. The idea being
actors that read text accompanied by music. that they would complement each other as
This inclusion has really expanded the audi- you cook, eat, and listen. It was a fun way to
ence for the concerts and I am very proud of perhaps reach a new audience for both of us. 
the festival and what we have achieved.
We as artists today cannot go to perform at
Another thing that has impressed me a festival with the assumption that the pro-
about you is that you seem to have not moters will provide a full house for us every
only studied the guitar exhaustively, but time. We have to not only work on our music,
also to have thought on a business level but also our own publicity and promotion,
how we are to survive as non- mainstream to engage with and cultivate our fan base by
artists in today’s digital age. Many artists embracing the new mediums.  A metaphor
are not adept at this aspect of their ca- that comes to mind could be that of an apple.
reer and may think that to reach a wider If you have a delicious apple, very high qual-
audience we must compromise our art in ity, but it is a bit dusty, perhaps hidden in
some way. Could you speak to this a little? the corner under cobwebs, probably no one
will buy it. To have our music reach a wid-
I do not know if I’m that good, (laughing) er audience in today’s world we can “polish”
because at this point I would like to have the apple and present it in a more attractive
achieved more of my objectives than I have! context.  This allows us not only to survive,
Perhaps our focus should be to always raise but of course also to share the joy and beauty
the bar for ourselves a bit higher every year. that this instrument brings to us with others.
Some of our colleagues think we must make
music only without thinking of how it can ar- You can hear and see more of Andrea’s music
rive to the public. I believe we need to help and learn more about the “Festival delle Due
the public know the guitar in all of its facets. Città” at http://www.musikrooms.com/
We as classical guitarists are not so differ-
ent from guitarists of other genres; we all *This interview was translated from Italian
have this love for the instrument in common. with linguistic help from Matteo Bizzotto, Ales-
Therefore, the idea of marketing is the same, sandra Mastroianni, and Francesco Pisano.
41
Through The Looking Glass Andrea Vettoretti
Moderato
‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
V 34 œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ
œ œ œ œ

T 0
3
0
1
0 0
3
0
1
0 0
3
0
1
0 0
3
0
1
0
A 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
B 3 3 3 3


j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ
5

V
œ œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
0 0 0 0

‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ
9

V
œ œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
1 1 1 1

‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ
13

V
œ œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
3 3 3 3


j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
17

V œ œ œ
œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3

© Copyright Andrea Vettoretti. Used By Permission


‰j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
21

V œ œ œ
œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
0 0 0

‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
25

V œ œ œ
œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
1 1 1

‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ
29

V
œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
3 3 3

˙. j œ ‰ j œ ‰ j œ œ
V ‰œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ
33

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

0 3
3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3

˙. j ‰ j ‰ j œ
V ‰ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ
37

œ œ œ
0 3
3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
0 0 0
˙. j œ ‰ j œ ‰ j œ œ
V ‰ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ
41

œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
0 3
3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
1 1 1

> 3
3 > 3 3

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3

œ œ œ œ
œ œœ œ œœ œ
45

V œ œ œ œ œ ˙. ˙.
œ œ
>3 >3
let ring

0 1 0 3 3 3 3
3 1 0 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 5 3 5
0 0 0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3
3 3
3 3

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3 3 3 3
3 3 3 3 3 3

œ œ œ œ
49

V œ œ
˙. ˙. ˙. ˙.
3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 5 5 3 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 1 0 1 0

3 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3 3 3 3 3

œ œ
53

V œ
˙. ˙. ˙. ˙.

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 5 5 5
1 0 1 0 1 5 6 5 5 5 5 6 5 5 5

0 5 5

3 3 3 3 3 3

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3 3 3 3 3
57

V ˙. ˙. œ œ œ œ
˙. ˙.
5 5 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 6 5 5 5 6 5 5 5 6 5 3 3 3 3 3 3
0 0
3 3
5
3 3
‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ
3 3 3 3 3 3

œ
61

V œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ
˙. ˙. œ
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 0 3 2 3 2
3 3
3 3

≈⋲œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ
œ
65

V œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ
œ œ
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2
3 0 0

≈⋲
œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ
œ
69

V œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ
œ œ œ
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2
0
1 1

73
≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ
V œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ
œ œ œ
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2
1 3 3
Libero ed espressivo
3 3

≈⋲ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ 2 œœ œ œ
77

V œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ 4 œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
rit.

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 10 8 0 10 10 8
3 3 3 3 3 3 8 8 8 8
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 0
3 2
3 8 8 7 7
≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ
3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œœ œ œ 3 œœ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
81

V œ 4 œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
a tempo a tempo
rit.
0 7 7 8 5 3 5 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
5 5 0 3
0 0 0 5 10 9 10 9
0 0
3 3 8 8

≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ
85
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V œ
œ œ
a tempo

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
10 9 10 9 10 7 5 7 5
0 0
8

≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ
89

V œ œ
œ
8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13
7 5 7 5 7 12 10 12 10
0
10 10

≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ
œ œ
93

V œ œ œ
œ œ
13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
12 10 12 10 12 5 4 5 4

10 3 3

≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ
œœœ œœœœœœœ œœœœœœ œ œœ œ œ œ 24 œ œ
œ
97

V
œ
5 5 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 8 8 8 10 10 10 12 12 12 13 13 13 12 12 12 12 12 12 10 10 10 10 10 10
5 7 9 10 12 14 12 12 10 10

3
≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲
œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈⋲ ≈⋲
œ œ œ œ œ 3 œœœœ œœœ œœœ
101

V œ 4 œ œ
con brio

8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 5 5 1 1 1 0 0 0
8 8 8 3 3 3
9 9 7 7 5 4 2 0
3
con brio

‰ j œ ‰ j œ ‰ j œ
V œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
105

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
a tempo

3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3


j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
109

V œ œ œ
œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
0 0 0

‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ
113

V
œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
1 1 1

‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ
117

V
œ œ œ

3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
3 3 3
˙. j œ ‰ j œ ‰ j œ œ
V ‰ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ
121

œ œ œ

0 3
3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3

˙. j œ ‰ j œ ‰ j œ œ
V ‰ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ
125

œ œ œ
0 3
3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
0 0 0

˙. j ‰ j ‰ j œ
V ‰ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ
129

œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
0 3
3 1 3 1 3 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
1 1 1

3 > 3 > 3 3

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3
133
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ ˙. ˙.
>3 >3
∑ ∑ 3
5 5 5 3 5
3
5 5
3
5 3
3
5

3 3

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3 3 3 3
3 3 3 3 3 3

œ œ
137

V œ œ
˙. ˙. ˙. ˙.
3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 5 5 3 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 1 0 1 0

3 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 3

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3 3 3 3 3

œ œ
141

V œ
˙. ˙. ˙. ˙.

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 5 5 5
1 0 1 0 1 5 6 5 5 5 5 6 5 5 5

0 5 5

3 3 3 3 3 3

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3 3 3 3 3

œ œ
145

V ˙. ˙. œ œ œ œ
˙. ˙.
5 5 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0
5 6 5 5 5 6 5 5 5 6 5 3 3 3 3 3 3
0 0
3 3
5
3 3

‰œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ
3 3 3 3 3 3

œ
149

V œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ
˙. ˙. œ œ œ

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 0 3 2 3 2
3 3
3 3

≈⋲
œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ
œ
153

V œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ
œ œ œ
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2
3 0 0

≈⋲
œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ
œ
157

V œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ
œ œ œ
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2
0
1 1
≈⋲
œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ
œ
161

V œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ
œ œ œ
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2
1 3 3

U
≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ ≈⋲ ≈⋲
≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ ≈⋲ œ œ œ
œ
165

V œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ
œœ œœ œ œ
~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~
œ œœœ
U
rit. libero

0 0 0 0 0 3 7 7 7 5 5 5 3 3 3 1 1 1 0 0 0
3 3 3 3 3 0 3 3 3
0 0 0 0 0 0 7 5 4 2 0
3 2 0 0 3
3 2
3 3

‰ ˙˙ ..
j ˙˙ ..
œ œœ œ
169
~~~~~~~

V œ œ œ œ ˙.
˙.
rallentando dolcemente
8
~~~~~~~

3 1 8
0 0 0 9
2 2 10
3 10
8
Young Artist Profile

Connor Low
I became aware of Connor Low when
Kansas City guitarist Rod Fleeman
taught Connor in a summer jazz camp.
At the time I believe he was only thir-
teen and on fire for music. It is always
inspiring to see young musicians such
as Connor and a pleasure to share their
story.

Bill Piburn

You have stated that music is your life, a


passion that you hope to share with the talent show in April 2010, which was my
world.  I’d like to hear in your words how very first live performance. He also start-
music has affected your life. ed me with the fundamentals of music and
how to read music.  I studied with Brian at
Music has turned my life into something ex- my home and online with Marty Schwartz.
traordinary. It has been a creative vehicle In my first year of playing, I also found vid-
to better myself, not only as a musician, but eos of Tommy Emmanuel, Andy McKee,
also as a person. I have met some of the most Adam Rafferty and Don Ross. I watched
incredible people because of music, traveled video tutorials online for fingerstyle, but
around the states, and hope to continue all then in the fall of 2011, I began studying
these things on a greater scale.  with David Ferrara, a classically trained gui-
tarist. I met David and many great friends
You began playing the guitar at the age of through a music program called Camp Jam,
nine and learned by watching YouTube a once a year nation wide summer mu-
videos.  At what point did you begin study sic camp. I was also studying with a local
with a private teacher and with whom? musician, guitarist, and singer named Guy
Kingsbury.  I have always tried and con-
I started by watching the incredible Marty tinue to study with anyone who’s playing
Schwartz on YouTube - and I still watch Mar- inspires me, which over the past six years
ty to this day. We have become good friends has grown into a very long list of teachers
and that to me is so humbling. My first pri- and mentors. 
vate instructor was Brian Sowinski who
I began study with that same year. Brian You have studied and you play many
helped me learn the “Sweet Child O’ Mine” styles of music.  Please tell me about
solo by Guns N Roses for my grade school your various stylistic interests.
51
From jazz, reggae, psychedelia, rock, and local School of Rock.  I’ve also been able to
blues to classical, hip hop, soul, world mu- play with a lot of the local great musicians
sic and everything in between - I just love here in St. Louis. They all are wonderful
music. I have always been exposed to a lot people who love to see younger musicians
of music, and I am always looking to be ex- doing well.
posed to even more and develop my own
style along the way. You have had the opportunity to perform
at many other festivals and events out-
You have become a bit of a celebrity in side of Saint Louis.  Tell me about some
your hometown of Saint Louis.  of these opportunities.

It all started when I played at a festival called I have had the honor of playing all around
the Festival of the Little Hills with my uncle’s the US - mostly with School of Rock and as
band, Trixie Delight. He knew how hard I part of the School of Rock All-Stars. I have
had worked to learn the solo of “Sweet Child played in Denver, Kansas City, Indianapolis,
O Mine” for my talent show. He showed the Cincinnati, Chicago, Milwaukee, Las Vegas,
band a video of me playing it and they of- and Los Angeles. All of those with the ex-
fered me the opportunity to play the entire ception of Los Angeles were with the School
song with their band. There were about of Rock. As part of the School of Rock, I have
10,000 people there. It was the most hum- played at the music festivals Lollapalooza
bling start to a musical journey I could imag- and the Milwaukee Summerfest for the last
ine. Since then, things just grew into more three years. Playing in Los Angeles was with
opportunities, places to perform and people a program through the Grammy Foundation.
to learn from. The St. Louis music scene and
musicians embraced me, which was so en- You have met and played with many well-
couraging. I have continued putting myself known musicians such as Eric Johnson,
out there as much as possible, all the while Tommy Emmanuel, Pat Martino, Steve
studying music with everyone I can. Vai, Marcus Miller and many more.  What
has this meant to you and can you share a
I’ve played everything from open mics and story or two from the experiences?
jams at coffee shops, clubs to charity and
school events. Also, our local jazz club, Jazz Meeting these people, my idols, has been
at the Bistro, amphitheaters, community the most humbling thing ever. They are the
events and any music venue in Saint Lou- people who inspire me to be better. I am so
is I could think of - I’ve tried to play them blessed and thankful to have had the expe-
all, or at least most of them. I have a band riences I’ve had. When I met Eric Johnson
called Gypsy Lion with several of my musi- and shook his hand, he had the softest hands
cian friends. I perform solo guitar and I play I’ve ever shook. He is also one of the calm-
out as a duo regularly with a singer named est, sweetest beings I’ve ever met.  I played
Race. I also play in a jazz combo with some “Cliffs of Dover” for him on my guitar after he
of the top high school aged jazz players in signed it. He was so kind and encouraging.
my area through Jazz Saint Louis called the He was truly interested in me. What kind
JazzU All-Stars. I perform regularly with my of music I liked and what I was doing with
52
music. Marcus Miller is hilarious. He always Tommy Emmanuel is one of the kindest, fun
has great stories and advice. The first time and influential people I have ever met. I
I met Marcus, he had just finished a mas- have now met with him three times and at-
ter-class through the JazzU program at Jazz tended one of his master-classes. The first
at the Bistro. I ended up being one of the last time I met him I was just 11 years old. I had
ones in line to get a photo and autograph.  only seen his videos on YouTube and had
After talking, he and some other members not learned to play any of his songs yet.  I
of the crew invited me to stay and hang out. had just started to learn Drifting; by Andy
He told us a story from his tour about Doug McKee on YouTube, a week before my mom
the “Crewsician,” it was so funny and inter- found out that Tommy was playing in St.
esting, a great look into the touring life and Louis. The show was sold out, but my mom
the fun they have with each other. I then told managed to find a way to get me to the meet
them how I was new to jazz and played gui- and greet.  I knew we would not get to see
tar. They told me to show them what I knew, the show but I was happy just to meet him. I
so I had my mom run out to our car to get my asked Tommy to sign my guitar and I played
guitar. Doug set me up on the Bistro stage “Drifting” for him.  He was very kind and en-
and I started playing for them. Next thing I couraging. He also gave me a few tips. Af-
know, Marcus gets up, walks over to the pi- ter the meet and greet, we were surprised
ano, and starts playing along, and then Lou- to be invited to stay for the concert.  They
is Cato, his drummer got up and started to found some extra chairs for us and we sat
play bass.  It was truly a magical experience. behind the soundboard. It was so inspiring
I was just 12 years old, but that experience to see him play live and it sparked my desire
made a huge impact on my life.  Three years to play more like him. That kindness and
later when Marcus came back to St. Louis, I generosity was such a blessing. Every time
went to his first night of shows. Seeing him Tommy has been back to St. Louis, he greets
again was incredible and after the show, he me with a big “ CONNOR! “ It makes me feel
asked if I was coming the next night too. I so amazing. He is truly a wonderful person.
said absolutely!  His tour manager told me I hope to touch people with my music the
as I left to make sure to bring my guitar. I way he does.
wasn’t sure if anything would happen, but I
showed up the next night and watched him It’s obvious that music will play a major
and his incredible band play another amaz- part in your future.  Please share your
ing set. As Marcus announced playing their hopes on what that may be.
encore song, he called out my name and told
me to go grab my guitar. I ran to get my gui- I want to spread love and peace through
tar from a back room, as the guitarist for the power of music by sharing it with as
Marcus, Adam Agati offered up his amp for many people as I can while traveling the
me to use. I joined Marcus and his band on world.
the song “Detroit.” It was one of the great-
est experiences that I have ever had. Marcus
and the entire band were so incredible to
embrace me and give me such an amazing
experience.
53
Study NOW with fingerstyle jazz guitarist
Steve Herberman at MikesMasterClasses.com
“Over the last couple of years these classes have had a profound
impact on my playing, writing and arranging and for this reason I’ll
be forever grateful to Steve!” — Nico S. (London, EN, GBR)
“I am totally pleased by this class (Blues Call and Response, 1/20/14)...
Steve gives so many ideas to make it fresh that it’s well worth your
time and money investment.” — James S. (Riverside, RI, USA)
“This class (Contrapuntal Triad Pairs, 9/14/12) is amazing. Steve
Herberman has deep thoughts about counterpoint and a beautiful
guitar sound.” — Julio H. (Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sol, BRA)

Steve has more than 30 topics to make you a better player such as:
• Electric Fingerstyle Guitar • Contrapuntal Improvisation
• Chordal Solo Choruses • Lenny Breau Style: How to Comp
• Going for Baroque While Soloing
• Chord Melody Arranging & Soloing • Open String Voicings for Guitar
Inspired by George Van Eps • Jazz Line Construction

Visit mikesmasterclasses.com to learn from more than 50 other


jazz masters including these acclaimed musicians and teachers:
Sheryl Bailey, Paul Bollenback, Sid Jacobs, Vic Juris,
Tom Lippincott, Lorne Lofsky and John Stowell

GW989/90 • $39.95 GW966/7 • $39.95 GW1019 • $29.95 GW954 • $29.95 GW907 • $39.95

GW914 • $39.95 GW915 • $29.95 GW937 • $29.95 GW944 • $29.95 GW943 • $29.95
All titles available as downloads and DVDs and come with PDF tab/music booklets.
Buy Three and choose a fourth title FREE (Free item must be lowest price item ordered)
Stefan Grossman’s Guitar Workshop • PO Box 802 • Sparta, NJ 07871 • www.guitarvideos.com
Dream Guitar Gallery Dreadnought, and the grand master - an
all-original 1930 Martin 000-45! This last
one is a particularly unique discovery: there
Prewar Martins And The were only 21 made in 1930. Add to that this
Martin’s voice, with all its 86 years of music,
Contemporary Voice and the completely original state of its parts
(right down to the cast iron key for the case),
and the chances of finding a guitar like this
By Logan Wells in the wild become nigh impossible.

Living in the land of ultra high-end guitars for Valued at $135,000, this Martin is an incred-
as long as he has, Paul Heumiller has honed ible find, and Paul was able to line up a buy-
his ability to reach out, pluck those dream er within a matter of days. Soon the chalice
guitars from out of the air, and present them will be passed and this Holy Grail guitar will
to the rest of the world for our viewing and be en route to its new owner. In quick order,
listening pleasure. Paul’s kept himself at the the Larson Prairie State also sold as well, and
center of this colorful world for seventeen both guitars are going to trusted clients who
years now, patiently building his knowledge respect the historicity of these instruments.
base and making connections between play- This is what it’s all about for us: connecting
ers, builders, and collectors. Diligently plac- players and collectors across state lines (and
ing new voices into practiced hands, provid- national borders) to foster a healthy market
ing discerning clientele to inspire luthiers, for the exchange of these irreplaceable in-
and reuniting collectors with the instru- struments.
ments of their childhoods, or their parents’
childhoods. As a result, Dream Guitars has Before we let this one go, however, Paul
become one of the focal points for preserv- wanted to compare it with some of the con-
ing the world of fine lutherie and maintain- temporary voices that we have in the shop,
ing the market for anyone with a voice or a so we set up a little taste test between the
guitar model at stake. 1930 Martin 000-45 and a McConnell 16
Inch, Matsuda M1, a Traugott R, and a Wing-
Accordingly, Dream Guitars is exactly the ert 00. Here are Paul’s thoughts:
place you want to come to if the instrument
you’re looking for is off the beaten path (just “The taste test was really fun. Dream Guitars
look at the country roads that lead to our is well known for representing many modern
showroom): masterfully constructed and ex- makers moving away from the traditional or
ceedingly rare. When one of our clients came vintage voicing, instead searching for new, in-
to us with his collection of Holy Grail guitars, dividual forms of expression and musicality
Paul was more than ready to help. One quick from the fascinating new ideas in their heads.
flight to New York and a careful car trip back, It’s wonderful to have a chance to play many
and Dream Guitars has now gotten a hold of of these prewar Martin guitars because they
three irresistibly collection-worthy instru- are quite different from these contemporary
ments: a 1935 Larson Brothers Prairie State builds. On the one hand, it’s nearly impossible
15 Inch, a 1938 Larson Brothers Euphonon to replicate what happens to a guitar after 80
55
or 100 years of being in the world. The finish
gases off or is worn-off, and the wood dries
out while millions of notes vibrate through
its fibers. This chronological process yields a
distinct kind of energy and body - something
that contemporary builders of traditional
styles are seeking to recreate. A similar, but
distinct quality of energy can also be found
in the very finest modern guitars, even after
just one year of being played in and opening
up. The advances in bracing and voicing for
the modern guitar, I believe, allow us to get
closer to a sound that’s comparable to these
prewar instruments, but much earlier in the
guitar’s life. I attribute many of these advanc-
es to one simple thing: how much time each
builder spends on one guitar. Do they prac-
tice a methodical, painstaking attention to
detail? Do they pausing to consider the im-
plications of one more pass of the top through
the thickness sander, or to take one more pass
with a chisel at the scallop of a brace? All the
while as they tap the wood and strive for their
own personal voice. To me that’s why you can
pick up a recent McConnell, Traugott, Tip-
pin, or Somogyi, to name a few, and feel the
same sort of inspiration you feel from one of
these outstanding vintage Martin guitars. Of
course, it is not the same sound, but I am sure
that these myriad advances in construction
and voicing allow these new instruments to
compete on the same field as the revered Holy
Grail guitars. I truly believe we are in a gold-
en age: we’re surrounded by dozens of makers
building their own versions of luthier history
to carry the torch from these prewar Martins
into the future.”

http://www.dreamguitars.com/
CHORD PROGRESSIONS FOR
SONG ENDINGS
by Walter Rodrigues Jr

The following examples are some ideas of


chord progressions that can be used as song
endings. They are written based on the I
chord with root on strings 6 and 5, so you
can easily transpose them to other keys by
just moving up and down the fingerboard.
All the examples can be adapted to a variety
of styles, such as Swing, Waltz and Latin.

Example 1: This progression consists of a


sequence of 5-note chords in the key of C ma-
jor, with a 6th string root at the 8th fret for the
I chord. The top note C is played throughout
the entire progression while the bass takes
a descendent movement for the first half of
the sequence. The second half is based on a
regular ii – V – I progression with the “DbM- Example 3 (option B): The same as option A,
7sus2add13” (although not a dominant 7 except it can be used as a modulation tool to
chord) functioning as a tritone substitution a major key up a minor third. In this case,
for the V chord. the progression uses the ivm7 – b7 chords
functioning as a iim7 – V7 of the knew key
Example 2: In the key of C major with a 5th “Bb major”, which is a minor 3rd up from the
string root at the 3rd fret for the I chord, the original I chord (G major).
harmonic movement outlines the melody
throughout the entire progression. The se- Example 4 (option A): In the key of G major,
quence starts with a standard I – VI7 – iim7 with 6th string root, this progression outlines
– V7 and then instead of resolving on the I the use of the bVI , iv, and bII. Both the melody
chord, it takes a “detour” to a bVI chord (de- and bass lines have a descendent movement
ceptive cadence), and to a bII chord M7 tri- throughout mostly of the entire progression.
tone sub, finally resolving on the I chord.
Example 4 (option B): The same beginning
Example 3 (option A): In the key of G major as option A, except is has a very interesting
with a 6th string root for the I chord, this pro- ending. Starting on measure 3, I played F/A
gression in 6/8 is a substitution for the regu- (b7/II) leading to the I chord (Gsus2), which
lar ii – V – I. Note that the sequence starts on creates a “false” sense of modulation. Intu-
the ii chord. The progression is iim7 – iiim7 itively, our ears would naturally expect to
– ivm7 – b7 – I. Here the chord progression hear a resolution towards Bb as the new I
also outlines a melody line. chord, but instead, I went back to original I

59
chord (G). Having said that, this progression
can be used both ways, it can lead us back to
the original I chord, or it can take us to a new
key up a minor 3rd.

Example 5: This is a progression that can be


used as an ending in minor keys. It’s in the
key of C minor with the I chord root on the
5th string, 3rd fret. The progression is a stan-
dard ii – V – i. The sequence outlines a mel-
ody that leads us to a i(M7) chord, preceding
the final minor7 chord.

Example 6: In the key of A minor, 6th string


root, this progression is also based on a reg-
ular ii – V – i. It incorporates a melodic minor
line to the V7 chord, ending on a IM7sus2
chord. Although the final I chord does not
have a minor third in it, it does imply the
sound of a minor chord.

Arranged by Walter Rodrigues Jr.


Ten favorite hymns arranged in Walter Rodrigues Jr.’s unique style of
solo guitar, in standard notation and tablature. Songs include: Abide
with Me • Amazing Grace • Blessed Assurance • God Is So Good •
Just a Closer Walk with Thee • Londonderry Air • Oh How I Love
Jesus • Softly and Tenderly • Sweet Hour of Prayer • What a Friend
We Have in Jesus. The book includes access to videos online for
download or streaming using the unique code in the book.

00153842 Book/Online Audio................................................... $19.99

FREE SHIPPING on orders of $25 or more. Mention ad code WRFG.


U.S. only. Least expensive shipping method applies.

1-800-637-2852

60
Example 1

C 13 B 13 ( b 9) B b 13 A (b13,#9) D m7 D bM7sus2add13 C add9

˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ # ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ w
˙ # b bb ˙˙˙ www
& 44 # ˙˙ # n ˙˙ b ˙˙ # ˙˙ ˙˙
˙ b˙ ˙ ˙ b˙ w
8 8 8 8 8 8 8
T 10
9
9
8
8
7
6
6
6
5
9
8
5
7
A 8 7 6 5 7 8 5
B 8 7 6 5
5
9 8

Example 2

C M7 A 7(b13,#9) D m7add11 G 7sus2 G 7( b 9) A bM9 D bM7sus2 C6

œ œ˙ œ œœ˙
œ œ
& 44 ˙˙˙ # ˙˙ ˙˙ œœ b œœœ b ˙˙˙ ˙
b b b ˙˙˙
ww
ww
˙ ˙ b˙
3 8 5 3
T 5
4
6
6
5
5
6
2
0
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
A 5 5 3 3 3 5 1 2
B 3
5
5
3 4
4 3

Example 3

(OPTION A)

j
œœ ˙˙ ..
A m7 B m7 C m7 F 7sus2add13 G 6add9

œ œ œ #œ œ
# œ œ œœ . œ œ
b b œœ .. œ .. ˙˙ ..
& 68 œœ .. œ. nœ. ˙.
œ. œ. œ.
10 8 10
T 5
5
7 8 7
7
8 10 8
8
10 11 8
8
10
9
A 5 7 8 9
B 5 7 8
8 10

(OPTION B)
B bM9
A m7 B m7 C m7
œ
F 7sus2add13
j ˙˙ ..
# œ œ œ œœ . œ œ œ œ #œ œœ .. œ nb ˙˙ . .
& œœ .. œ. b b œœ .. nœ. b ˙.
œ. œ. œ.
10 8 10
5 7 8 7 8 10 8 10 11 8 10
5 7 8 8 10
5 7 8 10
8 13
5 7 8
4
©2016 Walter Rodrigues Jr.
Example 4

(OPTION A)

D 7sus4 D7 E bM7 B b/D C m7 Bb A bM7 A m11 A b7 G M7 G6

# 4 ˙˙ ˙˙ œœ n œœ b œœ œœ œœ œ # œ n œœœ b œœ
b œœ
& 4 ˙˙ ˙˙ b œœ n œ ˙˙ ˙˙
œ bœ b˙ nœ bœ w
3
T 8
5
7
5
3
3
6
3
4
3
3
3 5
3 4 3
5 5 4
A 7 7 5 3 5 5 4 4 2
B 5 5 6 5 3
6 4 5 4 3

(OPTION B)
D 7sus4 D7 E bM7 B b/D C m7 Bb F/A G sus2

# ˙˙ ˙˙ œœ n œœ b œœ œ nœ #œ ww
& ˙˙ ˙
˙ b œœ
b
œ œœ n œœ n ˙˙ w
bœ w w
3
8 7 3 6 4 3 6 4 3
5 5 3 3 3 3 5 2
7 7 5 3 3 0
5 5 6 5 3
6 5 3
5

Example 5

D m7 ( b 5) G 7(b13,b9) G 7( b13)
œ ww ww
C m(M7,9) C m9

œ˙ nœ
b b b 4 œww œ nœ œ n ˙˙
œ
n ww ww
& 4 w
˙ Ó w w
4 3 11 7 10
T 8
5
6 5 6 4
4
8
8
A 6 3 9 8
B 5
3 8

Example 6

B m7 B m11 B m7 ( b 5) B m11 E 7(# 9) A5 A M7sus2

œ œ œ ‹ œœ n œ œ œ œ Ó
& 44 wœ # œœ œ nœ œ ww # ˙˙ www
w w
T 7
5 6 5 8
7
6 5
7 5 4
A 7 6 6 5 6
B 7
7 8 7
5
©2016 Walter Rodrigues Jr.
Composers Corner

Composing for the Solo Guitar- Building


an Arrangement Part 1
by Troy Gifford

What is the process composers and arrangers use to cre-


ate a solo fingerstyle guitar piece? In this column I will
walk you through some basic steps you might take to
compose a simple piece for solo guitar. Every composer/
arranger works a little differently, but if you are relatively
new to the activity, hopefully this can give some insight
into how a composer might methodically work through
the process, taking some very simple ideas and gradually
building them into something that sounds more complex.

Typically we will start with a harmonic idea and build a melody that works with it, or we
may take a melody and build a harmony for it. Let’s start with a common chord progression
in G major that has been used many times through the years and is built off a descending
bass line. (See Ex. 1)

Ex. 1
G D/F # Em D C G/B Am D

# œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ
& œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ
œ œ œœ
œ œ œ
0 2 0 2
T 0 3 0 3 1 3 1 3
A 0
0
2
0
0 2
0
0 0
0
2
2
2
0
B 3 2 0
3 2 0

Played simply as a series of chords, this is a somewhat generic sounding progression that
can be used as an accompaniment for many different melodies. What can we do with it to
make it sound like something new? Well, first we need to come up with an original melody
that works with it. Something like this, perhaps: (See Ex. 2)

63
Ex. 2

G D/F # Em D C G/B Am D

# 4 œ. œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œœœœ˙
& 4 J J œ œ œ ˙

T 0 0 0
2
0 0 0
2 0 0
0
0
1 0
2 0 2
A
B

You may notice that this simple melody has a very limited range and centers around reso-
lution on chord tones, or notes that are part of the chord underneath them (see last issue’s
column on the harmonization of melodies for more info on this topic). Now, we could easily
create a two-guitar arrangement where one guitar plays the chords and the other plays the
melody, which would sound fine. Creating a solo arrangement, however, is trickier since one
guitarist has to play both parts at the same time. Let’s start with just the bass line and the
melody together and see what that sounds like. (See Ex. 3)
Ex. 3

D/F #
j j
G Em D C G/B Am D

# 4 œ. œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œœœœ˙
& 4 ˙ œ˙ œ œ ˙ ˙
˙ ˙ ˙ ˙
˙
T 0 0 0
2
0 0 0
2 0 0
0
0
1 0
2 0 2
A 0 0
B 3 2 0
3 2 0

Those two parts give us a basic foundation to work with. Now we need to flesh out the
chords. We do this by finding notes in each chord that work around the melody without dis-
tracting from it. Simple arpeggiations in the spaces around the melody create a fuller sound.
We need to be careful not to use too many notes that might cause the listener to lose track
of where the melody is. You will notice that I place the 3rd of the final chord (D major, the V
chord in this key) in the bass here. This gives us a D/F# chord with a bass line that resolves
nicely up to G at the end. (See Ex. 4)

64
Ex. 4

D/F # D/F #

# 4 œ . œj œ j
G Em D C G/B Am

& 4 œœ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ ˙ œ œœœœ˙
œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ ˙ œ
T 0
0
0 0
2
0
0
0 0
2 0 0
0
0
1 0
2 0 2
A 0 0 2 4 2 0 0
B 3 2 0
5 3 2 0
2

This gives us a nice little arrangement with all the necessary elements; melody, harmony,
and bass. When we play it, we would want to take care to emphasize the melody so that the
listener can clearly hear where it is at all times.

However, there are still additional things we can do if we wish to spice up our arrangement
further. For example, you will notice that the melody doesn’t use the top string. This gives
us the possibility of adding additional harmony notes above the melody. To do this, we
might strategically place chord tones on the high E string on the second and fourth beats of
each measure. We must be particularly careful when adding notes higher than the melody
that they don’t cause the listener to lose focus of where the true melodic line is. (See Ex. 5)

Ex. 5

D/F # D/F #
# 4 œ . œ œj œ œ œ j œ œœ œ
G Em D C G/B Am

œ œ œœ œ œ œ
4 4

& 4 œœ œ .
œœœœœœœ œœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ ˙ œ
3
œ 2œ œ 2 œ
3 2 3 2 0 3 0 2
T 0
0
0 0
2
0
0
0 0
2 0 0
0
0
1 0
2 0 2
A 0 0 2 4 2 0 0
B 3 2 0
5 3 2 0
2

65
We can take things a step further and add some other slight embellishments in places that
make sense. In the next example, you will see that I have added embellishments in all three
parts. Keep in mind, however, that the busier we get, the harder it is to keep the focus on the
original melody. (See Ex. 6)

Ex. 6

D/F # D/F #
œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ
G Em D C G/B Am

# 4 œ œ œ œœ
3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& 4 œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ.
œ œ œ ˙ œ
œ J J
3 3 2 3 2 0 0 2 3 0 0 2
T 0
0
0 0
2
0
0
0 0
2
3
0 0
0
0
1 0 1 0
2 0 2
3
A 0 0 2 4 2 4 0 0
B 3 2 0
5 3 2 0
2

If we were to play this melody twice in a row, which would sound fairly normal in this set-
ting, we might choose to play the unadorned version in Ex. 4 the first time and then the more
elaborate version in Ex. 5 or 6 the second time. This would give us variety and help maintain
interest in the repeat.

I hope this gives you some ideas to use when making your own arrangements. In the next
column we will look at possibilities for a B section to continue this piece.

66
Mapping the Fingerboard
Part II

In this second edition of Mapping the


Fingerboard, I will be discussing the
pentatonic major, pentatonic minor and note which most of the time resolves up
the blues scale. to the 5th or down to the natural 4th. The
notes for the A blues scale are (A – C – D
The origin of the word penta is Greek, – D# - E – G) The interval numbers are
meaning five; having five. Bringing us (1 – b3 – 4 - #4 – 5 – b7).
combining forms such as pentagon, pen-
tameter, and of course pentatonic. There- The Pentatonic and blues scales con-
fore, a pentatonic scale is a five-note struct a huge percentage of all styles of
scale. The major pentatonic is simple popular music. I promise you have heard
the seven note diatonic major scale that them used countless times. Once you get
leaves out the 4th and 7th degrees of the the sound in your head you will start to
scale. The pentatonic major in the key of recognize their use.
C would be (C – D – E – G – A) or (1 – 2 –
3 – 5 – 6). It is always best to know your I’ve included the one octave pentatonic
scales in both letter names and numbers. major, pentatonic minor and the blues
The numbers make for easier transposi- scale on each string group. Unlike the
tion. other charts, they always start and end
on the root. While some of the fingerings
The pentatonic minor is thought of by may feel more natural than others I have
many as an independent scale but it is included all of the fingerings to satisfy
actually the same notes as the major my normal obsessive self.
pentatonic played over the relative mi-
nor. In other words C major pentatonic = Remember that the open circles indicate
A minor pentatonic. I have included the the root of scale. Open strings are not
minor pentatonic chart. Notice that the used which allows for easy transposition.
notes are the same as its relative major.
C major = A minor, G major = E minor, etc. we will soon move into the harmony of
scales and the application of the scales
The blues scale is a hexatonic scale. It is over all chord types, including altered 7th
a six-note scale. The origin of the prefix chords.
hex, ‘hexa’ is also Greek. The blues scale
consists of the minor pentatonic scale
plus the #4th degree. The #4 is the blue
67
Major Pentatonic
(1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 6)

Root 2nd 3rd

5th 6th
Minor Pentatonic
(1 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b7)

Root b3 4th

5th b7
Blues
(1 - b3 - 4 - #4 - 5 - b7)

1 b3 4

5 b7
Major Pentatonic one octave
(1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 6)
Minor Pentatonic one octave
(1 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b7)
Blues scale one octave
(1 - b3 - 4 - #4 - 5 - b7)
Fingerstyle Jazz Concepts
Divided Voicings Part 2
(II-V-I-V1 Cyclical Progression)
by Steve Herberman

In this month’s column we will use the


divided tritone voicings (as in the previ-
ous column) as well as other divided (or
spread) voicings, this time in the context
of a progression. The II-V-I-V1 or II-V-III-V1
progression is extremely relevant in jazz
and sounds great as an exercise when the
voicings and voice leading is interesting
and logical. Adding to the dominant 7th’s
from the previous column, we will include In this exercise, I purposely change which
minor 7th and major 7 voicings. To keep the notes sound first and second on occasion
chords from sounding blocky we will delay to try to keep the exercise musical (and to
the entrances of certain notes. Though the avoid monotony.) On the dominant sev-
chord grids in the lesson can be played con- enth chords sometimes the first two notes
certed (all notes sounding at the same time) you will sound together will be 3rds and
let’s try playing them this way: First, sound 7ths but other times I’ve chosen different
the solid notes. Second, sound the notes pairings of notes to expand on the altered
marked as X’s while the first two notes are dominant seventh chords from my previ-
still ringing. This gives a nice layering effect ous column. Each chord should typically
while it helps get you accustomed to build- be given two beats (two chords per mea-
ing chords in stages. Usually a wide inter- sure.) Sounding the notes of each chord in
val is sounded with the first two notes you pairs on each beat will give you a quarter
play and then the next two or three notes note pulse that works great for comping on
added are closer intervals, sometimes clus- ballads. Do not try to play these any faster
ters. Now think ahead to when you will be than at a slow-medium ballad tempo, striv-
improvising when comping or soloing using ing for a nice even sound, using a steady
these structures. Staggering the chord in pulse once the exercise becomes more fa-
this manner can buy the improviser some miliar. Most importantly, have fun discov-
time when deciding which secondary notes ering new voicings. I sincerely hope that
to add. It is possible then to build voicings you enjoy the material! 
like this “on the fly” which can yield some
new and exciting voicings on the spot. http://www.reachmusicjazz.com/

74
X

10fr. 12fr. 10fr. 13fr.

Œ œ Œ Œ
Œ œ œ #˙ œ
1 ˙ 3 bœ 4 ˙ bœ
42˙
4 1
4

1 œ
1

3 œ
2

V4 ˙ 3 ˙
4

2 ˙ ˙
1 3

D-(add 9) G7b9 E-7#5 A7+b9

12 15 10 13
T 10
12
13 12
14
13
A 10
B 10
12
13 12 15

12fr. 11fr. 10fr. 8fr.

Œ Œ Œ
1 ˙ Œ
b b œœ ˙ n1œœ
1

œ 2 ˙ œœ ˙
1

4 œ
3 2 1

V ˙
4 4 1

3 ˙ ˙
3

2 3 2

D-9 G+7b9 E-7(11) A+7#9
12 11 10 8
12 10 8
14 13 12 10
15
13 13 12 9
8fr. 6fr. 7fr. 8fr.

Œ Œ Œ Œ
1

4 ˙ 4 #˙ 4 ˙ 1 n˙
1 1 3

œ œ #œ œ
b n œœ
1 1 1
5

bœ œ
3

V ˙ 2 œ
˙ #˙
1 2
˙ 2 2

D-11 G7b9#11 C6/9#11(no3) A+7#9b9


12 9 10 8
6 7 8
10 10
6 7 8
10
8 7 8 9
5fr. 4fr. 9fr.
8fr.

Œ Œ Œ Œ œ
œ
2

b ˙
2 4

1˙ 1 b˙ ˙ 3 œ
4

œœ b œœ
4 4

3 œ
7

2 œ
2

V
1

˙ 3
˙ 1
˙ #˙
3 1
D-9 G+7b9 CMaj.9 A+7b9
5 4 10 13
6 6 8 11
9 8 9 12
9
8 7 8 9
10fr. 10fr. 8fr. 8fr.

Œ Œ Œ
4 ˙ œ 1 ˙
Œ #œ
˙
4

œœ 4 bœ œœ
1

1 ˙
3 œ
1 2

œ
9
2

V ˙
1 4

˙ ˙ 2 #˙
1
1 3 3

D-9 G7b9 C6/E A+7#11


12 10 8 11
10 12 10 8
10 13 12 10
10
10 13 12 9

6fr. 6fr. 5fr. 3fr.

Œ
˙ Œ #4œ Œ œ Œ b4œ
œœ 1 ˙
4


3 #œ 3 œ 3#˙ 2# œ
11 4 1

V
3

2
˙ 2 ˙ ˙ 1 ˙
2
D-9 G+7#11 CMaj.9 A7b9#11
10 9 8 6
6 6 5 4
9 8 7 6

8 7 7 3

3fr. 4fr. 5fr. 6fr.

Œ Œ Œ
2

Œ 1b ˙
2

1˙ 1b˙ œ
œ n # œœœ
4


1

œ
13 2

V 4 #œ 4 œ
1 œ
4

˙ 3 ˙ 3
˙ 3

3
A7 #11
D- (add11) G7b9#9 CMaj.13 b9 #9
3 4 5 6
6 8
5 7 8
3 8 9 10
5 7 8 9
9fr.
7fr. 8fr.

Œ Œ
˙ ˙ ˙˙ ..
15
œ ˙ bœ Œ ˙˙ ..
V ˙ œ b˙ œ
bœ w
G7b9#11 CMaj.9
D-9 or Db7#11
8 13 12
9 12
9 12 12
9 12
8 11
10 9 8
Let Me Count The Ways

By Dylan Ryche

Hey Everyone, let me introduce you to a song


off my aptly, if un-creatively, titled 2011 al-
bum Acoustic Fingerstyle Guitar called “Let
Me Count The Ways.”

This was the last song I wrote for that record


and one that I have probably played in every
performance since its release. It’s in open
D tuning (DADF#AD) and has a nice flow-
ing major key melody. One of my happiest
memories of this album was sharing it with
my grandmother. She was always my biggest
supporter and number one fan throughout
my life and she listened to a million terrible
songs and demos of various garage bands I
was in over the years. So, having a chance to
show her a real, actual album with my name face this is a simple melody over an A chord
on it was a great thrill. She was ridiculous- in the key of D. But, when you let all these
ly and almost humorously proud and played notes overlap each other - you momentari-
this album to anyone that came within 100 ly get an Em-type chord with an added 9th
yards of her. “Let Me Count The Ways” was (F#) and an 11th (A) all sounding at once,
a song she particular liked. She has since which makes the resolution back to D sound
passed away. Now this song always reminds very interesting and engaging. More than it
me of her and those memories. It’s interest- perhaps appears on paper.
ing how a song’s meaning evolves over time.
It is a fun little tune to play and it’s one that
The key to this song is lots of sustain with people really seem to like. I hope you enjoy
the overlapping and cascading notes. This playing it too.
brings out a certain dreamy quality and some
extra harmonic interest. The underlying See you next time,
chord progression and melodic content are
not very complicated, but by hanging on to Dylan
certain notes throughout a melodic line, you
get all these interesting 2nds, 9ths, 4ths and http://www.dylanryche.com/
other harmony appearing before our eyes
and ears. For example, the last four notes in
bar 4 is a little run of E, F#, G & A. On the sur-
77
Let Me Count The Ways
Open D Tuning:
Dylan Ryche
DADF#AD

# # 4 . ≈⋲ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
r
œ œœ œœ œœ
œ œ œ œœœ œœ œœ œœ
j
V 4 . œ œ
œ œ
œ œ. œ œ
œ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿
T . 7 4 5 4 0 2 24 2 0 0 4 4 5

.
0 0 0 2 24 4 4 5
0 0 0 1 13
A
¿ ¿ ¿ ¿
2 2
B 0
4 0 2 0

# œœ
j
œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œr œ œ œ œ
V # œ œ œ œ œ
3

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ w
¿ ¿
54 0 7 9 7 75 4 0
0 7 4 0 0
5 0 0
¿ ¿
5 0 5
0 7 7
5 5

## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œr œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ
œœ œœ œ
5

œ œ œ œœœ œœ
j
V œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ. œ œ
œ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿
7 4 5 4 0 2 24 2 0 0 4 4 5
0 0 0 2 24 4 4 5
0 0 0 1 13

¿ ¿ ¿ ¿
2 2
4 0 2 0
0

# # œœ
j
œ œ
œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ≈⋲ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
7

V œ œ œ œ
œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ œ ˙
54 0 7 9 7 5 4 0
0 7 9 7 7 4 0
5 0
¿ ¿
5 0
0 0 7
5 5
X in the B section indicates thump guitar body with heel of hand

%% œ œj œ œ œ ‚ œ œ œ ‚ ‚
j
## ‚ œ
œ œ œ œ
9

V œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
¿ ˙ œ ˙
w J w
12 12 11 9 0 1211 9
<12> 0 <12>

¿
<5>
4 9 11 7 9
7
0 9 97 0
‚ œ œj œ œ œ ‚
Da Double Coda

## ‚
œ œ œœœ œ œ
œ œœ œ œ œ
12

V œ œ œ œ
˙ ˙ œ ¿ ˙ œ ˙
œ
w J

0 12 12 11 9 0
0 <12> 0

9
9
9 11
7
7
7 9 ¿ 9
9 11
7
7 9
0 9 97

1.

## Œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
15

V œ œ œ œ œ ˙. œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
0 0
0 0 7
7 0 3 7
0 0 0 0
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

œ œ œ j
# œ œ œ j œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V #
18

œ œ œ ˙ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
4 45 54 0 0 0
0
7 7 0
7 7
0 0 0 0
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

## œ œ œ œœ œœœ œœœ
j j
œ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œ
œ œœ œ ..
21

œ œ œ œ
j
V œ ‰ J J Œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ ¿
0 4 45 4 42 0
.
.
0 7 7 5 54

¿
0 7 7 5 53
79
0 0 0 0 0 0

2.

23
## ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V œœ œœ œ œ œ œ ˙
˙ ˙ œ œ ¿
0 0
0 0 0
7 7 0 1 0
¿
5 5 0
0 0
5 0
25
## ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ
œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ œ ¿
4 4 7 7 7 2 2 2 0 2 24 4 4 4 7 7 7 2 2
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 13 0 0 0 0 0

2 ¿ 5 ¿ 0 ¿ 0 ¿ 2 ¿ 5 ¿

# œ œœ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœj œ œ
V # œœ
28

œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ
œ
œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ ¿ œ œ ¿
2 0 0 4 4 7 7 7 2 2 2 0 2 24
0 0 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 13

0 ¿ 0 ¿ 2 ¿ 5 ¿ 0 ¿ 0 ¿ 2

## ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œœ œ œœ
31

V œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ
œœœ œœœœ ‰ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ ¿ œ œ ¿
0 0 0 0 4 4 7 7 7 2 2
4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
2 0 5 5 5
4 5 5 5 5 2 0 5 0

# œ œœ œœ œœ œœj œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œj œ œ œ œ œ
V # œœ
34

œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ
œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ œ œ œ ¿ œ œ ¿
2 0 2 24 4 4 7 7 7 2 2 2 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 0 0
0 0 1 13 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 ¿ 0 ¿ 2 ¿ 5 0 0 ¿ 0 ¿

37
## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœj œœ œ œ œ
V œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ ¿ œ œ ¿
4 4 7 7 7 2 2 2 0 2 24 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 13 0 1

2 ¿ 5 ¿ 0 ¿ 0 ¿ 2 0
4
# œ œ
V # œ œ œ
40

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙
˙ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ
0
0 4 2 0 0
0 1 0 1 0 1 5
0 5
2 0 0 2
5 4 5

# œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ
V # œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
43

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ˙
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
0 0 4 0
4 2 0 0 0 7 7 4
0 1 0 1 1 5 0
0 2 7 79
0 0 0 0 0
4 5

# Œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ
j j
V # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
47

œ œ ˙.
˙ œ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ œ œ ˙ œ
0 0 4 45 54 0 0
0 0 7
7 0 7
7
0 0 0 0
5 5 5 5
D.S. al Coda

œ œ œœ œœ œ œ‰ œ œœœ œ œœ œ nœ #œ œ œ
3

# œ œ œ
j
V # œ œ œ œ
51

œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ
j
œ
œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J ¿ Œ

0 0 4 45 7 3 4 20
0 0 7 7
¿
7 7 0 0 7 7
7 7 79
0 0 0 0 0 0
5 5 5 5 5


# # ≈⋲ œ œ œ œ œ œ œr œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ
55

V œ œ œ
œ œ œ œœœ œ
j
œ œ
œ œ œ .
œ ¿ ¿ ¿ œ œ ¿ œ ¿ œ œ ¿
7 4 5 4 0 2 24 2 0 0 4 4 5 54 0 7 9 7
0 0 0 2 24 4 4 5 0
0 0 0 1 13
¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿
2 2
4 0 2 0
0 5 5
## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ
j
œ œœ œ œœ
œ œ œ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ
58

V œ œ œœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ
j

w œ œ œ. œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
75 4 0 7 4 5 4 0 2 24 2 0 0 4 4 5
7 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 24 4 4 5
5 0 0 0 0 0 1 13
5 0 5 2 2
0 7 7 4 0 2 0
0 0 0 0 0

D.S.S al Double Coda

# œ
j
œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ≈⋲ œ œ œ œ
V # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
61

œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙
5 54 0 7 9 7 5 4 0
5 0 7 9 7 7 4 0
5 0
5 0
0 0 7
5 0 5 0

fifi
63
## ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ
V œœ œœ œ œ œ œ ˙˙
˙ œ ˙
~~~

˙
~~~

~~~~~
ritard

0 0
0 0 0
~~~~
~~~~

7 7 0 1 0

~~~~
5 5 0 0
0 0 0
5 0
Secrets of the Tango
By Roger Hudson

Music and Dance


Art forms often transform each other when
they are combined. Musical theater, opera,
ballet, film, video games are but a few ex-
amples of the fusion of art forms. Some art
forms would have trouble existing without
some others. Dance has a particular depen-
dency on music. It would be hard to imag- means I am stoked to compose original piec-
ine dance without music. On the other hand, es (or use ones I’ve already composed) and
countless musicians have been inspired to do arrangements to illustrate the dance.
compose and perform music expressly for
dancers. In “fine art” forms, such as ballet, Tango
composers have created custom music for The tango is often associated with Argentina.
skilled dancers to use in intricately choreo- I think it can be said that Argentina can be
graphed performances. largely credited with the tango’s success in
the 20th century. However, the tango’s rhyth-
Composers have also freely borrowed from mic origins likely go as far back as ancient
the music and dance of the common folk. Africa. Even the origin of the word “tango” is
And why would composers do such a thing? up for debate among scholars. The word was
For one reason, dance forms do not belong apparently in use in Argentina from the ear-
to anyone in particular. Many dances - such ly 1800’s for the places where slave and free
as the tango - have developed at least in part Africans gathered to dance. However, like so
from controversial human interactions (i.e. much music of the New World, the story of
brothels). As dance forms develop and are the tango is not simply due to a gathering of
specified, they become musically distinc- people from the same ethnic background. In
tive as well. The musical characteristics of the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, Argentina
a dance form (rhythm, time signature, tem- received an influx of immigrants from Europe
po, etc.) often give composers a ready-made which grew the population more than ten-
template for creativity. fold by the 1910’s. With these immigrants,
the ingredients of polka, waltz, mazurka,
With this column I will begin a series that and other dances were added to the cultur-
briefly surveys dance forms in conjunction al kitchen. Many of these immigrants were
with how they may be used by fingerstyle young men longing for their families and
guitarists. Rather than attempting to give sweethearts from the old country and per-
a complete analysis of a particular dance – haps yearning for new relationships. Against
which would require more than a few para- this background, we can begin to trace the
graphs - I will give brief descriptions. As I undertone of loneliness and intrigue that is
suggested earlier, dance forms are fertile often characteristic of the tango. The tango
ground for a composer’s inspiration. That has the distinction of having, simultaneously,
83
a very serious and vulnerable quality. What- a bit shy and unsure – but still graceful.” This
ever it’s meaning, the tango – like jazz, rock, 2016 version offers the listener a vision of
and blues was in the U.S. - a South American a much more confident, complex, and even
example of the artistic fusion of African and slightly tormented relationship. Could these
European cultures. However, it is more than be the same dancers twenty-two years later?
that. In fact, to dedicated adherents of the
art form, tango is a culture. Actually, I don’t think I changed it too much
from the 1994 version. The basic themes
About Secret Tango are the same but I did add 22 measures of
new material to the composition. That num-
As an example of the tango, I am using a gui- ber 22 is coming back again! The new addi-
tar piece I composed in 1994 called Secret tions are from measures 37 to 59 and build
Tango (from the CD Guitarchitecture). As an a development and dramatic climax that the
inspiration, I actually used a rhythm charac- original didn’t really have. This tango might
teristic of an older dance form known as the not be able to keep a secret.
habanera. So why didn’t I name the tune Se-
cret Habanera? Well I think the “Secret Tan- Roger Hudson
go” title is more tantalizing. Also, the tango September 27, 2016
was derived from the habanera. Tangos from
the early 1900’s often carry a distinctive dot- http://rogerhudson.com/
ted habanera rhythm that is used at the be-
ginning of Secret Tango. This is similar to the
rhythm that opens Bizet’s famous Habanera
from his opera Carmen.

It has been twenty-two years since I com-


posed Secret Tango. I have recently been
revisiting some of my earlier compositions,
deciding to enjoy them again by giving them
an update. Like an old house, I think many of
my compositions have good bones but would
not be hurt by adding some rooms. Secret
Tango seemed a good candidate for some
renovation. The original was released as the
second track on my 1994 Guitarchitecture
CD. Mel Bay Publications then published Se-
cret Tango as part of the Guitar Collection of
Roger Hudson in 2000. Although I am per-
fectly happy with these earlier versions, I
think that this new version shows some ma-
turity (like the composer!). In the 1994 lin-
er notes from Guitarchitecture I wrote this
about “Secret Tango:” “Imagine the dancers,
84
Secret Tango
6= D
Andante q = 98
Roger Hudson

4
&b 4 ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‚
œ œ œ œ œ œ ‚ ‚ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‚
œ
P pizz. œ œ œ harm.7
harm. 12 pizz.

T 7
A 0 0 12 0 0 7
B 0
0 0 3
0
0 12
0
0 0 3
0
0

œ j . .
œ œ # œ
4 4
&b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ ‰ ‰
5

œ0 œ1 œ2 œ0
3 3
œ œ œœ œ œ‚ ‚ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ
œ œ œ 1 1
nat.
3
pizz. harm. 12 pizz.
5 3 2
5 3 0 0
0 0 12 0 0 2 3
0 0 3 0 12 0 0 3 1 0 0 4
0 0 0

% œœ œœ 4 œ 1œ 3œ 1
III3

œ 4œ œœ ‰ 3œ ‰ œ
œ œ œœœ n œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ
1 4
b n œ œ œ œ
4
9

& 2 œœœ œœ 3 œœ œ 2 œ œ 2 œœ ˙˙œ œ


2 4
1 1
4 œ ˙
3
œ. œ œ œ œ ˙ œ. œ ˙
F œ . J œ œ. J J
J
0 1 0 1 3 1 5 1
0 3 0 3 5 3 0 3 0 3 5 3 3
2 0 2 0 2 3 2 2 2 0 2 0 2 3 2 2
3 0 3 5 3 3 3 0 3 0
5 0 0 5 0 0 5 0 0
0 0 3 0

. . .
œ œ1 1œ 3 œ ˙ # 3œ 1œ 2œ 0
III4
1
œœ œ œ œ4
III
3
œ
œ œ œ ‰ œœ œœ œœœ œ œ #œ 2œ 2 ˙ 44 2œ œ œ #œ œ œ
4 2
œ
& b ‰ œ œ # œœ 4
13

3 3 2 2 4
2 œ. J 2 1
œ. J œ. 2
œ ˙ w
œ J
5 3 8 6 5 10 9 6 0 1
3 5 6 3 6 10 3 5 6 8 3 2
3 5 7 3 3 5 7 9 7 6 10 9 3
5 4 5
0
5 0 5

©1994 Roger Hudson ©2000 Mel Bay Publications, Inc. ©2016 Roger Hudson
. 1 2 1
w ˙. ww ‚ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ
4
&b œœ 3 4
17

‚ ‚
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1

p œ. J œ. J œ. J
3

F
12
7
harmonics
12
5 3 5 565
2 2 7 7 3 5
0 0 0 7
0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 3 7
0 0 0

œ œœ œœ ‰ 3œ ‰ œ œœ
& b 21 œœœ n œœœ 32 œœœ œœ œœ n œœ œœœ œœ
21
4 1 4
4
2 œ 1 œ 2 œœ ˙˙
œ œ œ œ ˙ œ
œ ˙ œ. œ œ œ
3
4
œ. J œ œ. J
J
0 1 0 1
0 3 0 3 5 3 0 3 0 3
2 0 2 0 2 3 2 2 2 0 2 0 2
3 0 3 5 3 3 3 0 3
5 0 0 5 0 0 5 0
0 0 3 0

3œ # ˙œœ b 4œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
V3 III
œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ
III
4
œ
III3 4 4
b
& œ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ
24

œ 3
˙ 2 œ. œ ˙ œ. œ
f J J ˙
3 1 5 3 3
5 3 7 7 6 5 5 6 7 6 5 5 6
3 2 5 8 7 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
0 0
5 5 0 5 5 0

III

‰ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 4
III II3 III3 II3
4 4 4
3
1

œ œ œœ œ œœ# œ
4
&b œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ 1œ 1œ œ œ # œ
27

œ. œ
2 œ. œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ n ˙ 3 2 œ # 2œ
F J J 1

3 3 3 5
7 6 5 5 6 7 6 5 5 6 6 5 2 3 3 3 2
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 2 3 2
0 5 3 5 5
0 0 2 0 4
5 5 0 5 5 0

U fi 34 ˙ .
œ œ œ 4œ œ œ gw œœ ~~~~~~~
4
˙.
3
II4

œœœ .. œj œ œ œ
II3
1 4
œœ ~ ~~~~~
To Coda

& b œ. 1œ 1œ œ œ # œ # ggg ww 2 # ˙ ..
31

ggg œ ggg ww 1˙ ~~~~


œ œ œ ggg œw ˙.
J P
ggg 3 ggg 62 ~~~~~~~~~
ggg 23 ~~~~~
3 5 0 0 1 5 6 6
ggg 22
6 5 2 3 6 6

gg 0
2 3 2 2 6 6
0 5 5 5
0 0 1 0
œ œ œ œ ˙˙˙
V2
4

&b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j
35

2 1 3
œ ‚
œ œ œ œ œ ‚ ‰ œ œ ‚
2
œ ‚ œ œ œ
œ
F pizz. œ harm. 12 p
œ J œ harm.7

5
8 6 5 5
7 7
0 0 12 0 0 7
0 0 3 0 12 0 0 7 0
0 0 0 0

œ œ œ œ ˙˙˙
V2
4

& b 4 œ œ2 œ œ œ œ œœ œ̇ ‰ œ ‚ 2 1 3 ‰ œ œ2 ‰ j ‚ 4œ œ œ œ
39

œœ
1 0‰ œ œ œ ‚ œ ‚ œ œ
œ œ 5 œ œ harm.7 œ 1 0 ‰ œ œ
2

P œ J œ J œ J F J
harm. 12
5
865 5
2 7 7 2
5 3202 0 3 0 12 0 0 7 5 3202 0 3
0 0 0 12 0 0 7 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0

œ
4
œœ 4 œœœ œ
III3

‰ œœœ ... œ œ œ œ3œ n œœœ b œœ


III2

œœ b œœ
poco a poco crescendo

œ
& b ‰ 3œœ .. 1 œœ œœœ œ n œ œ œ1 œ
1 3 4
II4
44
4 2 4 1 4 III3

œ
œ œ 1 3 3
œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
2
œ. J œ. J œ. J œ. J
3 1 5 3 5 3 6
3 3 5 3 6 5 3 3 356 3 3
3 5 2 2 3 5 5 4 3 3 2 5 5 4 3
5 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0

œ œ œœ œœ 1œœ 4œ œ .. 4 œ # 3œ 1 gg œœ ma œœ œœ gg œœ œœ œœ
4
‰ œœœ ... b œœœ n gg œœœ œ
3 1 3
œ
VIII2 VI2
4
œ œ 1œ ‰ œœ . 12 œœ œœ 3gg œ i œ œ ggœ œ œ
3 3

1
& b 3 œ gggg œ ggg ggg
48
2 3
g œ œ œ œ ggg ˙ ˙ gg ˙˙
œ . Jœ œ pg œf œ. œ
J cresc. œ. J œ œ
ƒ pg ˙ p
gg ˙
ggg10 ggg1511 11 11 gg11 11 11
ggg 0 14 14 gggg140 14 14
8 6 10121012 10 13 12 10 9 15 15 15 15 15
g 90
8 6 10 101113 11 11 10 10 8 8
10 8 12 9 9 14
g 00 g 00
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0

œ
g œ œ œ œ œ 1 4 3 2 1 3gg œ œ œœ b œœ œœ œœ œœj dolceœ œ œ
3

gggœœ
4 2 1
3 V5
4 2
œ œ œ. œ. n œ.
4
œ œ b œ œ # œ gg œœ œœ œ œ œ œ gg œ ‰ ‰
2 1
b g ‰ ‰
52

& gg œg g g œ
ggg œ ggg œ
œ œ œ œ gggg œ
gg œ f gg œ . ß pg œ F
J . .
3

ggg 15 ggg 6 6 6 6 6 66 ggg 56


p

gg 140 g
10 8 6 10 10 8 7 7 6 5 3
9 8 7 6 g9 9 9 7 7 7
ggg 0 0 g
11 10 8 6 6 5
ggg 0 ggg 5
7 7 5 4

g0
0 0 7
g0
0
0
œ œ ˙œ œ œ 4 3
III3 3 II3

œ
3
4
œ
III
œ œ œ ˙ œ˙ # œ 3œ n gg wwœœ ..
& b ‰ œœ 3 œ œ # œœ
4 2
j bœ œœ œ
55
3

J ˙ gg œ . œ
2œ. ˙ ˙ P gg œ
œ f p gw

gg 00
ggg 23
5 6 8 10 6
3 5 6 3 8 8 5 2

gg 05
3 5 7 3 9 2 3 3 2 3 2
5 4 3 0
0 0 0
5 0

œœ 41˙˙ 1 2 1 3
œœœœ œ œ
III3 3

œ 2 ˙ 3œ 4œ œ œ œ ‚ ‚
D.S. al Coda

& b ‰œ . œœ .. œœ œœ
58

œ J œ œ. œ . F 12 ‚ ‚ 3
J . 7
harmonics
3 1 12
5 3 56 5
2 0 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 7 7 3 5
3 2 5 0 3 7
5 0 0 7
0

˙˙ œ 4œ 3
œ.
b œœœ ‰ 32 œœ ‰
4

n##
4 24
gg œœ ..
3
& b # ˙˙ ‰ j# œ
23
61

fi Coda 1œ jœ œ
2
# ggg œ .
œ œ
1
˙ ggg œ œ œ œ
1
. pizz.
œ
ggg 55
ggg 54
6 8 6
6 8 6

gg 0
6 8 6
5 7 5 4 0 4 0
0 0 0 0
0

# # . 1 œ œ œœ ‰ 2œœ ‰ 12 7 7 ‚12 7‚ œœ ‰ 12œ ‰ 12 7 7 ‚12 7 .


œœœ œœœ œœœ
64

& . 3 œœœ œœ œœ œ 1œ ‚ ‚ œ 4œœ ‚ ‚ ‚ .


œ . œJ ˙ œ . œJ
4 ˙
‚ ‚
harmonics

. 2 00 32 000 202 .
harmonics
12 0 12

. 45 0 40 .
7 0 3 0 3
7 2 0 2 0 2 7 7
7 4 0 4 5 7
5 0
0 12 0 12

j
œœ ‰ œ ‰ 1 ggg œœœ ww
4
‰ ‰ 1œ ‰ œ 2 4
w
# œœ œ 3œ
œ
œœ œœœ œœœ œ
1

& # œœœ
68
2 1

œ œ œ œ
œ
4
w
3 3

p w
œ. J
0 2 5 10 12 14
0 3 0 0 7 8 10 12
2 0 2 0 2 9 11 12 14
4 0 4 0
5 0
0
Electric Guitar Transition
Part II
By Stephen Davis

Welcome back! I hope my article on tran-


sitioning to electric guitar was helpful to
some of you. This article will focus on the
most common designs of the electric guitar.
I’m going to avoid such topics as scale length
and wood since they have the same effect in
both electric and acoustic guitars.

The most common electric guitar is the sol-


id-body. These guitar bodies are built of solid
wood, hence the name. They are often built
with multiple pieces of wood, like acoustics, issues. These guitars can have any of the
but single piece bodies are out there. The three designs, but the set neck is the most
most common solid-bodies are bolt on neck common. These combinations make the
guitars (Fender Stratocaster, Squier Bullet, semi–hollow electric some of the most ver-
Ibanez RG Series) and set neck guitars (Gib- satile guitars out there. They can be seen in
son Les Paul, PRS SE245). These are built almost all genres of music except metal. The
in the same style as their acoustic counter- Gibson 335 is still probably the most com-
parts. Solid-bodies also have a neck through mon semi-hollow on the market.
design that is not seen in the acoustic world.
This design extends the neck to the lower The final design is the hollow body guitar.
bout and has two wings of wood glued on These are the closest design to a flat top
either side. The result is extended sustain acoustic. They are completely hollow with-
and easy access to the upper frets. out a block. They are mostly seen in the jazz
world, but are also common in rock. The de-
The chambered electric guitar is a close signs are primarily set neck, although bolt on
cousin to the solid-body. The design is the necks are made as well. The most common
exact same, except for chambers inside the hollow bodies are archtops, like the Gibson
guitar. This definitely helps with weight is- L5, and known for their dark jazz tone. The
sues and can give the guitar a slightly more smaller versions, such as the Gibson 330
acoustic quality. It does make one-piece and the Epiphone Casino, are also common
bodies impossible. in jazz, but have made a huge mark in the
rock, pop, and country world as well. Due to
The next electric guitar design is the their acoustic nature, they are highly prone
semi-hollow guitar. They are named from to feedback and rarely seen on large stages.
the fact that the body is partially hollow, but The next big difference between acoustic and
have a block of wood inside. The block, or electric guitars are the pickups. The pick-
blocks, definitely reduce the acoustic quality ups found in electric guitars usually fall into
of the instruments, but help with feedback- two categories: single coil and humbuckers.
89
There are literally thousands of variations, The second basic bridge style is the stan-
but they can almost all be classified under dard tremolo. The Fender Stratocaster and
these two headings. Single coils are just that, its many variations is still the most com-
pickups with one coil being used to pick up monly used guitar with the standard tremo-
the vibration on the strings. There are ver- lo. These trems allow you to manipulate the
sions with a second coil for noise cancelling, pitch by moving the attached whammy bar.
but there is still only one coil being used. They can be allowed to float above the body,
This family does include P90 pickups since allowing you to raise and lower the pitch, or
they are also one coil. The output is usually set on the body, limiting you to only lower
less than that of humbuckers, and they have the pitch. This does cause a decrease in sus-
the dreaded 60cycle hum. (Hence the reason tain, but allows a different type of creativity.
for the noise cancelling options.) They are Jeff Beck is one of the greatest guitar players
common in all kinds of guitars and all styles to use a standard tremolo.
of music.
The next basic bridge is the Bigsby. These
The other major category of pickups is the bridges are seen on countless guitars, but
humbucker. These pickups are made up of are synonymous with Gretsch guitars. These
two separate coils that work together to de- bridges are known for their unique ability
tect the vibration of the strings. This nor- to add vibrato to whatever you are playing.
mally results in a higher output when com- They allow you to raise and lower the pitch
pared to single coils. It also gets rid of the from very subtle to extreme.
60cycle hum, making it a better option for
noisy environments. Humbuckers come in The final bridge style we will look at is the
all sizes so they can accommodate just about floating bridge. The most widely known
any guitar on the market. They are also used floating bridge is the Floyd Rose. These
in every type of guitar and all styles of music. bridges actually float above the body of the
guitar, allowing you to raise and lower the
The last aspect of electric guitars we will bridge. These are most commonly found on
address here are the types of bridges. The shredder style guitars (Ibanez, Jackson) and
main difference that electric guitar bridges almost always lock the strings at the bridge
can have that acoustic bridges don’t is the and the nut. This does give a drop in sustain,
ability to alter pitch. Let’s look at the basic but the tuning stability is second to none.
type of electric bridges. Most players that do dramatic whammy bar
tricks use double locking, floating bridges.
Many electric guitars have fixed bridg-
es, strings through the body, or tail pieces Obviously there are many other differenc-
mounted at the lower bout (Epiphone Les es in acoustic and electric guitars. But, this
Paul, Fender Telecaster, Rickenbacker 330). should help give you a good starting point
These bridges act very similar to acoustic for adding the electric guitar to your arsenal.
bridges because they do not allow the play-
er to alter the pitch with their use. This re-
sults in greater sustain, but you do not have
a whammy bar.
90
Eric Lugosch
Acoustic Third Coast

Pork Belly Futures


I’ve been playing Pork Belly Futures for a
long time. I wrote it back in 1988 while com-
ing home in a snowstorm from a gig in Green
Bay, WI. The announcer on the radio show
took a break to give the news and the pork
belly futures report. I was new to the Mid-
west and had never heard of such a thing.
Whatever it was, I thought it probably wasn’t
good news for the pig. I also thought the
pork industry might like the idea of a theme
song to go along with “the other white meat”
slogan it had just introduced! I would suggest practicing the main theme of
the tune until it is fluent under your fingers.
This tune is a challenge but a lot of fun to The next thing I would do is to identify and
play. It’s a crowd pleaser and I still perform go over the turnarounds. This is (the intro)
it on a regular basis. It also turned out to be measures 1-4, 24-27, 36-39, 51-54, (the tag)
a great platform to study inversions of Dom 59-62, (the end) 63-66 It will become obvi-
7 chords and put them into action as well as ous that these four measure’s chord struc-
a developing independent bass lines. Let’s tures are identical. Play these turnarounds
look at the form of the tune and a good way until they are fluent under your fingers.
to start learning it! I would suggest looking/
listening to the link. Get yourself familiar My goal of using Dom 7 inversions in a clear
with the tune and try following along with concise way began in the vamp of the 12 bar
the transcription while it is playing. blues on measure 15. This is sort of an intro-
duction and I tried to emulate a pig squeal…
As an introduction to the tune, I use the turn- that’s right, you read it here! Just trying to
around from the 12 bar blues section. I con- capture a picture in my mind to set the scene,
sider it the hook and feel it really captures I’ll call it a farm lick. You’ll notice that there’s
the feeling of the whole piece. The A section an independent bass line going on through-
of the tune is 16 measures and I would con- out the twelve bars. I think it has a drunk
sider it the main theme. Take a look at the professor Longhair Creole kind of feel to it. I
endings. The first ending brings you back to was trying to incorporate as many inversions
the beginning to reiterate the theme again. of an E7 chord as I could in a useful practi-
The second ending leads you into to the cal manner. In the first 12 bar blues vamp
12 bar blues vamp, which I play two times I use an E7/D so a doubled up 7 in the bass
through with different variations. and treble notes. This is a cool inversion that
91
I often use and it’s mirror image is ½ step
up and one set of strings over, so an E7/G#.
This inversion looks the same except that the
third is doubled on the bass and treble notes.
In the second pass through the 12 blues sec-
tion (measure 28) I use a quick succession of
three inversions, which overlap one another
over one measure. Look at these changes
carefully and slowly go through the changes
until they flow. After the second run through
the twelve bar blues section you DS to the
third ending.

The third ending starts off with the final 12


bar blues vamp. This is really fun to play. I’m
using a bar position on the 9th fret and uti-
lizing the 9, & minor 3rd behind the chord, it
sort of sounds like crying to me.

On the forth beat of measure 44 I lead into a


broken third run like Fats Waller would use.
Make sure you hold the dotted third beat on
measure 46 for the full time. People over the
years have asked me about that measure,
and that’s the best way I can explain to ap-
proach it. Most people skip a beat!

Measure 55 is the last time through the


theme of the tune. I look at measure 59-62
as a tag to set you up for the ending, these
are the turnarounds.

This is really a tour de force of a piece. It


might be something to keep in your reper-
toire.

I hope you enjoy playing it.

http://www.ericlugosch.com/

92
Pork Belly Futures
Eric Lugosch
V

j nœ nœ #œ
j
‰ IIj
# # # 4 n œ # œ œ œ n œœ œ œ œ œ2 œ
3 3 4 1 3 1

œ 1 œ
œ œ n œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ # œ n ¿¿¿ œ
2 3 3

œ œ #œ
1
3# œ

V 4 ‰ œ . #œ ˙ œ œ œ ¿ œœ
2J
3
1 Œ 4 2œ ˙. ↑
¿¿
¿¿
5 7 8 7 5 89 5 0 5
T 6 7 7
5
7
89 6 6
4 3
4
0 0
2 4
1 2
2
A 2 5 6 6 6 2
B 5 6 7 7 5 0 0

%4 1 II 2 II

### . nœ #œ œ ‰ II

4 4 3

œ œ ¿¿ n œ œ œ œ œ œ . j nœ #œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ
3

¿¿ œ
4 2 3 3
5

V . œ n ¿ # œ œ œ œ n œ # œ
œ Œ œ œ ¿¿ œ œ œ n
œ n œ # œ œ ↑ J¿ ‰ œ 3 ‰ œJ œ œ‰ œœ n œ3 # œ3
3

œ œ œ ↑J

3 3
4
2

5 ¿¿
¿ ¿¿
. 5 2 2 0 0 0 0
¿ 2
. 04 ¿ 5 6 6 6 ¿ 2
7 2 4 3
5 6 6 2 5 4
6 6 7 2 4 2
3 4 0 79 0 3 4 7 5
2 2 0


1.
VII

###
4 4

œ œ œ n
œœ œ œ # œ œ n œœ œ n ¿¿¿ œ n œœ # œ œ œ ¿¿ j
4

n œœ # œ œ œœ ..
9

V n œ # œ œ œ œ ˙ œ n ¿
œ n œ # œ œ. ‰ Œ
↑J ‰
¿ œ n œ # œ ‰
œ œ œ n œ # œ œ œ J¿ ‰
J ↑

0 ¿¿
¿ ¿¿
2 0
¿¿ .
¿ 2 4 .
2 5 7 2
5 7 10 2 5 2 2 2
4 7 9 10 2 2 2
0 3 4 8 9 0 3 4 0 3 4
2 0

2.

‰ 4j 4 1 œ
4 1
II
# # nœ #œ œ
4 2 1 1

œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ n ¿¿¿ œ # œ œ
4 4

V # œ n œ # œ n œ˙ œ œ n œ
13

#œ œ
Œ
œ. œ œ ‰ Œ œ ↑ ¿J ‰ Ó
J J
0 0 5
7 0 4 3 2 0 0 5
10 0 2 0 7 8
9 10 6 2 0
8 9 0
0 4
1
2 4

œ œ œ œ
4 4 4 4 2 3 4

### nœ #œ œ b œ œœ œœ n œ œ n œ œ œ b œ œœœ n œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ # œ œ œ n œ # œ œ œ n œ # œ œ œ n œ
1
j
4 4 1

œœœ
16

V œœ œœ œ œ œ2 ‰ ˙ œ1 # œ1
#œ œ . ‰ œ œ # œ œ. ‰ œ ˙
1

œ J œ œ
3
1 J 1 2

34 0 0 3 4 0 0 5 0 0 5 0 0 3
4 3 4 3 7 7
4 4 6 5 6 5 6 5 6
6 6
12 5 1 2 5 0 0 0 4 1
0 4 0 4 0 0

© Copyright Eric Lugosch. All Rights Reserved. Used by Permission


3 4 1 3

nœ #œ œ œ
4

### #œ œ bœ ‰ œ œ
1 4 2
2 3 1 1

œœ œœ n œ œ n œ # œ œ b œ œ n œ #œ œ œ œ
20
3 3
V œœ œœ
1 3

œ. ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ nœ #œ
‰ œ œ œ. œ œ w œ œ œ
J J J J ‰Œ œ Ó
4 0 0 0 0 5 7 8 9 5 0
4 3 4 3 7
4 0 8 6
6 6 7 4 2 2
2 5 0 0 4 0 0 3 4
0 4 0 4 7 0

Œ
œ œ nœ œ œ œ nœ #œ
j
# # œ2 œ
4 1 3

nœ #œ
j
œ œ # œ1 œ œ œ n œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n ¿¿¿ ¿¿
2 3 3 1 1

V # n œ # œ œ
24 1

˙ 3# œ

œ œ œ ¿¿ 1œ ~ ~ ~
œ . #œ 3 Œ 4 2œ œ. œ ¿ Œ gliss.
2
J 3
1
J
5 ¿¿ ¿¿
↑ ↓
5 ¿ ¿¿ 2 ~ ~ ~
5 7 8 7 5 89 5 0
¿
67 7 4 3 0 0
56 89 6 6 4 2 1 2
0 7 2 5 6 6 6
6 7 7 5 0 4

j j
3 1 1 4 4

œ œ
2

j
4 2 3

œ
1 3 1 3

‰ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œœ ..
œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ..
œ œ
2 3

### œ œ œ œ b œ # n œœ # œœ n n œœ # œœ œœ œœ
2 1 1

nœ #œ œ
2 2

3 œ œn œ
3
j
# œ j
28

V ‰ n œJ # œ ‰ 1 œ œ n œ1 # œ1
n œ
1œ œ œ œ œ
œ 2 œ œ . 2 Jœ 1 œ
1

œ œ . J
2 2
J1 6 6

10 10 7 5 3 4 3 4 0 5 5
9 9 5 4 4 5 3 5 0 3 5 10 10 5 10 10
7 7 6 5 4 56 9 9 56 9 9
5 6
2 0 7 7 0 7 7
0 0 4 3 4 9 9 9 9

4 3
1 2 3 4 2

j j œ œ
1 2

œ œ œ œ œ n œœ
1 3 3

# # # # n œœ # œœ n n œœ # œœ œœ œœ ‰ ‰ œj œœ œœ œœ ‰ œ œ œœ ‰ b œ œ œ
2 3 2 2
2 1 3 2 2 1
3 3

nœ #œ nœ #œ
j j
32

1# œ
2 2

V ‰ 1 œ 1 œ n œ1 # œ1 ‰ 1 œ œ n œ1 # œ1 œ œ1
œ . 2 Jœ Œ # œJ 1 ˙ œ
1

œ J œ J1 6

3 4 3 4 0 4 0 5 9 7
4 5 3 5 0 3 0 5 0 3 5 10 10 0 5 10 5 8
4 3 4 56 9 8 7 56
2 2 0 67 0 7
0 4 3 4 0 4 3 4 9 9

D.S. to 3rd ending

œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3
1

œ b œ œ n œ n œj # œ œ b œ 4 œ œ n œ # œ œ ¿¿ œ
1

### nœ #œ
1 4 1
j harm. 12 1
œ œ œ œ
1

n œ # œ
36 4

V 3 ˙
œ . #œ ˙ ‰ #œ œ œ œ2 œ n œŒ ‚ w n ¿¿ œ
2 J œ JJ 3 ↑

¿¿
¿¿
5 7 8 7 5 12 9 0 0 0 5
67 7 10 0 4 3 1 2
56 7 6 56 0 2 4 2
0 7 2 7 6 2
6 0 12 0
0 4 < 12 >
j
3. 4

‰ œ
1
4

Œ Ó Ó
II 2

# # nœ #œ œ ¿¿ n œœ
4 2 1 1

œ bœ œ œ œ œ
4 4

V # œ n œ # œ n ˙œ œ œ n œ
40

Œ
#œ ‰ Œ œ œœœ ‰ ‰
œœ
‰ n ¿¿
œ. œ œ
J J
. œ œ œ . œ œ J ‰
œ
J J J Tap strings
¿¿ 108
¿¿ 9
0
7 0 4 3 2 0
10 0 2 2
9 10 6 2 2 2
8 9 0 0
0 4 0 0 0 0 0
3
5

œ œ
2 3
4 1

Ó
1 2 1 4

# # # # œœ œ œ j 3
1

œ œœ n œ œ # œœ œ œœ œœ
2 1

œ œ
4 1 3 2 1
2 3 1
œ
44 4 1

œ
3

V œ œ ‚ œ n œ # œ œ
œ œ œ1 n œ2 n œ # œœ n œ œ œ œ Œ ‰
Ó Ó Ó
3

n œ # œ Œ
2 2

œ 2
œ œ
J
harm. 12 3

10 0 2 0
9 9 3 3 2 1 2 3 2
9 0 4 2 1 2 1 2
<12 > 4 6 0 4 2 3
9 11 7 2 3 4
0 3 4 0 0

4 3
1 2 3 4 2

# # # # n œœ # œœ n n œœ # œœ œj œœ ‰ œ œ
1 2

œ œ œ œ œ n œœ
1 3 3

œ œ œœ ‰ b œ œ œ
2 3 2
2 1 3 2 2 1
3

nœ #œ nœ #œ
œœ n œ # œ œ n œ œ b œ œ
j j
48

œ
2 2

V
‰ 1 œ 1 œ n œ1 # œ1 œ . 2 œJ Œ # œJ œ1 ˙ œ œ
Œ œ Œ
1
1

œ J 6

3 4 3 4 0 5 9 7
4 5 3 5 0 3 5 10 10 0 5 10 5 8 1
4 56 9 8 7 56 0 1 2 2
4 1 0
2 0 67 0 7 5
0 4 3 4 9 9 2

II
nœ #œ
j
2

œ œ ¿ ‰¿
1

###
1 3 4

œ
4
3

œ œ # œ1 œ œ œ n œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ # œ œ
2 3 3 1 1 4 1

œ n œ # œ œ ¿¿ # n œœ
52 2

n ¿¿¿ œœ œ
3# œ

V œ œ œ œ n
Œ 4 2 w œ n œ # œ œ ↑ ¿J ‰
3 3
3
1 ↑

¿¿ ¿¿
¿¿ ¿¿
89 5 0 5 2
4 3 0 0 1 2 2 5
89 6 6 4 2 4 2 5 5
2 5 6 6 6 2 4 6
7 7 5 0 0 3 4
2

œ ¿ nœ
1
II
# # œ œ œ.
4 3

j nœ #œ œ œ œ
4 2 3 3 1

# œ œ
1

V # œœ œ œ ‰ œ œ3 n œ # œ n ¿¿¿ n œ
56

œœ œ œ œ
n œ # œ œœ œœ œ œ œ
n œ # œ œ
œ 3 ‰ œ œ œ œ Œ 4 2 w
3 3
J 1 ↑

¿¿ 6
¿¿ 5
0 0 0 0 5
7 2 4 3 0 0 1 2
6 6 2 5 4 2 4
6 7 2 4 2 5 6 6 6
0 79 0 3 4 7 5 0
2 0
# # # œœ œ œ n œ œ œ œ nœ #œ
4 j

œ2 Uœ # œ1 œ
1

œ œ # n œœ œ œ œ œ œ
1/4

n œ # ˙˙
j
60

œ
œ . #œ 3 ˙ œ ˙
3# œ

V œ œ nœ #œ œ œ ˙
œ œ œ

~~~~
2 J
3
œ œ
Fan the chord
1/4
5 7 8 7 5 89 5 0 2 0
7 7 7 4 3 2 0 0

~~~~
6 89 6 7 2 1 2 5 6
0 7 8 0 2 6 7
6 9 2 4 0 3 4 0
0
David Oakes
Jimmy Wyble’s Sketchbook Vol. I

Improvisation based on the changes


to “Sweet Georgia Brown”

by Jimmy Wyble (1922 - 2010)

Welcome to Jimmy Wyble’s sketchbook Vol-


ume I. Jimmy wrout out many solos and im-
provisations based on the changes to stan- of music as part of every practice session. In
dard tunes. I look at this material not as other words, a daily composition assignment
chord melody arrangements but as beautiful is necessary. Even if it is one little idea or
compositions and studies based on a famous motif, phrase, arrangement or transcription.
progression or tune. All the music in these Just write it down on paper!
volumes will be either composed and worked
out by Jimmy himself or a transcription that Jimmy said that this arrangement was writ-
Jimmy personally approved both the finger- ten as a retrospect of playing with Red Norvo.
ing and notation. Red used to play this tune with Jimmy add-
ing a counter line to Red playing the melody.
In his seminars at Musicians Institute, Jimmy Jimmy said that they use to perform “Sweet
constantly relayed the importance of writing Georgia Brown” at a very fast tempo.
music as a critical part of every practice ses-
sion. He meant with a pencil and manuscript There are three different types of motion in
paper not on the latest multitrack digital re- two-line music. Parallel motion when both
corder. Jimmy did this kind of writing so much parts are moving together in the same direc-
in his life that when he saw music on the staff, tion. Oblique motion when one part stays the
his hands knew instinctively where to go to same and the other part moves. The third
play those notes in the most musical way. Mu- kind of motion is contrary motion when both
sic reading skills are greatly enhanced from parts move in opposite directions. This ar-
writing down ideas and arrangements on pa- rangement uses all three types of motion in
per. You can begin to understand how much this arrangement. Be aware of how the lines
Jimmy wrote by looking at the vast amount of are moving.
music and musical ideas on my website and
then add in the four or five books that he pub- One final comment: The top line of musical
lished along the way. I can honestly say that notation is heavily edited with right and left
writing music, arranging, as well as compos- hand fingerings. Practice that line until you
ing has made me a much better guitarist and have it down. That will make the rest of this
musician. Some people even think that I have study much easier.
developed into a pretty decent sight-reader. I
would like to challenge you to add the writing http://www.davidoakesguitar.com/

97
Improvisation based on the changes to:
"Sweet Georgia Brown"
Jimmy Wyble

Œ
F7
œ naœ bmœ n iœ
4

bb 4 œ nœ
2 4 4 2

œ nœ
1 1

œ
4 4 3 1 4

V b b 4 mœ œ n œ˙ œ œ nœ œ
2 m i m a m m
1

œ bœ œ #œ œ Œ
3
m i i

n œ 3n œ œ Œ Œ œ
1 ˙
3 1 1 3 4

>
3 2
3 2
4 5

T 0 2 3 5
3 4 5 6 5 4 3
5 3 2 3
A 3 5 4 3 4 5
B 1
3
5
5 6
6

B b7
2

œ nœ bœ œ fi œ
3

‰ œj
3 4

œ œ œœ nn œœ
1 2 4 4 2 1 2
4 3 1

b nœ œ œ nœ œ
4 1

V b b b œ Œœ œ œ
2

bœ nœ 3 œ
5 1

œ
œ 3 1
nœ 3 œ 3 2 1 2 Œ 4 Œ ‰1 œ 4 œ 3œ
3 4 5
5
6

8 9 10 11 10 9 8 4
5 7 8 10 10 8 7
10 9 8 9 10 5
8 6 10 11 6
10 3

E b7 3
4
3

œ
4

b œ nœ œ œ
4 1

V b bb œ b œ œ
4 4

œ œ
9 2 4 4 2 4

œ œ nœ bœ œ
1 1 3

œ nœ
4

œ œ œ œœ œ nœ bœ œ œ
œ œ nœ
1

2 1 3 1 3 3
3 3 1 3
4 1 2
2

5 6 4
2 3 5 6 1 2 3 3 5 6
4 3 3 5
4 3 4 3 2 1 4 3
6 6 5
Ab E b7 Ab
G m7( b5) C 7( b 9)
2 2

œ
3 2 4

œ
4

œ œ nœ nœ
4 4

œ
1

œ œ nœ
4 3

b œ nœ
1 3 3 2

V b b b œœ œ
1 2

œ
13 2 4

œ
1

œ œ œ 2œ ˙ ˙ n˙ ˙ ˙

3 3 3 2 1
3 1 2
1
D.C. al Coda
3 4 5 6 8
2 4 5 6 4 3 6 5
1 3 5
5
3 4 6 4 3 2 4
4 3 6
Jimmy Sketchbook Vol. 1 - written by Jimmy Wyble
Copyright © Jimmy Wyble 2008 - All Rights Reserved
Fm

Coda 3
C7 Fm

Œ œ œ œ œ
3 1

Œ œ œ œ œ
3 1 2 4 3 1 2

bbb œ
3 1 4

œ nœ ˙ n ˙œ
1 2

œ 3˙ œ œ œ n ˙œ œ 3˙
17 4

V b œ
4 Œ Ó œ
1 4
3
œ œ 4
4 1 1 4
5 5 5
1 4 3 1
6 4
5

8
8 9 8 9
10 8 7 10 10 9 10
10 8 10 10
11 11 11 10 8 7 11
8 9 8
C7 Ab G b7 B b7 E b7
j
F7

3

Ab
2 4 2 3

œ ‰
2 4 2 1 2 3 2 4

œ œ œ œ n˙ œ n œ
1

œ œ œ 3œ
4 2 1 3

bœ œ œ n˙
1

bbb ˙ œ
2 4

œ n œ b œ œb ˙œ œ n œ w3
21 4 2

V b œ œœ œ J nœ
3
œ œ 3œ 1 3 1
œ Ó
2J n œ w1
4 3
1 4 3 1
1 4 3 2
4 1 4 1
4 5 3
6
6 7 8 9
11 9 8 6 9 7 6
10 9 8 8 8 7 6
11 8 6 8 7 6 9 8 6 5 6
1110 8 8 8 7
9 8 5 4
OUSTANDING ARRANGEMENTS FROM “Bill Piburn is one of the best

BILL PIBURN
players, arrangers and teachers
I have known.”
– Chet Atkins
Bill Piburn Plays Groovy Guitar
Antonio Carlos Jobim 15 custom arrangements of
Solo guitar arrangements in standard notes popular music classics, including: Daydream
and tab for 12 Antonio Carlos Jobim classics. • Happy Together • A Hard Day’s Night • Last
The accompanying CD features Bill Piburn Train to Clarksville • Scarborough Fair • (Sittin’
peforming each song. Songs include: Água On) The Dock of the Bay • Spooky • Walk On
De Beber (Water to Drink) • Desafinado • How By • What Becomes of the Broken Hearted •
Insensitive (Insensatez) • and many more. and more.
00703006 Book/CD Pack .................... $17.99 00701215 Book/CD Pack .................... $17.99

Fingerstyle Guitar Fingerstyle Love Songs


Standards 15 love songs masterfully
15 more tunes for your fingerpicking arranged, including: Always on My Mind •
repertoire, including: Autumn Leaves • Cheek Dream a Little Dream of Me • I Will • Just
to Cheek • Georgia on My Mind • Moon River the Way You Are • Only You (And You Alone)
• My Romance • The Nearness of You • • This Guy’s in Love with You • Unchained
Route 66 • Sentimental Journey • You Are My Melody • The Very Thought of You • and more.
Sunshine • and more. 00699912 Book/CD Pack .................... $17.95
00699612 Book/CD Pack .................... $17.95

FREE SHIPPING
ON ORDERS OF $25 OR MORE!
1-800-637-2852 • musicdispatch.com Mention ad code BPRN. U.S. only. Least expensive method applies.
http://www.timlerch.com
Tim Lerch
Eclectic Electric

Melodic Inversions

For the last few columns we have been


looking into inversions. This time I thought
it would be a good idea to write an exer-
cise that uses the melodic connection we
looked at last time.

The chord progression is from the Jerome


Kern classic “All the things You Are.” Basi-
cally I used two inversions per bar with the
top voice using diatonic neighbors moving
in quarter notes to create melodic connec-
tions between the chords. There were a
few bars when I couldn’t help myself and
put in a few more voicings to keep things
interesting. There aren’t many substitu- used. Take the time to understand the me-
tions (maybe one or two) I just stuck with lodic choices as well.
the basic changes. Rather than follow any
strict formula, I tried to make the exercise Once you get comfortable with the move-
as musically pleasing as possible. The bass ments, try varying the rhythm. It’s also fun
notes are tending to rise for a few bars then to add more melody notes to create a “solo
descend, then rise again throughout the guitar improvisation.” With a nice two feel
piece, avoiding big jumps or jagged, discon- that you can use when you play this song.
nected movements.
Ok enjoy, next time we will look at the same
The inner voices (my favorite part) hope- progression with movement in the bass.
fully make cohesive voice leading sense as
well. Some of the voicings aren’t strict in- http://www.timlerch.com/
versions of the previous chord but are used
for specific musical results. I recommend
practicing this study slowly and in small
sections. Be sure to take the time to un-
derstand the relationships of the voicings
102
Melodic Inversion based on "All The Things You Are"

B b-7 B b-7/D b E b7 E b 7/G Ab ± A b /G ±


F -7/A b
œ œ˙
F -7
œ œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œ 4
œ œ˙ œ
b œ ˙˙˙ ˙˙
4 4 1

V b b b 44 œ˙˙ œ
1 3 2 1

4˙ ˙˙
4

˙ ˙˙
4

˙
3

˙ ˙ ˙
˙ 2
˙ 2 2 3

3 9
T 1
1
2 4
5
6
6
8 9
10 10
8
6
9 11
8
13
12
11 9
8
8
A 1 3 6 8 8 11 13 10
B 1 4 6 9
6 10 11 10

Db ± ±
D b /F D m7(b5) G 7#9(#5) C ± D -7 Eb 7 o E -7 D -7 ±
œ 1œ b œ˙
C G7
b œ œ œ˙ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ
n ˙˙ n œ n œœ n œœ
3

V b b b ˙˙˙ ˙˙˙ œœ n nn œœœ nn œœœ


5 3 4

n ˙˙ œœ
4

˙˙ nœ œ œœ œ
2 ˙ ˙ œ
6 6 4 3
6 8 9 6 8 4 5 6 7 8 6 5
5 6 5 4 4 5 5 7 5 4 4
6 10 6 3 5 7 7 9 7 5 3
4 8 4 3 5 6 7 5 3 5
3 3

C -7/E b F -7/E b F -7
B b9 B b 9/D Eb ± E b/G
œ 2 œ˙˙
C -7
œœ œ œ œ
œ œ˙ œ˙ n œ˙˙ œ
4

b b b 2œ˙ œ œ˙
1

n œ˙˙ œ
9 4 2

b ˙˙
1 1 4 4

˙˙ n ˙˙
4

V ˙˙ 3
˙ ˙ ˙
3
˙ ˙
2

4 1 3 6 4 4
4 6 8 1 4 3 4 6 8 6 4 3
3 5 1 5 5 5 7 3
5 8 1 3 6 6 8 1
3 6 5 6
6 3

A b6 A b/C
D 7/F # G ± G/B ±

A -7 G G/B
œ œ n n˙œ˙ œ1 # 4œ œ
1

b 4 œ n œ˙ nœ
4

V b b b œ˙ n œ nœ œ n 3œ˙
13 1 4

n ˙˙ # n œ˙
1 1


4 4

˙ ˙
3 4


2
˙ 3
˙ n n ˙˙ 2
3 n˙ ˙ n˙
3

7
3 6 5 8 10 8 5 8
5 8 5 7 11 7 4 5 7
3 6 5 10 9 5 4 5
7 9 10

±
4 8 5 7 3 7
D9 D 9/A D 9/F # ± G ±/B G
n 4œ˙ # œ
A -7 G

n #n œ˙˙ n œ n œœœ œœ
A -7/G
n œ œ n œ n œ œ n œ n 4œ 1œ
4 3

n œ
1

˙
4 4 4

# n ˙˙ # n ˙˙ œ
2 3

b n˙ ˙
4

V b b b ˙˙ ˙ n œ # œœ n ˙˙
17

n ˙˙
4
3n˙
˙ ˙
2

2 2 3
1

5 7 8 10 12 10 14 10
5 8 10 13 10 12 13 15 12 8
5 9 11 11 9 11 12 11 11
5 7 10 14 10 12 12 12 9
12 9 10 14 10 10

© Tim Lerch 2016


F #-/A
B9
F #-7 ± G m7(b5)

B 13/A E 6/9/G#
n œ # # 4œ˙ n œ
C 7#5
n # # œ˙˙ # œ # n œœ˙ n œ # œ œ˙ n œ # œ3 n œ
3 3
E
n œ œ n œ
4

# œ
4

# ˙
2 3

b n ˙ n ˙˙
3 2 1

V b b b # # ˙˙ n # n ˙˙˙ 23 ˙˙
4 4

n ˙˙ # # ˙˙
21 2

n ˙3 n˙
2 2 1
1
˙

12 14
10 12 14 14 16 12 12 14 11 10 9 8
9 11 14 13 14 13 14 11 10 9
11 11 13 13 13 11 11 8
9 12 14 12 14 11 10
12 8

F -7
F -7/E b B b-7 B b-7/F E b7 E b 13/D b A b 9/C
6
Ab ±
b b b œ˙˙ œ œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œ˙ bœ œ˙ nœ œœ
4 4 4

œ
25 3

b ˙˙ ˙˙ œ˙ œ
4 1 4 2

V ˙˙ ˙˙
3 1 1

˙ 1
˙˙ ˙˙
2
2 ˙ 3 2 1
2

9 8 6 6 9 8 7 6 5 4
8 5 8 6 8 6 6 5 3 5 1 3
6 6 6 6 5 5 3 5
8 6 8 6 4 3 3
6 4

± D b /F D b-7 D b m(maj7)/A b
o o
D bMaj9
C -/G
C -7/B b B 7
C -7
œ
B 7/F
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ˙ n1œ
b b ˙˙ ˙˙ œ
3 4

b œ 1 ˙˙ ˙˙ œœ
4

V b b b 1 œ˙˙
n œ˙
29 4

œ n ˙˙
3 1

˙
4 3

˙ ˙ ˙ œ
œ
œ n˙
1

3 2
2 2 4
2

8 9 8 7
4 9 9 11 13 11 8 4 6 9
5 6 9 9 8 8 5 7 7
3 6 9 11 8 8 5 6 9
4 8 11 10 8
9 8 6 7
E b 9/D b
B b-7/A b B b-7 E b 9/B b E b 9/G E b 9 A b6 A b/C G m7(b5)
œ œ œ œœ œ œ˙
C 7#5
bœ œœ œ œ œ
4

2˙ œœ œœœ œœœ œœ œ œ˙ n # œ˙˙


2 2

b b ˙˙˙ ˙
4 1 1

œœ ˙˙
4

˙˙
33 1 1

b
V b 3 ˙
œ
3
˙
1 3 4
2
˙ ˙

6 8 9 11 13 9 6
6 9 11 8 11 8 9 8 9 13 11 9 11
6 10 12 10 10 10 10 8 10 9
6 8 11 8 11 11 10 6 11 8
10 11 10
11 8 8
Fingerstyle Jazz Café:
Playing Solo on a Bebop Standard
(Part 2)

By Sean McGowan

In this issue, we’ll continue to explore possi-


bilities for soloing – whether in a solo guitar
or ensemble context – over the chord chang-
es of Charlie Parker’s “Confirmation.” This chords for chromatic approach, but domi-
analysis is accompanied by a transcription nant chords are usually the most effective.
for the second chorus of the solo I played In this case, the Db7 and B7 chords replace
on my recording of standards for solo fin- G7 and F7 chords.
gerstyle guitar titled, Indigo. This chorus
features some chordal and basic reharmoni- The melodic line continues through the Bb6
zation ideas. Sharpen your pencils, tune up, chord to a G7 chord by way of a quick ii-V7
and we’ll get to work! of G. At this point, with a little cadence on
the G, we can add a new texture by playing
The form of this song is a standard 32-bar, a line, as Joe Pass might have done. This
AABA format, and the second chorus will line utilizes a triplet pattern crossing over
start at measure 33 if you’re working with the strings, harmonically outlining a G7-
the complete transcription. Therefore, the Daug-G movement before resolving up to
first measure of this chorus continues a ‘mel- the high C. Many bebop soloists would in-
ody on top of chords’ approach that closed sert a little I-V-I movement if they had a full
out the first chorus. With this approach, measure or two of just one chord to work
I’m definitely trying to emulate what a pia- with, in this case, inserting a G-D-G over a
nist might play for chords underneath a solo static G7 chord.
line. To that end, I’ll tend to keep the melod-
ic lines on the high E and B strings to allow The next four bars continue threading
chords voicings on the A, D, and G strings. In through the progression with a solo line,
fact, the two chord voicings for Em7b5 and outlining each chord change as it arrives.
A7 (they kind of look like Gm9 and Bbm9 One little reharmonization appears right
voicings respectively) are voicings that pi- after the Dm7 chord. Instead of outlining
anist Bill Evans would use frequently. That G7-Cm7-F7, the line outlines Db-Gb-B ma-
half step cluster adds some really nice col- jor before resolving to the Bb6 chord three
or to the voicing. This leads us into the Dm7 bars later. Why does this work? You can
chord. Rather than continuing through the think of each substitution as a ‘tritone sub-
normal chords, we can move down to Bb Ma- stitution’ of the original chord (because
jor – target if you will – via half-step, chro- each root sub is the interval of a tritone
matic motion. You can use different types of away from the original, e.g. G7 = Db, etc.).
105
You can think of the B major line as anoth- or down) creates some consistency the ear
er chromatic approach to Bb (like we played can recognize.
earlier) and the B is preceded with a cycle
four (aka “Backcycling”) progression. Final- This time, instead of resolving right on the
ly, we have a few chords built in 4th intervals Bb6, we continue the tritone concept by
to target our home key of F. The stacked 4th playing Emaj7 over the Bb. Finally, we close
voicings have a nice, inherent ambiguity to out the chorus with a common iii-VI-ii-V line
them, and sound great as a constant struc- with some single bass notes thrown in to
ture moving up and down the fretboard. bring our ears back to the home key of F.

For the B section, we resolve the stacked 4th Sean McGowan is a jazz and acoustic guitar-
voicing over a C to create a Cm11 sound for ist based in Denver, CO, where he directs the
the iim7 chord. Then a triplet line appears Guitar Program at the University of Colorado
over the ii-V; however, instead of just play- Denver. Visit him on the web at
ing normal triplets, we can manipulate the www.seanmcgowanguitar.com
rhythm and play triplets in groupings of four
notes, which is almost a type of rhythmic Note from Editor: The music transcription
substitution. These can feel tricky at first, so of Confirmation solo (2nd chorus) starts at
I strongly recommend practicing four-note 1:32 in the video. For the transcription of
groupings of triplets slowly, always with a the first solo see issue #4.
metronome. The following ii-V-I in Db fea-
tures more chords stacked in 4th intervals,
across five strings, using notes of Db major.

The last A section features some bi-tonal re-


harmonization, meaning chord voicings that
imply the sound of two, unrelated chords.
The first example of this is a B/F chord (pre-
ceded a half step above by the C/Gb) substi-
tuting for an F major chord. Again, I like this
sound because the B major is a tritone away
from F – about as far away as you can get –
and yet, the sound really works as a duality
of sorts. After an Em9b5 chord, we contin-
ue this concept by playing an Eb/A voicing
for the A7 chord. Then, things get interest-
ing from the Dm7 through the Bb6 chord.
For the iim7 chords (Dm7 & Cm7) I used an
11th voicing a half-step down in constant
structure (e.g. C#11/D and B11/C) and each
of those is followed by a standard altered
dominant voicing. Again, the use of constant
structure (i.e. repeated voicings moving up
106
Confirmation Solo (2nd Chorus)
Sean McGowan

F6 > E m7(b5) A7
D b7 C7 B7

œ . œj œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ
D -7
w n ˙œœ œœ # ˙œ œ œ œ
4
V b 4 œœœ ... œœ œœ œœ # # œœ œœ n œœ b b œœ œœ
˙
œ Œ ‰ ‰ œ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œJ Œ b œ œ œ œ n˙
J œ œ J J
J
3 0 3 5
T 1
2
3
3
3
3
6
6
6 8 10
7 8 8 9 9
6 8 10 6
8
A 2 7 7 10 10 9 9 8 8 7
B 1 0
0
10 9 9 8 8 7

B b6 D 7( b 9)
œ œ œ œ . b œj œ . j nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ
A7 G7 G -7 C7
˙ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ œ
V b œœ Œ œœ Œ œœ œœ
5

# b œ œ n œ
‰ bœ œ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ nœ œ nœ œ #œ
J J 3
3 3
3
3

5 5 6
6 8 6 5 4 3 3 6 8 6 5 6 8
5 5 5 5 3 4 7
5 5 5 4 3 4 5
5 5 5
6 6 5 3 7
F6
E m7(b5)
bœ bœ bœ œ œ
F7
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
A7 D -7 C -7

b œ œ œ œ n œ b œ œ b œ b œ b œ bœ
V b Œ ‰ œœ Ó œ bœ
9

bœ œ œ œ
J 3

8 8 8 6 5 5 6 5 6 9 7 6
8 6 9 7 9 7
5 8 7 5 9 6 8 8
5 8 7 7
6 5 8

B b6
œ n œ n œ œœ œœ n œœ
A -7
j D7
œœ .. b œ œ .. j
G -7
j j
C7 F6

n œ b œ œœ .. . n œ ˙ œ œ ‰ b œœ
13

Vb œ nœ n œ
J œ. œœ œœ . b b œœ nœ œ
œ . # # œœ œœ .. n œœ ˙˙ œ
J Œ œ Œ œJ ‰ Œ œ ‰ Œ œ ‰ œ. œ Œ œ
J
6 8 10 8 6 4 2 1 1 3 4
7 10 7 5 3 1 4 0 3
8 7 5 3 1 4 0 3
0 3 4 3
3 0 1 1

C -7 F7 B b maj7
œ b œ œ œ œ j b n œœ b œœ
3

œ œ œ œ b œ
3

œ œ œ œ
17 3 3

b œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 3

V œœ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ bœ œ #œ œ œ bœ bœ œ b b œœ
3
3 3
œ J
3

8 6 6 7
3 5 7 7 5 5 8 5 8 7 7 6 6 6
5 3 7 5 8 7 7 8 8 8 7 6 6
3 6 5 6 8 9 9 8 9 6
10 6

Copyright© Sean McGowan 2016


D b maj7
A b7
E b-7
œœ b œ œœ b œ b b œœœ œœ œ
b bb œœœ
œœ nœ œœ #œ
C7

œœ œ j b b œœ œ b œœ œœ n #n œœœ œœ # œœ # n n œœœ n n œœœ nœ


# n œœœ
œ ‰ bœ b œ ‰ b œœ œœ
21

V b œœ œ œ ‰ bœ œ œ ‰
J J b b œœ n œ
J J
6 8 9 11 13 13 12 9 11 8 7
9 11 13 14 14 13 10 12 8 7
8 10 11 13 13 12 9 11 9 8
8 10 11 13 13 11 8 10 8 7
8 9 11 13 13 9 8

F7
j j j b œj j
G7
E m7(b5)
j j j j
C -7 D -7
j j
A7
œœ b œ b œ œ j
F6
œ œ # œ œ œ
# œ # œ œ œ b n œœœ œœœ b # œœœ b œœ œœ # #n œœœ #œ œ #œ œœ
V b œœœ œ œ n œ n n # œœœ #œ
25

n œ b œœ
œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ # # œœ
œ. J . J œ œ . J œ œ. œ
3
J J J
6 4 6 2 4
7 7 7 8 8 6 4 4 2 5
8 8 7 7 8 8 6 4 4 2 4
7 9 9 8 8 8 8 4 3 2 1 6
8 5 3 6
0 5 3 1 0

B b maj7 3 A -7 D 7( b 9) G -7 C7 F6
œœ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ˙˙
29 3

b
V œœ n œ œ b œ
3

œ n œ œ Ó Ó . # œ ‰ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ
Ó œ ˙
œ œ Œ J œ
J J Œ œ ˙
J ‰
5 8 5 4 3 1
7 5 5 3 2 3 2 0
5 7 8 7 5 4 2 3 0 0
5 7 5 3
5 6 3 1 1
Sight and Sound

CD Play-along Collection

Hal Leonard Publications


Charlie Parker Omnibook

In 1978, Jamey Aebersold published the


Charlie Parker Omnibook, a collection of six-
ty Parker compositions and improvisations.
This was a landmark achievement. In the
years since it has become a required collec-
tion for all jazz musicians and aspiring im-
provisors.

While there have been play-along collections


in the past none have included all sixty titles
featured in the Omnibook until now. This
three CD collection features Mark Davis on
piano. Mark is the Chair of Jazz Studies at
the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music and
former student of the legendary Barry Har- TrueFire Interactive Software
ris. Dave Bayles is the drummer and Jeff Ha-
mann plays bass. Dave and Mark are also
professors at the Wisconsin Conservatory
Bill Evans – featuring Mike Stern
and highly esteemed jazz musicians. 30 Sax Licks for Guitar You Must
Know
The recording is very professional and per-
fectly mixed. It sounds like a great jazz re-
cord minus the soloist. Being the music of
Charlie Parker it may be understood that
many of the tempos are fast! It will certainly
serve a challenge to most.

This is an audio only collection so if you do


not have the Omnibook it also will be re-
quired. Both the book and CD collection are
available through Hal Leonard publication.

www.halleonard.com

109
For years, guitarists in the know have recom-
mended studying the lines that saxophone
players play. Saxophonist such as John Col-
trane, Wayne Shorter, Charlie Parker, and
many others have been a great source of in-
spiration. The challenge has been in adapt-
ing their lines and concepts to the guitar.

Now saxophonist Bill Evans has put togeth-


er a wonderful collection of hip sax lines for
guitar. Jazz-fusion guitarist Mike Stern has
adapted fingerings that make these lines
work very well for the guitar. It’s also a real
bonus that they both play the lines separate-
ly and in unison over a rhythm track. Bill has
included all of the rhythm tracks for you to
work with on your own. The styles touched
upon include jazz, rock, blues, and jazz-fu-
sion. There are 35 videos on the disc with a Book
running time of 130 minutes. Transcriptions
in both tab and standard notation are includ-
ed.
Walter Rodrigues Jr
Hymns For Solo Jazz Guitar
Bill Evans and Mike Stern both are former
band mates in the Miles Davis group and Through his extremely popular YouTube
currently tour together. Bill has also worked performances Walter has built a devoted
with other guitarists such as John McLaugh- audience. His arrangements of Hymns have
lin, John Scofield, and Steve Lukather. become some of his most popular. Due to
this popularity Hal Leonard publishing has
This is high recommended for guitarists released Hymns For Solo Jazz Guitar.
wanting to add cool licks to their arsenal and
improve your over all skills as a musician. The songs included are: “Abide with Me,”
“Amazing Grace,” “Blessed Assurance,” “God
www.truefire.com Is So Good,” “Just a Closer Walk with Thee,”
“Londonderry Air,” “Oh How I Love Jesus,”
“Softly and Tenderly,” “Sweet Hour of Prayer,”
“Oh How I Love Jesus” and “What a Friend
We Have in Jesus.”

Congratulations to our friend Walter! We


highly recommend this book.

www.halleonard.com