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In July 2016, Sergei Millian sat down with ABC News to talk about US-Russia relations and the

campaign of presidential candidate Donald J. Trump. Millian attempted to befriend numerous


aides to Trump during the 2016 campaign. He was identified in media reports as the source of
salacious information about Trump that found its way into the so-called “dossier” compiled by a
former British spy for a firm hired by a conservative publication, and later by Democrats, all of
whom wanted to know more about Trump’s past ties to Russia. And today he remains a mystery
figure in the federal investigations into Russian meddling. This was his only interview with an
American television network.
ABC NEWS:
So for starters, Sergei, if you could just say your name and spell it for the people who take down
the transcription.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes. My name is Sergei Millian. S-E-R-G-E-I, M-I-double-L-I-A-N.
ABC NEWS:
And tell me the organization you're involved with.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes. Russian American Chamber of Commerce in the U.S.A.
ABC NEWS:
And what is that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Russian American Chamber of Commerce in the U.S.A., it's a nonprofit, nongovernmental
organization that is not involved with politics whatsoever. We do not support or represent any
politicians. But at the same time, what we do is we help Russian American businessmen to work
together, to do business together, to do transactions together.
And we do that by facilitating meetings. By arranging conferences, forums, symposiums,
workshops, seminars. And we have the privilege of arranging some of the governmental
meetings between governors of Russia and the governors of United States of America. Some of
the trade missions we partnered with, for example, with the State of Alabama trade mission to St.
Petersburg in Moscow. And we helped come back with a lot of transactions together in the
hundreds of millions of dollars.
ABC NEWS:
And is it primarily to bring American business to Russia or Russian business to America?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Well, some of the initial ideas was to bring more of the Russian business to the United States.
But the reality showed after working for several years is that there is much more interest from
the United States to go into Russia and to open businesses there, especially during the, I would
say, the renaissance of the U.S.-Russia relations. And what we did is we facilitated a lot of --
including some big companies -- entrance into the Russian Federation. And so we ended up
working more with American businessmen than with the Russian ones.
ABC NEWS:
And among the businessmen you worked with is Donald Trump?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes, correct.
ABC NEWS:
Now, how did you meet Mr. Trump?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Some members of his team came to visit our event in Atlanta, Georgia, that we hosted. It was a
reception with some of the diplomats. And they asked me to come meet Mr. Donald Trump in
Miami. So I received invitation to meet with him in the Gulf Stream Horse Racing event. So we
stayed in his private suite.
ABC NEWS:
So you went to his private suite at the-- at the race track?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
That's correct.
ABC NEWS:
And what was the purpose of the meeting?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
The idea was that I help his team to represent Trump Hollywood, which is one of the top projects
he has in Florida that he [did] together with Jorge Perez. He's another billionaire. And he is the
biggest developer. Happens to be the biggest developer in the State of Florida.
ABC NEWS:
And why did Mr. Trump want your help?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because [the] Trump team, they realized that we have lots of connection with Russian investors.
And they noticed that we bring a lot of investors from Russia.
ABC NEWS:
And they wanted your connection with the Russian investors?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
And they needed my assistance, yes, to sell properties and sell some of the assets to Russian
investors.
ABC NEWS:
And were you successful in doing that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Absolutely. It was a huge success, and we are so happy to be part of that.
ABC NEWS:
And, so what was your title? What was your role?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
So initially, I was presented as president of Russian America Chamber of Commerce. But then
they asked me to work on the business side, not just on the public side. So they asked me to
represent the project to Russia and the C.I.S., which is Commonwealth of Independent States
countries.
So what I did is that we signed an agreement with his team so I can be his official broker. So we
did a lot of marketing for Trump. We presented his team with a proposal. It's an 11-page
proposal that we wrote. And some of the items were in fact implemented successfully in Russia.
ABC NEWS:
So you became the official broker for Donald Trump?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I became the official broker for Trump Hollywood.
ABC NEWS:
And how many units did you sell?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
We cannot disclose the financials. And we have, in fact, signed that we cannot disclose that. But
a nice percentage of all the units sold out of 200 units, they were sold to Russians.
ABC NEWS:
To Russians?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
So the Russian money was heavily invested in that.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Absolutely.
ABC NEWS:
And have there been other projects too?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
That some of my colleagues, they were involved in some other projects. But overall, Trump has
done significant business with Russians. And the level of business amounts to hundreds of
millions of dollars that he received as a result of interaction with Russian businessmen.
ABC NEWS:
Hundreds of millions of dollars from Russian businessmen?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Correct. Correct.
ABC NEWS:
And what sorts of projects?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
The two biggest ones I would disclose is that he worked with Dmitry Rybolovlev. So he sold one
of his properties in Florida. And another one is, he worked with one of the most active Russian-
speaking members of our community here in New York, Tamir Sapir. It happened so that in our
community he is as fact known as Temur, not Tamir. But for the Americans he's known as…
ABC NEWS:
Mr. Sapir.
[Sapir was a wealthy American businessman and investor from the former Soviet republic of
Georgia who was involved in developing Trump SoHo. He died in 2014.]
SERGEI MILLIAN:
As Tamir. And he was one of his partners for Trump SoHo.
ABC NEWS:
So there are many deals he has with Russian businessmen.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I would say it more correctly, more properly put say, "Russian-speaking-businessmen." Because
he's done business not only with Russian citizens, he did business with the Russian-speaking-
Americans and Russian-speaking individuals.
ABC NEWS:
And how is Mr. Trump regarded by the Russian business community?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
He is the icon for luxury. Everybody knows he's one of the richest men here in the United States,
so, of course, Russian billionaires, millionaires, they would like to be affiliated with his name.
And his name is in high regard. And people give millions of dollars just to use his name.
ABC NEWS:
So they license his name?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
In fact, that's what he does is, whenever he has a project, he would have people… and people are
in fact very happy, Russian billionaires in particular and foreign billionaires, they're happy to pay
millions of dollars just to be able to use his name, his trademark.
ABC NEWS:
So many Russian billionaires actually are in business with Donald Trump?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
For a fact, he received money from Aras Agalarov, which is Crocus International. So he was
paid to bring the pageant, the Miss Universe Pageant, to Russia. So he was paid for that, yeah.
ABC NEWS:
Mr. Trump was paid for that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
What did they have to pay to bring that to?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Just to hold, because, it's a very prestigious event. And it's very well publicized. So it's great for
image of Russia, an image of Russian culture. So…
ABC NEWS:
It's great to have Donald Trump connected?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
So they are happy to pay for him to bring this important event to Russia, yes.
ABC NEWS:
I saw one of the music videos of his son, Mr. Agalarov's son. Donald Trump appears in that.
Have you seen that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No. I know-- I know--
ABC NEWS:
His son is a well-known musician, right?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I know.
ABC NEWS:
And there's Mr. Trump in the in the video. Has Mr. Trump been to Moscow with you or by
himself?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
He was not with me. He was at the same time in Moscow as I was. But he worked with some of
our advisors. And he was…
ABC NEWS:
When was that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Last time I know for a fact? 2013.
ABC NEWS:
2013?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes, before that in fact, Mr. Trump has been about ten times -- more than ten times -- to Russia.
And some periods he traveled very often when there are some negotiations and dealings. And
sometimes not so often. But please keep in mind that the main idea why he would travel to
Russia is to promote his name to Russians. The main idea was not to construct in fact a building,
but to popularize his properties. Because he knows that a lot of Russians love his properties.
They buy his luxury residences. So it was a good, very good business for him.
ABC NEWS:
I saw one newspaper clipping that he talked about building a skyscraper in Moscow.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
There were discussions that he will. And according to my information, in 1993, he registered a
trademark, [a] Trump trademark in Russia. And in fact, I had a meeting afterwards in his
headquarters with (UNINTEL), his right-hand man. And I asked him, "How are you going to
protect it?" Because laws in Russia, unlike the United States, it's a new democracy. So it's not as
protected as here in the United States where you have everything pretty much safe.

So I asked him how he's going to protect it, if he needs help. Because of course, we have some
important people in Russia who can provide some assistance. And he said, "We don't need any
help, because if anything happens, we can call Hillary."
ABC NEWS:
That's what he said?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
What does that mean?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
What it means to me that, at least at that point, they [had an] excellent relationship with Hillary
Clinton. And I believe they supported her campaign and financially too.
ABC NEWS:
And has Mr. Trump raised money from Russian businessmen for his campaign?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I doubt so. I'm not familiar with this fact.
ABC NEWS:
Have you helped to raise any money for Mr. Trump?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No.
ABC NEWS:
Just business?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No, I just personally I contributed something. But I didn't help for the campaign.
ABC NEWS:
I see. How much did you contribute?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
It's a secret.
ABC NEWS:
It's a secret?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes. But it will be public.
[Records show Millian contributed $548 to the Trump campaign]
ABC NEWS:
And are you allowed to contribute?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes, I'm an American citizen.
ABC NEWS:
You are an American citizen. How long have you been a citizen then?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Just recently.
ABC NEWS:
Just recently.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes, naturalized.
ABC NEWS:
Yeah. So you're supporting him then for president?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I think he would be a great president for this country. He is a very shrewd and smart
businessman. He built his own empire. And in fact, you know, he looks presidential, and he acts
presidential. And it looks like vast majority of population supports him. And this made him
possible to overtake the control of the Republican Party.
And I have lot of good friends who are Republican, including advisor to the former Mitt Romney
campaign. So they ask me about Russia. They ask me for my advice about Russia. Every time I
would go to Russia, I would meet with them. So it was not possible for them even imagine that
he can become the top runner for the Republican Party. And I'm sure he has a lot of other tricks
up his sleeve.
ABC NEWS:
You think so?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
That you will see soon in the presidential campaign, yes.
ABC NEWS:
And when he visited Russia the last time, that was 2013?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
To my knowledge. Maybe he's been afterwards, but I don't know.
ABC NEWS:
And at that time, who did he meet with? Do you know?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Primarily, it was related to the pageant contest. So there was the official party and there was [an]
after party. There were many billionaires. And he was supposed to meet with President Putin.
But last minute, President Putin decided to cancel his meeting. But as consolation he sent a small
gift for Donald Trump. It's [a] lacquered decorative box with some Russian culture.
ABC NEWS:
And why did he cancel the meeting?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
He, first of all, President Putin is a very busy man. His schedule is very tight. And he works a lot.
So I believe the, just because he didn't have enough time. And he, President Putin, is known to
be late for meetings. So maybe he did not just want to make him wait.
ABC NEWS:
President Putin has spoken many times about how he thinks that "Donald Trump is a smart man,
a genius."
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I'm not sure if he said genius, because I speak Russian, and I understand the word he said.
ABC NEWS:
What did he say?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
So he said, "He is a colorful person." And, I think basically he [is] definitely for Russia, it's my
personal belief. And I think some people in the government also believe that he would be better
for U.S.-Russia relations. Because with Hillary Clinton in particular, we already know what will
happen. Because it will be just a continuation of the current policy towards Russia. So I doubt
there will be any changes at all.

But at the same time, with Donald Trump, it looks like there might be either neutral or positive
stance towards Russia. So we might see a new try after Hillary's failed attempt to reset U.S.-
Russian relationship. Maybe if Donald Trump becomes President of the United States, maybe he
will try again. And maybe it will be successful. Who knows?
ABC NEWS:
Do you think he might end the sanctions?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because, you know, president in this country, he's not the sole decision maker also. He might
portray himself as, he's the top leader, but at the same time there are so many different lobbyists
and so many groups and so many influential politicians who he has to consult with. So I doubt
that in the near future, even if he [was] elected, like immediately it will be lifted.
Because the controversy over [the] Russian-Ukranian crisis, it will not, be smooth. But what
happens is that Russia is, in fact, a capitalist society. It's a fully-fledged market economy
recognized by both the United States and the European Union. It's a member, it's a permanent
member of [the] United Nations Security Council.
So Russia is an integral part of the global political economic community. So you cannot just
disregard the opinion of Russia these days. So we have to work with Russia. And it shows why
Russia's important, in particular to the Syria crisis. Once Russia decided to intervene, including
militarily, we realized that Obama needs Russia's help. Because without Russia, they cannot
solve any issues in Syria.
And let me tell you that I'm speaking right now, I'm speaking personally, not on behalf of any
organization or any groups I'm affiliated with. It's my personal opinion. So please take that. And
what is important in this country in particular, some of the topics that I would like to see more
discussion [of] as a new American citizen, is I would like to see what we are going to do with the
national debt.
You know, let's say in 2010 we had $13 trillion debt. Right now we have $19 trillion plus. Every
single American citizen when he's born, instead of getting some kind of support from the
government as some other countries, we get almost $60,000 in debt. So that's a nice gift from the
government. So I want to see that clock, the national debt clock reverse. Once I see those
numbers in reverse, I'll know that we're doing great in this country.
ABC NEWS:
What about Ukraine?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Ukraine is protected by the United States and supposedly Russia. Because they said they all
signed [the] Budapest Memorandum, which is an agreement. And…
ABC NEWS:
But the Republican platform no longer says that the U.S. would protect Ukraine if Russia were to
invade.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because the situation with Ukraine, it's not part of the NATO block. So that is big disadvantage
for that particular country. Because NATO itself cannot protect [it] militarily from disintegration
of a country, even if Ukraine wants to join NATO they cannot because they have military
conflict right now, basically civil war. So.
ABC NEWS:
Have you ever talked to Mr. Trump about Ukraine?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No, we only spoke about Moscow in Russia.
ABC NEWS:
And what's his view on the relationship between the U.S. and Russia?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because I was involved more on the business side, so I can tell you that what amazed me is how
knowledgeable he was on the status of the real estate market in Moscow. So he must have had
very good advisers, maybe in Russia, maybe in New York, who gave him a good idea what's
happening in [the] Moscow real estate market.
So basically, the opinion that I shared with him, they, he pretty much, I realized he understood
those opinions. And he understood the ideas and the situation. He was very knowledgeable of
what's happening in the Moscow marketplace at that particular point.
ABC NEWS:
Does he have any projects in Moscow or anywhere in Russia?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Right now, I don't believe he has any projects at the moment, just because he is into political
campaign. So he is a big-shot politician these days. And I know him as a businessman.
ABC NEWS:
But was he planning some projects in Russia?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
For sure, yes.
ABC NEWS:
He has some that are being considered?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
He had some that were being considered, yes. Correct.
ABC NEWS:
What kind of projects?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
It's building a tower, residential tower.
ABC NEWS:
Residential tower?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
In Moscow City, yes.
ABC NEWS:
In Moscow itself?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
In Moscow City, which is next to, basically it's like skyscrapers like Manhattan, but on a
miniature level.
ABC NEWS:
So and there's a proposed residential tower? How far along is the project?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I don't think that at the moment it's going any further.
ABC NEWS:
It started but stopped or?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
It was in the draft stage. I know there were some drafts prepared for the project when Donald
Trump flew to Moscow. And he shared those drafts with some of the Russian businessmen. And,
other than that, I think, after signing some agreements, it didn't go any further at the moment.
ABC NEWS:
So they haven't started any construction?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No.
ABC NEWS:
Did he take any investment money in it?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
This is, I'm not familiar with.
ABC NEWS:
But he liked the idea of building something in Moscow?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
He made Donald Trump made a lot of money doing business with Russians. And, in fact, some
Russians lost money. But he was able to be very successful. Because, like the top people he met,
he'd done deals with the Russians. They lost tens of millions of dollars. And he was always doing
that.
ABC NEWS:
Really?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
Are they unhappy about that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Of course.
ABC NEWS:
Does he have enemies in Russia?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I doubt so, because he does business an honest way. Like, he didn't deceive them. It just was the
turn of events, the market downturn. So they lost money just because of the U.S. economy was
not doing as expected. And they were happy to invest with him, and they were happy to work
with Donald Trump. And they were happy to be associated with Donald Trump.
Because all money in Russia is new money. Because Russians, let's say, in 1980, 1990, they
didn't have billionaires yet. They only had millionaires, multi-millionaires. So for them to be
associated with a successful American billionaire, it was something of a novelty and something
that they liked. And they want to take pictures with him, and they want to have dinner with him
to, you know, to enjoy his company.
ABC NEWS:
Who are the best-known billionaires who've had deals or connections with Donald Trump?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Dmitry Rybolovlev, of course.
ABC NEWS:
And who else?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
With billionaires? [Aras] Agalarov. Rybolovlev. Sapir. That's about it, out of billionaires. Of
course, many multi-millionaires, and deal with them.
ABC NEWS:
Right. Many multi-millionaires as well. And what about Felix Sater? Do you know Felix-- who
is connected with Sapir I guess in some way? You don't know him at all?
[Sater is a Russian-born businessman who helped develop Trump SoHo and was involved in an
aborted effort to build a “Trump Tower Moscow” during the 2016 presidential campaign, along
with Trump attorney Michael Cohen.]
[https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/memory-lapse-trump-seeks-distance-advisor-past-
ties/story?id=34600826]
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Unh-uh
ABC NEWS:
He's one of the advisors for Trump. Who else…
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because my advisor, he's best friend of Tamir. He's regretfully he passed away. But he was one
[of] his best friends. So that's how are connected.
ABC NEWS:
And why do you think Vladimir Putin likes Trump so much?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I think for Vladimir Putin right now [the] timing is very interesting in Russia. The economy [is]
shrinking. Now it might be coming out of recession soon though. But it looks like, with the
coming election, because in Russia we'll have the Russian Parliament elections. And then in two
years from now, we'll have presidential elections. So I think, who will be the president in the
United States will affect who will be the president in Russia.
ABC NEWS:
So Vladimir Putin likes Trump for that reason?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I don't think that's the only reason. But definitely for them, for the Russian elite, there is at least
some hope that with Donald Trump, they can make a deal. Because he is known to be able to
make deals. But with Hillary they know that nothing will happen.
ABC NEWS:
And your own relationship with Trump, when was the last time you saw him or spoke with him?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
It was a long time ago.
ABC NEWS:
A long time ago?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
Are you still an advisor or still a broker?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes, I have brokerage license in New York, and I do talk to his team. But it's, I do not officially
form advice.
ABC NEWS:
You talk to his team?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
Like who in his team do you talk to?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Some of his top advisors.
ABC NEWS:
Yeah. And what's the nature of the discussion? More business deals or?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No, it's more related to Russia, yes.
ABC NEWS:
As to possible arrangements there, or what? Just, I'm just curious, what's the ongoing interest?
Like, do you talk to his children at all or do you talk to Eric or Donald Junior or Ivanka?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No.
ABC NEWS:
And--
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I've been invited one time, when Ivanka was in Atlanta. They invited me, but I had to fly to
somewhere else, so I couldn't meet her.
ABC NEWS:
And are there investments in Kazakhstan or that you're aware of or?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I know at one point Donald Trump, he also considered building a hotel in Russia, yes, that's
correct, with Russian agency. But it didn't go any further. Because there were lengthy
conversations. And a lot of meetings. But at that time, Russia was very slow at doing business.
And there [were] so many different chains of command you have to go through. So many
agreements. And the problem of doing business in Russia is that political circles, they change a
lot. So just give you an example, just few days ago, President Putin, he replaced four governors
in one day. He replaced five Plenipotentiary Representatives in one day. So it's unimaginable.
And [the] political system Russia is totally different from the political system in the United
States. For example, President Putin, he appoints governors. Here, of course, it's a totally
different case. Then, President Putin and any president in Russia, he is elected for six years. And
the American president is elected for four years.
So he has a longer term in the office compared to the American president. So he has more room
for maneuvers compared to the U.S. president. And also, [the] president in Russia has much
more power, political power than the American president in the United States.
ABC NEWS:
And it's fair to say though that the Trump organization is still interested in doing projects in
Russia?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I'm sure that if he is elected to be president, he will not probably do any projects in Russia.
Because he will be a top political figure. But if he's not elected president, I guarantee in the next
ten years, he'll do a project there.
ABC NEWS:
He wants to do projects there?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Of course, because he made a lot of money with Russians. And you must be stupid in business
not to make money if there is a chance legally.
ABC NEWS:
So he likes Russia because there's money to be made there?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
He likes Russia because he likes beautiful Russian ladies. And he likes talking to them of course.
And he likes to be able to make lot of money with Russians, yes, correct.
ABC NEWS:
Does he have a Russian girlfriend?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No.
ABC NEWS:
No, he just likes beautiful Russian ladies? And--
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because he was the [leader of] the pageant. So he had a chance to meet all the most beautiful
ladies in the whole world, yes. Because, when I had meeting with Donald Trump, in fact there
was also a Miss Florida in the same time. So I talked to her, because she was having meeting
with him after me.
ABC NEWS:
Miss Florida?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
What year was that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
It was 2008.
ABC NEWS:
2008? And Miss Florida was there too just to--
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
What was the--
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because he likes a good entourage. Yes, good-looking people.
ABC NEWS:
Yeah, but one quick question. Do you go by any other name?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Before, I used the name Sergio sometimes. Because I give a lot of presentations. I gave
presentations to Harvard University, to Berkley Law School. I gave presentations to different
agencies. And sometimes they mispronounce my name. So sometimes I would just use by the
name Sergio, because it's just easier for the American people to comprehend and to spell and to
pronounce.
ABC NEWS:
Any other last name?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Mil-- Millian.
ABC NEWS:
That's the only last name you use?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Officially, yes.
ABC NEWS:
Do you have another name you use?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
What is that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Kukutz
ABC NEWS:
Why do you use another name?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because I'm a dual citizen.
ABC NEWS:
You use two names?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
Why?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Because when I immigrate to United States, I changed my name.
ABC NEWS:
Why did you do that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
In, to, in respect to my grandmother. Her last name, Millianovich.
ABC NEWS:
Because some people wonder whether you are working for the Russian government secretly.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Absolutely no.
ABC NEWS:
No?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No.
ABC NEWS:
Are you involved in any way with a Russian intelligence agencies?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Absolutely no.
ABC NEWS:
You've heard that, right?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Of course.
ABC NEWS:
What do you say?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
So I'm not involved.
ABC NEWS:
Not involved? Do you ever report back to them?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Absolutely no.
ABC NEWS:
Do they ever ask you questions or?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No.
ABC NEWS:
But you have friends inside the government, don't you?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Of course.
ABC NEWS:
Do they ever ask you what's going on in American politics?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes. Because usually, if I meet top people in the Russian government-- they invite me let's say to
Kremlin for the reception-- so of course I have a chance to talk to some presidential advisors and
some of the top people. But…
ABC NEWS:
But you're saying you're not a Russian spy.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Of course not.
ABC NEWS:
You've become an American citizen.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
And you changed your name?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
What is your original name?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Kukutz.
ABC NEWS:
But now it's Millian? You changed it now to?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Millian.
ABC NEWS:
And why did you do that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I already said, in respect to my grandmother.
ABC NEWS:
What do you mean?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
My grandmother's maiden name was Millianovich, so I really like that name. And I respect my
grandmother, so I decided to -- I had to shorten it because it was too Slavic and too complicated
to pronounce for the Americans. So I changed it to Millian.
ABC NEWS:
Because for some people for you to take a different name when you came here raised some
questions about who you really are.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
For who?
ABC NEWS:
People in U.S. government wonder.
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No, it's--
ABC NEWS:
Because you worked for the Russian military, right, and the foreign ministry? And then you
came here and changed your name?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I didn't work for Russian military ever.
ABC NEWS:
You were a translator for them?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No.
ABC NEWS:
You were not?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No.
ABC NEWS:
You were a translator for the foreign ministry?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I was translating for [one of the export] agencies in Belarus, not in Russia.
ABC NEWS:
I see. And what do you think is your ultimate goal in the U.S., in terms of U.S.-Russia
relationships?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
It's a very good question. Are you talking about the political side of it? What I believe is that I'm
one of those very few people who have insider knowledge of Kremlin politics who have [the]
ability to understand the Russian mentality and, who has been able to successfully integrate in
American society.
And I believe that my knowledge and insider information and connections and-- what I have
done so far, with doing business deals with Russians-- could translate into great benefits for the
American administration. Because I can help direct them to the way where they can have very
successful relationship. And what is very important, we will never face a nuclear winter.
ABC NEWS:
And with your insider information, do you have any information as to whether the Russian
government hacked into the Democratic Party computers?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I've been asked this question a few times. And what I can tell you right now is that, for example,
if the Russian government or let's say, some people Putin ordered to get into the computers... But
he-- another question, let-- okay, he wants to support Donald Trump. That's fine. But if he
wanted to support Donald Trump, he would share those emails that got deleted. That would be
real support. So right now, it looks like Putin if he ever did that, which I doubt, he is supporting
Hillary.
ABC NEWS:
By releasing all the documents?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No, by not releasing the, not sharing those deleted emails -- if he has them.
ABC NEWS:
Do you think the Russians might have done that?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
How? I don't know how to know. Even if Barack Obama doesn't know, how can Sergei Millian
know?
ABC NEWS:
So do people in the Kremlin ask you for your advice, your thoughts on Donald Trump?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
No, not really. I mean, we discuss Donald Trump, but never.
ABC NEWS:
But they like him?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Okay, there are many different opinions, but the basic opinion, they doubt he can become U.S.
president.
ABC NEWS:
They doubt it. They like him, but they doubt he can actually succeed?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
Yes.
ABC NEWS:
What do you think?
SERGEI MILLIAN:
I think he's a great. He can be great politician. I think-- I really hope that if he succeeds-- if he is
successful in becoming U.S. president-- maybe he can make this country more efficient. Because
the way he runs his business empire, if he employs those methods and tactics to the management
of U.S. government, which is also like a corporation let's say. Because in my mind, which may
be a little bit different from the common view, [the] U.S. government is like a big corporation
and it's run like a big corporation. Many people involved in many branches. And like you talked
about, for example-- different agencies including Secret Service agencies, in the United States--
there are more than 1,000 government secret agencies and maybe about 2,000 private secret
agencies.
And I'm thinking sometimes, does the United States really need so many thousands of different
agencies? Maybe a hundred agencies can do the job that the thousands of agencies are doing.
Because I doubt any single country in the world has so many agencies. And it's just interesting.
Is it possible to make it where United States spends more money on infrastructure? Because I
travel a lot. I just returned from Dubai. Beautiful airport, you know, and I travel throughout the
United States. And Detroit, I was amazed by the infrastructure and by the airport. So I really
hope that, for example, if Donald Trump becomes president that he will keep his promise and he
will rebuild the infrastructure, especially that one of the Third World country infrastructure.
Because for me it's just incredible why one of the most powerful countries in the world has the
infrastructure that is, you know-- wherever I go they have better infrastructure. And I just cannot
believe that. And when people arrive to United States, they just, that is their first impression.
And, the impression as compared to the Hollywood movie, it's kind of disappointing.
And, for example, immigration system also one of the least efficient. Because I went many times
to China, to other countries, [where] very fast you process through Immigration Control. In the
United States, you wait hours and hours. And, I really hope that these basic things-- let's say
about food in United States is also big problem, especially with the public schools. What they
feed our children here in United States is terrible. Because I think we could give example, take
example from France, from European countries where there is some concern about the food-- the
quality and the safety of children. And, it just, these are some basic things that I think the new
president should focus on.
And there is a lot of discussion about international politics and a lot of discussion about the
Trans-Pacific Partnership. But what I don't like with these big agreements is that some of the
parts are done in secret. That's also not very fair to the businessmen and to manufacturers.
Because I think if the United States does any kind of business with foreign countries, the first
idea should be protecting its own manufacturing base, its own businesses, its own factories. That
should be goal number one. And then other countries, whoever is aligned with the United States,
of course they should also benefit. But if the idea is to give [the] manufacturing base to other
countries and the United States stays behind, I don't think it's a very reasonable and good idea.
ABC NEWS:
Well, thank you very much for your time today. I appreciate it much.