You are on page 1of 38

ISR – INDIVIDUAL SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

SURAJ PADMANABHA SUVARNA

ADMISSION NO. HPGD/JA16/0634

SOCIAL CAUSE: WATER SCARCITY IN MAHARASHTRA

NAME OF THE NGO: “PAANI FOUNDATION AND SATYAMEV JAYATE WATER CUP
2018”

PRIN. L. N. WELINGKAR INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT &

RESEARCH

MAY 2018
INDEX

SR. NO. PARTICULARS PAGE NO.


1 Introduction 3
 Social context of NGO 3
1.1 Social Causes of Water Scarcity 4
 Freshwater deficit 5
 Impact on State & Cities 5
 Important Causes on Water Scarcity 5
1.2 Economic Problems 6
1.3 Health Problems 7
2 About “PAANI FOUNDATION” 8
 Paani Foundation Team & Directors 9

3 Satyamev Jayate Water Cup 12

3.1 Water Cup 2016 13


 Highlights of Water Cup 2016 14

3.2 Water Cup 2017 15


 Highlights of Water Cup 2017 17

3.3 Water Cup 2018 18


 Highlights of Water Cup 2018 18
3.4 Training Programme 19
4 Satyamev Jayate Water Cup 2018 / Marking System 22
4.1 Soak Pits 22
4.2 Nursery 23
4.3 Soil and Water Conservation structures done through 24
Shramdaan / Manushyabal
4.4 Structures / Treatments for Water Storage or Silt 29
Trapping Created by using Machines
4.5 Weightage for Doing Adequate Proportion of Area 30
Treatment and Ridge Line Work
4.6 Quality of Work Done 31

2
4.7 In Situ Soil and Water Conservation 32
4.8 Water Saving Technologies 34
4.9 Water Budget of the Village 35
4.10 Repairs of Existing Structure / Dug Well recharge / 36
Innovations
5 Get Involved 37

1. Introduction

Water is one of our most precious resources and as much as we want it to be, it is not
an infinite resource. Water is all around us but, only 2.5% of water is fresh water. A
main problem that we face all over the world is to meet daily needs of water- 1 in 3
people around the world suffer, as water isn’t as accessible to them for their
needs. We struggle to get water directly to communities far and near, and this
problem gets worse due to climate change, deforestation, increased population and
urbanization. This problem is only going to get worse as cities and populations grow
and as the need for water increases in agriculture, industries and households. As
demand increases, we keep digging deeper and deeper to find it. Farming accounts for
70% of water use and as the population will keep increasing the usage will also
increase. We need the right crops and planting methods, better water supply system,
environmental restoration and climate forecasting to reduce drought and flood risks.

How is water scarcity affecting countries?

India

India is not a water poor country, due to growing human population, severe neglect
and over-exploitation of this resource, water is becoming a scarce commodity. While
this is a growing concern all over the world, India is most vulnerable because of the
growing demand and in-disciplined lifestyle. Today in India, shifts in climate and
increases in population are drastically depleting water supplies. 90% of water
consumed is used for agricultural purposes. From 1990-2012, groundwater supplies
has decreased up to 1 Meter and will continue to do so. As the population will keep
on growing (1,270,272,105 today) and water keeps depleting, by the year 2080 India

3
could have smaller harvest to feed its population which will act as a domino effect
leading to other problems! This calls for immediate attention by the stakeholders to
make sustainable use of the available water resources to ensure better quality of lives..

 Social Context of NGO:


Paani Foundation is a not-for-profit company set up in 2016 by the team of the TV
series Satyamev Jayate to fight drought in rural Maharashtra. Water scarcity is largely
a man-made condition, and we believe that only people’s efforts can solve the crisis.
Paani Foundation aims to harness the power of communication to mobilise, motivate
and train people in this mission to eradicate drought. Offering training in scientific
watershed management, leadership and community-building, Paani Foundation is
now working in roughly 90% of drought-hit Maharashtra. Our flagship project, the
Satyamev Jayate Water Cup was instituted in 2016 as a way to encourage villages to
apply their training in watershed management. Water Cup 2018 will be held from 8th
April to 22nd May 2018.

1.1 Social Causes of Water Scarcity:


The water sources are contaminated with both bio and chemical pollutants. 21% of
the country's diseases are water-related with only 33% of the country having access
to traditional sanitation. Excessive use of groundwater for agriculture has also caused
a strain in the resource. As India is one of the top agriculture producers in the world,
the consumption of water for land and crops is also one the highest. The results of the
widespread use of traditional techniques used for irrigation aligned with
mismanagement are few of the reasons for the water deficit.
A significant portion of water used for industrial and domestic purposes is waste when
returned to the streams. The demand for freshwater is increasing with the growing
population, but the decreasing amount of supply fails to meet the needs of the people.
The increased amount of solid wastes in water systems such as lakes and rivers also
heavily pollute the water. To combat this problem, the government issued the Ganga
Action Plan issued in 1984 to clean up the Ganges River. However, much of the river
remains polluted with a high coli form count at many places. This is largely due to lack
of maintenance of the facilities as well inadequate fees for service. Due to this issue,
urgent need for safe drinking water is 70.1% of the households in urban areas. 18.7 %
in rural received organized pipe water supply and others have to depend on surface
and ground water which is untreated.

4
 Freshwater deficit
Along with the strain on surface water, the country is also facing great stress with
freshwater. Lack of strict state regulation on ground water development has caused a
strain on the amount of freshwater available. Indifference from bureaucratic powers
and constant neglect has caused the problem to intensify. In hand with the lack of
government interference and continued industrial waste deposited into major rivers,
most freshwater entering the bodies of water is defiled. The approximation of the
untreated water entering the water sources such as rivers and lakes is 90 percent and
only furthers the problem.

 Impact on State & cities


Various states in India including Maharashtra experienced a great water shortage.
Much of the farming industry came to a halt and created both food insecurity and
massive unemployment. Much of the local economy and farming regions nearly
collapsed with the citizens having no choice but to use the polluted water.

 Important Causes for Water Scarcity:

 Overuse of Water: Water overuse is a huge issue that a lot of people are
dealing with. It may be overused on people, animals, land, or any other
number of things. It may also be used for recreational activities without any
care about the effects that it may have on the world around them.

 Pollution of Water: Water pollution is a huge problem, especially when


you’re looking at areas that don’t necessarily have a good sewage system.
Pollution can be anything from oil, to carcasses, to chemicals, and to fecal
matter. No matter what it is; it makes a lot of issues for the people who may
need to use it.

 Conflict: If there is conflict over an area of land, it may be difficult to access


the water that is located there. In the worst case scenarios, people could end
up dying if they try to access the water in these areas (due to violence). This
can result in a variety of other issues, including pollution, which we discussed
in the previous point.
 Distance: There are a number of areas throughout the entire world that deal
with water scarcity because they just aren’t close to anywhere that has
water. Areas that are considered to be desert, or areas that are secluded,
may not have somewhere that the people can get water effectively.

5
 Drought: A drought is, in short, an area which is not getting enough rainfall
to be able to sustain the life that is residing there. Some areas are in perpetual
drought, whereas other areas may be dealing with a drought on occasion.
Droughts are common all over the world, and there is little that can be done
to prevent such things from happening.
 Governmental Access: In some countries, specifically those with
dictatorships, the use of water may be strictly controlled by those in power,
causing a scarcity for those who may be located in those areas of the world.
These governments use it as a source of control over those that they are
governing, which can be a huge problem.

1.2 Economic Problem:


AFTER two successive dry years, 330m people in India, around a quarter of the
population, are facing acute water shortages. A scorching summer is at its peak:
destitute farmers are committing suicide and tanks are running dry. Officials in
Madhya Pradesh, in central India, have deployed armed guards to protect a fast-
depleting reservoir. Last month, in a last-ditch effort to save lives, trains carried
millions of litres of water to Latur, a parched district 400km east of Mumbai. In mid-
April, an “above-normal” rain forecast by the India Meteorological Department was a
godsend for a country reeling from its worst water crisis in four decades. Earlier this
month, it predicted the onset of the monsoons on June 7th.

A good drenching will lift the spirits of both farmers and businesses. Over 600m people
in India depend on agriculture for their living and nearly two-thirds of land under
cultivation has no irrigation and so relies on rain. The period between June to
September brings three-quarters of total rainfall but is known to be erratic four out of
ten years. After last month’s cheery forecast, India's stock market rallied to its highest
peak in four months. Using subsidized electricity, farmers pump groundwater at will,
drawing up more annually than China and America combined. A recent European
Commission report counted more than 20m boreholes in India, up from tens of
thousands in the 1960s. The water table is falling on average by 0.3 meters and by as
much as 4 meters in some places. Water-starved regions often cultivate water-hungry
crops like paddy, cotton and sugarcane. Punjab in the north and Tamil Nadu and
Karnataka in the south continue to squabble over the ownership of rivers. The problem
is not lack of adequate water, but its reckless overuse. China, with a larger population,
uses 28% less fresh water than India.

An ambitious $165 billion water-diversion scheme for drought-prone regions is in the


works. A total of 15,000 kilometres of artificial waterways are to link no fewer than 37
rivers. The rigged system is set to relocate 174 cubic kilometres of water, ostensibly

6
enough to quench the thirst of 100 metropolises the size of Mumbai. In February,
Narendra Modi, the prime minister, pledged to double farm incomes by 2022. But
before grand projects and promises, small steps are needed. Rainwater harvesting, an
age-old technique for capturing monsoon run-off, can provide the country with
reliable water supplies throughout the year. Building check dams on riverbeds will
improve groundwater levels. Farmers should be trained and encouraged to switch to
drip irrigation. And the government should set a better example as India awaits the
rains: when a minister visited Latur last month, local officials wasted 10,000 litres of
water scrubbing the helipad for his arrival.

1.3 Health Issues/Problem:

Water crisis is one of the most dreadful things that one faces in one’s life. The recent
case of water scarcity in Latur, Marthawada region in Maharashtra is an eye-opener
for one and all to think about how each drop of water is so precious.
Water is a key player that controls almost the whole body and it also controls the
diseases that are spread when adequate water is not available. Some of the diseases
that are spread due to water scarcity are the following:-

1) Trachoma: (eye disease) this disease is caused by a bacterium Chlamydia


trachomatis. This bacterium causes the breakdown of the outer surface of the cornea,
roughening of the inner surface of that eyelids or eyelid inversion and may also lead
to complete blindness. This can spread directly or indirectly due to lack of clean water
and poor sanitation. The bacterium can spread through unwashed hands or towels of
the infected person.

2) Diarrhea: It is caused by a virus, bacterium or parasite and affects the intestine. The
infection is spread from food or water that is contaminated from stool or directly from
the infected person through contact. The flies are major carriers for spreading the
disease by sitting on the feaces. It can be prevented by drinking loads of clean water,
proper sanitation and by washing hands properly.

3) Amoebic Dysentery: It is similar to diarrhea but will be having blood stains on stools.
It is caused by the amoeba Entamoeba hystolytica. The mode of transmission is
through contaminated water and food. These amoeba form infective cysts on stools
and spreads through flies or whoever has contact with the stools and does not wash
hands properly.

4) Cholera: Cholera is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. This infection also
affects the small intestine and the mode of transmission is same is through
contaminated food and water which contains human faeces containing the bacterium.
Here also poor sanitation, poverty and scarcity of clean water are the major villains.

7
5) Giardiasis: This disease is caused by the parasite, flagellate protozoan Giardia
lambda. It mainly affect the digestive tract and almost all the digestive tract diseases
are caused by the insufficient clean drinking water.

6) Typhoid: This disease is caused by the bacterium Salmonella typhi. It mainly affects
the intestine and spreads in the blood. This disease is also caused by eating or drinking
food or water that is contaminated by the faeces of the infected persons which directly
points to the scarcity of water.

7) Hepatitis A & E: This is a viral infection affecting the liver. The mode of transmission
in all these diseases is by consuming water and food contaminated by the virus causing
it.

8) Worm disease: Hook worm and guinea worm disease is caused by the corresponding
parasites. It lives inside the intestine of the host and is spread through the faeces
(which contains this parasite) contaminates water and food.

2. PAANI FOUNDATION

Paani Foundation is a not-for-profit company set up in 2016 by the team of the TV


series Satyamev Jayate to fight drought in rural Maharashtra. Water scarcity is largely
a man-made condition, and believe that only people’s efforts can solve the crisis. Paani
Foundation aims to harness the power of communication to mobilise, motivate and
train people in this mission to eradicate drought. Offering training in scientific
watershed management, leadership and community-building, Paani Foundation is
now working in roughly 90% of drought-hit Maharashtra. Flagship project, the
Satyamev Jayate Water Cup was instituted in 2016 as a way to encourage villages to
apply their training in watershed management. Water Cup 2018 held from 8th April to
22nd May 2018. Paani Foundation was set up with the aim of making Maharashtra
drought-free using the power of communication. The team of Satyamev Jayate
researched the issue of water and found that man, not nature is largely responsible
for this crisis of drought. While decentralized watershed management has proved to
be the scientific solution to this problem, the greater problem to address has been
that of social fracture. At Paani Foundation we believe in the power of unity, and are
convinced that only a people’s movement can eradicate drought. Our efforts have
been towards catalyzing this movement.

Through a holistic, experiential training programme, we equip villagers with both


technical know-how as well as leadership skills to tackle the issue of drought in their
villages. We have created simple training films, an Android App as well as training
manuals for this purpose, and have teams working across the state to impart this

8
knowledge. Every year, to incentivize this programme, we conduct a competition
called the Satyamev Jayate Water Cup, in which villages compete to win prizes for the
best watershed management work. In these past two years, what started as an
experiment has become a movement of which we now are merely a small part. The
efforts of the villagers themselves have ensured that a water revolution is not far
away.

 PAANI FOUNDATION TEAM

Aamir Khan Kiran Rao


Founder Founder

Satyajit Bhatkal Reena Datta


Chief Executive Officer Chief Operating Officer

9
Lancy Fernandes Dr Avinash Pol
Training Head Pramukh Margdarshak

Suresh Bhatia Christopher Rego


Creative Director Creative Director

Svati Chakravarty Bhatkal


Head, Social Media

10
Board of Directors

Rajiv Luthra

Anand Desai

B. Shrinivas Rao

11
3. Satyamev Jayate Water Cup:

The Satyamev Jayate Water Cup is an annual competition organized by Paani


Foundation in which villages compete to do the best work in rainwater harvesting and
watershed management. Every year Paani Foundation invites all villages from selected
talukas to participate in the six-week long competition. Villages which wish to
participate must nominate between three and nine citizens based on their population,
and send them to a four-day intensive training programme conducted by Paani
Foundation. Here they learn the techniques of scientific watershed management as
well as leadership and community building skills. They are also familiarized with
the rules and marking system of the Water Cup.

Once the training is complete the competition begins, typically over the months of
April and May in preparation for the monsoon. Villages build water conservation
structures through Shramdaan (voluntary labour), raise money for machine work, test
and treat soil, budget water usage, implement water saving technologies, etc. Paani
Foundation makes technical help available to the participants. Once the competition
is complete, villages are judged on a 100-point marking system.

12
The top three villages in 2018 will get cash prizes of ₹75 lakhs, ₹50 lakhs and ₹40 lakhs
respectively, and the top village from each taluka will get a cash prize of ₹10 lakhs.

Watershed Organisation Trust (WOTR) is the knowledge partner of Paani Foundation


for the Water Cup.

3.1 Water Cup 2016:

When we conceived of the Water Cup, we first wanted to ascertain the feasibility of
the competition and test its effectiveness across different regions of the state. The
pilot project in 2016 was started in three talukas across three diverse regions of
Maharashtra – Marathwada, Vidarbha and Western Maharashtra. The three chosen
talukas were Ambajogai (Beed), Warud (Amravati) and Koregaon (Satara). The
competition was declared open for all villages which wished to participate in these
talukas. 850 villagers were trained in this pilot year, and 116 villages chose to
participate in the Water Cup which was held between 20th April and 5th June 2016.

Water Cup 2016 was a huge success, with over 10,000 people doing Shramdaan
(voluntary labour) daily, and mass participation of people from all walks of life. Groups
of volunteers from diverse sections of civil society, like drivers of State Transport buses
in Baramati, Giants International, IT students from Satara, doctors, lawyers, actors,
journalists, government officials at all levels, people with disabilities and even senior
citizens, all participated with great enthusiasm. This had a transformative impact on
the villages, creating unprecedented unity in action and a sense of pride and
achievement in the work they had collectively done by putting aside old differences.
There was also a sense of confidence in being able to solve this age-old problem
themselves, breaking the cycle of dependence of government. 1,368 crore litres of
water storage capacity was created in just 45 days, which is valued at ₹272 crores
annually.

13
 Highlights of Water Cup 2016

3 Districts
3 Talukas
116 Villages
850 People trained
The average number of people who did Shramdaan
10,000
daily
1,368 Crore litres of water storage capacity built.
Winner Velu village

14
3.2 Water Cup 2017:

With the success of the pilot project, viz. Water Cup 2016, our next objective was to
test the Water Cup model at scale. So in 2017 we scaled up ten times and chose 30
talukas for the competition in the same three regions. The challenges were many,
primary among them being ensuring quality control in both the training and the work
carried out in the talukas. Two big tools were created and employed for this.

The first was that we created more than 20 videos in Marathi which were simple, step-
by-step guides explaining all the methods of watershed management. These are
available for free on YouTube and on our website and can be used by anyone whether
or not they are a participating village.

The second major tool was the creation of the Paani Foundation App, which again is
free to download from the Play Store. This Android App helps each village track their
progress in the Water Cup, and it includes numerous features like data entry forms

15
that record work done, educational films, information about the marking system and
rules, and even enabled GPS tracking of watershed structures. The App has been
integrated into the Water Cup system in a way that a village’s final score is largely
based on the data that the village itself has entered into the App.

Training began in February 2017, and 6,000 people were trained in 22 centres across
the state. Water Cup 2017 began on 8th April with 1,321 villages participating with
unstinting enthusiasm till 22nd May. An average of 65,000 people did Shramdaan daily
across the talukas. Over 70,000 hours of machine work was donated by Bharatiya Jain
Sangathana, a professionally run NGO with experience in large-scale rural projects.
Large numbers of people from cities and towns lent a hand. On 1st May – Maharashtra
Day, more than 25,000 city dwellers came to the villages to take part in a massive
Shramdaan initiative titled ‘Chala Gaavi’ (‘Back to the Villages’). The tremendous work
carried out in these six weeks created water storage capacity of 8,261 crore litres,
valued at ₹1,652 crores annually. It is heartening to note that the participation of
women in this movement has been equal to, if not greater, than that of the men.

From Drought to Prosperity

16
 Highlights of Water Cup 2017

13 Districts
30 Talukas
1,321 Villages
6,000 People trained
The average number of people who did
65,000
Shramdaan daily

8,261 Crore litres of water storage capacity built

Winner Kakaddara village

17
3.3 Water Cup 2018:

The third Water Cup has been scaled up to include 75 talukas and a whole new zone –
Northern Maharashtra. 5,945 villages applied for training this year, which was held at
60 training centres. 4,025 villages are now participating in the competition between
8th April and 22nd May 2018. Click here for the list of
villages: www.bit.ly/watercup2018

 Highlights of Water Cup 2018

24 Districts

75 Talukas

4,025 Villages

20,000+ People trained

18
3.4 Training Programme

Our four-day training programme aims to do two things:

1) Provide a basic course in watershed management, which will enable the trainee
to know the first principles of the science behind watershed development.

2) Provide social skills including leadership, team building, conflict resolution, etc.
through games and role playing.

We have found that people best learn by observing their peers and by doing rather
than listening. We have developed a peer-to-peer training programme that is both
practical and experiential. Training is conducted in a village which is water-abundant,
often despite being hundreds of kilometres away from canal irrigation, so that trainees
can see for themselves the wonders of effective watershed management. Activities

19
are designed to compete for the attention of the trainee as fiercely as one would for
the attention of a TV audience, with role-play and games making the process an
emotional experience that educates. There is both technical training as well as social
training in which the trainees are invited to grapple with situations that – as in life –
are not easy to resolve. Our social training games are also designed to sensitise
trainees to concepts like inter-generational equity in access to water, treating water
as a shared or community resource and village-level plans for the use of water.

20
Some of the things we cover in curriculum are:

o Calculating the amount of rainfall received by one’s village annually, along with
how much is wasted and how much can be saved
o Understanding the functioning of basic watershed structures like farm ponds
and contour trenches through live models
o A tour of a successful village watershed
o Understanding what will work best for the topography of one’s own village
o Understanding the function of supplementary activities like tree planting and
soil testing
o Playing games that teach leadership, teamwork and the importance of water
o Using the Paani Foundation App effectively

Villagers go away with an introduction to the science of watershed management.


However, more complex skills like engineering design and site-selection are taught
using supplementary audio-visual and print material that are provided to trainees free
of cost. Trainees must go back and study this material while implementing what they
have already learnt for their village’s Water Cup efforts, to become true masters in
watershed management. Paani Foundation continues to provide technical help to any
village that requires it.

21
4. Satyamev Jayate Water Cup 2018 | Marking System:

The participating villages will be judged for a total of 100 marks under the following
broad heads:

Sr. Component Maximum


No. Marks

1. Soak pits 5
2. Nursery 5
3. Soil and water conservation structures built 20
through Shramdaan/Manushyabal
4. Soil and water conservation 20
structures built using machines
5. Weightage for doing adequate 10
proportion of area/ridge line work
6. Quality of structures 10
7. In-situ soil treatment 10
8. Water saving technologies 5
9. Water budget 5
10. Repair of existing structures/Dug 10
well recharge/Innovations
TOTAL 100

Each of these is explained in detail below.

4.1 Soak Pits (5 Marks)


A total of five marks are available for the construction of soak pits.
The marks will be based on the proportion of households in the Gram Panchayat who
construct soak pits. E.g. if more than 40% of the households residing in all the villages
under one Gram Panchayat dig and complete soak pits, then the Gram Panchayat will
secure full 5 marks. The complete marking structure is as follows:

Percent of Households Having Functional Soak Pits Marks

More than 40% 5

More than 35% and upto 40% 4

More than 25% and upto 35% 3

22
Equal to or more than 15% and upto 25% 2

Less than 15% 0

Please note:
1. Cumulative number of functional soak pits would be considered including the soak
pits built before the competition starts.
2. Sarvajanik or community soak pits will be considered under this category. If a
community soak pit is connected to ten households, all ten households will be counted
as being treated by a soak pit.
3. Soak pits built for toilets will not be considered for this purpose.
4.2 Nursery (5 Marks)
Trees prevent erosion of soil, help in water seepage into the ground, and increase the
possibility of precipitation. Hence, tree plantation is an important activity for soil and
water conservation.
The marks scored by the competing village will be based on the proportion of
plantation done in the period of the competition as compared to the total population
of the Gram Panchayat. To score full 5 marks, two saplings per person must be planted.
E.g. if a Gram Panchayat has a total population of 1,000 (men, women and children)
and the number of saplings planted is 2,000, then it will secure full 5 marks. To win the
state-level prize, a minimum of 750 saplings must be planted. The complete marking
structure is as follows:

Percent of Plantations as Compared to the Marks


Total Population

More than 200% 5

More than 150% but upto 200% 4

More than 100% but upto 150% 3

More than 50% but upto 100% 2

Less than 50% 0

23
Please note:
1. Plantation should be done by sowing seeds or planting saplings. Seeds should be
filled in plastic bags and then sowed in the ground or sowed on raised beds. The
seeds must sprout. For scoring in the competition, on the day of the visit of the
verification team, only the number of live sprouting will be considered. Number of
bags will not be considered. Hence, considering the deficit that may occur, it will
be wise to plant more saplings.
2. The plants need not be at a single location. It can be anywhere in the village. If they
are planted by children in the school premises, it will cultivate a fondness in the
minds of the students for trees and nature. It can be at the villagers’ homes or
public places in the village. However, the nursery at a single location should have
at least 250 saplings so that it is convenient to tend to them.
3. Plants can be of any variety. However, local species will ensure easy availability of
seeds, and the plants are more likely to survive and be more compatible with the
local ecosystem.
4. Nurseries prepared before the commencement of the competition will also be
considered. However, the plantation must be done by the villagers only. Purchased
saplings will not be considered.
4.3 Soil and water conservation structures done through Shramdaan/Manushyabal
(20 Marks)

20 marks are allotted for treatments or structures created by


Shramdaan/Manushyabal that have water storage or silt trapping potential.
Please note the following in this regard:
1. Only the structures/treatments created through community Shramdaan and/or
Manushyabal from the competing Gram Panchayat will be considered in this
section. Please remember for the purposes of this competition, Manushyabal does
not allow the use of labour from outside the competing Gram Panchayat.

2. There is an exception to the above rule. Certain structures require skilled labour
for their construction. For example, skilled masons for cement nallah bunds or
those who make the mesh/ net for gabions. Some villages may not have such
skilled labourers in their villages. In such cases, in order to ensure that the quality
of the structures is sound, you may get skilled workers from outside the village.
Please note that unskilled labourers have to be from within the village.

24
3. Only the structures/treatments created in the period of the competition, i.e. from
8th April 2018 to 22nd May 2018 will be counted for this purpose. Any work done
before 8th April 2018 and after 22nd May 2018 will not be counted. Any work that
is half complete (eg. a half completed earthen dam) before 8th April 2018 and after
22nd May 2018 will be excluded for the purposes of the competition.

4. Marks will be granted on the basis of the volume of combined water storage and
silt trapping potential created. This will be measured as per the table A given
below. Total potential of water storage and silt trapping created by the Gram
Panchayat would be divided by the total population of the Gram Panchayat to
calculate per capita storage potential. It will be the responsibility of the Gram
Sevak to certify the population of the persons of all age living in the area of the
Gram Panchayat. The per capita unit is being used so that larger Gram Panchayats
and smaller Gram Panchayats are put on an equal footing.

5. Full marks, i.e. 20 marks would be given to Gram Panchayats achieving 6 cum or
more storage per capita. Gram Panchayats creating lesser potential than this
would be granted proportionately lesser marks (eg. 3 cum storage per capita will
get 10 marks).

6. If a village reaches the 10,000 cubic meter level it will be awarded 1 bonus point.
Thereafter, for every further 2,500 cubic meters, it will get 1 bonus point. The
following chart will clarify the same:

Total capacity created by the village Bonus points


through Shramdaan

10,000 cubic meter capacity 1 bonus point

12,500 cubic meter capacity 2 bonus points

15,000 cubic meter capacity 3 bonus points

17,500 cubic meter capacity 4 bonus points

20,000 cubic meter capacity 5 bonus points… and


further in this manner

25
7. After securing full 20 points in this section, the additional Shramdaan will be
counted under the machine work in section 4. Such additional work will be given 3
points. E.g: To obtain full marks in this section, the target is 2,500 cu.mtrs. If the
village has done 3,500 cu.mtrs work, then the additional 1,000 cu. mtrs. will be
given 3 points and 3,000 cu. mtrs will be added in the machine work. This
calculation will be directly done by the Paani Foundation App.
8. The above rules are in an attempt to bring large and small villages on an equal level.
9. Constructions like small earthen dams and loose boulder structures reduce the
speed of flowing water and obstruct sludge. The volume of the water at the upper
level of the construction and its capacity to obstruct sludge can also be considered.
During the period of the competition, the total storage capacity created by the
revenue villages/ Gram Panchayats will be a sum of the obstruction capacity of all
these structures and their water storage capacity. The method to calculate the
obstruction capacity and water storage capacity of every construction/treatment
that is a part of the competition is given below.
1 Continuous Contour Trench (CCT), Staggered Contour Trench (SCT)

Storage potential (TCM) = Volume of Earth Excavated (borrow pit)


= Total Length (m) x Average Width (m) x Average Depth of borrow pit (m) /
1000
Storage potential of each plot may be calculated and combined to work out Gram
Panchayat level total potential created. OR single calculation may be made by
combining length of all trenches excavated in the Gram Panchayat area and calculating
averages of width and depths of all the trenches at Gram Panchayat level.

2 Deep CCT/ Water Absorption Trench (WAT)/ Water Absorption Deep Trench
(WADT)
Storage potential (TCM) = Volume of Earth Excavated (borrow pit)
= Total Length (m) x Average Width (m) x Average Depth of borrow pit (m) /
1000
Storage potential of each plot may be calculated separately and then added to work
out Gram Panchayat level total potential created. OR single calculation may be made
by combining length of all trenches excavated in the Gram Panchayat area and
calculating averages of width and depths of all the trenches at Gram Panchayat level.

26
3 Compartment Bund, Farm Bund

Storage potential (TCM) = Total Length (m) x Average Width of the bund (m) x 1
The total capacity created in the entire village is calculated by combining the
storage capacity of all plots.

4 Contour Bunding (CB), Graded Bund (GB)


Storage Potential (TCM) =
= Total Length (m) x Average Height of bund (m) x 2
The total capacity created in the entire village is calculated by combining the
storage capacity of all plots.

5 Farm Pond/ Dug out Pond/ Sunken Pond/ Water Conservation Ditch
Storage potential (TCM) = Volume of Pond/ Ditch
= Total Length (m) x Average Width (m) x Average Depth (m) / 1000
Storage potential of each Pond needs to be calculated separately and then added to
work out Gram Panchayat level total potential created.
6. Plastic (without inlet-outlet) Farm Pond
Storage potential (TCM) = Volume of Pond/ Ditch
= Average Length (m) x Average Width (m) x Average Depth (m)

7. Small Earthen Structures or Earthen Gully Plugs (EGP)


Storage potential (TCM) = Maximum Volume of Runoff Water stopped at high flood
level
= Total Length of EGP (m) x Average Height of EGP (m) x Water Spread Length (m)
x 0.25 / 1000
Where, Water Spread Length = Average Height of EGP (m) x 15
Where 15 is a constant assuming that EGP is constructed on the stream having 5% bed
slope. Storage potential of each structure may be calculated separately and then
added to work out Gram Panchayat level total potential created. OR single calculation
may be made by addition of lengths of all the structures erected in the Gram
Panchayat area and calculating averages of heights of all the structures at Gram
Panchayat level.

27
8. Loose Boulder Structures (LBS)/ Stone Gully Plugs
Storage potential (TCM) = Maximum Volume of Runoff Water stopped at the time of
overtopping
= Total Length of LBS (m) x Average Height of LBS (m) x Water Spread Length (m)
x 0.25 / 1000
Where, Water Spread Length = Average Height of LBS (m) x 10
Where 10 is a constant assuming that LBS is constructed on the stream having 10%
bed slope.
Storage potential of each structure may be calculated separately and then added to
work out Gram Panchayat level total potential created. OR single calculation may be
made by addition of lengths of all the structures erected in the Gram Panchayat area
and calculating averages of heights of all the structures at Gram Panchayat level.

9. Gabion Structure
Storage potential (TCM) = Maximum Volume of Runoff Water stopped at the time of
overtopping
= Total Length of Gabion (m) x Average Height of Gabion (m) x Water Spread
Length (m) x 0.25 / 1000
Where, Water Spread Length = Average Height of Gabion (m) x 15
Where 15 is a constant assuming that Gabion is constructed on the stream having 6.5%
bed slope.
Storage potential of each structure may be calculated separately and then added to
work out Gram Panchayat level total potential created. OR single calculation may be
made by addition of lengths of all the structures erected in the Gram Panchayat area
and calculating averages of heights of all the structures at Gram Panchayat level.

10. Mateechaa Nala Bandh (MNB) or Earthen Nala Bund (ENB)


Storage potential (TCM) = Maximum Volume of Runoff Water stopped at high flood
level
= Total Length of ENB (m) x Average Height of ENB (m) x Water Spread Length
(m) x 0.25 / 1000
Where, Water Spread Length = Average Height of ENB (m) x 30
Where 30 is a constant assuming that ENB is constructed on the stream having 3% bed
slope.

28
Storage potential of each structure needs to be calculated separately and then added
to work out Gram Panchayat level total potential created.

11. Cement Nala Bandh (CNB)


Storage potential (TCM) = Maximum Volume of Runoff Water stopped at high flood
level
= Total Length of CNB (m) x Average Height of CNB (m) x Water Spread Length
(m) x 0.25 / 1000
Where, Water Spread Length = Average Height of CNB (m) x 70
Where 70 is a constant assuming that CNB is constructed on the stream having 1.5 %
bed slope.
Storage potential of each structure needs to be calculated separately and then added
to work out Gram Panchayat level total potential created.

12. Nala Deepening and Desilting of Water Storage Areas


Storage potential (TCM) = Volume of Earth Excavated (borrow pit)
= Total Length (m) x Average Width (m) x Average Depth of borrow pit (m) /
1000
Storage potential of each Nala Excavation needs to be calculated separately and then
added to work out Gram Panchayat level total potential created.
Total water storage potential may be calculated by adding the storage of all structures
erected during the competition period.
4.4 Structures/treatments for water storage or silt trapping Created by using
machines (20 Marks)

20 Marks are allotted for treatments or structures created by the use of machines that
have Water Storage or Silt Trapping Potential.

Please note:
1. Any work that has a combination of machine and labour will be counted as
machine work.
2. Total potential of water storage and silt trapping created by the Gram Panchayat
would be divided by total geographical area (TGA) of the Gram Panchayat to
calculate per hectare storage potential. The performance of the Gram

29
Panchayats would be marked based on “per hectare storage potential
created”.
3. Gram Panchayats achieving 150 cum or more storage per hectare of TGA would
secure full marks that are 20. GPs creating lesser potential than this would be
granted proportionately lesser marks. Eg. A gram panchayat achieving 75 cum
of storage per hectare would secure 10 marks.

4.5 Weightage for Doing Adequate Proportion of Area Treatment and Ridge Line
Work (10 Marks)

Percent of Storage created by ‘Area and Marks


Ridge Treatments’ Gained
‘W’ to Total Storage created to be
created by the Gram Panchayat to get full
The
marks i.e. ‘T’ (Percent=W/T*100)

50% and above 10

45% and above but less than 50% 9

40% and above but less than 45% 8

30% and above but less than 40% 5

20% and above but less than 30% 3

Less than 20 % 0

Satyamev Jayate Water Cup aims to do soil and water conservation in a scientific
manner. This requires ridge to valley treatment. It also requires that every farmer’s
field is treated as a micro watershed where soil erosion is minimized and water is
conserved, 10 marks are therefore allotted to encourage soil and water conservation
treatment.

For example, if the population of Dongarwadi Gram Panchayat is 100 and their
area is 100 hectares:
S = Shramdan to be done to score full marks.
= Population of the Gram Panchayat X 6
= 100 X 6

30
= 600 cubic meters.
And
M = Work using machines to be done by the Gram Panchayat to score full
marks under Section 4.
= Geographical area of the Gram Panchayat (hectare) x 150
= 100 x 150
= 15000 cubic meters.

T = Total work to be done by Dongarwadi Gram Panchayat to score full marks


under Section 3 and 4
= S+M
= 600 + 15000 cubic meters
= 15600 cubic meters.

The total measurement of the work of the above treatments 1 – 8 under sections 3
and 4 is W i.e. 6,000 cubic meters. Hence, under section 5 their marks will be as
follows.
W/T = 6,000/15, 600/100
= 38.4%
According to the above chart, Rampur will score 5 points.
If, in Rampur, the total measurement of the work of the above treatments 1 – 8
under sections 3 and 4 is W i.e. 8,000 cubic meters.
W/T = 8,000/15, 600/100
= 51.2%

According to the above chart, Rampur will score 10 points.

4.6 Quality of Work Done (10 Marks)

1. These marks will be given in the following manner:


i. These will be concurrently given by the panlot sevak/technical
trainer appointed by Paani Foundation to whom they will report.
ii. For the top ten Gram Panchayats competing for the first three prizes on
an all Maharashtra basis, these will be given afresh by the final panel of
judges.
iii. The heads under which these Marks will be given are as follows:
a. 2 marks for the overall quality of the village water plan. To what

31
extent does it aim to tap the full potential of the rainfall available
in the area of the Gram Panchayat?
b. 2 marks for site selection of various treatments that are
executed.
c. 2 marks for alignment and marking of the structures. Is a
hydromarker used where required? Are structures that should be
on the contour correctly on the contour?
d. 4 marks for the execution of structures. Are they executed as per
technical parameters.

4.7 In Situ Soil and Water Conservation (10 Marks)

Soil Test: 5 marks


In this section 5 marks will be given for soil testing.

Increasing the organic kerb of the soil greatly increases the water conservation
capacity of the soil. Hence, every farmer should know the level of organic kerb of is
soil and must increase it. 5 marks are given for the percentage of farmers who do
the soil testing in the completion period.
The marks will be based upon how many percent of the total khatedars in the
competition have done soil testing. The details are as follows:

Proportion of farmers who have done soil Marks given


testing from the total khatedars

50% or more 5

40% or more but less than 50% 4

30% or more but less than 40% 3

15% or more but less than 30% 2

Less than 15% 0

Soil testing done between 1st January 2018 to 22nd May 2018 will be considered for the
competition.

32
Fire-Free-Farm/ Aagpeti Mukt Shivaar: 5 marks
Biomass is constantly being created by the remains of the crops and trees (like leaves,
flowers, branches etc.). If such biomass is consistently composted and added to, the
organic kerb of the soil increases. However, in our villages this biomass is regularly
burnt which is an obstacle in increasing the level of organic kerb of the soil or the
biomass consistently decreases.
Biomass can be increased by various methods of gathering, composting and spreading
it around the farm. The compost pits or heaps on or near the farm, bio dynamic pits or
Nadep disintegrate the agricultural waste. The compost manures thus created help in
increasing the biomass and also the capacity of the soil to hold water. Hence, marks
will be given for not burning the biomass and generating compost manure from it.
These marks are based on the proportion of compost pits or heaps. Bio-dynamik pits
of Nadeps in comparison to the total khatedars. The details are as follows:

Proportion of farmers who build compost Marks given


pits or heaps, bio pits or NADEP amongst
total khatedars

50% or more 5

40% or more but less than 50% 4

30% or more but less than 40% 3

20% or more but less than 30% 2

10% or more but less than 20% 1

Less than 10% 0

Please note:
1. The ukirde/ pits that are being used for composting of only household wastes will
NOT be considered. But even a common heap of waste on the farm will be
considered because the main intention is that the biomass shouldn’t be burnt and
it should be disintegrated and its pith should go back to the soil.
2. The compost pits and heaps, bio pits of Nadep made before the competition will
also be considered.

33
• Water Management
While the previous section takes stock of rain water harvesting and storage, the
current section deals with the efficient utilization of the available water and measures
to reduce the usage of water. This section would assess the willingness of the villagers
especially the farmers to establish and maintain the balance between available water
in the village and the water being utilized for various purposes such as drinking,
domestic, livestock and agriculture.
Total Marks allotted for the section are 10.
The marks will be based on the performance of the Gram Panchayat in two sub-
sections described below:

4.8 Water Saving Technologies (5 Marks)

The marks allocated for adoption of Water Saving Technologies of the Gram
Panchayat are 5.

Use of water saving technologies like the use of drip irrigation, sprinkler and mulching
in agriculture saves large amounts of water. In this section, the Gram Panchayat would
secure marks based on the proportion of the cultivable area that is supported with
these water saving technologies as compared to the total area under cultivation during
the rabbi season of year 2016. The detailed marking structure is as under.

Proportion of the area supported with Marks


water saving technologies to the total Gained
Rabbi cropped area of 2016

Equal to or More than 50% 5

Equal to or More than 30% and less than 50% 4

Equal to or More than 15% and less than 30% 3

Equal to or More than 5% and less than 15% 2

Less than 5% 0

34
Note:
1. All land under water saving technologies will be considered for this purpose
including land brought under water saving technologies BEFORE the competition
period.
2. If land is under more than one treatment it will be counted separately for each
treatment. Eg. If 10 hectares of land are under drip and also use mulching, it will be
counted as 20 hectares of land using water saving technology.

4.9 Water Budget of the Village (5 Marks)


Water budget at the Gram Panchayat level has to be done by the villagers themselves
so that demand and supply of the water is understood. The water budget reveals
whether a village is water surplus or water deficit.
The marks allocated for Water Budget of the Village are 5.
The assessment of the water budget would be based on broadly the following points:

• Two Water Budgets must be prepared: one the existing Water Budget which
shows existing supply and demand for Water; and second, the proposed Water
Budget which shows the changes the Gram Panchayat proposes to make to
both supply and demand for water which could enable the Gram Panchayat to
move from a deficit to a neutral or positive budget.
• Technical correctness of the two water budgets.
• Changes in cropping patterns proposed by the Gram Panchayat in order to
move towards a neutral or positive water Budget.
• Awareness, knowledge and agreement of the Community, especially the
farmers on the water management systems and practices to be adopted
• Plans to change the cropping pattern to reduce the deficit in the water budget
- both in the current situation as well as after watershed development.
• A Gram Sabha resolution in favour of changing the cropping pattern and better
water management practices based on the water budget of the village.
• Display of the water budgets at a public place and mechanism set for its regular/
seasonal updation of the same.
This is a qualitative assessment and will be appraised depending on the specific
conditions and challenges of the particular village.
A copy of the Water Budgets should be sent with the Village Activity Form attached
hereto.

35
4.10 Repair of Existing Structures/Dug well recharge/Innovations (10 Marks)

a) Repair of Existing Structures:


Most villages have existing watershed treatment structures like CNB, MNB, KT
Weir and Paazhar Talav. However, they are leaking or broken down. It is much
cheaper to repair these old structures than to build new ones. Also, these existing
treatments are on the most appropriate sites. Hence, repairing the existing
treatment structures is essential as well as beneficial. The 10 points for this section
have been divided into 3 sub sections as follows.
Survey the existing structures and make a report about the following:
a. Total number of all existing structures
b. Measurement of each existing structure, volume of water storage, irrigated
area capacity and number of farmers benefitted
c. Current condition of each existing structure- does it leak or have any other
defects? If so, what is the defect and what is the plan to repair them?
d. A village map plotting the existing structures
e. A photo with GPS of each existing structure

3 points will be given if this report is duly filled. This work can be done even before
the competition. If a competing village or Gram Panchayat doesn’t have a single
structure as
above, then instead of the report, for 3 marks they can recharge wells or
undertake innovative initiatives. Every recharged well be awarded 1 point each.

b) Repairing existing structures/recharging wells:

Based on the number of structures repaired, 7 points will be awarded. Cleaning


the storage bodies will not be counted under repairs. Errors in construction,
completion of incomplete work, and repairing leakage will be counted under
repairs.
o If 2 or more structures are repaired then full 7 marks will be
given. If 1 structure is repaired 4 marks will be given.
o If a revenue village/ Gram Panchayat has only 1 structure that can be repaired,
then the revenue village Gram Panchayat should first repair that 1 structure
and for the remaining 3 marks, the village should recharge wells.
o If a revenue village/ Gram Panchayat has no structure that can be repaired,
then the revenue village Gram Panchayat should recharge wells for all 7 marks.
o Every recharged well be awarded 1 point each.
o Drinking water or public well recharging will not be considered.

36
c) Innovative Initiatives:

If there aren’t enough wells to recharge, only then should the village compete
under the section of Innovative Initiatives.
It is important that the village must repair existing structures and if that number is not
enough then the village must undertake the recharging of wells. If both options are
not available in adequate quantities, only then can the villages work for marks under
the Innovative Initiatives section.

e.g 1: A competing village has only one existing structure for repairs. That will give the
village 4 marks. That village has only one well to recharge. If that is done it will secure
1 extra point which makes it 5 marks. For the rest of the 2 points the village can
undertake Innovative Initiatives.

e.g 2: If a village doesn’t have a single existing structure for repair then according to
point no 1 survey report and point no.2 reparing of existing structures cannot be done.
In that case, to secure the entire 10 points, 10 wells should be recharged. If they have
only 6 wells that can be recharged then for the rest of the 4 points they can undertake
Innovative Initiatives.

For the marks that will be awarded for Innovative Initiatives, the judging committee
will take into account the need for the work, the quality of the work, conditions of the
village, and the challenges they faced while making the assessment.

5. Get Involved

a) Volunteer:

Paani Foundation has a number of opportunities for people from diverse fields to
contribute and be a part of this movement. Most volunteer activities will take place in
Maharashtra between 8th April and 22nd May, which is the Satyamev Jayate Water
Cup 2018 competition period.

One of our key activities during the Water Cup is an initiative called ‘Chala Gaavi’ (‘Back
to the Villages’), in which we invite people to offer Shramdaan (voluntary labour) in
certain villages on 1st May – which is both Maharashtra Day and Labour Day. It is an
opportunity for city dwellers to make a trip to the villages and lend villagers a hand in
building watershed structures. We have found that both urban and rural folk benefit
and greatly enjoy this interaction. To register for this, or any of our other volunteer
programmes, please fill up our Jalmitra Form by clicking here.

37
b) Donate:

Paani Foundation is fully funded and does not accept individual contributions. This is
because Paani Foundation’s mandate is to use communication to create a people’s
movement to fight drought. Paani Foundation does not directly fund villages in cash
or kind. However, villages do require assistance in the form of machines. Bharatiya Jain
Sanghatana (BJS), a non-political, non-profit, professionally managed NGO, has the
experience of organising large-scale watershed management work using machines. In
2017, BJS came forward on its own to provide over 350 villages machines for over
70,000 hours free of cost. This year BJS has committed 250 hours of JCB or 100 hours
of Pokland use free of cost to all villages that complete a threshold quantum of
shramdaan.

Those who want to support this massive effort can donate to them by clicking here.

c) Work With Paani Foundation:

If you would like to work with us in any capacity, please email your CV
to work@paanifoundation.in and we will reach out to you as and when we have a
suitable opportunity for you.

Contact
Email: paanifoundation@paanifoundation.in
Office Address:
701, Kakad Mansion
Talmiki Road
Saraswat Colony
Santacruz (West)
Mumbai – 400054

38

Related Interests