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e-Proceeding of the 4th Global Summit on Education 2016

IMPACT OF REVIEW ON THE PERFORMANCE OF GRADUATES IN THE


LICENSURE EXAMINATION FOR TEACHERS, 2012-2014

Consorcia S. Tan
Associate Professor V
Laguna State Polytechnic University, Los Baños Campus
Los Banos, Laguna Philippines
nenetan22@yahoo.com.ph

ABSTRACT

This study aims to determine the impact of review on the performance of graduates in the Licensure
Examination for Teachers in 2012 to 2014. Majority of those who attended the review were Bachelor of
Secondary Education graduates and most of them were female. The data reveal that graduates of
Bachelor of Secondary Education performed better than the national LET performance. In 2012, the
reviewees posted 66. 67% which is higher than 43. 5 % in the national level. The same is true with 2013
performance where they obtained 47.06 % which is higher than the national passing rate of 39.67 % for
that period. In 2014, the reviewees got a rating of 46.51 % which is also higher than 34.41 % of the
national LET rating. The same holds true for the LET performance in elementary teacher education. The
reviewees incurred positive differences of 13.21 %, 31.32 %, and 35.69 % for the same periods which
further strengthen the findings that the review contributed a lot in their LET performance. Their LET
performance as compared with the national passing rate showed a positive difference which means
that the graduates performed better. It is concluded that the LET review conducted by the CTE of LSPU
Los Banos Campus has a great impact on the passing performance of those who attended the review. It
is therefore suggested to continue conducting the LET review as an intervention program of the College
in order to improve the graduates’ performance. There is also a need to unify the different review
materials of Lecturers in conjunction with the Table of Specifications as stipulated in the respective
areas of disciplines and clusters.

Field of Research: Impact of review, performance, examination

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Introduction

A curriculum’s effectiveness is almost always measured in terms of the graduates’ employability and
their passing performance in licensure examinations. Curriculum planners have envisioned the
programs’ graduates as productive, employable and good citizens of the country. In Singapore, known
for its quality of education puts strict measures on assessment of student learning. The Commission on
Higher Education (CHED) has been consistently monitoring the performance of Teacher Education
Institutions (TEI) in the Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET). In fact, advisories to State
Universities and Colleges (SUC) Presidents have been forwarded to the Vice President for Academic
Affairs to call the attention of the Deans of the College of Teacher Education

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regarding graduates’ performance in the LET. The Philippine Business for Education (PBEd) has recently
released a list of top and worst performing TEIs in the 2014 Licensure Examination for Teachers. Worse
performers are those that registered only 20 percent passing rate in teachers’ board from 2009 to 2014
for both elementary and secondary education. (http://www.sunstar.com.ph/ ) In an article published in
PBed's website, it said that though the performance of TEIs in LET "generally improved" in 2014, there
are still about more than half of the 1,200 TEIs in the country that "have more than 50 percent of their
graduates" failing the teachers board. PBed also said that "the performance of TEIs with less than 20
percent test-taker passing rate in the Secondary LET continues to deteriorate." In an article published
on Rappler.com, it was reported that the organization had already presented its 2014 study to the
Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) and CHED, and included in their recommendation for the
"closure of programs that have consistently performed poorly for 5 years." An official of the regional
office of the Commission on Higher Education (Ched)-Davao said they are still awaiting order from its
central office before they can close programs of "worst performing" teacher education institutions
(TEIs) in the 2014 Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET).

This study was done at Laguna State Polytechnic University Los Baños Campus. It has been one of
the strong recommendations of the Accrediting Agency of State University and College (AACCUP) as
stated in the Level II results of Bachelor of Secondary Education (BSEd) in 2011 to wit: “The self-survey
recommendation on conducting a research on the impact of the LET review on the passing
performance of BSEd graduates is hereby recommended. ”

2. Effects of Review Theoretical Framework

This study is anchored on the fading theory which contends that the trace or mark a memory
etches into the brain is like a path made in the woods when one continually walks along the same
route. If one does not take that same path, it eventually becomes overgrown until it disappears. In
the same way, facts that are learned are forgotten when one does not review them. A famous
study on forgetting textbook materials compared the percentage of material remembered after
different intervals of time. The results were as follows:
After 1 day 54% was remembered.
After 7 days 35% was remembered.
After 14 days 21% was remembered.
After 21 days 18% was remembered.
After 28 days 19% was remembered.
After 63 days 17% was remembered.

Remembering what one heard in lectures is even more difficult to recall because he/she is not able to
slow down, pause, reflect, or to reread unless he/she takes excellent notes! In a study on recall after
listening to a seminar, students forgot more than 90% of the points from the lecture after 14 days!
(http://faculty.bucks.edu/specpop/memory.htm) According to retrieval theory, a forgotten fact hasn't
faded, it has been misplaced in the "file cabinet" of the mind. Whether the information has disappeared
completely, or has been lost, the result is the same-it has been forgotten. The interference theory is
based on the principle of limited space. As one keeps adding new information, a conflict develops
between the old and new information over the space

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available. The key to avoiding this problem is to look for connections and relationships between
ideas so that they can be "filed together" or combined. With these presented, a review is
significant if one wants to recall learned information and establish a system of retention which
can be done during review classes. Passing the LET is crucial for new graduates because it
determines their employability to a certain extent if they would like to land in more stable and
productive jobs in the future.
Merely started as an extension program of the college, the conduct of LET review classes has been
going on for about 5 years already. So far, no study has been made yet on its impact on the
graduates’ LET performance hence, this investigation.

3. Theoretical Framework

Impact of Review LET Performance Higher than the National Passing Rate

Figure 1. Theoretical Framework of the study

Based on the objective of this study, the review conducted by the College of Teacher Education
has a great impact on the LET performance of graduates who attended it as depicted on their
performance higher than the national passing rate.

Methodology

4.1 Sample and data collection method

Graduates of BSEd and BEEd who attended the review from 2012 to 2014 were the samples used
in the study. The data came from the results of examination from Philippine Regulation
Commission from 2012 to 2014. Attendance of those who attended the review was traced back
and names who passed the LET were identified.

Finding and Discussion

5.1 Descriptive statistics and analysis

The profile of reviewees in 2012 is shown in the succeeding figures. An average of fourteen
graduates availed of the LET Review classes conducted by the College of Teacher Education. Seven
or 50 % of the reviewees were graduates of BSEd and the other half were BEEd.

Course

BEEd BSEd BSEd


BEEd
7 7
50% 50%

Figure 2. Course Distribution of 2012 Reviewees

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A great majority, 13 or 93 % were female and the rest was male. (Figure 3)

Gender
Male Gender
1
7%

Gender Male
Female
Female
13
93%

Figure 3. Gender Distribution of 2012 Reviewees

For the BSEd specializations, Figure 4 depicts that 4 or 57 % were TLE majors; 2 or 29 % were
Mathematics majors and 1 or 14, Social Studies major.

Social
Specialization
Studies
1
14%
Mathemati TLE
TLE Mathematics
cs
2 4 Social Studies
29% 57%

Figure 4 . Specialization of 2012 BSEd Reviewees

On the average there were 25 graduates who attended the review in 2013. The profile of LET
reviewees in 2013 is illustrated in the succeeding figures. Figure 5 indicates that there
were 17 or 68 % who were BSEd graduates; 8 or 32 % were BEEd.

Course
BEEd, 8,

32% BSEd
BSEd, 17, BEEd

68%
Figure 5. Course Distribution of Reviewees

As depicted in Figure 6, a great majority (20 or 80 %) of the reviewees were female, the rest
were male.

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Gender
Gender Male
20%
Gender Male
Female Female
20
80%
Figure 6. Gender Distribution of 2013 Reviewees

Figure 7 shows the BSEd reviewees’ specialization. Filipino majors comprise 35 % of the
reviewees; 4 or 23 % were English majors; 3 or 18 % were Mathematics and 1 each or 6 % for
Biological Science and Social Studies.

Biological Social Mathematics


Science Studies Specialization 3
1 1 18%
6% 6%
TLE Mathematics
2 Filipino
12% English
English
Filipino TLE
4 6 Biological Science
23% 35%
Social Studies

Figure 7. Specialization Distribution of 2013 Reviewees

On the average, there were 33 graduates who reviewed in the LET for 2014. As shown in
Figure 8, majority (26 or 79 %) were BSEd and 7 or21 % were BEEd.

Course

7 BSEd
21%
BSEd
26 BEEd
79%

Figure 8. Course Distribution of 2014 LET Reviewees

Gender distribution of 2014 LET reviewees is reflected in Figure 9. It shows that majority
were female accounting for 73 % and 27 % were male.

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Gender
Male
9 Male
27%
Female Female
24
73%

Figure 9. Gender Distribution of 2014 LET Reviewees

The graduates’ specialization as illustrated in Figure 10 shows that there were 11 or 42 %


Mathematics major; 5 or 19 % Social Studies; 4 0r 15 % Biological Science and 3 or 12 % were
TLE and English majors.

Social
Specialization
Studies
5 Mathematic
19% s Mathematics
11
Biological 42% English
TLE
Science
4 Biological Science
TLE 15% English Social Studies
3 3
12% 12%

Figure 10. Specialization Distribution of 2014 LET Reviewees

The LET performance of reviewees is reflected in the following charts. Figure 11 shows that 5
out of 7 or 66.67 % who attended the review passed the LET for secondary teacher education
in 2012 while 4 out of 7 or 62.5 % for the elementary teacher education.

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8
7 Number of
Passers Number of
6 BSEd
5 Passers
BEEd
5 4
4 Number of Number of Number of Passers
Takers Takers
3 BSEd BEEd Number of Takers
2 7 7

1
0
BSEd BEEd

Figure 11. LET Performance of 2012 Reviewees

The data in Figure 12 show that in 2013, eight out of 17 or 47.06 % BSEd reviewees passed
the examination and 5 out 8 or 62.5 % BEEd reviewees passed it.
18
16 Number of

Takers
BSEd
17

8 Pass
Number of Takers
Pass Number of
6 BSEd Takers
4 8 Pass BEEd
8
BEEd
2
5
0
BSEd BEEd

Figure 12 . LET Performance of 2013 Reviewees

The LET performance in 2014 is reflected in Figure 13. It depicts that out of 26 BSEd graduates who
reviewed, 12 or 46.15 % passed the LET while 5 out of 7 or 71.43 % of the BEEd reviewees passed it.

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30
25
Numbers of
20 Passers Numbers of Passers
BSEd Numbers of
15 12 Passers
Numbere of Numbere of Numbere of
10 BEEd

Reviewees 5 Reviewees Reviewees


5 BSEd BEEd
26 7
0
BSEd BEEd

Figure 13. LET Performance of 2014 Reviewees

The comparison between LET performance of BSEd reviewees for 3 consecutive years, 2012-
2014 and the National Passing Rate for the said periods is illustrated in Figure 14.

80
70 66.67

60
50 43.5 47.06 46.51
39.75 34.41 National
40
30 LET Reviewees
20
10
0
2012 2013 2014

Figure 14. LET Performance of BSEd Reviewees and National Passing Rate

The data reveal that graduates of Bachelor of Secondary Education performed better than the national
LET performance. In 2012, the reviewees posted 66. 67% which is higher than 43. 5 % in the national
level. The same is true with 2013 performance where they obtained 47.06 % which is higher than the
national passing rate of 39.67 % for that period. In 2014, the reviewees got a rating of
46.51 % which is also higher than 34.41 % of the national LET rating. For the elementary teacher
education , Figure 15 illustrates the reviewees’ passing rate as compared with the national passing
performance. In 2012, the BEEd reviewees got a rating of 62.5 % which is higher than the national
passing rate of 49.29 %. In 2013, they performed much better with 62.5 %, again higher than the
national performance of 31.18 %. For 2014, the reviewees also posted very good performance of
71.43 % much higher than the national rate of 35.74 %.

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80 62.5 62.5 71.43

60
49.29
40 31.18 35.74 National

20 LET Reviewees

0
2012 2013 2014

Figure 15. LET Performance of BEEd Reviewees and National Passing Rate

A difference of + 36.83 %, +7.31 % and +12.1 % were incurred in LET secondary teacher education
performance for 2012, 2013 and 2014 respectively (Table 1). This clearly proves that the conduct of
review by CTE has a big impact on the reviewees chance of passing the LET . It can be inferred from the
result that among the 3 years of evaluation, 2014 positive difference of 35.69 was the highest and that
a trend of improvement in the passing rates is observed.

Table 1. Percentage of Difference between LET National and Reviewees Passing Rates in Secondary
Teacher Education

Year National Passing Rate(%) Reviewees Passing Rate Difference(+/-)


(%)
2012 43.5 66.67 +36.83
2013 39.75 47.06 +7.31
2014 34.41 46.51 +12.1

The same holds true for the LET performance in elementary teacher education. Table 2 indicates
that the reviewees incurred positive differences of 13.21 %, 31.32 %, and 35.69 % for the same
periods which further strengthen the findings that the review contributed a lot in their LET
performance. However, these findings contradict the study of Cheng (2008) who averred that a
40-hour board review course has no positive effect on improving a resident’s in-training
examination score. But it is also worthy to mention that even today students live in a test-
conscious, test-giving culture in which the lives of people are in part determined by their test
performance. (Sarason et al., 1960, p.26). This also finds its relevance in the teaching profession where
a graduate who is not a LET passer is not given the opportunity to hold a permanent teaching position
in public schools. Therefore, he/she needs to pass it to be awarded the license to teach issued by the
Professional Regulation Commission.

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Table 2. Percentage of Difference between LET National and Reviewees Passing


Rates in Elementary Teacher Education

Year National Passing Rate Reviewees Passing Rate Difference


(%) (%) (+/-)

2012 49.29 62.50 13.21


2013 31.18 62.50 31.32
2014 35.74 71.43 35.69

6. Conclusion and Future Recommendation

From the salient findings of the study, it is concluded that the LET review conducted by the CTE of LSPU
Los Banos Campus has a great impact on the passing performance of those who attended the review.
There was an increasing passing rate difference between the reviewees performance and the national
passing rate for 3 consecutive years when the review was conducted. It is therefore suggested to
continue conducting the LET review as an intervention program of the College in order to improve the
graduates’ performance. There is also a need to unify the different review materials of Lecturers in
conjunction with the Table of Specifications as stipulated in the respective areas of disciplines and
clusters.

Acknowledgement

This research paper is inspired by the leadership of the University President, Dr. Nestor M. De Vera.

References

http://faculty.bucks.edu/specpop/memory.htm

http://www.sunstar.com.ph

Sarason, S.B., Davidson, K.S., Lighthall, F.F. et al. (1960). Anxiety in elementary school children. New
York: Wiley International Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2008 Dec; 1(4): 327–329.
Published online 2008 Oct. 28

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