You are on page 1of 15

American Education in a Diverse World

Education 212
Fall 2017

Instructor: William J. Rodriguez Nieves Office:  Old Main 207

Office Phone:  299­3641 E­mail: wrodrigu@cord.edu

Office Hours:  

Wednesday 9:00am­11:00am

Tuesday and Thursday 2:00pm­4:30pm

Call or e­mail to schedule a time that works
for you.

Course Description

This introductory course explores the historical, social, and philosophical issues that have 
influenced and shaped the development of the education system in the United States. This 
context promotes (1) an understanding of current educational issues, practices and trends; (2) an 
awareness of the complexities of the teaching profession, and (3) the importance of identifying 
and articulating a personal philosophy of education.  In addressing the diverse nature of 
American education today this course additionally examines the common roots of oppression, 
prejudices, and discrimination. There is a focus on our society’s dynamic ethnic and linguistic 
diversity and cultural pluralism. Also addressed are alternative and differing abilities of 
individuals and groups, and conflict resolution, all of which emphasize the need and practicality 
of inclusive education. The course confronts teacher candidates with individual and group 
experiences to realistically challenge them to a greater self­awareness plus a personal 
commitment to proactive and positive changes in both themselves and the larger society.  To 
assist in understanding what schools are like as a place to teach and learn, the course also 
includes a 30­hour clinical experience in a multicultural setting with diverse learners. At the end 

1
of the course, students interested in continuing in the teacher education program will apply for 
admission to the program.

BECOMING RESPONSIBLY ENGAGED IN THE WORLD (BREW)
Concordia College has articulated a curricula focus emphasizing the importance of responsible 
engagement in the world. Additionally, liberally educated people need knowledge, skills, and an 
awareness to negotiate a world lived in common with others (Maxine Greene, 1988). Every 
classroom exemplifies these areas­you, as students, are a part of the world’s classroom and you, 
as a responsible future educator, will have a continued active relationship with global issues at all
levels and with a wide variety of communities.

All Education course content, from theory to planning to classroom teaching, revolves around 
the Department’s mission to “act in the best interests of the students we serve.” As a future 
educator, what does it mean to be responsibly engaged in the world through your actions? 
Academic classes help and encourage you to develop your talents for the good of others. In short,
each class is a dress rehearsal for the classroom stage that awaits you. With this comes a moral 
responsibility for you as educators to change people’s lives for the better.

As you gain broader perspectives and the skills needed to promote a global, moral and equitable 
education for all, you will be better able to discern your true calling as you exercise informed and
fair judgment in the world’s classrooms. This will be made known through your responsible 
engagement in the schools in which you teach. 

INTEGRITY STATEMENT
The students and faculty of Concordia College are committed to the expectations and 
procedures set forth in the joint statement on academic responsibility.  Academic honesty is 
expected of all students at all times.  Dishonesty (e.g., cheating or plagiarism) will result in a 
minimal penalty of failing the exam or assignment in question.  Some offenses constitute ground 
for failing the course.  Remember­­ANY time you attempt to pass off someone else's work as your
own, you are plagiarizing.   Any academic integrity violations and the consequences levied must 
be reported to the Academic Dean's Office.

2
Please insert and sign a statement of integrity on each assignment, worded as follows: 
I affirm that I have adhered to the college’s expectations 
for integrity in the completion of this assignment. 

Disability Statement 

Students who have a disability, whether permanent or temporary, which might affect their 
performance in this class are to speak with the instructor at the beginning of the term.  We will 
work together with the counseling center to determine appropriate accommodations so that you 
can meet the goals and objectives of this course. 

Required Text

Spring, J.  (2014). American Education. (16th ed.). Boston: McGraw Hill. 

Goals: Students will gain an understanding of
• The historical, social, and philosophical issues that have influenced and shaped the 
development of the education system in the United States.
• Current educational issues, practices and trends.
• Common roots of oppression, prejudices, and discrimination.
• Society’s dynamic ethnic and linguistic diversity and cultural pluralism.
• The complexities of the teaching profession.
• The importance of identifying and articulating a personal philosophy of education.

Student Learning Outcomes

Standard 3, Diverse Learners. 
A teacher must understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and create 
instructional opportunities that are adapted to students with diverse backgrounds and 
exceptionalities. The teacher must: 
c. know about the process of second language acquisition and about strategies to support the 
learning of students whose first language is not English;

3
d. Understand how to recognize and deal with dehumanizing biases, discrimination, prejudices, 
and institutional and personal racism and sexism.
e. Understand how a student’s learning is influenced by individual experiences, talents, and prior
learning, as well as language, culture, family, and community values.
f. Understand the contributions and lifestyles of the various racial, cultural, and economic groups
in our society.
g. Understand the cultural content, world view, and concepts that comprise Minnesota­based 
American   Indian tribal government, history, language, and culture.
h. Understand cultural and community diversity; and know how to learn about and incorporate a 
student’s experiences, cultures, and community resources into instruction.
j. Know about community and cultural norms.
r. identify and apply technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse 
backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities. 

Standard 6 – Communication 
b. Understand how cultural and gender differences can affect communication in the classroom.
c. Understand the importance of nonverbal as well as verbal communication.
e. Understand the power of language for fostering self­expression, identity development, and 
learning.
g. Foster sensitive communication by and among all students in the class.
k. Use a variety of media and educational technology to enrich learning opportunities

Standard 9, reflection and professional development.  A teacher must be a reflective practitioner 
who continually evaluates the effects of choices and actions on others, including students, 
parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and who actively seeks out 
opportunities for professional growth. The teacher must: 
a. understand the historical and philosophical foundations of education; 
d. know major areas of research on teaching and of resources available for professional 
development; 
e. understand the role of reflection and self­assessment on continual learning; 

Standard 10, collaboration, ethics,  and relationships.  A teacher must be able to communicate 
and interact with parents or guardians, families, school colleagues, and the community to support
student learning and well­being.  The teacher must: 
a. Understand schools as organizations within the larger community context and understand the 
operations of the relevant aspects of the systems within which the teacher works.

4
k. understand the social, ethical, legal, and human issues surrounding the use of information and 
technology in PK­12 schools and apply that understanding in practice. 
l. understand mandatory reporting laws and rules. 

Course Requirements

Attendance and Participation in Class Sessions 

a. It is expected in this course that you will practice the same high standard of 
professional conduct that will make you a valued member of a school community.
This includes being present and active in group and class discussions, offering 
thoughtful and honest critiques of the work of your colleagues, and presenting 
work that represents your own best personal effort.

b. If you are absent from class because of a college­sponsored co­curricular activity, 
notify your instructor in writing prior to your absence from class.  As you know, 
you are still responsible for content covered during your absence.  

c. If you are absent because of illness or any other unexpected event, notify your 
instructor by e­mail or telephone message as soon as possible.  Some group work 
assignments can only be completed in class; alternative assignments may be 
required.  These assignments are due at class time when you return. 

Attendance Policy:
2 unexcused absences = one letter grade drop (A becomes B)
3 unexcused absences = two letter grade drop (A becomes C)
4 unexcused absences = three letter grade drop (A becomes D)
An unexcused absence is defined as follows:  any absence that is not due to 
illness, emergency, or College sanctioned activities.

Assignments

A. Personal Learning Network (PLN) (10 points)

5
Evolving technologies have enabled teaching and learning to move beyond the barriers and 
restrictions of classroom walls. The same is true when a teacher creates a Personal Learning 
Network (PLN).You will create, use, and develop your PLN throughout the course. You can use 
a variety of technological tools in the process. One particularly effective tool for educators 
currently is Twitter. You will create a plan for developing your PLN and log your interactions 
throughout the semester. At the end of the semester you will reflect on what you have learned via
your interactions; how your Personal Learning Network has grown; and your future plans.

B. Education in the News (10 points)

Subscribe to this daily newsletter at http
   ://
   www
   .  smartbrief .  com /  ascd /.  Please browse the stories 
each day and read anything that you find relevant.   On an assigned date you will present a 
summary of the article to the class and lead a discussion. Select an article you think will result in 
interesting discussion with your class.  Prepare a 
   typed discussion
    outline that includes the 
following:

A short summary of the major points covered in the article.  Two questions directly related to the
content of the article which will lead to a group discussion on (1) how this article affects the 
education profession and (2) how it may relate to in your role as a teacher.

C. Weekly Reflections – Hand in via Moodle (100 points)
You will be responsible for ten (10) single­spaced, one­page response papers during the 
semester.  In these papers, you will respond to and make connections between your academic 
and personal life experiences and the course readings. Some Reflection Journals will have 
specific guidelines. All these reflections will be completed before class and handed in 
electronically via Moodle.  You will end each reflection with two questions to begin the class 
discussion.   
 
A reflective journal is not a summary of what you read, so do not provide one.  The professor
will be looking for the following: tolerance, growth, empathy, and authenticity/openness.   In
reflecting, you may: 
 discuss what you think 
 reflect upon your feelings in response to what you read 
 agree or disagree 
 relate what you read to previous experience 

6
 discuss   ideas   you   would  like   to   explore   in   the   future   as   a   result   of   having   read   the
chapter, article or book 
 account for learning new ideas you had not considered before 
 provide a critique and/or conclusions 
 raise questions for further reading and investigation 
In preparing to compose a reflective journal, you may ask yourself the following questions: 
 What ideas from the reading caught my attention? 
 What ideas from the reading were new to me? 
 What is my personal response to the reading?  What is the basis for such a response? 
 What conclusions can I derive from the reading material? 
 How can I implement the ideas contained in the text in my professional life? 
  
Note:  The above are suggestions to help you think critically about your journal entries.  You do
not have to address each one.  They are meant to help you go beyond summarization.  A rubric
will be provided. 

D. Issues in Education research project (80 points)

Research a topic of significance currently being discussed by American educators and, 
subsequently, share your findings with a small group of classmates. You will present your work 
twice.  This major project will allow you to explore the current research in education, develop an
in­depth understanding of a critical issue in education, and to present (teach) this information to 
others.  The second presentation will provide you with the opportunity to experience the role of 
reflection and self­assessment in improving instruction.

E. Clinical Reflections (60 points)

One of the purposes of your clinical experience is to help you recognize the various factors that 
should be included in understanding how and why young adolescents behave the way they do in 
a school setting. Equally important is recognizing how teachers create a safe and 
developmentally responsive learning environment for their middle level students. An important 
theme of good practice in teaching is reflection. Your Three blog posts will document the 
connections you make between your clinical and course content, thus providing evidence of your
thought process as you observe and work with young adolescents. Your three response/feedback 

7
posts (minimum) to other classmates’ posts provides the opportunity to engage in conversation 
with your peers. 

Points earned will be based on the quality and depth of your posts (and response/feedback posts).

****It may be that you have little interaction with the students in your clinical classroom; strong 

observation skills are valuable for educators and much, if not more, can be learned 
through 

intentional observation as actively participating in a classroom environment.

CONFIDENTIALITY: Do not identify cities, schools, teachers, or students by name. Identify 
students by letter (Female Student A, Male Student B) or “The student/teacher” rather than using
real names.

F. Response Essay: Crash    (20 points)              
In a 4­5 page essay, please respond to the following questions after viewing the film Crash in 
class. 
 What is your overall impression of the film’s portrayal of U.S. cultural/ethnic 
relations?
 Which character is the least ethical?
 Which character is the most ethical?
 What important cultural/ethnic issues are not addressed in the film?
 What relevance does the following statement have for you as an educator? “You 
think you know who you are. You have no idea.”

** Please reference the course readings, class discussion and exercises to support your 
answers.

G. Diversity Research and Presentation (50 points)=Final 

8
This assignment provides you with the opportunity to conduct research on an area of human 
diversity and present your findings to a small group of your peers. You may collaborate with 
other students assigned the same topic to identify sources of information and presentation 
ideas.

H. Clinical (School­based) Practicum

A 35­hour teacher’s aide clinical is to be completed during this block. Field­based 
experiences are designed to provide you with the opportunity to observe, analyze, 
appreciate, and reflect upon the role of a teacher. Two written clinical reflections 
document the connections you make to course content and provide evidence of the 
thinking behind your emerging philosophy of education. Clinical schedules are arranged 
with the assigned cooperating classroom teacher. Clinical hours are recorded on the 
Education Department Clinical Evaluation/Time Log form (blue). The cooperating 
classroom teacher completes the evaluation component on this form at the end of your 
experience. It is your responsibility to turn this form in to the instructor on the final day 
of class. Failure to complete at least 35 hours in a responsible manner may result in the 
failure of this course. In addition, an unfavorable teacher evaluation will result in the 
recommendation that you repeat the clinical or do not continue in the education program. 

Total Points: 300

Grading 
Due Date Policy

All assignments are due at the beginning of class on their due date.  Please be responsible about 
completing assignments on time.  In return, we will make every effort to return the corrected 
assignments to you no later than one week from the assigned due date.  If you are having 
problems completing any assignment, please contact us to discuss solutions.

All assignments, unless noted otherwise, must be word­processed, double­spaced, and in 12­
point font.  Papers with excessive grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors will result in a 
lowered grade.  

9
Grading Scale

95 ­100 A 80­83 B­ 68­69 D+


90­94 A­ 78­79 C+ 64­67 D
89­88 B+ 74­77 C 60­63 D­
84­87 B 70­73 C­ Below 60 F

Tentative Course Schedule (articles may change, order of events may change)

Date Topic Readings/Assignments


Aug.  Syllabus­Course Introduction
31 Register EZtest online 
Instructions for Research 
Day #1 Presentation 
Choose presentation topics
 Dr. Deb Grosz ­ Director of Field 
Experiences

Sept. 5 Dr.  Darrrell Stolle ­ Admission and  Reading: Spring, ch. 1


Day #2 Retention policies for the 
Department of Education
Political goals of public schooling
 Citizenship training
 Political values
 Censorship

Sept. 7 Social goals of schooling Reading:  Spring, ch. 2


Day #3
 Character education
 Morals
 School values and gay and 
lesbian youth

Ed. in the news
Sept.  Education and equality of  Reading:  

10
12 opportunity: School models  Spring, ch. 3
Day #4  Spring, ch. 4
Economic goals of schooling:
Frontline – separate and unequal
 Human capital theory
 School curriculum and 
global economy

Ed. in the news
Sept.  Meet in the Library – Amanda  Due:  
14 Brue, Librarian 
Day #5 List of potential topics from journal review
Introduction to and exploration 
of a variety of professional 
development resources 
available to teachers and pre­
service teachers.
Sept.  Finding your own philosophy Reading:  
19  Ryan and Cooper, “What are the philosophical 
Discussion and comparison of main
Day #6 foundations of American education?”
philosophies
Ed. in the news

Language Acquisition Reading:  
Sept.   Stages of language   Assigned articles & 5 key strategies for ELL 
26 acquisition instruction
Day #7  Activity – Iris Center   http://www.ldonline.org/article/50691#challenge
Understanding BICS and 
CALP
 Activity­Iris Center – 
understanding sheltered 
instruction
Ed. in the news
Sept.  Activity­ Iris Center ­  Reading:  
28  Diversity: Cultural Sensitivity  White Privilege:  Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack 
Day #9  Mainstream culture,  Spradlin Chpt 1
 Marginalization,
 Prejudice, bias, racism, 
white privilege

11
Oct. 3 Equality of education opportunity:   Reading:  
 Race,   Spring, ch. 5
    Gender 
Day#1  Special needs Due:  
0

Oct. 5 Movie: Crash Due:  

Day 
#11
Oct. 10 Student Diversity
Day   Global migration Reading:  
#12  History of cultural conflicts   Spring, ch. 6
in schools
 Educational experiences of 
 The Co­construction of racialized identity among 
immigrants
Somali youth 
 Classroom tips for non­sexist, non­racist teaching
 Ivory Tower:  Lessons for a Teacher
 Practical Ideas for confronting curricular bias
 Hammond, What’s Culture Got to Do with It?
                Classroom tips for non­sexist, non­racist teaching
                 Practical Ideas for confronting curricular 
bias
Oct. 12 Student Diversity (cont.) Due:  
 Global migration  Stages of racial development
Day   History of cultural conflicts   Ch. 3 Derman­Sparks/Ramsey, What if all the kids 
#13 in schools are white
Educational experiences of   Spring, ch. 7
immigrants 
Oct. 17 Due:  
Day   First Clinical Reflection
#14  Group A presentations

Oct. 19 Multicultural and Multilingual  Reading: 


Day Education  Group B presentations
#15
Crash Debriefing

12
Ed. in the news Due:
 Crash Reflection
Oct.   Multicultural Education Reading: 
26  Project Implicit  Group A presentations: re­teaching
Day 
#16  Video: Introduction to 
Culturally Relevant 
Pedagogy
 Ed. in the news
Oct. 31 Multicultural Education Reading:
Day   Group B presentations: re­teaching
#17 Ed. in the news
Nov. 2 Movie:  Bullied Reading:  
Day  Acting with courage scenarios  LGBT Handout Packet Info:  Tools for a Future 
#18 Ed. in the news Educator.
Nov. 7 Acknowledging and Responding  Reading :  
Day#1 to Diversity   Learning Lakota  
9  What We Don't Know Can Hurt Them: White 
• Group presentations Teachers, Indian Children
1. Native American  An Indian Father’s Plea
History & governance / Worldview
–application to schools

Ed. in the News

Nov. 9 Native Americans Reading


Day  Video ­ Indian School: Stories of   American Indian 101
#20 Survival  Sherman Alexie
Ed. in the news
Nov.  Acknowledging and Responding  Reading:
14 to Diversity   Speaking up at school

Day#2 • Group presentations
1 1. LGBT
2. Latino/a Americans      
Nov.16  Acknowledging and Responding  
Day#2

13
2 to Diversity 

• Group presentations
1. Latino/a cont.
2. African Americans   

Nov.21 Acknowledging and Responding 
Day#2 to Diversity 
3
• Group presentations
1. Asian Americans 
2. Students w/ Disabilities
Nov.  Acknowledging and Responding  
28 to Diversity 

Day  • Group presentations
#24 1. Students w/ Disabilities
2. Poor and Working Class
 
Nov.  School Choice Reading:  
30  Video ­ The bottom line in   Spring ch. 8
Day  education
#25 Ed. in the news
Dec. 5 Power and control at state and  Reading:  
Day  national levels:   Spring, ch. 9
#26  Political party platforms,  Spring, ch. 11
 high­stakes testing, 
 school violence

Globalization of Education
 Consumerism 
 Human Capital Theory
Dec. 7 The profession of teaching Reading:  
Day   Mandatory reporting  Assigned articles /Minnesota teachers code of ethics
#28  Code of Ethics
 Spring ch. 10
Homeless Education
Video:  Children in Poverty  McKinney­Vento Homeless Assistance Act

14
Ed. in the News
Dec. 12 11:00Final’s Session Due:
 Second Clinical 
 Clinical Log

15