You are on page 1of 1

HO

ori AU (NW'O
) Ho LU
zon
H L

MA rizon A
'O
KO

NU
U
)
(NE

N
MA

MA
M NU
U
(SE ALA
N
A zon)
MA

Ho N N
riz AI
o KO Hori
n)
(SW

This star chart incorporates the Hawaiian Star Compass and is oriented for an observer looking up and facing South.
In this orientation, the Hikina (East) horizon is on the left and the Komohana (West) horizon is on the right.
This chart reflects the night sky over Hawai'i at 8pm.

February Moon Phases February Highlights


> Orion Nebula - Amongst the starline of Kekaomakli’i, a multitude of
famous astronomical objects are easily spotted. Beneath the famous three
stars of Kaheiheionākeiki, Orion we can see a few stars that are often
considered to be Orion’s sword. Behind these stars, we can sight faint
NEW FIRST FULL LAST fuzziness that is the glow from the Orion Nebula (M42), a larger stellar
2/4 2/12 2/19 2/26
nursery and the closest region of massive star formation to Earth.
> Supermoon - In February, the full moon will fall on the day when the
moon is at its closest physical position to the Earth. The moon does not
orbit around Earth in a perfect circle; it orbits in an ellipse or oval shape,
which means that the moon’s distance from Earth changes as it orbits. The
moon’s closest physical position to Earth is called perigee; the moon
passes through its perigee point every month and is often thought to look
bigger in the sky when it is at this point. A supermoon occurs when the
moon is full and at its perigee.