You are on page 1of 16

International Conference on

Timber Bridges 2010

ICTB 2010

Use of composite timber-concrete


bridges solutions in Portugal

João Rodrigues / Paulo Providência / Alfredo Dias
13 September 2010 ‐ Lillehammer
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 2/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

This  work  deals  with  the  use  of  composite  timber‐concrete 


structures in bridge construction

First part
• Historic review of the use of composite timber‐concrete bridges around the
globe
• Identification of the reasons, whether economic, sociological, political, or 
environmental, as to why this structural solution appears to be more
appealing in some geographical regions than in others

Second part
• The use of this type of bridges in Portugal
• Possible reasons for the actual state of affairs
• Potential applications of composite timber‐concrete bridges in Portugal
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 3/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

This  work  exclusively  considers  composite  timber‐concrete  bridges  designed  to 


account for the effective composite of these two materials

As  a  result,  a  sample  of  59  composite  timber‐concrete  bridges  located  in 
different  areas  of  the  world  was  identified.  It  should  be  clear  that  this  sample 
does not represent the totality of composite timber‐concrete bridges built in the 
world
Next picture shows the distribution of the construction dates of these bridges by 
decade, from 1930 to 2009
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 4/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

USA
• In the USA composite timber‐concrete bridges were promoted in the early
1930’s by the University of Washington with a research program to construct
experimental bridges, mainly for economic reasons

• During the decades from 1930‐1950 composite timber‐concrete bridges were
used in the USA

(1936)

• Nowadays, composite timber‐concrete bridge construction almost vanished
in the USA
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 5/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Australia and New Zealand
• In Australia, composite timber‐concrete bridges have been built since the
1950’s, improving the locally established timber constructions used until then

• The new technology was probably encouraged and imported by the U.S. Army

• This initial impetus was deepened by research
programs conducted by forest authorities in
Australia and New Zealand to promote
composite timber‐concrete bridge construction
with local roundwood species
(1955)

• The reasons for the success of this type of bridges in Australia and New Zealand
appears to be a result of (i) economic matters, (ii) the traditional use of timber
in construction and (iii) the support of public authorities
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 6/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Brazil
• In Brazil the first composite timber‐concrete bridge was built in 1974 in São
Paulo, followed by a few more until 2000 

• Perhaps encouraged by the success of this experience, University of São Paulo 
promoted during last decade a research program on timber bridges, “Emerging
Timber Bridge Program of São Paulo State”

• The main goal of this program was to design bridges with a competitive cost
and a durability which could be positively compared with that of other
structural materials
• During the last decade, under this program, 
eight new composite timber‐concrete bridges
were constructed for vicinal roads, all of them
designed by the Laboratory of Timber and
Timber Structures of University of São Paulo 
(2004)
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 7/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Northern Europe
• In Northern Europe composite timber‐concrete bridge construction began
some decades ago, and it results from university research programs supported
by the public authorities
• A good study case is “The Nordic Timber Bridge Project”, whose objective was
to construct more timber bridges instead of steel and concrete bridges in
Nordic European countries
• This programme served as the basis for the construction of a wide number of
timber bridges in those countries. However, only in Finland was the composite
timber‐concrete system employed

(1999)
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 8/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Central Europe
• In Central Europe composite timber‐concrete bridges were introduced during
the 1990’s
• Switzerland pioneered the use of this structural solution but other Central
European countries, such as Austria, France, Germany and Luxembourg have
adopted composite timber‐concrete system bridges 

• Unlike what occurred in Nordic Europe, in Central Europe the choice of this
composite system apparently did not result from any research project
• The main reason for the adoption of timber in bridge construction have been
the increasing awareness for environmental protection
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 9/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

A very brief history of bridge construction in Portugal

• In Portugal, until the first half of the 19th century, most bridges were built with
timber or stone

• Then, the increased availability of iron arrived together with new structural
solutions for bridges, such as truss bridges and suspension bridges

• Concrete‐reinforced bridges appeared in 1900 and concrete pre‐stressed
bridges only in 1938

• In this period, the bridge structures in Portugal adopted the worldwide
technological advances in reinforced concrete and steel solutions –
condemning other structural materials, such as timber, to oblivion

• More recently, some other techniques were introduced, such as composite
steel‐concrete bridges
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 10/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

A very brief history of bridge construction in Portugal
• Regarding composite timber‐concrete bridges, there is a unique example in
Portugal. Quiaios Bridge was built in 2005 on a forest road on the Atlantic 
coast
of the country

• As in other countries, the Quiaios Bridge project resulted from an exchange
between universities (University of Coimbra and Polytechnic Institute of
Castelo Branco), owners (forestry administration) and local authorities

• This bridge represents a fine aesthetic/environmental solution and its cost was
quite competitive
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 11/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Why is timber an unpopular bridge construction material in Portugal?

(i) lack of technical knowledge on composite timber‐concrete construction
(ii) dominance of the traditional reinforced concrete, usually prestressed, and
steel solutions
(iii) pervading mistrust of timber as a building material, based on its apparently
poor durability and quality characteristics

• At the present time, civil engineering courses in most Portuguese universities
do not include timber structures analysis

• This is in complete opposition to the status of the two dominant subjects in the
field of structural design, which are reinforced concrete and steel structures

• This fact leads to an effective lack of technical knowledge on composite
timber‐concrete construction of the majority of Portuguese civil and structural
engineers and to a resistance shared by most construction agents
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 12/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Why is timber an unpopular bridge construction material in Portugal?

• The first Portuguese Regulation on Reinforced Concrete was published in 1918. 
But Portuguese engineers had to wait for almost one century to have their first
“Portuguese” standard on the structural use of timber – Eurocode 5 

• As a primary consequence of this lack of standards on timber structures, design
aspects were neglected

• Furthermore, during the last century the safer artisanal timber construction
techniques fell progressively into oblivion

• This led to unsafe and low durability timber structures, with short service life
and malfunctions, which in turn originated strong present‐day distrust of the
use of timber as a structural material

• And hindered the development of companies and economic activities in any
way related to timber or timber‐concrete structures
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 13/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Why is timber an unpopular bridge construction material in Portugal?
• When the universities sensed that the need no longer existed, they decided to
ignore this field of engineering, thus perpetuating the present combination of
(ii)circumstances, and contributing to the ignorance about timber
the dominance of the traditional reinforced concrete, usually prestressed,
as structural
and steel solutions
material

• To change the situation, the universities and research institutes should
establish programs to improve the  knowledge on timber structures and on
composite timber‐concrete systems

• This could be the first step in providing future civil engineers with the
knowledge on how to design composite timber‐concrete systems and to allow
them to rightly compare this type of solution with the more “traditional” ones

• The next step would be the development and implementation of a system
which enables the spread of knowledge on design, construction, monitoring
and maintenance of composite timber‐concrete bridges
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 14/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Potential applications of composite timber‐concrete bridges in Portugal

In Portugal there is an interesting market for composite timber‐concrete 
bridges, particularly for short spans

Forest roads
• Forest roads are the primary example, because Portugal as got a large
percentage of forest area, approximately 38% of the territory

• According to Portuguese Forest Authorities that manage forest roads network
there are thousands of bridges requiring urgent rehabilitation

• Moreover, these authorities are potentially attracted by environmentally
friendly solutions which might incorporate forest produced resources

• Such requirements are fulfilled by composite timber‐concrete bridges
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 15/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

Potential applications of composite timber‐concrete bridges in Portugal
Railway network
• Another possibility to introduce composite timber‐concrete bridges on a larger
scale in Portugal are the overpasses crossing over railways
• The first Portuguese high‐speed rail line, between Lisbon and Madrid, whose 
construction is about to be initiated, requires 81 overpasses. Moreover, the
improvement of the normal speed rail network also requires the construction
of new overpasses

Road network
• Another common use of composite timber‐concrete bridges are overpasses
crossing over roads
• According to the Portuguese road authority, there is a huge number of small
span bridges urgently requiring intervention
• Composite timber‐concrete bridges are a good option for secondary roads,
where they could be used in standard solutions for short spans
Use of composite timber-concrete bridges solutions in Portugal 16/16

Introduction World Wide Panorama Portuguese Reality Conclusions

• During the last twenty years the increase in the number of composite
timber‐concrete solutions applied to bridge construction has been observed in
different regions of the globe, namely in Europe

THANK YOU FOR 
• Meanwhile in some regions or countries, such as Portugal, the case is totally
opposite. Nowadays there is a general lack of interest in Portugal for timber
bridges and particularly for composite timber‐concrete bridges
• However the construction of “Pavilhão Atlântico,” a large indoor arena with a
glulam roof grid, built purposely for the 1998 Lisbon World Exposition, appears to

YOUR PATIENCE
be associated with the rebirth of structural engineering incorporating timber
in Portugal
• The first composite timber‐concrete bridge in Portugal was built in 2005. In
Portugal,  bridges  in  forest  and  rural  zones  and  overpasses  crossing  over  roads 
and
railway also present a significant potential for composite timber‐concrete
solutions
• This leads us to believe in a future development in Portugal of a composite
timber‐concrete bridge industry, which will come into being sooner if there is a
higher involvement of research centres, universities and public authorities