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Getting Started with Guitar


for Beginner
Prepared by Hung Duc Nguyen
Version (Demo) 1.0 1/07/2017

 
 

© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. All rights reserved. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or


hng33526@bigpond.net.au.

 
 

Table of Contents
Preface .................................................................................................................................................... 1 
Lesson 1 Getting Started with Guitar ...................................................................................................... 3 
Overview ............................................................................................................................................. 3 
1. Two Types of Guitar (Nylon String Classic Guitar and Steel String Acoustic Guitar) .................. 3 
2. Necessary Accessories (Indispensible Ones Are Tuner and Metronome) ...................................... 4 
3. How to Hold Guitar ........................................................................................................................ 4 
4. How to Tune Guitar ........................................................................................................................ 6 
4.1 Tuning by Ear ........................................................................................................................... 6 
4.2 Tuning by an Electronic or Software Tuner.............................................................................. 7 
4.3 Tuning to a Keyboard or Piano ................................................................................................. 7 
Summary of Lesson 1 ......................................................................................................................... 8 
Follow-up Exercise ............................................................................................................................. 8 
Lesson 2 Basic Notes on Six Strings ...................................................................................................... 9 
Overview ............................................................................................................................................. 9 
1. How to Read Music ........................................................................................................................ 9 
2. Rhythm............................................................................................................................................ 9 
3. Rests .............................................................................................................................................. 10 
4. Treble Clef, Time Signatures, Barlines and Measures .................................................................. 10 
5. Basic Notes on Fretboard in the First Position ............................................................................. 11 
7. How to Read Chord Blocks .......................................................................................................... 13 
8. How to Read Guitar Tabulature (Tab) .......................................................................................... 14 
9. Basic Notes on 6 Strings in the Firsr Position .............................................................................. 14 
9.1 Reading Notes on String 1E .................................................................................................... 14 
9.2 Reading Notes on String 2B ................................................................................................... 15 
9.3 Reading Notes on String 3G ................................................................................................... 16 
9.4 Reading Notes on String 4D ................................................................................................... 17 
9.5 Reading Notes on String 5A ................................................................................................... 18 
9.6 Reading Notes on String 6E .................................................................................................... 19 
10. Notes in the First Position ........................................................................................................... 20 
11. C Major Scale Example .............................................................................................................. 20 
12. Ties.............................................................................................................................................. 21 
13. Dots ............................................................................................................................................. 21 
14. Repeat Signs................................................................................................................................ 21 
15. Eight Notes.................................................................................................................................. 21 
Summary of Lesson 2 ....................................................................................................................... 22 
Lesson 3 Basic Open Chords ................................................................................................................ 23 
Overview ........................................................................................................................................... 23 
1. Open Chords C and G7 ................................................................................................................. 23 
2. Open Chords A, Am and A7 ......................................................................................................... 23 
3. Open Chords B, Bm and B7 ......................................................................................................... 24 
4. Open Chords C, Cm and C7 ......................................................................................................... 24 
5. Open Chords D, Dm and D7 ......................................................................................................... 24 
6. Open Chords E, Em and E7 .......................................................................................................... 24 
7. Open Chords F, Fm and F7 ........................................................................................................... 25 
8. Open Chords G, Gm and G7 ......................................................................................................... 25 
Summary of Lesson 3 ....................................................................................................................... 25 
Lesson 4 Play Some Simple Songs ....................................................................................................... 26 
Overview ........................................................................................................................................... 26 
1. Jingle Bells .................................................................................................................................... 26 
2. Happy Birthday ............................................................................................................................. 27 
3. We Wish You a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year .......................................................... 28 

© 2017 Hung Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com. All rights reserved.


 

4. Twinkle Twinkle Little Star .......................................................................................................... 29 


Summary of Lesson 4 ....................................................................................................................... 32 
Appendix Extended Notes in the First Position .................................................................................... 33 
A1. Accidentials ................................................................................................................................ 33 
A2. Extened Notes in the First Position ............................................................................................ 33 
References ............................................................................................................................................. 34 

ii 

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Preface
Playing guitar is not an easy learning process, and requires patience and frequency practice. In order
to have inspiration for guitar learning you should have a good start. This brochure provides you with
very basic information on a guitar, how to tune strings, how to embrace guitar, how to read music,
how to play basic notes in the first postion of a guitar, and mnemornics of all notes on 5 frets for
simple soloing, basic open chords, basic strumming patterns and practice of some simple songs. The
brochure is a sort of “getting started off a guitar”, which helps you to build up your inpriration and
advanced skills at later stage.

The book consists of the following lessons:


 Lesson 1 Getting started
 Lesson 2 Basic Notes on Six Strings
 Lesson 3 Basic Open Chords
 Lesson 4 Play Some Simple Songs

I wish you to have a very good inspiration of playing guitar and make very good progress.

Author
Hung Nguyen
Launceston, Tasmania

© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

Lesson 1 Getting Started with Guitar


Overview

Playing guitar requires a little understanding of a guitar and its parts, how to tune strings, seting up a
goal and good plan to practise. This lesson will cover general information on guitars, parts of a guitar,
necessary accessories, names of strings, how to tune strandard strings (EADGBE) and how to
hold/embrace a guitar properly.

1. Two Types of Guitar (Nylon String Classic Guitar and Steel String Acoustic Guitar)

There are several types of guitars including accousic guitars and electric guitars. This booklet is to
mention only two popular types of acoustic guitar, namely nylon string (acoustic) classic guitar (CG)
and steel (metal) string acoustic guitar as (AG) shown in Fig. 1. As shown in Fig. 1 an acoustic guitar
has three main parts head stock, fretboard and body.

Head stock Tuning pegs/keys)


Tuning pegs/keys
Nut
Nut Fretboard

Frets

Neck and truss rod

Neck Position markers

Sound hole
Sound hole
Body Pick guard
Saddle Saddle
Bridge
Bridge pins
Bridge
Top board

(b)
(a)
Figure 1 Guitar and parts (a) Nylon string classic guitar, (b) Steel string acoustic guitar

As a beginner player, you may need to pay attention to selection of a right guitar which should have
the following features:
 Action (the distance between strings and fretboard) is not very high, that may cause pain in
fingers when you play, but not very low, that may cause humming;
 Size should be suitable for yourself;
 Type of guitar for your favourite music you are going to play, for example, for classic soloing
a nylon strong CG is a good option, for most of music types, a steel string AG should be good;

© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

 Strings should be suitable for the selected guitar. It is recommended for beginner to start with
nylon string CG, or steel string AG with extra light or custom light or light guage strings as
they are easier (less painful) on fingers.

2. Necessary Accessories (Indispensible Ones Are Tuner and Metronome)

In order to play guitar properly indispensible accessories should be a tuner and metronome which can
be any form as shown in Fig. 2 and 3.

                                       
(a) (b) (d)
(a) Electronic tuner (b) Computer sofrtware tuner (c) Mobile software tuner

Figure 2 Tuners

(a) Electornic type (b) Software type

Figure 3 Metronomes

Apart from a tuner and metronome, the following accessories may be useful:
 Gig bag (soft or hard case) to protect your guitar
 Guitar learning books; alternatively free online tutorials (websties, YouTube video clips) are
available via search engines like Google;
 Some picks/plectrums;
 A strap, guitar stand and music sheet holder;
 A lead and amplifier if you have an electric acoustic guitar and wish to play guitar via an
amplifier; and
 Computer and software may be useful for online learning resourses.

3. How to Hold Guitar

Holding a guitar properly is a good start. Fig. 4 illustates how to hold a guitar when you are sitting.

© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

(a) Holding an AG when sitting (Courtesey of http://www.fretjam.com/how-to-hold-a-guitar.html)

(b) Holding a classic guitar when siting


(Courtesy of http://www.learnclassicalguitar.com/how-to-hold-a-guitar.html)

Figure 4 Illustration of how to hold a guitar

© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

4. How to Tune Guitar

Names of strings of a guitar are shown in Fig. 5 where the guitar is held in a playing position. 1E is
the thinnest string at the bottom, and 6E is the fattest string on the top.
Nut
III IV V
1E
2B E
3G B
4D G
5A D
6E A
(a) Names of strings and notes in the sampe pitch for tuning

E A D G B E
(b) Notes of open strings (on nut) on staff

Figure 5 Names of strings and notes used for tuning

Tuning guitar is very important as strings of guitar are out of tune due to variation in temperature and
humidity. Tuning should be done before any practice. Tuning involves tightening or loosening the
strings to riase or lower the pitch to match a constant pitch. There are three main ways to tune guitar.
The third way is to tune guitar by ear using the other strings of the guitar and constant pitch from a
known source. The second way is to tune guitar by an electronic tuner or software tuner (in computer
or mobile phone). The third way is to tune guitar to a keyboard or piano.

4.1 Tuning by Ear

In this way, we use the notes for tuning as described in Fig. 5, and follow the processure below:
 Tune an open string to a constant pitch (for example open string 6E).
 Put your finger the 5th fret of string 5E and tune the open string of 5A. Play both the 6E string
and 5A string listen to two pitches. If the open 5A string sounds higher loosen it, if it sound
lower, tighten it until two notes match. You always adjust the tuning key of the open string,
not the string that you are fretting.
 Next tune the open 4D string in the same way with above step by putting your finger on the
5th fret of the 5A string, and play both the open 4D string and fretted 5A string.
 Play the 4D string on the 5th fret, listen and tune the open 3G string.
 Play the 3G string on the 4th fret (as shown in Fig. 5), listen and tune the open 2B string.
 Play the 2B string on the 5th fret, listen and tune the open 1E string.

Tips: Never let anybody else be close in front of your guitar whiling tuning as any broken string may
cause injury in his/her eyes.

© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

4.2 Tuning by an Electronic or Software Tuner

Fig. 6 shows an electronic tuner clipped to the head stock. According to the directions of the specific
tuner you have, it will display whether you need to tighten or loosen the string in order to get it tuned.
As shown in Fig.6 the 1E string is tuned when the indicator E becomes green. Refer to the instructions
of your tuner.

Notes: There are often two types of electronic tuner, one is a clip type that must be clipped to the
guitar’s headstock, the other is a built-in microphone type that does not need to be clipped to the
headstock.

If you do not have an electronic tuner, you can use a software tuner with your mobile phone or
computer. You need to download a free software tuner and install into either your computer (with a
microphone) or mobile phone, and then use it as a microphone type of tuner.

Figure 6 Tuning using an electronic tuner (clip type)

4.3 Tuning to a Keyboard or Piano

In this way, a well-tuned keyboard or piano is used, and the open strings of a guitar correspond to
certain notes on such a keyboard or piano (see Fig. 6).

Figure 7 Notes on a keyboard for tuning

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Summary of Lesson 1

This lesson is summarised with the following key information:


 Two main types of acoustic guitars: nylon string classic guitar, steel string acoustic guitar.
Never try to put steel strings into a classic guitar.
 Necessary accessories used with guitar
 How to hold a guitar properly
 How to tune guitar.

Follow-up Exercise

Check your guitar whether it is out of tune. If it is out of tune, then apply a suitable tuning method and
tune your guitar.

© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

Lesson 2 Basic Notes on Six Strings


Overview

When practising playing guitar we need to read music sheet and play notes on fretboard of guitar by
both fretting strings with left hand fingers and plucking strings. This lesson with provides with basic
information on how to read music, how to play notes with correct fingers, how to memorise basic
notes in the first postion of fretboard (including open string, the 1st fret, 2nd fret, 3rd fret and 4th fret).

1. How to Read Music

Music is written on a Staff which has 5 lines and 4 spaces as shown in Fig. 1. Music is read from left
to right. A note on a staff tells you how high or low it is in pitch. A note can be in line or space. When
a note is too low or too high to be written on the staff, a legder line is used. Each line or each space of
the staff has a letter name (to express a note) that goest with it. There are 7 notes namely by A, B, C,
D, E, F and G written on the staff as shown in Fig. 1. Note A is repeated after note G, and has the
same name with the first note, but it has higher pitch.

High note
5th line
4th space
4th line
3rd space
3rd line
2nd space A
2nd line G
1st space F
1st line E
D
C
B
Treble clef (G) A
Low note
Ledger line
Figure 8 Staff and notes (A B C D E F G A)

Notes: each note of the 7 basic notes has other name express as A is La, B is Ti, C is Do, D is Re, E is
Mi, F is Fa and G = So. These names are convenient for vocal practise, especially for those who wish
to sing notes while playing guitar.

2. Rhythm

There are four main types of notes which vary based on how long they are played as shown in Fig. 9.

Whole note Half note Quarter note Eighth note


(4 beats) (2 beats) (1 beat) (1/2 beat)

Figure 9 Four main types of note in terms of how long they are played

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3. Rests

Music itself is played with a mix of sound and silience. Corresponding to main types of notes, there
are four rests which tell you how long when not to play as shown in Fig. 10.

Whole rest Half rest Quarter rest Eighth rest


(4 beats) (2 beats) (1 beat) (1/2 beat)
Figure 10 Types of rest

Apart from the above main types of note and rest, there are shorter notes and rests as shown in Fig. 11.

Sixteeth note Sixteenth rest (1/4 beat)

Thirdty second note Thirty secondth rest (1/8 beat)

Sixty fourth note Sixty fourth rest (1/16 beat)

Figure 11 Types of shorter note and rest

If we compare the types of note and rest, we can see the equivalence in duration as shown in Fig. 12.

= =

= = etc.

Figure 12 Equivalent duration between types of note and rest

4. Treble Clef, Time Signatures, Barlines and Measures


Treble clef (G)

Measure Measure Measure


Top numer = how many beats in each measure
4 Bottom numer = what kind of note gets the beat
4 Barline Barline Ending
Time signature Barline
Figure 13 Treble cless, time signatures, barlines and measures

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5. Basic Notes on Fretboard in the First Position

Nut (0) I II III IV V


1E E F G A
2B B C D E
3G G A B
4D D E F G
5A A B C D
6E E F G A
Open
Figure 14 Notes on fretboard of a guitar (notes in yellow are used to tune strings)

The following figures show notes of each string on staff.

E F G A

Figure 15 Notes on the first string (1E)

B C D E

Figure 16 Notes on the second string (2B)

G A B

Figure 17 Notes on the third string (3G)


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D E F G

Figure 18 Notes on the fourth string (4D)

A B C D

Figure 19 Notes on the fifth string (5A)

E F G A

Figure 20 Notes on the sixth string (6E)

6. Fingers

When playing guitar, left hand fingers and right hand fingers have symbols as shown in Fig. 21 where:
 Left hand fingers:
o 0 is for open string; 1 is for index finger; 2 is for middle finger; 3 is for ringe finger;
and 4 is for little finger;
o Basic rule: 1 to press the first fret 1, 2 to press the second fret; 3 to press the 3rd fret
and 4 to press the 4 press.
 Right hand fingers:
o p is thump; i is index; m is middle, a is ring;
o Basic rule: 1 to pluck 3 bass strings 6E, 5A and 4D, i to pluck string 3G, m to pluck
string 2B, and a to pluck string 1E. The little is not used.
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2 m
3 i a
1

4 Not used

Not used p

Left hand Right hand


0

(a) Symbols for fingers

(b) Example of a music sheet (classic solo) with symbols for fingues (letters for right hand fingers,
numbers for left hand finguers)

Figure 21 Symbols for left hand and righthand fingers in a music sheet

7. How to Read Chord Blocks

Chord blocks as shown in Fig. 22 tell us how a chord is to be played. They include information about
which frets are to be pressed by which fingers and which strings are to be plucked.
Chord name
Strings
6th 5th 4th 3rd 2nd 1st
Don’t play string C Play strings open

E A D G B E
Nut
Put 1st finger on
1 2nd string at 1st fret
1st fret
Put 2nd finger on 4th
string at 2nd fret
2
2nd fret
Put 3rd finger on 5th
string at 3rd fret 3
3rd fret

4th fret

Figure 22 How to read a chord block


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8. How to Read Guitar Tabulature (Tab)

Tabulature (Tab in short) is a type of notation to describe what strings to be played and what frets to
be fingered. A tab looks like a staff but it has 6 lines for 6 strings as shown in Fig. 23. The numer is
the fret number. Tab may be an easy way for beginner player. It is recommended not to use tab too
much as using tab may not help to memorize notes.

1E
2B
3G
4D
5A
6E

Single notes
Chord
Figure 23 Tab and how to read

9. Basic Notes on 6 Strings in the Firsr Position

9.1 Reading Notes on String 1E

3 basic notes on string 1E include E, F and G as shown in Fig. 24.

E F G

Open 1st fret 3rd fret

Figure 24 Notes on string 1E

First String Exercise

Instructions: Write above each note the letter name of the note. Play each exercise using the correct
finger for each note.

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1. Whole notes get 4 beats

2. Half notes get 2 beats

3. Quarter notes get 1 beat

4. Mix of half notes and quarter notes

9.2 Reading Notes on String 2B

Basic notes on string 2B are shown in Fig. 25.

B C D

Open 1st fret 3rd fret


Figure 25 Notes on string 2B

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Second String Exercises: Write above each note the letter name of the note. Play each exercise using
the correct finger for each note. Practise slowly. Remember to give each note the proper number of
beats (using a metronome).

1. Whole notes
Si Do Re

2. Half notes

3. Mix of quarter notes, half notes and whole notes

4. Mix of quarter notes and half notes

9.3 Reading Notes on String 3G

G A

Open 3G 2nd fret


Hình 26 Notes on the 3G string
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Third String Exercises: Play each exercise using the correct finger for each note. Write in the notes
if needed.

1.

2.

3.

4.

9.4 Reading Notes on String 4D

E F G

Open 4D 2nd fret 3rd fret

Hình 27 Notes on the 4D string

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Fouth String Exercises: Play each exercise using the correct finger for each note. Write in the note if
needed.

1.

2.

3.

4.

9.5 Reading Notes on String 5A

A B C

Open 5A 2nd fret 3rd fret

Figure 28 Noes on the 5A string

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9.6 Reading Notes on String 6E

Mi E Fa F Sol G

Open 6E 1st fret 3rd fret

Figure 29 Notes on the 6E string

Fifth and Sixth String Exercises: Play each exercise using the correct finger for each note. Write in
the notes if needed.
1.

2.

3.

4.

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10. Notes in the First Position

E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F G

6E string 5A string 4D string 3G string 2B string 1E string

Figure 30 Notes in the first position

11. C Major Scale Example

Figure 31 C Major Scale

All String Exercise: Play the following exercise using the correct finger for each note.

Minuet in C
J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

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12. Ties

A tie combines the rhythmic values of two notes and is represented by a curved line between two
notes of the same pitch. The first note is played for the duration of both notes and the second note is
not played.

13. Dots

A dot following a note changes the rhythmic value of the note. Dots add one half of whatever note
value they are attached to.

14. Repeat Signs

A repeat sign is a double bar line with two dots. It means to repeat a section of music. You would
repeat back to where a previous backwards repeat sign was or to the beginning of the song, whichever
comes first.

15. Eight Notes

An eight note receives 1/2 a beat so it takes two of them to make 1 beat. If you have several eight
notes together, the are grouped together by a beam.

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Summary of Lesson 2

Lesson 2 is summarised with very basic concepts for beginner including how to read music including
pitch, rhythm (duration) of notes, rests, treble clef, time signature, barlines and measures, how to read
chord blocks, how to read guitar tabulature, basic notes on 6 strings in the first position, ties, dots,
repeat signs and eight notes.

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Lesson 3 Basic Open Chords


Overview

In this lesson, we will learn how to finger basic open chords, and how to play simple strumming
patterns for each beat.

1. Open Chords C and G7

The first two chords are C and G7 as shown in Fig. 31.

C G7

                
Figure 31 Two chords C G7

Chord Exercises
1. Finger two chords

 
2. Strum chord for each slash.

3. Strum chord for each slash.

2. Open Chords A, Am and A7


A Am A7

                 

Figure 32 Chord blocks for A, Am and A7

Repeat Chord Exercises for A, Am and A7.

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3. Open Chords B, Bm and B7

B Bm B7

                                     
Figure 33 Chord blocks for B, Bm and B7

Repeat Chord Exercises for B, Bm and B7.

4. Open Chords C, Cm and C7

C Cm C7

                                   
Figure 34 Chord blocks for C, Cm and C7

Repeat Chord Exercises for C, Cm and C7

5. Open Chords D, Dm and D7

D Dm D7

                                   
Figure 35 Chord blocks for D, Dm and D7

Repeat Chord Exercises for D, Dm and D7.

6. Open Chords E, Em and E7


E Em E7

                                   
Figure 36 Chord blocks for E, Em and E7

Repeat Chord Exercises for E, Em and E7.

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7. Open Chords F, Fm and F7

F Fm F7

                                   

Figure 37 Chord blocks for F, Fm and F7

Repeat Chord Excercises for F, Fm and F7.

8. Open Chords G, Gm and G7

G Gm Gm G7

                  hoặc                  

Figure 38 Chord blocks for G, Gm and G7

Repeat Chord Excercises for G, Gm and G7.

Summary of Lesson 3

Lesson 3 is summarised with basic open chords and strumming for each beat.

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Lesson 4 Play Some Simple Songs


Overview

In this lesson, we will practise playing notes and chords of some simple songs.

1. Jingle Bells

Exercise: Play the notes then practise strumming the correct chord for each beat. If a measure does
not have a chord to change over it then continue to play the previous chord until the chord changes.

Jingle Bells

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2. Happy Birthday

Exercise 1: Play the Valse with the follow pattern for chord C, then apply to other chords including F,
G, G7.

Exercise 2: Play the notes then practise Valse the correct chord for each beat. If a measure does not
have a chord to change over it then continue to play the previous chord until the chord changes.

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3. We Wish You a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

Exercise: Play the notes then practise Valse the correct chord for each beat. If a measure does not
have a chord to change over it then continue to play the previous chord until the chord changes.

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4. Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

Exercise: Play the notes then practise Valse the correct chord for each beat. If a measure does not
have a chord to change over it then continue to play the previous chord until the chord changes.

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star


Easy Solo Ver 1.0

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© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

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© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

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© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

Summary of Lesson 4

Lesson 4 is summarised with practice of 4 simple songs Jingle Bells, Happy Birthday, We Wish You
a Merry Christmas and Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.

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© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

Appendix Extended Notes in the First Position


A1. Accidentials

Accidentals include sharp and flat (we will use b instead) and natural .

Sharps (#) riaise up any note one half-step or one fret. The sharp sign appears before the note that is to
be sharped. Remember to use the correct figure for each fret.

Flats b lower any note one half-step or one fret.

Naturals : A natural sign cancels out a previously used sharp or flat and restores it to its normal
position.

Let’s have a look at the cluster of 7 basic notes starting with A:


ABCDEFG
If we add a possible sharped note between two notes, we will have 12 notes as follows:

A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#

If we add possible flatted note between two notes, we will have 12 notes as follows:
A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab

It is seen that A# is similar to Bb.

A2. Extened Notes in the First Position

The following figure shows extended notes in the first postion of guitar and corresponding notes on
staff.

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© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.
 

Figure 39 Extended notes in the first position

References
Bay, W. (1989a). You Can Teach Yourselt Guitar. Mel Bay Publications Inc. Pacific, MO. USA.
Bay, W. (1989b). You Can Teach Yourselt Classic Guitar. Mel Bay Publications Inc. Pacific, MO.
USA.
Krenz, S. (2006). Learn and Master Guitar with Steve Krenz. Legacy Learning Systems Inc.
Download: https://www.learnandmaster.com/resources/Learn-and-Master-Guitar-Lesson-Book.pdf
Shearer, A., Kikta, T. and Hirsh, A. (2012). The Shearer Method Classic Guitar Foundations. Etson
Music Corp.

Websites:
http://www.fretjam.com/how-to-hold-a-guitar.html
http://www.learnclassicalguitar.com/how-to-hold-a-guitar.html

Useful websites:
https://www.guitarlessons.com/guitar-toolbox/?gclid=CL769dTArNUCFYeCvQodJIQIgg

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© 2017 Hung Duc Nguyen. Email: kamome.seagull@gmail.com or hng33526@bigpond.net.au. All rights reserved.