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FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT PL IN 2019

PART TWO: EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK


NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE Page 2
OUTCOMES
• To enhance knowledge and understanding
of how effective feedback practices will
move student learning forward
• To learn about and embed effective
feedback teaching techniques in classroom
practice

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AUSTRALIAN PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS FOR TEACHERS

5.2.2
• Provide timely, effective and appropriate
feedback to students about their
achievement relative to their learning goals.

6.2.2 • Participate in learning to update knowledge


and practice, targeted to professional needs
and school and/or system priorities.

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What does ‘excellence’ in the School Excellence Framework look like?
Effective Classroom Practice
In schools that excel, all teachers are committed to identifying, understanding and
implementing the most effective explicit teaching methods, with the highest priority given
to evidence-based teaching strategies.
Teaching Domain
Feedback
Teachers routinely review learning with each student both in class and on work
submitted, ensuring all students have a clear understanding of how to improve. Student
feedback is elicited by teachers and informs their teaching. Student errors and
misunderstandings are explicitly addressed until teachers and students are confident
that mastery is demonstrated.
NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE 1 May 2019 Page 5
UNPACKINGWhere
FORMATIVE
the learner
ASSESSMENT
Where the learner How to get
is going is now the learner there

Effective
Teacher
Effective Feedback: questioning
Effective feedback

Providing
Learning
intentions and
feedback that moves
Peer Peer Assessment
learners forward
success criteria

Student
©NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE Self-Assessment 6
PART 1 – REFLECTING ON WHAT THEY HAVE DONE
AND DO
FEEDBACK FROM TERM 1 – HOW DID IT GO?

 What did you do?


 What has changed?
 Success stories?
 What still needs to be done?
KEY QUESTIONS

• What form/s does feedback take in your classroom?

• To what extent is feedback attended to and acted upon by students?

• To what extent do your assessment and feedback processes inform and


shape your teaching?

• What are your concerns with providing feedback?


PART 2 – WHAT IS FEEDBACK?
WHAT IS FEEDBACK?

Feedback is information provided by an agent regarding aspects of one’s


performance or understanding.

The main purpose of feedback is to reduce discrepancies between


current understandings and performance, and a learning intention or goal.
The Power of Feedback, Hattie & Timperley 2007
FEEDBACK IS INFORMATION:

• for the learner and teacher about the learner’s performance


• about performance relative to learning goals
• based on evidence of learning
• from the teacher, the student or peers
• that leads to changes in teacher and student behaviour.

 Adapted principally from Hattie and Timperley, 2007; Black and Wiliam, 2010; and Evidence for Learning, 2016

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THE POWER OF FEEDBACK

COGNITIVE
FACTORS

FOSTER A
GROWTH
MINDSET
MOTIVATIONAL
FACTORS
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NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE


THE OUTCOME

 What can effective feedback achieve?


• students increase effort
• students develop more effective learning strategies
• students increase autonomy and self-regulation
• teachers provide specific goals and criteria
• teachers understand the impact of their teaching Australian Institute for
Teaching and School
Leadership
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VARIABILITY OF FEEDBACK EFFECTS

 Feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement, but
this impact can be either positive or negative...

 although feedback is among the major influences, the type of feedback and the
way it is given can be differentially effective.
John Hattie and Helen Timperley 2007

 So how could feedback lower student achievement?

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EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK

• is timely, specific and related to the learning and assessment intention


• is constructive and provides meaningful information to students about their learning in a
variety of forms
• focuses on the activity and corrects misunderstandings
• identifies and reinforces students’ strengths
• provides information about how they can improve
• facilitates the development of and provides opportunities for self-assessment and reflection
during the learning process
• informs future teaching and learning opportunities

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STUDENT RESPONSE TO FEEDBACK

 Students might:
• increase effort
• increase motivation or engagement
• adjust learning goal
• develop effective error detection skills
• seek or be taught better strategies
• obtain more information
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FOUR LEVELS OF FEEDBACK
Each feedback
question works at
four levels

Task Process Self-regulated feedback Self


feedback on how well tasks feedback on the learning on how students monitor, personal evaluation and
are performed or processes underlining or direct and regulate their effect (usually positive)
understood relating and extending tasks own learning about the student

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NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE
THREE KINDS OF FEEDBACK
 Sample: 264 low and high ability grade 6 students in 12 classes in 4 schools; analysis of 132
students at top and bottom of each class.
 Same teaching, same aims, same teachers, same classwork.
 Three kinds of feedback: scores, comments, scores + comments

Achievement Attitude to continuing


Scores no gain High scorers : positive
Low scorers: negative
Comments 30% gain High scorers : positive
Low scorers : positive Butler(1988)
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NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE
COMMENTS PLUS MARKS

 Giving marks alongside comments cancelled the beneficial effects of the


comments.

Research conclusion:
 If you are going to grade or mark a piece of work, you are wasting your time
writing careful diagnostic comments.

 The key is to never mark students while they are still learning because as soon as
they get a mark, the learning stops.

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Directed
Improvement &
Reflection
Time
PART 3 – FORMS OF FEEDBACK
FORMS OF FEEDBACK

• Whole-class discussions to clarify the task during the activity, including blogs, wikis and forums
• Whole-class or individual student comments about aspects of the activity where students
performed well, and how to improve
• Checklists, criteria sheets
• Cues, reinforcements or prompts to redirect learning
• Drafts and resubmissions
• Written, audio or digital annotations
• Discussion of a range of student work samples and other examples beyond the classroom in
relation to criteria

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TEACHING TECHNIQUES

Rubrics Which face Margin symbols


Find it and fix it

 ? 
Wagoll
Mystery feedback Whiteboards
Feedback strips

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KEY IDEAS
cause thinking

be actionable
Feedback
should
be related to goals and success criteria

be more work for the recipient than the donor


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NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES


DIRECTORATE
POSSIBLE ACTIVITIES FOR FACULTY TIME

The participant workbooks will assist you with your planning.


Some suggestions include:
• Audit of what is currently happening – look at the reflection chart
• Tying the feedback to the Learning Intentions and Success Criteria
• Types of feedback – what to trial
• Exit slips
• Identifying key moments for feedback in a unit of work
NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE – PRESENTED BY PAULA MADIGAN (CURRICULUM ADVISOR) FOR COFFS HARBOUR HS
TERM PLANNING – MORE IDEAS

 10+ minute sessions in faculty meetings focusing in on feedback approaches,


assessment of feedback collected etc
 Work in teams to design feedback opportunities for the learning cycle
 Sharing from staff – what have they done, what worked? What impact? Etc.

NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE – PRESENTED BY PAULA MADIGAN (CURRICULUM ADVISOR) FOR COFFS HARBOUR HS
HOW CAN I SUPPORT YOUR FACULTY?

 Co-present at faculty meetings during the term


 Work with a team to add feedback opportunities into Term 2 units
 Assist with development of marking rubrics and feedback to include
more explicit guidance
 Other??

NSW DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SCHOOL SERVICES DIRECTORATE – PRESENTED BY PAULA MADIGAN (CURRICULUM ADVISOR) FOR COFFS HARBOUR HS
RESOURCES

 Use Strong Start, Great Teachers – Phase 3 – Feedback to students as


your starting point
 NESA resources
 AITSL feedback resources
 How am I doing? By Jan Chappius
WHILE I AM HERE…

 HSC Minimum Standards – Look at the Australian Skills Framework,


Level 3.
 Curriculum Page – PL opportunities both face to face and online
 CLN support – can you let organisers know I am available to support