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FINAL PROJECT

MATERIAL BOARD – VIDEO REVIEW – PROJECT JUSTIFICATION - COMPILATION

CATHERINE ZEMAN
INTA275: SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS FOR RESIDENTIAL DESIGN
WEEK 6 ASSIGNMENT 1
FACULTY: DR. TUCKER CROSS
DUE DATE: 4.24.18
PART I

MATERIAL BOARD
PART II

VIDEO REVIEW
One green building item I plan to incorporate is the radiant floor heating, which they used around the structural
beams. The builders were concerned that the steel beam would become cold in the winter, so they developed an
idea to wrap radiant heating pipes around the edges of the beams. The steel will retain the heat and be energy
efficient.
Also the green building was built on am infill lot, in an existing neighborhood, close to transportation and
community services. These sustainable site features are similar to the ones for my building, on 36 Touraine Dr.

I would have liked to incorporate recycled construction materials, but was not sure of the options available for this
residential project.

The green building techniques and elements used in this project would have a huge positive impact for not only the
sustainability of the home, but also for future projects. For example, implementing new uses for these construction
materials would be an economical solution for both the municipality, but also the builder. The city would be able to
resell the materials, thus recouping some of the expenses. The builder would be able to purchase high-grade
recycled materials at a reasonable cost. The materials would bypass the landfill route; the film stated that 25% of
landfills are filled with construction materials. That is mind-boggling to consider and any way we can reuse the steel
in its current form would be sustainable.

Green buildings are critical to out overall economy in many ways. As stated above, reusing materials is beneficial to
the seller, the buyer and the environment. The higher upfront costs for the solar panels, geothermal heat pump,
spray foam cellulose insulation, etc. are offset by the future energy savings. If the homeowners stays in the home
long enough, they can eventually make money by selling the extra energy back to the utility companies.

Sustainable building is the future and this is an exciting time to be learning about it. So much of the process is on-
site troubleshooting and there is so much room for invention! We, not only as designers - but also as member of the
community – need to focus on improving the environmental impact of the construction process and resultant
sustainable living situation.
PART III

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION
The design concept for this project was to incorporate sustainable features into a single family home. The residents are an aging couple who are
dedicated to building an environmentally friendly and energy efficient building. This was achieved by a combination of exterior sustainable features
and selecting sustainable materials and finishes for the interior as well. Prior to inspection, the building is expected to earn at least 98 LEED-H
points, which will mean Platinum certification.

The first step was to select a sustainable site and orient the building on the lot in the most efficient way to take advantage of natural energy sources.
The site chosen is in an urban, previously developed area adjacent to existing development. It is close to public transportation and other walkable
community resources. This will discourage excessive automobile use and make good use of an infill lot. The building itself will be situated so that
solar panels can be mounted along the southern slope of the roof, allowing the property to earn more points towards energy efficiency. Another
similarly beneficial feature is the Geothermal Heat Pump. This heats the building’s water using the natural heat of the earth in which the pipes are
buried 4-6’ deep. Further reducing the heating and cooling costs will be evergreen trees such as Eastern White Pine and Emerald Green Arborvitae
will be planted on the northwestern side of the lot to provide wind control. Large paper-barked maple and birch trees will be planted in the
backyard to provide shade. These trees are medium size and will not grow large enough to block the solar panels on the roof. The landscaping of
the property will earn further LEED credits for site sustainability by using only native prairie plants, eliminating traditional water-sucking turf lawns.
Permeable pavers will be used for the driveway and sidewalk areas reducing the local heat-island effect and aiding in erosion control. A rain garden
will be created to manage the roof runoff from storm water and to stockpile the water and further minimize the need for irrigation.

All southern facing windows, including the skylights, will be outfitted with Smartglass – a special type of glass that tints accordingly to the amount of
sunlight in senses, aiding in both indoor temperature management and daylighting.

The outdoor color theme will be one of blending within nature, incorporating many browns and grays. This theme will be continued inside which
will result in a calming and meditative interior. Natural rust tones and stainless steel will provide color and shine, respectively. All indoor materials
and finishes are low VOC and sustainably produced and installed. The neutral tones will be enlivened by the mix of textures –the smooth stainless
steel, the nubby wool carpet, the knotty wood floors and the ribbed wall paneling. All lighting will be LED and operate on dimmers and photo
sensors. There are no emergency lighting features since this is a residential home, but there will be photo sensor night lighting features to add the
aging couple as their night vision deteriorates. This energy efficient lighting package will also earn credits towards LEED certification. In addition to
the exterior sustainable features, all appliances installed will be energy star rated and all fixtures will be low-flow and water-saving.

The interior will designed universally, allowing the residents to age in place gracefully. The doorway and hallways will be wide to accommodate
wheelchair use and the living space will be all on the first level; steps will be minimal. One full bathroom will be built according to ADA guidelines.
The kitchen will incorporate features such as low storage, pull out work surfaces, one handle operation levers, ADA-compliant [and energy star!]
appliances, bright task lighting and non-slip surfaces.

Sustainable construction techniques will be employed throughout the building process. Spray foam cellulose insulation, Insul-Tarp and concrete
form walls will be key components of the insulation solution. , air infiltration will be controlled sustainably and all glass will be low E-4. Framing will
be OVE [optimum value engineering], will use fiber composite materials and OSB roof sheathing. This will all strengthen and earn points towards
indoor air quality as well.

This project has brought awareness throughout the neighborhood and community towards sustainable practices. Many of the neighbors are
considering implementing similar landscaping and energy efficiency ideas. The builder has learned a great deal about sustainability and will use
this knowledge for future projects, as well as continuing to learn and develop more sustainable ideas. The resident’s dedication to designing a
sustainable residence will multiply and blossom as their friends and neighbors observe their low maintenance, energy efficient and beautiful home.
PART IV

COMPILATION
SITE RESEARCH
SITE OPTIONS

educational use.
These drawings
are only for
REVISIONS

103'-8 5
8"

9"
120'-416

100'-0"
16 "
183'-4 5
7"
130'-116
140'-916

180'-0"
1"

MARCH-APRIL 2018
INTA275
C. ZEMAN
125'-0"

3
120'-1016"

THE ART INSTITUTE


OF PITTSBURGH

117'-1 5"
ONLINE DIVISION

8
LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR

LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR LOT 111 SALLY CT LOTS 78 & 79 RIDGEWOOD

CLIENT
AVE

C ZEMAN

SITE OPTIONS
DR. CROSS
4.4.18

N
W3A1

SCALE 1/16"=1'-0" A1
of _ SHEETS
educational use.
These drawings
are only for
SITE OPTION: LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR REVISIONS

103'-8 5
8"

9"
120'-416 Would need to be oriented this way to take
advantage of south facing solar panels.

I cannot tell where the street is from the map

100'-0"
provided, but there is room for driveway to be

16 "
183'-4 5
7"
created from north OR west entry.

130'-116
140'-916

180'-0"
1"

10’ required setback from all sides is met.

MARCH-APRIL 2018
INTA275
C. ZEMAN
125'-0"
Topography in N. Illinois is flat; would
3 not influence site situation
120'-1016"

THE ART INSTITUTE


OF PITTSBURGH

117'-1 5"
ONLINE DIVISION

8
LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR

LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR LOT 111 SALLY CT LOTS 78 & 79 RIDGEWOOD

CLIENT
AVE

C ZEMAN

SITE OPTIONS
DR. CROSS
4.4.18

N
W3A1

SCALE 1/16"=1'-0" A1
of _ SHEETS
SITE OPTION: LOT 111 SALLY CT

educational use.
These drawings
are only for
REVISIONS

103'-8 5
8"

9"
120'-416
Would need to be oriented this way to take
advantage of south facing solar panels.

(-) unable to orient towards true south; would

100'-0"
16 "
need to be at an angle to have equal lot line

183'-4 5
7"
130'-116
140'-916

distance from neighbors.

180'-0"
1"

MARCH-APRIL 2018
INTA275
C. ZEMAN
Driveway entry would need to be from north
125'-0"
side; this works for this site.
3
120'-1016"
Required setbacks of 30’ @ front, 20’ @ rear &
10’ on sides are all met. 117'-1 5"
THE ART INSTITUTE
OF PITTSBURGH
ONLINE DIVISION

8
LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR

LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR LOT 111 SALLY CT LOTS 78 & 79 RIDGEWOOD

CLIENT
AVE

C ZEMAN

SITE OPTIONS
DR. CROSS
4.4.18

N
W3A1

SCALE 1/16"=1'-0" A1
of _ SHEETS
educational use.
These drawings
SITE OPTION: LOTS 78 & 79 RIDGELINE AVE

are only for


REVISIONS

103'-8 5
8"

9"
120'-416

Would need to be oriented this way to take


advantage of south facing solar panels.

100'-0"
(-) unable to orient towards true south; would

16 "
183'-4 5
7"
need to be at an angle to have equal lot line

130'-116
140'-916

distance from neighbors.

180'-0"
1"

MARCH-APRIL 2018
INTA275
C. ZEMAN
Driveway entry only from west side. Garage 125'-0"
door would be move to west wall for side entry.
3
120'-1016"
Required setback of 10’ from all sides is met.
THE ART INSTITUTE
OF PITTSBURGH

117'-1 5"
ONLINE DIVISION

8
LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR

LOTS 36 & 38 TOURAINE DR LOT 111 SALLY CT LOTS 78 & 79 RIDGEWOOD

CLIENT
AVE

C ZEMAN

SITE OPTIONS
DR. CROSS
4.4.18
W3A1

SCALE 1/16"=1'-0"
N A1
of _ SHEETS
SUMMARY
All of these lots were chosen based on their location on brownfields in semi-
urban areas, however I’ve determined that the lots 36 & 38 on Touraine Drive are
the most sustainable selection. The major determining factor is the close walking
proximity to public transportation, services and parks, which would minimize
driving needs.
The lot is large enough to accommodate the home with the required setbacks on
all sides. Although I can’t tell from the image provided which sides of the lot
abuts the street, direct driveway access could be placed from either the north of
the west side. The plans state that the garage entry could be specified on either
of these sides.
The topography of northern Illinois is flat, so this should not be a factor in the site
selection.
The climate zone for Northern Illinois is Zone 5. The required R-values and U-
factors are listed on the following page.
CLIMATE ZONE:
NORTHERN ILLINOIS – ZONE 5

[www.energycode.pnl.gov] [www.energycode.pnl.gov]
WORKS CITED

“Residential Prescriptive Requirements - 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).” 2009
IECC Climate Zone Map - Illinois, Image. www.energycode.pnl.gov/EnergyCodeReqs/?state=Illinois.
PROGRAMMING DOCUMENT
&
SITE SELECTION
CLIENT PROFILE, PROJECT CONSTRAINTS & CLIENT NEEDS

The Eldridge Family


Mr. & Mrs. Eldridge are empty nesters who are not yet retired. They learned about
and became interested in sustainability from their extensive travels and stays in eco-
tourism resorts. Their goal is to be nearly net-zero in their new home and they are
willing to invest in up-front sustainable features which will pay for themselves long-
term. They have four grown children who live out of state and occasionally visit in the
summer. They would like to create an aging-friendly home with all of their living
space, including a home office/library, on the first level. The basement will be
finished as guest bedrooms, baths and recreation area for their children and future
grandchildren.
The lots on 36 & 38 Touraine Drive are being combined into one lot of ~120.5’ x 137’
in a dense urban residential neighborhood. There is a 10’ required setback from all
sides. Living in this setting will allow the Eldridge’s easy in getting around as they age.
They will be able to walk around the safe, family-filled neighborhood for moderate
exercise. Having close neighbors will encourage easy and convenient socializing
opportunities. The site is close walking proximity to public transportation, services
and parks.
GRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION OF SITE SELECTION
• Winter prevailing winds are from the
north & northwest, so evergreen
SIDEWALK
trees will be planted here for privacy
• The driveway, paths & patio DRIVE & wind block. The wind block will
will be made of eco-pavers, WAY aid in keeping heating costs down in
a system designed to allow the winter months.
rain water to seep back into • Photovoltaic Solar Panel Array:
the ground instead of Placed on south facing roof to
draining to the sewers convert the sun’s radiation into
usable electricity
• A traditional grass lawn will
be replaced with native • Skylights: allow daylighting,
prairie plants, grasses & passive solar heating &
flowers. These will be little ventilation
to no maintenance for the
aging residents. • Fiber Composite Plank Decking
• A rain garden in the • Deciduous tress planted along
backyard, built with a south side will provide shade &
shallow concave that keep cooling costs down in
downspouts drain into summer.

NORTH SOLAR PATH


SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IMPLEMENTION
&
LEED-H APPLICATION
SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES, CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES & FEATURES

• Reduce the heat-island effect: • Winter prevailing winds are from the
the driveway, paths & patio will north & northwest, so evergreen
be made of eco-pavers, a system SIDEWALK
trees will be planted here for privacy
designed to allow rain water to DRIVE & wind block. The wind block will
seep back into the ground WAY aid in keeping heating costs down in
instead of draining to the sewers the winter months.
• Photovoltaic Solar Panel Array:
• Minimize irrigation: A traditional Placed on south facing roof to
grass lawn will be replaced with convert the sun’s radiation into
native prairie plants, grasses & usable electricity
flowers. Gray-water reuse system
will help irrigate when needed. • Skylights: allow daylighting,
passive solar heating &
• Rainwater harvesting system: ventilation
Tank size & filter TBD.
• All appliances will be Energy • Fiber Composite Plank Decking
Star.
• All fixtures & fittings will be high • Deciduous tress planted along
efficiency. south side will provide shade &
• Home will have Energy Star keep cooling costs down in
Advanced Lighting Package. summer.

NORTH SOLAR PATH


FURNITURE SCHEMATIC LAYOUT

educational use.
These drawings
are only for
aio.gif
THE ART INSTITUTE
OF PITTSBURGH
ONLINE DIVISION

INTA275
36-38
CAT ZEMAN
DR. CROSS
4.11.18
W4A1

A1
1 36 TOURAINE DR - FURN PLAN
A1 SCALE: 1/8" = 1'-0"
Design
Development of _ SHEETS
LOCATION AND LINKAGES (LL) – 13 POINTS
FINDINGS BASIS:
LOCATION AND LINKAGES [LL]
1 LEED for Neighborhood Development – 10 points –

Walkable Streets

Compact Development

Connected & open community

Transit Facilities

Visitability & Universal Design [

2 Site Selection– 2 points –

Brownfield Remediation

Preferred Location [previously developed]

Access to Quality Transit

Floodplain Avoidance

4 Existing Infrastructure – 1 points –

Streets, sewer, electric, cable, water all exising

5 Basic Community Resources/Transit – 1 points –

Solar Panel Array on south side of roof


SUSTAINABLE SITES (SS) – 16 POINTS
FINDINGS BASIS:
SUSTAINABLE RESOURCES
1.2 Minimized Disturbed Area of Site – 1 point -
2.2 Basic Landscape Design – 2 points -
– Any turf must be drought-tolerant.
– Do not use turf in densely shaded areas.
– Do not use turf in areas with a slope of 25% (i.e., 4:1 slope).
– Add mulch or soil amendments as appropriate.
Mulch is defined as a covering placed around plants to reduce erosion and water loss and to help regulate soil temperature. In
addition, upon decomposition, organic mulches serve as soil amendments. The type of mulch selected can affect soil pH.
– All compacted soil (e.g., from construction vehicles) must be tilled to at least 6 inches.” [“Basic Landscape Design.”]

2.3 Limit Conventional Turf – 3 points –


20% of less conventional turf

2.4 Drought Tolerant Plants – 2 points –

Native prairie plants & grasses are drought tolerant will be planted that “are perfectly matched to the prairie habitat they prefer.”

[“Are Native Plants Really Drought-Tolerant?”]

2.5 Reduce Overall Irrigation Demand by at Least 20% – 6 points –


Native plants and grasses chosen will not require any additional irrigation. There will be no conventional turf to water.
WATER EFFICIENCY (WE) – 11 POINTS
FINDINGS BASIS:
WATER EFFICIENCY
1.1 Rainwater Harvesting System – 4 point –

Storm water runoff needs to be calculated based on weather history data to determine the correct size tanks & proper filters
[“‘Rainwater Harvesting/Smart Controllers and LEED Points.’”]

1.2 Graywater Reuse System – 1 points –

Graywater will be sourced from laundry, sink & shower and used for drip irrigation. To maintain health of irrigated plants, only
environmentally safe soaps, cleansers and laundry detergents will be used. [“Residential Grey Water Systems for Home Use.”]

1.3 Uses of Municipal Recycled Water System – 3 point –

Determine if the City of Chicago offers a Recycled Water System

3.2 Very High Efficiency Fixtures & Fittings – 6 points –

Showerheads no more than 2gpm

Faucets no more than 1.5 gpm

Toilets no more than 1.28 gpm & dual-flush [“Switch to High-Efficiency Plumbing Fixtures to Save Water, Energy, and Money.” ]
ENERGY AND ATMOSPHERE (EA) – 38 POINTS
FINDINGS BASIS:
ENERGY AND ATMOSPHERE [EA – PERFORMANCE APPROACH]
2.2 Enhanced Insulation – 2 points –

Install insulation that exceeds the R-value requirements listed in Chapter 4 of the 2004 International Energy Conservation Code by at least 5%

see page 10

3.3 Minimal Envelope Leakage – 3 points –

see Table 1 & 2 on page

4.3 Exceptional Windows – 3 points –

Low E-4 glass


5.3 Minimal Distribution Losses [Heating & Cooling Distribution System]

6.3 Very High Efficiency HVAC – 4 points –


7.3 Efficient Domestic Hot Water Equipment – 3 points –

8.3 Advanced Lighting Package – 3 points – ENERGY STAR qualified lighting use about 75% less energy than standard models and last 10
times as long. [Energy Star Lighting Packages Can Significantly Reduce Your Electric Bill.]

8.3 High Efficiency Appliances– 2 points – ENERGY STAR

9.2 Water Efficient Clothes Washer – 1 point – 13 gallons of water per load
10 Renewable Energy System – 10 points –
Solar Panel Array on south side of roof

11.2 Appropriate HVAC Refrigerants– 3 points –


AIR LEAKAGE CHARTS

[www.usgbc.org/credits/homes/v4-draft/eac7]
WORKS CITED
Samarasekera, Rukesh. “LEED for Neighborhood Development Credits, Prerequisites and Points.” U.S. Green
Building Council, 10 Apr. 2017, www.usgbc.org/articles/leed-nd-credits-and-points.
“Basic Landscape Design.” U.S. Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org/credits/ssc22-0.
Vogt, Scott. “Are Native Plants Really Drought-Tolerant?” Dyck Arboretum, 1 Feb. 2017, dyckarboretum.org/are-
native-plants-really-drought-tolerant/.
“Residential Grey Water Systems for Home Use.” Flotender, www.flotender.com/residential-grey-water-system-for-
home-use.html.

“‘Rainwater Harvesting/Smart Controllers and LEED Points.’” "Rainwater Harvesting/Smart Controllers and LEED
Points" | U.S. Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org/education/sessions/green-homes-summit-2014/rainwater-
harvestingsmart-controllers-and-leed-points-482.

“Switch to High-Efficiency Plumbing Fixtures to Save Water, Energy, and Money.” The Green Spotlight RSS,
www.thegreenspotlight.com/2010/08/high-efficiency-water-saving-plumbing-fixtures/.
“Residential Prescriptive Requirements - 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).” 2009 IECC Climate
Zone Map - Illinois, Image. www.energycode.pnl.gov/EnergyCodeReqs/?state=Illinois.
“Air Infiltration.” U.S. Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org/credits/homes/v4-draft/eac7.
Energy Star Lighting Packages Can Significantly Reduce Your Electric Bill,
www.greendesignbuild.net/Pages/EnergyStarLightingPackagescanSignificantlyReduceYourElectricBill.aspx.
LIGHTING & HVAC LAYOUT
educational use.
These drawings
are only for
LIGHTING SCHEDULE
TAG SYMBOL LAMP DESCRIPTION REVISIONS
L1 LED GARAGE PHOTOSENSOR

L2 LED OUTDOOR SCONCE ON PHOTOSENSOR

L3 R
LED RECESSED LIGHTING - DIMMABLE

L4 LED PENDANT - DIMMABLE


GARAGE L1
L5 LED OUTDOOR PHOTOSENSOR [SECURITY]
L2
L3

S S

DIM

DIM
R R R
R R R
R

DIM
DIM

S
S

BEDROOM #2
S

DIM
R
R R R
R
PANTRY R R R R
DN
R R R

DIM
S
LIVING ROOM

DIM
DIM
S S S

DIM
DIM

ADA
R R R

R
MASTER WIC

S
R R R R R
BATHROOM
DIM

DIM

DIM
R R S S R

INTA203 - AUTOCAD II
S S DIM DIM R
R R R

S
S
DIM

DIM

FEB-MARCH 2018
R R

C. ZEMAN
MASTER BATHROOM
R R
R
R
R R

R
KITCHEN/DINING

S
S
DIM
R

DIM
MASTER BEDROOM
R
R

R R

R R R R

OFFICE

S
DIM
R R R

DIM
S
R R
S S

DIM
DIM

DIM
R S
R R R
THE ART INSTITUTE
OF PITTSBURGH
ONLINE DIVISION

R
R R R
L4

GALLERY 203
DIM

DIM
S S

L5

C ZEMAN
A ROLAND
2.12.18

1 LIGHTING PLAN W1A3

A1
SCALE 14"=1'-0"

of _ SHEETS
LIGHTING NOTES
■ All windows will have EarthShade brand window treatments. These are designed to
maximize light & energy control
– “Safeshades Roller line offer a wide array of options that will reduce, reflect, absorb, or
cut heat gain increasing the efficiency of ventilation systems thereby saving energy
and money while cutting Carbon emissions.” [“Solar Control.”]
– Minimizes the 3 factors of conduction, convection and pressure. The company’s "R-
values" ratings “directly correlate to the rest of a wall system including framing,
sheathing, insulation etc., that together form the insulating system.” [“Energy Control.”]
■ All south facing windows will be mounted with light shelves to reflect the sunlight into the
space & improve daylighting.
– “Light shelves are most effective on walls facing the sun's path.” [“Redirecting Light .”]
■ All interior lights will be on dimmers and occupancy sensors will be installed to
automatically turn lights off if no movement is detected.
■ All exterior lights will operate on photosensors & be Dark Sky certified [see charts page 4]
■ Advanced Lighting Package – 3 points – ENERGY STAR qualified lighting use about 75%
less energy than standard models and last 10 times as long. [Energy Star Lighting Packages
Can Significantly Reduce Your Electric Bill.]
LEED LIGHTING CREDITS REQUIREMENTS

[www.usgbc.org/credits/homes/v4-draft/eac13]
educational use.
These drawings
are only for
REVISIONS

GARAGE

BEDROOM #2
PANTRY

LIVING ROOM

ADA
MASTER WIC BATHROOM

INTA203 - AUTOCAD II
FEB-MARCH 2018
C. ZEMAN
MASTER BATHROOM
KITCHEN/DINING
MASTER BEDROOM

OFFICE

THE ART INSTITUTE


OF PITTSBURGH
ONLINE DIVISION

GALLERY 203
C ZEMAN
A ROLAND
2.12.18

1 HVAC PLAN W1A3

A1
SCALE 14"=1'-0"

of _ SHEETS
HVAC NOTES
■ Geothermal Heat Pump: “A geothermal heat pump makes use of heat from the Earth by way of
looped piping that is placed into the ground. During cold months, the fluid in this piping loops
underground and absorbs the heat, which is carried back indoors to provide heating. Geothermal
systems like these are said to be four times more efficient than traditional HVAC systems, and can
also be used to supply cooling, too.” [“7 Green Technologies That Are Changing HVAC.”]

• On Demand/Tankless water heater:


• 24%–34% more energy efficient than
conventional storage tank water
heaters.
• 20 year life expectancy
[“Tankless or Demand-Type Water
Heaters.”]

• Passive ventilation: in addition to


natural heating and cooling of the
interior of the home, passive
ventilation also removes indoor
pollutants which improves indoor
air quality.

[www.usgbc.org/credits/eac63.]
HVAC NOTES
■ Outdoor Air Ventilation – 3 points
– Passive ventilation: in addition to natural heating and cooling of the interior of the home, passive
ventilation also removes indoor pollutants which improves indoor air quality.
– This is achieved by strategic window placement, resulting in cross ventilation. Placing windows on the
side of the home with the prevailing windows is necessary to maximize the passive ventilation.
[“Air Quality, HVAC & Lighting.”]

[www.usgbc.org/credits/homes/v2008/eqc4.]
WORKS CITED
“Solar Control.” www.earthshade.com/.
“Energy Control.” www.earthshade.com/.
Redirecting Light | Sustainability Workshop, sustainabilityworkshop.autodesk.com/buildings/redirecting-light.
Energy Star Lighting Packages Can Significantly Reduce Your Electric Bill,
www.greendesignbuild.net/Pages/EnergyStarLightingPackagescanSignificantlyReduceYourElectricBill.aspx.
“Lighting.” U.S. Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org/credits/homes/v4-draft/eac13.
“HEA6.3 Very High-Efficiency HVAC.” U.S. Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org/credits/eac63.
“7 Green Technologies That Are Changing HVAC.” HVAC Classes, www.hvacclasses.org/blog/green-technologies-
changing-hvac.
“Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters.” Department of Energy, www.energy.gov/energysaver/water-
heating/tankless-or-demand-type-water-heaters.
“Outdoor Air Ventilation.” U.S. Green Building Council, www.usgbc.org/credits/homes/v2008/eqc4.
“Air Quality, HVAC & Lighting.” Myclasses.artinstitutes.edu,
myclasses.artinstitutes.edu/d2l/le/content/121414/viewContent/1355133/View.
FINAL PROJECT:
SELECT & SPECIFY MATERIALS;
CREATE THE OWNER’S MANUAL
CATHERINE ZEMAN
INTA275: SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS
WEEK 5 ASSIGNMENT 1
FACULTY: DR. TUCKER CROSS
DUE DATE: 4.18.18
PART I: SPECIFICATION SHEETS
SOLAR PANELS

https://www.thesolarco.com/solar-energy/solar-panels/solar-panel-maintenance/
GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP

https://www.proudgreenhome.com/blogs/will-my-geothermal-system-need-much-maintenance/
STRANDWOVEN BAMBOO FLOORING
BELLMONT STAINLESS STEEL CABINETS

http://www.ssina.com/download_a_file/cleaning.pdf
MOHAWK EVERSTRAND CARPET

https://www.mohawkflooring.com/carpet/detail/5580-110150/Dynamo-Ancient-Marble?tab=care
“GRAY TO GREEN” REVIEW
The overall impact of the video on my thoughts towards selection of materials and sustainable designs
is an inspiring one. It reinforces the core concept of this class which is that building sustainably require
creativity and forethought. For example, many of the LEED-H credits need to be considered before the
project is started, not only for inspection purposes; but to maximize the amount of sustainable ideas
which can be implemented.
Once a developer completes one sustainable project, they have gained a whole toolbox of how
sustainable design can be used.

In the video, the focus is much bigger than LEED credits; it is how huge amounts of potential
construction ”waste” can be reused intelligently by thinking outside of the box. It requires considering
how temporary structures are put together in order to take them apart so that they are still usable. It
also posits how existing structures can be demolitioned thoughtfully in order to reuse the raw
materials, such as steel, in their existing form.

Material selection is extremely impactful on a sustainable project; the materials used should all be
recycled as much as possible. Additionally, the creation of the materials and how that impacts the
environment should be considered. Lastly, the lifespan of the materials is extremely important and the
”afterlife” of the materials should be considered too. After the useful life in one use has expired, a
second life can begin – like with the steel beams in the video.

After watching the video, I’m most strongly influenced by how important it is to be creative with the
available resources and technology. Sustainable design grows based on new, successfully
implemented ideas.