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DIPLOMA IN LAW ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION

http://www.scribd.com/doc/18306281/Sample-Exam-Questions-for-Law-Enforcement-Administration

PROGRAM WEBSITE
Law and Security Administration - Niagara College

Niagara College's 2-year Diploma in Law and Security Administration program is primarily
designed to equip learners with the knowledge and skills required to work in criminal justice
system administration particularly in either customs and immigration or private security. The
Program emphasizes a 'reality-based curriculum' based on 'applied learning and frontline
policing/investigative skills.' The first year of the Program has a common curriculum with that
of the College's Police Foundations program and is primarily geared towards providing
students with a foundation in criminal justice, including introductory classes in Criminology,
English, Law, Physical Education, Psychology, and Sociology.

The final year of the Program will have students focus their respective studies in either
customs and immigration or private security, learning the theory, knowledge, and skills
specific to the field chosen. During semester 4 of the final year of the Program, students will
have the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real-world situations
via a work experience placement in a setting befitting the student's chosen stream. The
Placement also provides an opportunity to reinforce and advance the lessons learned in
class.

Graduates of the Program can pursue employment, career advancement, and/or educational
opportunities in various areas of criminal justice system administration. Career-wise,
graduates may apply for employment in government security agencies at both the federal and
provincial levels, private security firms, and numerous other employers. For example,
graduates who focussed on customs and immigration can apply for entry level work with
Canada Border Services, customs brokerages, freight forwarders, and private businesses.
Graduates who specialized in the private security stream may assume positions in
correctional and youth detention centres, entertainment industry (such as casinos and special
events), high risk and task specific escorts (like money transfers and bodyguard work),
municipal by-law enforcement, national and provincial government asset protection (such as
government buildings and nuclear power plants), on board security roles (airplanes, trains,
and transit systems, for example), and public and private security. Students should be aware
that some positions will require further training and education as determined by the employer,
and those who possess a criminal record may find it difficult to attain employment in the
various aspects of the criminal justice system.

Graduates of the Program may also further their education in the criminal justice or related
fields at numerous institutes, colleges, and universities across Canada, often with advanced
standing. For example, graduates can take advantage of one of the College's existing transfer
agreements with Athabasca University, Griffith University, Ryerson University, and University
of Ontario Institute of Technology. At Athabasca, graduates can transfer into the Bachelor of
Professional Arts in Communication Studies; Governance, Law, and Management; or Justice
with an advanced standing of 60 credits. At Griffith, students can transfer into the Bachelor of
Arts in Criminology and Criminal Justice with 1.5 years worth of credits. At Ryerson, students
can transfer into the Bachelor of Applied Arts in Justice Studies with 1 year of credit being
awarded. At the University of Ontario Institute of Technology into the Bachelor of Arts in
Criminology and Justice with 'bridge courses required.'

To be eligible for admission into the Program, must have an 'Ontario Secondary School
Diploma with the majority of the senior level courses at the College (C), University (U) or
University/College (M) levels, OR Grade 12 Equivalency, OR mature student status,' and
'Grade 12 English (C) or (U), or Grade 12 English (minimum General Level).'

The College recommends that applicants complete Aboriginal Beliefs, Values, and
Aspirations in Contemporary Society-Grade 11 (M), Canadian Politics and Citizenship-Grade
11 (O), Challenge and Change in Society-Grade 12 (M), Introduction to Anthropology,
Psychology, and Sociology-Grade 11 (M), and Understanding Canadian Law-Grade 11 (M).
Furthermore, for College courses where 'prior academic performance' is required, only 'the
most senior final grade level available at the time of selection' will be used. Applicants may
also be subject to 'testing or other supplemental evaluation' before a final decision of their
respective applications is made.

Furthermore, candidates for the Program will undergo a Criminal Record Check, which 'will be
completed through the College at the beginning of the semester,' and 'those with criminal
charges pending or an uncleared criminal record (criminal convictions must be pardoned,
sealed or expunged) may not register in this program.' For placement purposes, students may
be required to have regular immunization, Hepatitis B inoculation, and have current
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and/or First Aid certification. The student is
responsible for 'all costs associated with CPR/First Aid and inoculations, and/or verification,'
as well as for the Criminal record Check. Students will also be 'responsible for their own
transportation in order to complete field placement requirements' including transportation
costs.

Introduction
A Law Enforcement Foundations diploma will prepare students to work in many law
enforcement fields including, police, prisons, customs, immigration, anti narcotics, anti-
corruption and maritime enforcement agency. Possible courses required for this diploma
include criminology, law, computers and security management. Read more about this
diploma program below.

The Law Enforcement Program at MSU is a part of the university's Department of Political Science
and Law Enforcement. The program has an outstanding reputation in Minnesota and in the Upper
Midwest for providing quality professional education in law enforcement. Students in our program
have a variety of career goals, including becoming a police officer, deputy sheriff, state trooper,
conservation officer, federal agent, military officer, attorney, policy analyst, crime analyst, insurance
investigator, and many others.
The program currently offers two options for students. Option I is the pre-licensing track for those
interested in becoming Minnesota peace officers. Option I is a broad major and therefore does not
require a minor. The curriculum in Option I is approved by the Minnesota Peace Officers Standards
and Training (POST) Board for meeting the academic portion of the professional peace officer
education (PPOE) requirement for licensure. An Option I degree, in conjunction with an approved
clinical skills program, meets the complete education requirement for licensure in Minnesota. Due to
an agreement between Minnesota State University and Hibbing Community College, students have
the option of completing the clinical skills requirement in Mankato during the final Spring
semester/early Summer of their college career. Option II also results in a bachelors degree in law
enforcement. However, it does not meet the Minnesota licensing requirements. Fewer law
enforcement courses are required to complete Option II than are required for Option I. Option II
requires a minor. Option II is ideal for students who are certain they do not wish to become Minnesota
peace officers (e.g. they intend to seek law enforcement employment in another state, they intend to
go on for law school or graduate school, etc.).

Why Earn a Law Enforcement Foundations Diploma?


Are you interested in entering the field of law enforcement? Then consider a diploma in Law Enforcement
Foundations. It will give you the basic knowledge or foundation needed to pursue a career in law and/or
regulations and by-law enforcement. Once you graduate, there are many career choices available to you.
Career Possibilities
Career opportunities include positions with police, corrections, parole, and state wildlife agencies as well as
private detective, investigators, wardens or security guards. Students may have to enter agency training
programs to learn more about their chosen field after graduation.
Occupational Outlook
The outlook and growth for this type of work remains steady. The US Bureau of Statistics (BLS), www.bls.gov,
sees an increase of 9-17% in the number of positions available for police officers and detectives in the time
interval 2004-2014. In addition, competition will be considerable, since positions are generally well paying.
Salary Information
While salaries for law enforcement personnel can vary greatly depending on the type of work, one may earn
between $34,000 and $56,000 annually if working for police and sheriff patrol agencies. Police detectives and
criminal investigators could possibility earn between $40,000 and $72,000 annually, according to BLS.
Coursework Requirements
The basic courses required for a law enforcement diploma include:

o Criminal investigations
o Criminal Justice system
o Interrogation techniques
o Homeland security
o Psychology
o Interpersonal communications
o Computers
o Detainment procedures
o Security Management
o Laws and ethics
o Weaponry
o Investigation of a crime scene
o Criminology

Skills you will learn


Graduates with a Law Enforcement Foundation diploma will be skilled in the following areas:

o Analytical skills
o Methods of securing a crime scene skills
o Decision making skills
o Teamwork skills
o Oral and written communication skills
o Computer and computer programs skills
o Skilled in using a firearm and weaponry
o Skilled in dealing with the public
o Skilled in apprehension techniques

Program Outline
Program Director: Colleen Clarke, Ed.D.

LE Program Office Manager: Pat Davis.


Click to contact: Pat Davis at patricia.davis@mnsu.edu

Law Enforcement Faculty: Jeff Bumgarner, Ph.D., Susan Burum, J.D., Colleen Clarke, Ed.D., Chris
Dobratz, M.A., Mark Robbins, Ph.D., Tamara Wilkins, Ph.D.

The law enforcement program is a distinct degree program within the Department of Government.
There is considerable integration between law enforcement and the other programs in the
department. The law enforcement program is designed for men and women seeking a professional
career in criminal justice and law enforcement. It is open to in-service students who wish to improve
their basic education, and to pre-service students who may be interested in pursuing a career in law
enforcement.

In order to enter the police profession, applicants should be aware that height, visual, and other
physical and mental standards are set by law enforcement agencies. Students should be aware that
some criminal convictions prevent licensure as a peace officer. Law enforcement students should
consider these standards.

All of the information below is available from the Political Science/Law Enforcement Department
Home page. The items below relate specifically to law enforcement.

Program Requirements
For descriptions of the following law enforcement courses go to the courses page.
Admission to Major, Option I
is granted by the department. Admission to Option I requires satisfaction of departmental GPA and
course prerequisites as well as POST Board documentation. Since these requirements are subject to
change, students should contact the Department of Government office for current admission
requirements.

Admission to Major, Option II


is granted by the department. Contact the department for application procedures.

Required General Education (3 Credits):


POL 111 US Government (3)

Required of Major (Option I or Option II):


There are two different options for the law enforcement degree. The Option I program is certified as
meeting the academic learning objectives of the Minnesota Peace Officer Standards and Training
(POST) Board. Option II is designed for students who do not wish to take the POST Board
Certification Test in Minnesota.

Option I (Pre-Professional)
Leads to Minnesota Licensure when combined with Skills Component

Required for Option I (Core, 44 credits):


LAWE 131 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3)

LAWE 231 Criminal Law and Procedures (3)

LAWE 232 Victims, Survivors: Police Response (3)

LAWE 233 Criminal Investigation (3)

LAWE 234 Policing in a Diverse Society (3)

Successfully
apply for admission to Option I program before taking 300-400 level classes. See Law Enforcement
Office for details.

LAWE 331 Police Stress (3)

LAWE 332 Police Juvenile Justice Procedures (3)

LAWE 335 Police and the Community


LAWE 343 Police Emergency Response Procedures (4)

LAWE 344 Tactical Communications (4) (Pre: LAWE 343 or instructors permission)

LAWE 431 Police Patrol: Theory, Practice (3)

LAWE 432 Minnesota Criminal Code (3)

LAWE 433 Senior Seminar (3)

Choose one of the following:


POL 221 Introduction to Political Analysis (3)

POL 260 Introduction to Public Administration (3)

POL 371 State and Local Government (3)

Required for Option I (Electives 12 credits):


6 credits of LAWE electives, 3 at the 300/400 level; 6 credits of electives from the following
departments:

CHEM 131 CHEM 134 COMS xxx

CORR xxx ETHN xxx HLTH 210

LAWE xxx POL xxx PSYC xxx

RPLS xxx SOC xxx SOWK xxx

SPAN xxx SPEE xxx WOST xxx

Required for Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree ONLY:


Language (8)

Total Credits Required for Major:


(56 credits)

Required Minor:
None

Option II (Generalist)

Required for Option II (27 credits):


LAWE 131 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3)

LAWE 231 Criminal Law and Procedures (3)


LAWE 232 Victims, Survivors: Police Response (3)

LAWE 233 Criminal Investigation (3)

LAWE 234 Policing in a Diverse Society (3)

LAWE 331 Police Stress (3)

LAWE 335 Police and the Community (3)

POL 221 Introduction to Political Analysis (3)

Choose one of the following:


POL 371 State and Local Government

POL 451 Administrative Law (3)

POL 452 Jurisprudence (3)

POL 454 Civil Liberties (3)

POL 475 Judicial Process (3)

Required for Option II (Electives, 9 credits):


3 credits of LAWE electives and 6 credits from the following departments:

CHEM 131 CHEM 134 COMS xxx

CORR xxx ETHN xxx HLTH 210

LAWE xxx POL xxx PSYC xxx

RPLS xxx SOC xxx SOWK xxx

SPAN xxx SPEE xxx WOST xxx

Required for Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree ONLY:


Language (8)

Total Credits Required for Major (36 credits)

Required Minor: Option II, yes, any.

Law Enforcement Minor (21 total credits)

Required for Minor (Core, 9 credits):


LAWE 131 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3)
LAWE 231 Criminal Law and Procedures (3)

POL 111 United States Government (3)

Required for Minor (12 credits):


LAWE 233 LAWE 234 LAWE 235

LAWE 332 LAWE 335 LAWE 393

LAWE 434 LAWE 435 LAWE 436

LAWE 437 LAWE 438 LAWE 491

LAWE 493

Courses

131 (3) Introduction to Law Enforcement


The course provides a survey of the institutions and processes of the criminal justice system with and
emphasis and the role of law enforcement agencies in a free society. Political theories of justice are
explored with theories of crime causation.

132 (3) Crime and Punishment


An overview of conflicting theories in criminal justice and the tools to critically evaluate the theories
and present the strengths and weaknesses of each in written, oral or other forms.

231 (3) Criminal Law and Procedures


The history and development of criminal law procedures and their application by law enforcement.
Pre: LAWE 131

233 (3) Criminal Investigation


Procedures of crime investigations, procurement and preservation of evidence, interrogation and
courtroom testimony.

234 (3) Policing In a Diverse Society


Historically, minority members have often faced disparate treatment in the criminal justice system.
Because of physical, cultural and economic distinctions, this course is designed to provide students
of law enforcement with the basic tools and skills needed to improve interpersonal communications
with citizens, victims, suspects, and co-workers.
235 (3) Women In Law Enforcement
This course utilizes a broad multi-disciplinary approach in examining the forces, theories, and popular
beliefs that influenced the restriction and eventual acceptance of women in the policing profession.
Included in this course are perspectives from the social, historical, biological, political, and social-
psychological sciences.

331 (3) Police Stress


This course will cover the sources of interpersonal and interpersonal stress in the law enforcement
profession. Students will be required to assess their vulnerability to these stressors and develop their
own strategies and tactics for coping.

332 (3) Police, Juvenile Justice Procedure


This course focuses on the law enforcement approach to the juvenile justice system and how it has
evolved in the United States. Theories of delinquency are reviewed Minnesota Juvenile Code in
emphasized.

335 (3) Police and the Community


This course explores the theories of community policing, what community policing is and is not, and
what recent research reveals regarding police in the community. The student will be introduced to
positive principles of interaction between the police officer and the citizens of the community in which
the offer serves.

336 (3) Advanced Criminal Investigation


A survey of methods and techniques for the investigation of major crimes.

pre: LAWE 233 or instructor's permission

343 (4) Police Emergency Response Procedure


This course will cover the crisis intervention aspects of law enforcement from the perspectives officer
safety, communications, persuasion, problem solving and interpersonal relations. It will start with the
fundamentals and build skills in the areas of working with emotionally distraught individuals, death
notifications, suicide, dispute intervention, and interpersonal problem solving.

344 (4) Tactical Communication


This course integrates officer safety and procedures with the role of street communications. The class
starts with the role of street communications. The class starts with the basic elements of fitness, the
dynamics and legalities of force, and the theory and fundamentals of structured communication.
These themes and skills are then integrated into routine law enforcement scenarios. pre: LAWE 343
admission to Option I or consent of instructor.

393 (1-4) Issues in Law Enforcement


An examination of issues facing law enforcement today in constantly changing legal, social and
cultural environments. Topics will vary and may be repeated for credit. Pre: LAWE 131.

431 (3) Police Patrol: Theory/Practice


Provides students with specific procedures for handling various types of routine calls and situations
and provides a base for handling those incidents which are not routine. Emphasizes critical thinking
skills through discussion, assignments and evaluations. Pre: junior or senior standing.

432 (3) Minnesota Criminal Code


An extensive study of Chapter 609, Minnesota Criminal Code, and traffic law. pre: LAWE 231,
admission to Option I or consent.

433 (3) Senior Seminar


This is the capstone course for LAWE Option I and will include such topics as POST license review,
ethics and interviewing skills.

434 (3) Comparative Criminal Justice Systems


A comparison of criminal justice philosophies, structures, and procedures found in carious countries
around the world. Same as POL 449.

435 (3) Jurisprudence


Philosophy and source of law. Schools of legal philosophies and types of legal thinking. Emphasis is
placed on Classical Natural Law, Analytical Legal Positivism, Legal Realism and Critical Legal
Studies. Same as POL 452

436 (3) Civil Liberties


Review of selected United States Supreme Court decisions interpreting important freedoms
contained in the Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment. Focus is on the rationale which underlies
decisions and their impact on American political and social processes. Provides and opportunity to
exercise and develop individual analytical abilities through analysis of Court's reasoning. Same as
POL 454.
437 (3) Judicial Processes
An examination of the structure, jurisdiction and processes of federal and state courts. Emphasis is
placed on selection of judges and justices and on the dynamics of judicial decision-making. Same as
POL 475.

438 (3) Terrorism and Political Violence


History, philosophy, techniques and countermeasures to terroristic and law intensity threats to public
order. Both domestic and international terror. The blurring of the lines between intensity
conflict/terrorism and multinational high intensity crime. Same as POL 485

439 (3) Police Administration and Planning


An examination of emerging administrative and management concepts and the processes related to
their implementation.

491 (1-5) Topics in Law Enforcement


This course explores topics in law enforcement beyond what is covered in the existing curriculum.
Students study specialized topics of current importance in the field. Specific topics will change
depending on the term and instructor. May be retaken with a change of topic.

492 (1-8) Internship


Field placement with a law enforcement agency or related organization. Provides a learning
experience in which the student can integrate and apply knowledge and theory derived from
curriculum. P/N only.

493 (1-3) Individual Study


Advanced study and research on topics not currently available in existing courses. May be repeated
with a change of topic. Requires advisor and instructor approval of topic.

About This Course

This course will provide students with specialised skills and knowledge in various aspects
of criminal law and related areas. The diploma qualification is specifically geared to
provide students with an understanding in criminal law, criminal practice, law of
evidence, police procedure and specific offences, crimes against the person, criminology,
forensic law and legal jurisdiction. Students will also look at procedures within the
Magistrate's Court.
Number National ID Title
Analyse and assess practice and procedure for a magistrate's
23427
court
23428 Analyse and assess foundations of law
23429 Analyse and assess elements of criminal law
23430 Analyse and assess law of evidence (fundamentals)
23431 Analyse and assess law of evidence (issues)
C9743 FNSICGEN301B Communicate in the workplace
C9744 FNSICGEN302B Use technology in the workplace
C9746 FNSICGEN304B Apply health and safety practices in the workplace

Title: GROUP 02 - STAGE 2


Description: Learners to complete all units listed below:

Units:
Number National ID Title
23432 Analyse and assess essentials of court evidence
Analyse and assess police procedure, traffic and property
23433
offences
23434 Analyse and assess crimes against the person
23435 Analyse and assess elements of criminology
23436 Analyse and assess criminology issues
23437 Analyse and assess legal jurisdiction
23438 Analyse and assess forensic science and the law
23439 Analyse and assess criminal law defences
Rationale

Currently there are 20 students in the graduate program and half of them either worked in policing or
have intention of doing so.

Why Earn a Law Enforcement Administration?


Many police academies now require individuals to hold a Law Enforcement Associate
Degree Diploma as a prerequisite for admission into their programs. Earning an
Associate Degree in Law Enforcement provides a basic level of training that today's
employers look for in candidates for entry-level security and enforcement jobs

Why Earn a Law Enforcement Administration Diploma?


Are you interested in entering the field of law enforcement? Then consider a diploma in
Law Enforcement Administration. It will give you the basic knowledge or foundation
needed to pursue a career in law and/or regulations and by-law enforcement. Once you
graduate, there are many career choices available to you.
Career Possibilities

Career opportunities include positions with police, corrections, parole, and state wildlife
agencies as well as private detective, investigators, wardens or security guards.
Students may have to enter agency training programs to learn more about their chosen
field after graduation.

Skills you will learn

Graduates with a Law Enforcement Foundation diploma will be skilled in the following areas:

o Analytical skills
o Methods of securing a crime scene skills
o Decision making skills
o Teamwork skills
o Oral and written communication skills
o Computer and computer programs skills
o Skilled in using a firearm and weaponry
o Skilled in dealing with the public
o Skilled in apprehension techniques

Skills Learned for a Law Enforcement Associate Degree

Graduates of a Law Enforcement Associate Degree will have acquired basic skills in many areas of law enforcement.
Some of the general skills include:

o Familiarity with functions of the police, the courts, and corrections facilities
o Understanding of basic law enforcement procedures and tactics
o Basic skills in criminal investigation, evidence handling, and forensics
o Human relations skills
o Stress management skills
o Effective oral communication skills
o Effective written communication skills
o Computer skills
o

Academic Requirements

Total credit

Course Duration

Core Subject Description

Undergraduate Studies - Criminology and Law

Courses

Instructional Staff
• Division Head: Krohn, M.
• Faculty: Akers, R.L.; Gibson, C.; Hasel, L.; Hollinger, R.C.; Lane, J.S.; Lanza-
Kaduce, L.; Levett, L.M.
• Affiliated Faculty: Adler, J.S.; Borg, M.; Spillane, J.S.
• Emeritus Faculty: Frazier, C.E., Magnarella, P., Shenkman, F.
• Graduate Student Teaching Assistants

CCJ 3012 History of Corrections


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS major
This course examines the origins and historical development of prisons in America.
Particular attention is given to the impact of reform movements, the rise of centralized
correctional systems, and regional variations in the practice of punishment.

CCJ 3024 Advanced Principles of Criminal Justice


Credits: 3
Advanced overview of criminal law, criminal procedure and criminological theory. Special
emphasis is placed on the components of the criminal justice system: the police, the
prosecutorial and defense functions, the judiciary and the field of corrections. This course
is required of all majors and minors. (S)

CCJ 3038 Law and Society


Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the scholarly study of law from a multidisciplinary,
liberal arts perspective. Students will have an opportunity to become familiar with legal
ideas, legal institutions, and the legal process, with particular emphasis on the study of
criminal behavior and the criminal justice process in American society.

CCJ 3662 Crime, Gender and Race


Credits: 3; Prereq: 3LS/4LS major
The objective of this course is to examine the relationships between gender, race, age and
social class and crime. Attention is given to theoretical explanations, empirical research,
and patterns in criminal behavior and the criminal justice system.

CCJ 3701 Research Methods in Criminology


Credits: 4; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS, major
Advanced research design and data analysis. Study of experimental and non-experimental
research designs, probability and nonprobability sampling techniques, construction of
scales and indexes and methods of bivariate and multivariate data analysis. Prior
completion of an introductory course in statistics is recommended but not required. (S)

CCJ 4037 Psychology and Law


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024 3LS/4LS major
Application of behavioral science research and practice to the legal system. Psychologists
and the legal system; lawyers: socialization, training, and ethics; legality, morality and
justice; forensic assessment; the insanity defense; competence in the legal system;
eyewitness identification; jury selection, theories or crime; punishment and sentencing

CCJ 4466 Victimology


Credits: 3
Multidisciplinary study of crime victims examining legal and philosophical issues
regarding victimization, social science research into victimization, theories of
victimization and role of victims in criminal justice and legal system. (S)

CCJ 4058 History of Criminal Justice in America


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS, major
An examination of the historical development of crime and criminal justice in America.
Special attention is devoted to the development of the modern prison, police and
organized crime in America. (S)

CCJ 4284 Law and Social Policy


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS, major
An examination of the philosophical, legal and scientific modes of inquiry that are central
to the study of law. Attention is given to fitting the ap- propriate method of inquiry to the
social policy question presented so that law and its effectiveness can be evaluated. Prior
completion of CCJ 3701 is recommended but not required. (S) GR-E†

CCJ 4508 Children, Families and the Law


Credits: 3; Prereq: 3LS/4LS, major
This course will use scholarship in psychology and law to examine relationships and
conflicts between the state, children and families. Issues will include child abuse and
neglect, reproductive rights of adolescents, juvenile delinquency, and child custody,
among others. The developing psychological capacities of children will be evaluated in
light of their legal rights and responsibilities.

CCJ 4604 Criminological Theory


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS
Advanced study and critical appraisal of various theories of crime causation, including an
examination of biological, psychological, economic and sociological perspectives on the
etiology of crime. (S)

CCJ 4622 Violence in American History


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS, major
This course will examine the historical roots of American violence. It will devote particular
attention to the history of racial, ethnic and domestic violence.

CCJ 4644 White-Collar Crime


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS, major
An examination of individual criminality in the course of one's occupation and the crimes
of organizations and corporations. Course will study the societal reaction to these "upper
class" illegalities. (S) GR-E†

CCJ 4680 Intimate Violence


Credits: 3; Prereq: 3LS/4LS, major
An examination of the factors increasing the risk for intimate violence, the effects of
violence on victims, interventions to prevent and treat violence, and public policies.
Topics will include child physical and sexual abuse, domestic violence, and sexual assault.
Law, social science, and feminist scholarship will be used to examine current
controversies in these fields.

CCJ 4764 History of Drug Control


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS major
This course examines trends and developments in the regulation of drugs in America. This
course emphasizes the study of the origins and impact of drug control, the evolution of
drug treatment, and drug law enforcement.

CCJ 4905 Individual Work


Credits: 1 to 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS major and consent of instructor
Qualified students and the instructor will develop a course of study or investigation
designed to extend available course work. A formal written report is required. May be
repeated, but no more than 3 hours of credit earned in CCJ 4905 may be applied to either
major area requirements or minimum degree requirements established by the university.

CCJ 4934 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024
May be repeated with change in topic up to a maximum of 12 credits; 3LS/4LS, major. A
changing-topic seminar which will examine a variety of current issues, techniques and
problems in criminal justice.

CCJ 4940 Practicum


Credits: 1 to 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024 3LS/4LS major and consent of instructor
Supervised experience in a criminal justice agency. May be repeated, but no more than 3
hours of credit earned in CCJ 4940 may be applied to either major area requirements or
minimum degree requirements established by the university.

CCJ 4970 Senior Thesis


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024 and director's approval
Qualified students submit a formal research proposal, carry out individual research under
the supervision supervision of a faculty member and prepare a formal written report of
the research to a faculty committee. May be repeated, but no more than 6 hours of credit
may be applied to either major area requirements or minimum degree requirements
established by the university.
CJC 4010 Introduction to Corrections
Credits: 3; Coreq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS, major
An introduction to the field of penology and corrections. Consideration is given to
conflicting philosophies of punishment, criminological theory as it applies to the field of
corrections, the selectivity of the process through which offenders move prior to their
involvement in correctional programs, alternative correctional placements and empirical
assessments of the short- and long-term consequences of involvement in correctional
programs. (S)

CJE 3114 Introduction to Law Enforcement


Credits: 3; Coreq: CCJ 3024; 3LS/4LS, major
The role of the police in the criminal justice system of a democratic society. The
organization of police work, discretion and police role in a socio-legal context.

CJE 4115 Police and Society


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024 and CCJ 3114, 3LS/4LS, major
An advanced assessment of poverty, minority groups, social class and cultural differences
as they impact on the police and police interactions with other segments of the criminal
justice system. Special attention will be paid to problems regarding police training and
education, career development and community relations.

CJE 4116 Analysis of Police Organizations


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024 and CCJ 3114, 3LS/4LS, major
An in-depth examination of current applications of organizational theory and research in
modern police organizations.

CJE 4144 Private Security and Control


Credits: 3; Prereq: 3LS, 4LS major
To understand the role of private security in the prevention of crime and deviance against
the assets of formal organizations and their employees, such as business corporations,
retail stores, and educational institutions.

CJJ 4010 Juvenile Justice


Credits: 3; Prereq: 2LS/3LS, major
An examination of the development, change and operation of the American juvenile
justice system. Special emphasis is placed on the nature of juvenile law and our methods
of dealing with youthful offenders. (S)

CJL 2000 Law and the Legal Process


Credits: 3
This survey course promotes an understanding of law as it relates to an individual's
everyday encounters with the legal system. Actual legal cases may be studied to analyze
how disputes are resolved by application of legal principles to factual situations, whether
justice was served by the decision, and potential implications of the decision on future
cases. (S)

CJL 4044 Tort Law


Credits: 3; 3LS/4LS, major
A study of civil liability for damages caused by a breach of an imposed duty. Topics
pursued include negligence, absolute liability, intentional torts, defamation, economic
torts, products liability and damages.

CJL 4050 Juvenile Law


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS, major
An examination of the juvenile justice system including delinquency, dependency and
laws that have special application for juveniles. Special emphasis is given to the operation
of the Florida juvenile code and the relationship between children and society.

CJL 4110 Criminal Law


Credits: 3;, 3LS/4LS, major
A study of substantive criminal law. Consideration is given to its historical development,
the tension between social and legal definitions of crime, the basic dimensions of
criminality, the specific elements of major crimes and the nature of criminal sanctions. (S)

CJL 4410 Criminal Procedure


Credits: 3; Prereq: CCJ 3024, 3LS/4LS, major
Study of constitutional rights of the accused in criminal proceedings. The course focuses
on analysis of case materials involving the law of arrest, search and seizure, the use of
confessions, fair trial, and the prohibition of cruel and unusual punishments

Criminal Justice Program Outline


The Associate Degree Program in Criminal Justice is comprised of twenty comprehensive courses
with clear, logical lessons. They are easy to follow, yet challenging and stimulating at the same time.
Each lesson begins with a subject matter preview and objectives, and an introductory note from your
instructor.
Next come the reading and research assignments. Practice exercises help you check and review
what you've learned. You'll take periodic lesson exams with your books and notes open. For your
convenience, you may take these online.
Semester 1
C01 - Introduction to Business
A broad overview of the business world for both business and non-business majors. An introduction
to the business environment, business ownership, management, marketing, technology and
information, and finance.
J01 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
An introduction to the criminal justice process, including an overview of crime in America, criminal
law, policing, the courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.
C08 - American GovernmentJ02 - Criminal Law
A careful examination of the behavior that is the subject of criminal law, presented through
straightforward examples and clear explanations. Covers criminal liability, criminal defenses and
jurisdiction, crimes against persons and property, sex crimes, and other criminal conduct.
C02 - Business Communications I
Semester 2
J03 - Criminal ProcedureC07 - Personal FinanceJ04 - Policing
An introduction to the responsibilities of police officers, providing examples and applications of theory,
including topics such as patrol techniques, use of discretion, and describing how police departments
are organized and managed, and how they are responding to modern challenges.
C12 - Business LawC05 - Business Communications II
Semester 3
C04 - Introduction to Psychology
Surveys the field of psychology, including the development of behavior, physiological mechanisms of
behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, consciousness, learning, memory, personality, and
mental health.
J05 - Corrections
A broad-based, foundational approach to understanding the many elements of America's correctional
system from the perspective of both the corrections worker and the criminal offender, paying
particular attention to issues including alternative sanctions, incarceration of women and juveniles,
and the effects of incarceration upon release.
J06 - Ethics in Criminal Justice
Bridges the gap between the ideals of justice and the ethical behavior that criminal justice
professionals should exhibit in the furtherance of justice. This course presents information that
criminal justice professionals need to resolve many of the ethical dilemmas they may face, and to
understand the dilemmas faced by others within the justice system.
C17 - College MathematicsJ07 - Private Security
An introduction to the situations encountered and the security techniques commonly used by private
security officers. Topics covered include loss prevention, physical security, access control, and
technology.
Semester 4
C10 - Introduction to Computers
Designed to assure a basic level of computer applications literacy. Includes word processing,
spreadsheet, database, e-mail, and the Internet. Also covers various types of computer hardware and
networking methods. (This course has been designed so that access to a computer is helpful, but not
required.)
J08 - Domestic Violence
A careful examination of crimes committed by a family member against another family member,
offering practical applications of theory and dispelling myths about victims and offenders.
J09 - Juvenile Justice
This course examines the facts behind juvenile delinquency, the processes in the justice system
affecting juvenile offenders, the roles of probation, institutionalization, and parole. Also includes
coverage of gangs and delinquency prevention.
J10 - Criminal Investigation
A thorough examination of the investigation process and of situations in which police officers apply
specific investigative and information-gathering techniques to meet the evidentiary requirements of
specific crimes.
J11 - Report Writing
A hands-on course that examines various reports used by police officers and develops the writing
skills needed for note taking, police reports, and warrants.

Criminal Courts
SECTION I: THE PURPOSE AND STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN COURTS

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION: LAW AND THE JUDICIAL FUNCTION

Why Study Courts?

What is Law?

The Code of Hammurabi

Two Opposing Perspectives: Conflict and Consensus

What is the Relationship of Law to Justice?

The Rule of Law


Justice, the Law, and Packer’s Models of Criminal Justice

Judicial Functions

How Judges “Make Law”

Development of the Common-Law System

The Role of Courts in the Criminal Justice System

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 2: SOURCES OF LAW

Introduction

Sources of Law

Sources of Individual Rights

Due Process and the 14th Amendment

Standard of Review

Incorporation of the Bill of Rights Into the 14th Amendment

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 3: TYPES OF LAW

Introduction

Types of Law: Criminal and Civil

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited
References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 4: COURT ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURE

Introduction

Jurisdiction

The Structure and Jurisdiction of U.S. Courts

A Brief Historical Overview

Federal Courts

State Courts

Court Actors

Overview of the Criminal Process

Overview of Defendant’s Rights/Due Process

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

SECTION II: COURTROOM ACTORS AND THE COURTROOM WORKGROUP

CHAPTER 5: PROSECUTORS

Introduction

Historical Evolution of the American Prosecutor

The Federal Prosecutor

State Prosecutors

The Prosecutor’s Duties

Assistant Prosecutors At Work

The Expansion of the Prosecutor’s Discretionary Power

Prosecutorial Ethics And Misconduct

Community Prosecution

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites
Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 6: DEFENSE ATTORNEYS

Introduction

Defense Attorney's Role in Criminal Justice System

Historical Development of the Right to Counsel

Indigent Defense Systems

Private Versus Appointed Counsel: Which is Better?

Effective Assistance of Counsel

Ethics and Lawyer-Client Relationships

Realities of Being a Defense Attorney

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 7: JUDGES

Introduction

Roles And Duties Of Judges

Judicial Selection

Judicial Socialization and Development

Judicial Accountability and Judicial Independence

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 8: THE JURY

Introduction

History of Jury Trials


The Role of the Jury

Limits On The Right To Trial By Jury

Jury Size And Unanimity Requirements

The Selection of Jurors

Reforms to the Jury System

Jury Nullification

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

SECTION III: COURT PROCESSES

CHAPTER 9: PRETRIAL PROCEDURES

Introduction

Arrest

The Charging Decision

Information

Indictment

Booking

Initial Appearance

Arraignment

Discovery

Pretrial Motions

Plea Bargaining

Jury Selection

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading
CHAPTER 10: THE CRIMINAL TRIAL

Introduction

Opening Statements

The Presentation of Evidence

Calling Witnesses

Evidence and Rules of Evidence

Closing Arguments

Instructing the Jury

Jury Deliberations and Verdict

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 11: SENTENCING

Introduction

The Goals of Sentencing

The Judge’s Options at Sentencing

How Do Judges Decide? Modeling the Sentencing Process

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 12: THE APPELLATE PROCESS

Introduction

Appealing to a Higher Court

The Appellate Courts

The “Right” To Appeal

The Writ of Habeas Corpus


How Do Appellate Courts Decide?

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

References/Future Reading

CHAPTER 13: SPECIALIZED COURTS

Introduction

Problem-Solving Courts

Drug Treatment Courts

Domestic Violence Courts

Other Problem-Solving Courts

Juvenile Courts

Summary

Discussion Questions

Key Terms

Internet Sites

Cases Cited

Coursework Requirements

The basic courses required for a law enforcement diploma include:

o Criminal investigations
o Criminal Justice system
o Interrogation techniques
o Internal security
o Psychology
o Interpersonal communications
o Computers
o Detainment procedures
o Security Management
o Laws and ethics
o Weaponry
o Investigation of a crime scene
o Criminology

Coursework for Law Enforcement Associate Degree

The Law Enforcement Associate Degree student will learn the basics of police procedures and policies, the judicial
system, prison systems, and social sciences. Required courses may include:

o Intro to Criminal Justice and Criminal Law


o Criminal Investigation and Procedures
o Intro to Forensic Science
o Patrol Procedures and Tactics
o Highway Traffic Patrol Operations
o Correctional Institutions, Parole, and Probation
o Fundamentals of Juvenile Justice
o Crisis Control and intervention
o Report Writing and Record-keeping
o Cultural Diversity in the Workplace
o Law Enforcement Information Systems
o First Aid and CPR
o General Psychology and Sociology

Year One

Year Two

MQA Subjects

Entry Requirements

Career Prospects

Universities Colleges offering this program

Further study / Degree Courses


Learning Outcomes - Students who successfully complete this program will be able to:

1. understand the criminal justice system in the U.S. through an examination of its subsystems -- law
enforcement, the courts and corrections.
2. understand police organizations through the study of the objectives, activities and relationships of the
operating sub-units that form a contemporary police department.
3. identify the role of interaction between the police and the community to prevent and control crime.
4. distinguish between the cause of the problem and the symptom of a problem.
5. describe the steps to identify the demographics of the community and recognize and meet the needs of
a diverse public.
6. demonstrate the ability to recognize methods for evaluating satisfaction and success in community
policing activities.
7. recognize terrorism threats and accurately predict police response to the threat.
8. a. understand and recognize appropriate procedures to stop, detain and arrest.
b. search and seizure.
c. understand effective wiretap and eavesdropping procedures.
d. interrogate witnesses and suspects to obtain confessions.

Forensic investigation

Learning Outcomes - Students who successfully complete this program will be able to:

1. identify the different types of evidence.


2. demonstrate knowledge of the legal and scientific aspects of evidence.
3. demonstrate the basic methods of applying scientific principles to the function of collection and
preservation of physical evidence.
4. demonstrate the duties and responsibilities of the first officer on the scene.
5. demonstrate the basic methods of crime scene searches.
6. demonstrate knowledge of the basic methods of crime scene photography.
7. demonstrate knowledge of the basic methods of crime scene sketching.
8. demonstrate the basic methods of locating and preserving latent prints.
9. demonstrate the basic methods of locating and preserving trace and impression evidence.
10. demonstrate the basic methods of locating and preserving blood and other biological evidence.
11. demonstrate knowledge of the basic methods of firearms identification, examination and comparison.
12. demonstrate the basic methods used to locate and preserve arson and explosive evidence.
13. demonstrate knowledge of the types of physical evidence associated with burglaries.
14. demonstrate knowledge of the types of physical evidence associated with sexual assaults.
15. demonstrate knowledge of the types of evidence associated with death investigations.
16. demonstrate the basic methods of computer forensics.
http://usf.usfca.edu/catalog/cps_ug_lel.html

Public Admin Law - Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Public Administration with an concentration


in Law Enforcement Leadership, a graduate will have acquired:

• Dramatically improved oral and written communication skills, including


effective online communication.
• Knowledge of statistical tools and quantitative skills in evaluating and
managing programs.
• Knowledge and skill in conducting performance appraisals, supervision,
and conflict resolution.
• Ability and skill in developing and using a budget as a planning document
and managing performance.
• Ability and skill in leading and collaborating with others.
• Ability and skill in conducting policy analysis.

Institutional Outcome Assessment


Institution Level Report General education outcomes are
practiced extensively, across the curriculum, in the context of progressively more
challenging problems, projects, and standards of performance. (Note: Starting
October 2009, the Institutional Planning Committee took charge of the
Institutional Outcome cycle accomplishments and results.)

Institutional Learning Outcomes

1. Quantitative Reasoning
Apply quantitative and symbolic reasoning to obtain objective solutions to
problems and equations. 5/07
2. Writing andReading
Write coherently and effectively, adjusting to a variety of audiences and
purposes, while taking into account others' writings and ideas. 5/07
3. Creative/Analytic Thinking
Use appropriate creative and analytic methods to interpret ideas, solve
problems, and present conclusions. 5/07
4. Oral and Listening Skills
Communicate effectively for a given purpose within the specific context of
a communication event. AS 5/07
5. Information Literacy
Locate, evaluate and use information from a variety of sources to take
action or make a decision. 5/07
6. Social Interaction
Demonstrate effective self-management and interpersonal skills with
people from a variety of backgrounds to seek consensus, resolve conflicts
and take responsibility. 5/07
7. Health and Wellness
Participate in active living and self-care practices that support health and
wellness. 2/08

8. Global Awareness
Demonstrate awareness, respect, sensitivity, and understanding needed
for participating successfully in a diverse, local and global society. 12/09

Program Learning Outcome Assessement


Program outcomes are achieved by the student for the various degrees and
certificates at the College of Sequoias. Starting 2008-2010, Program Level
Assessment is recording in Program Review documents.

Administration of Justice
AJ Corrections s10
AJ Law Enforcement s10
Fire Technology
Fire Technolygy Fall 07
Human Services - Social Worker
Human Services Fall 07
Nursing
Registered Nursing Fall 07
Register Nursing NCLEX Fall 07
Paralegal
Paralegal Program Fall 07
Course Learning Outcome Assessement
Course outcomes are achieved by students regardless the professor.
Assessment is common among the classes. This is a sample of assessment
activities - see Program Review for complete works. (Note: Learning
outcomes were first recorded in course outlines in Spring 2005. By Fall
2007, "CurricUNET" software became available for recording course outcomes
with a tie to Institution outcomes. In Fall 2008, the college began using "robust"
learning outcomes (i.e. the context for assessment, the measurable
outcome, the assessment method and degree of accomplishment expected.)
Finally, beginning 2009-20010, Program Review includes detailed reporting on
course level assessment cycle accomplishments and assessment results.)

Administration of Justice
AJ 11 Sp 10
AJ 111 Fall 09
AJ 113 Fall 09
AJ 114 Sp 10
AJ 115 Fall 09
AJ 117 Fall 09
AJ 120 Fall 09
AJ 121 Sp 10
AJ 130 Sp 10
AJ 219 FAll 09
Anthropology
ANTH 10 Fall 07
Biology
BIO 30 Fall 07
BIO 40 Fall 07
Chemistry
CHEM Fall 2007
Communication
COMM 5 Fall 07
Economics
ECON 50 Fall 07
English
ENGL 251 - Fall 07
ENGL 251 - Spring 08
ENGL 251 - Fall 08
English as a Second Language
ESL 350 - Fall 07
Fire Technology
FIRE 155 Fall 07
FIRE 157 Fall 07
FIRE 159 Fall 07
FIRE 163 Fall 07
FIRE 182 Fall 07
Human Services
HSRV 120 Fall 07
HSRV 121 Fall 07
HSRV 122 Fall 07
HSRV 228 Fall 07
HSRV 229 Fall 07
Library
Library 102 Spring 08
Library 102 F2009
Library 103 Spring 08
Library 103 F2009
Linguistics
Mathematics
MATH 200 Fall 07
MATH 230 Fall 07
MATH 230 (Woodbury) - Fall 07
MATH 360 Fall 07
Meteorology
Music
Music 34 Fall 07
Philosophy
PHIL 1,5,12,13, 25 Spring 09
Political Science
POLS 5 Fall 09
POLS 8 Fall 09
POLS 110 Fall 09
Psychology
PSY 1 Fall 09
PSY 1 Fall 07
PSY 10 Fall 07
PSY 34 Fall 07
Social Science
SS F07
Sociology
SOC 1 Fall 07
Multicultural Law Enforcement: Strategies for
Peacekeeping in a Diverse Society /Edition 5by Robert M.
Shusta, Deena R. Levine, Philip R. Harris, Herbert Z. Wong, Aaron T. Olson

L I ST PRI CE

$75.60
TEXTBOOK DETAI L S
• EDITION:
5th Edition
• ISBN:
013505088X
• ISBN-13:
9780135050880
• PUB. DATE:
January 2010
• PUBLISHER:
Prentice Hal