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UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES

College of Education
EDFD 100: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Second Semester, SY 2009-2010

I. Course Description
Developmental Psychology is a course that focuses on the factors that affect growth, development, and
learning of the individual from conception to old age. It examines the biological, cognitive, social, emotional,
and moral aspects of development through various theories. Implications to education and guidance, which
includes techniques for meeting diverse needs of children, youth, and adults, are discussed.

II. Course Objectives:


Upon the completion of this course, the student should be able to:
A. Explain the essentials of developmental approaches (theories, models, researches) of physical/
motor, cognitive, language, psychosocial, and moral theories of developmental psychology;
B. Evaluate the basic contributions of each approach and integrate the approach with real life examples;
C. Illustrate how growth, development, and behavior is influenced by a variety of factors, including home,
language, cultural/ societal values, and socioeconomic status;
D. Analyze through reflection on own life span how the factors in the environment interface with various
phases of and types of human development;
E. Describe and discuss the basic stages of human development, and the major biological, cognitive,
psychosocial, and moral characteristics of each stage;
F. Demonstrate the ways in which students learn and are influenced by their developmental stages and
identify areas of modification in order to best meet the needs of learners;
G. Identify the implications of the developmental approaches, factors, and stages in education and
guidance

III. Course Content


Activity Date
ORIENTATION/ Introduction Activity Nov
REMINDER: START WORKING ON YOUR GROUP REPORT (due: January 4) 18
FOUNDATIONS OF DEVELOPMENT Nov
Factors of Development 23
Nature (Heredity): Genogram 25
• http://www.hhs.state.ne.us/Children_Family_Services/safety_rfb/a1FGenSym.pdf 30
• http://calswec.berkeley.edu/calswec/05B_Casework_Sup_Genogram_Format.pdf
• http://www.galindoconsultants.com/Galindo%20Genogram%20Workbook%20Study%20Guide.pdf
Nurture (Environment): Parenting & Identify Formation, Birth Order
• http://people.virginia.edu/~cjp/articles/ffp10b.pdf
• http://fcs.tamu.edu/families/parenting/fathering/fathering_pdf/development.pdf
• http://www.virtualcancercentre.com/healthandlifestyle.asp?sid=321
• http://www.ccl-cca.ca/pdfs/LessonsInLearning/Dec-13-07-Parenting-styles.pdf
• http://www.sonoma.edu/users/p/pollack/edu420/sampleSchillerpaper.pdf
• http://www.google.com.ph/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=16&ved=0CDQQFjAFOAo&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sulloway.org
%2FHolcomb.pdf&rct=j&q=birth order
pdf&ei=61LZTKeeG46mvQO8vdXyCQ&usg=AFQjCNEIrvJjpsDrkNL7zg2Zejcjej00EQ&cad=rja
• http://msdadmin.scican.net/mhs/mhs_area_artesian%20herald/Artesian%20Herald%20Volumes/20072008/issue4/10.pdf
• http://www.sulloway.org/Birth_Order%28Salmon-Oxford-2007%29.pdf
• http://www.aaas.org/spp/bgenes/Chapter1.pdf
THEORIES/ PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT Dec 2
Physical: Arnold Gesell 7
Cognitive and Language: Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner, Lev Vygotsky 9
• http://math.coe.uga.edu/tme/issues/v18n1/v18n1_Ojose.pdf
• http://www.extension.iastate.edu/publications/pm1529f.pdf
Moral: Lawrence Kohlberg, N. Eisenberg, Martin Hoffman, Carol Gilligan (women)
Psychosocial: Erik Erikson, Ellen Greenberger and A. Sorenson, Sigmund Freud (psychosexual), Kazimierz
Dabrowski (emotional), Sullivan (interpersonal), emotional intelligence How Emotional Are You?
• http://www.childrenfirstfs.org/Documents/Psychosocial%20Development%20in%20Infancy%20and%20Early%20Childhood.pdf
• http://www.cals.uidaho.edu/feeding/pdfs/2_1%20Erikson.pdf
• http://www.simplypsychology.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/Freud%20psychosexual.pdf
Try answering online tests!
• www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ ilsweb.html
• www.oswego.edu/plsi/index.html
• www.personal.psu.edu/staff/b/x/bxb11/MI/MIQuiz.htm
BEGINNINGS OF LIFE Dec
Prenatal Development 14
Fetal Senses and Prenatal Memory and Learning 16
• http://www.aipro.info/drive/File/111.pdf Jan 4
• http://www.ummah.com/islam/taqwapalace/prenatal.pdf
Very Early Parenting: Teratogens
• http://aquaticpath.umd.edu/appliedtox/paper2_v3.pdf
• http://www.columbia.edu/itc/hs/medical/humandev/2004/Chpt23-Teratogens.pdf
Birth and the Newborn Baby
Childbirth: Stages, Pain, Complications, Psychological Aspects
http://www.choosegha.com/downloads/childbirth.pdf
The New Born: New Born Screening, Birth Defects, Common Forms of Inheritance, Bonding and Soothing,
Breastfeeding
• http://groups.anthropology.northwestern.edu/lhbr/kuzawa_web_files/pdfs/Duazo%20et%20al%20AJHB%202010.pdf
• http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/tutorials/newbornscreening/pd089103.pdf
REFLECTION PAPER NO. 1: INTRODUCTION FOCUSING ON FAMILY BACKGROUND AND
BEGINNINGS OF LIFE (due: January 6)
GROUP CONSULTATION/ SUBMISSION OF GROUP REPORT Jan 6
SUBMISSION OF INTRODUCTION PAPER
FILM SHOWING ON GENETIC ENGINEERING & AN EVERYDAY MIRACLE
INFANCY AND TODDLERHOOD: FIRST TWO YEARS (group 1) Jan
Physical, Cognitive, and Language Development: Development Milestones (i.e., object permanence) 11
• http://www.learningseed.com/_guides/1009_Infants_Physical_Development_Guide.pdf 13
• http://web.mac.com/jopfer/courses/846-Concepts_files/Flavell%20%281999%29%20TOM.pdf 18
• http://extension.missouri.edu/explorepdf/hesguide/humanrel/gh6115.pdf
• http://www.education.pitt.edu/ocd/publications/parentingguides/LanguageDevelopment1.pdf
• http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OERI/ECI/earinfections.pdf
Psychosocial and Moral Development: Bowlby’s and Ainworth’s Attachment Theories, Role of the Father,
Factors that Affect the Quality of Relationship between Infant and Caregiver, Stranger Anxiety and Separation
Anxiety, Chess and Thomas Temperaments (and factors that contribute to them), Temper Tantrums
• http://www.psychology.sunysb.edu/attachment/online/inge_origins.pdf
• http://www.center4familydevelop.com/temperament.pdf
Developmental Issues and Implications to Parenting/ Teaching: Smart Babies, Early Separation, Parental
Employment and Out-of-Home Care, Toilet Training, Movement Restraint
• http://www.gov.mb.ca/health/documents/toilet.pdf
• http://www.fcs.uga.edu/cfd/cdl/docs/toilet_training.pdf
• http://www.michaelolaf.net/09JC03parent.pdf
REFLECTION PAPER NO. 2: INFANCY AND TODDLERHOOD FOCUSING ON PHYSICAL AND
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT (due: January 20)
EARLY CHILDHOOD: TWO TO SIX YEARS (group 2) Jan
Physical, Cognitive, and Language Development: Conceptual Development and The Children’s Theory of 20
Mind, Brown’s Stages of Language Development (focus on the sequence) 25
• http://nationalstrategies.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/files/downloads/PDF_Special/4d778ee69e3571d2f0ca07cfcd44a670.pdf 27
• http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/yf/famsci/fs632.pdf
• http://www.learningseed.com/_guides/2007_Preschoolers_Cognitive_Development_Guide.pdf
Psychosocial and Moral Development: Functions and Importance of Play; Mildred Parten’s Classification of
Play, frustration/ aggression, fears and anxieties, jealousy/ rivalry, formation of self-concept and gender
identification, self-concept, self-esteem, identity, and resilience to stressful environments
• http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/TS/Bailey/Dean%20Hamer/Hamer%20PGN%20Article/Hamer%20PGN%20Article.pdf
• http://www.unicef.org/dprk/ecd.pdf
Developmental Issues and Implications to Parenting/ Teaching: Obesity, Child Abuse/ violence in the lives of
children (factors and effects), school readiness
• http://www.cchrchealth.org/downloads/e_childhood_obesity.pdf
• http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/physicalactivity/pdf/roleofschools_obesity.pdf
• http://www.dcmp.org/caai/nadh258.pdf
• http://vig.pearsonptr.com:8081/samplechapter/020540183X.pdf
• http://www.childrenshelp.com/pdfs_docs/effects_child_maltreatment.pdf
• http://www.ncac.gov.au/factsheets/qias_factsheet_13_school_transition.pdf
• http://www.nasponline.org/resources/handouts/schoolreadiness.pdf
• http://www.community.nsw.gov.au/docswr/_assets/main/documents/school_readiness.pdf
MID-SEMESTER
MIDDLE CHILDHOOD: SIX TO ELEVEN YEARS (group 3)
Physical, Cognitive, and Language Development: Handedness, Conservation, Decentration, Reversibility, Feb 1
Seriation, Horizontal Decalage, Developing Competent Learning and Critical Thinking, Learning Disabilities 3
(Causes and Interventions) 8
• http://e1.simplecdn.net/mcintyre/Guides/520156.pdf
• http://www.musicianbrain.com/papers/Schlaug_Music_Child_Brain_NYAS2005.pdf
• http://www.ntlf.com/html/lib/suppmat/103chap7.pdf
• http://www.skepdic.com/refuge/ctlessons/ch1.pdf
• http://outopia.org/teach/resources/CritThink1.pdf
• http://www.computerprep.com/proddesc/SAMPLE_CHAPTER/1426018533.PDF
• http://www.cedu.niu.edu/~shumow/itt/LDStudents.pdf
• http://web.jccc.edu/academic/math/faculty/Learning%20Disabilities%20Handbook.pdf
• http://tis.typepad.com/corporate/files/Learning_Disability.pdf
• http://www.floridatechnet.org/bridges/factsandstats.pdf
• http://www.otis.edu/assets/user/AccommodationsVerification.pdf
Psychosocial and Moral Development: Stages of Friendship, Features of Friendships and Peer Groups, and
Heteronomous and Autonomous Morality, Developing Emotional Intelligence
• http://www.newdirectionsconsulting.com/pdfs/EmotionalIntelligence.pdf
• http://www.frumi.com/images/uploads/TheEmotionalIntelligenceQuickBook.pdf
• http://www.school.hyogo-u.ac.jp/element/pdf/emotionalintelligence.pdf
• http://jornadeseducacioemocional.com/mat_anterior/i_jornades/taula1/the_effects_of_parenting.pdf
Developmental Issues and Implications to Parenting/ Teaching: Latchkey Children, Sports, Bullying, Effects of
Familial Stresses such as divorce and poverty, Peer rejection
• http://www.community.nsw.gov.au/docswr/_assets/main/documents/dv_paper.pdf
• http://www2.ed.gov/parents/academic/help/adolescence/adolescence.pdf
• http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh26-2/109-115.pdf
• https://wiki.uww.edu/other/childdevresource/images/1/16/Latchkey_children.pdf
• http://www.jimwrightonline.com/pdfdocs/bully/bullyBooklet.pdf
• http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/pdf/e12011405.pdf
• http://www.melissainstitute.org/documents/MakingADifference.pdf
• http://www.eyesonbullying.org/pdfs/toolkit.pdf
• http://netscaffold.bullying.org/external/documents/Bullying.org%20Bullying%20Facts%20Pamphlet.pdf
• http://www.bullying.org/external/documents/Bullying_Information.pdf
• http://www.nobully.org.nz/added.pdf
• http://www.parenting.sa.gov.au/pegs/Peg29.pdf
• http://extension.unh.edu/Family/Documents/divorce.pdf
• http://www.wellnessproposals.com/stress/stress-pdfs/stress-divorce-matters-talking-with-children.pdf
• http://www.adi.org/journal/fw97/ThomasFall1997.pdf
• http://www.enfant-encyclopedie.com/Pages/PDF/BoivinANGxp.pdf
REFLECTION PAPER NO. 3: EARLY AND LATE CHILDHOOD FOCUSING ON MORAL AND
PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT (due: February 10)
ADOLESCENT: TRANSITION TO ADULTHOOD (group 4) Feb
http://www.brightfutures.org/physicalactivity/pdf/Adolescence.pdf 10
Physical and Cognitive Development: Puberty, physical maturation (impact of early, late, and on-time 15
maturation), Early and Late Formal Operations Stage, Sexual Behavior 17
• http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/BRAIN.pdf
• http://www.actforyouth.net/documents/NewVision_Nov09.pdf
• http://s3.amazonaws.com/thf_media/2010/pdf/79314_1.pdf
• http://www.familyfacts.org/featuredfinding/ff_gl_01.pdf
• http://www.nfid.org/pdf/publications/adolescentvacc.pdf
• http://www.abanet.org/crimjust/juvjus/Adolescence.pdf
Psychosocial and Moral Development: Marcia’s Identity Formation, Peer Culture, Vocational Choice, Career-
Factor Test, Establishment of Gender Identity, Idealism and Criticism, Adolescent Egocentrism, Imaginary
Audience, and Personal Fable, Peer pressure and conformity
• http://www.actforyouth.net/documents/gender_identity.pdf
• http://www.joekort.com/PDF/cassmodelofidentityformation2.pdf
• http://www.narth.com/docs/GIDReviewKenZucker.pdf
• http://www.woodlandhills.org/resources/pdfs/positivepeergroups.pdf
• http://extension.psu.edu/workforce/briefs/overviewcareerdev%28insert%29.pdf
• http://www.careerkey.org/pdf/H._Theory_&_Career_Choice.pdf
• http://www.familyimpactseminars.org/s_ncfis03c02.pdf
• http://www.temple.edu/psychology/lds/documents/Risk-TakinginAdolescenceCDPS.pdf
• http://caribbean.scielo.org/pdf/wimj/v54n6/v54n6a09.pdf
Developmental Issues and Implications to Parenting/ Teaching: Teenage Pregnancy, Youth Activism,
Juvenile Delinquency, School Dropouts, Late Maturation, Eating Problems, Depression and Suicide, Vices,
Gay Lesbian Development: Coming out process
• http://philippinechildren.ph/filer/toledo-cebu/Teen-pregnancies-in-the-Philippines.pdf
• http://www.nspcc.org.uk/Inform/resourcesforteachers/classroomresources/infosheets/CLInfoSheetEatingProblems_wdf56379.pdf
• http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/eating-disorders/nimheatingdisorders.pdf
• http://www.actforyouth.net/documents/Nov063.pdf
• http://www.bettycjung.net/201fs/peebles.pdf
• http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/specialed/edi/ed1.pdf
• http://www.mhfa.com.au/documents/guidelines/Suicide_First_Aid_Guidelines_Philippines.pdf
• http://www.permanente.net/homepage/kaiser/pdf/13261.pdf
• http://edweb.csus.edu/edc/class_downloads/wilcox/edc171_lesb_gay_iden.pdf
• http://www.cedu.niu.edu/~shumow/iit/LGB%20Identity%20Development.pdf
EARLY ADULTHOOD (group 5) Feb
Physical and Cognitive Development: Adult Thinking, fulfillment theories, changes in measured intelligence, 22
fluid intelligence, and crystallized intelligence 24
• http://www.udlap.mx/construye/ciedd/CR/ensenanza/InclusiveAdultLearningEnvironments.pdf Mar 1
• http://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/77/07879596/0787959677.pdf
• http://www.worldcocoafoundation.org/scientific-research/researchlibrary/pdf/FFS_implementation_manual2.pdf
Psychosocial and Moral Development: Attachment, Development and Phases of Love, Choices of Mate
(Interpersonal Attraction Theory), Love Relationship, Marriage, factors to contribute to lasting love, personality
traits that remain stable and those that change
• http://www.as.wvu.edu/~richmond/measures/attraction.pdf
• http://workforce.cup.edu/sweeney/P211%20Attraction.pdf
• http://www.hss.iitb.ac.in/courses/Interpersonal%20Attraction.pdf
• http://www.dearshrink.com/affiliation_keppler_slides.pdf
• http://www.couplescompany.com/advice/Articles/Intimacy_Stages/Intimacy.pdf
• http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/fcs/FCSPubs/Fact_Sheets/STAGES_OF_LOVE.pdf
• http://www.psychologicalselfhelp.org/Chapter10.pdf
• http://www.nccbuscc.org/laity/marriage/Markey.pdf
• http://www.grantedministries.org/articles/qualities_for_potential_mate_d_e.pdf
• http://web.missouri.edu/~gearyd/MatechoicePDF.pdf
• http://www.helenfisher.com/downloads/articles/Article_final_JRS_06.pdf
• http://www.selfgrowth.com/love/LawOfAttractionLove.pdf
• http://files.tyndale.com/thpdata/FirstChapters/978-1-4143-1210-1.pdf
• http://files.tyndale.com/thpdata/FirstChapters/978-1-4143-1210-1.pdf
Developmental Issues and Implications to Teaching: Quarter-Life Crisis, The Unmarried, Divorce, Single
Parenting
• http://universitylifecafe.org/_media/uploaded/files/2010/The_Quarter-Life_Crisis.pdf
• http://www.inventyourlife.com/todayswoman.pdf
• http://ce.byu.edu/cw/fuf/archives/2004/Suzanne.Dastrup.pdf
• http://www.psych.utah.edu/classes/2007_spring/3260_001/stupre2004/atypicalparenting2.pdf
• http://www.parenting.sa.gov.au/pegs/Peg5.pdf
• http://extension.unh.edu/Family/Documents/s_strgfam.pdf
REFLECTION PAPER NO. 4: ADOLESCENCE AND EARLY ADULTHOOD FOCUSING ON CAREER
DEVELOPMENT, GETTING MARRIED, AND RAISING CHILDREN (due on March 3)
MIDDLE AND LATE ADULTHOOD (group 6) Mar 3
http://www.ahs.uwaterloo.ca/~hlth220/Middle_Adulthood_Webnotes.pdf 8
http://www.ahs.uwaterloo.ca/~hlth220/Late_Adulthood_Webnotes.pdf
10
Physical and Cognitive Development: Age-related Diseases (Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia, osteoporosis,
cataracts, etc.) and factors that contribute to them, Carl Jung’s Theory of Adulthood, promoting intellectual
vigor
• http://www.womenshealth.gov/pub/the-healthy-woman/healthy_aging.pdf
• http://www.apa.org/pi/aging/memory-and-aging.pdf
• http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/HealthyAging.pdf
• http://www.fsu.edu/~elps/ae/download/ade5385/Hansman.pdf
• http://www.uk.sagepub.com/upm-data/5433_Willis_I_Proof_Chapter_6.pdf
Psychosocial and Moral Development: Launching, Empty Nest, Sandwich Generation, Retirement, Styles of
Successful Aging, Grandparenting, Widowhood, Remarriage, Dying (Stages of Adjustment and Ways of
Dealing)
• http://www.healthymarriageinfo.org/docs/marriageforemptynesters.pdf
• http://www.blm.gov/pgdata/etc/medialib/blm/nifc/hr/docs.Par.69735.File.dat/EmptyNestSyndrome.pdf
• http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcpdf.nsf/ByPDF/Empty_nest_syndrome/$File/Empty_nest_syndrome.pdf
• http://www.regent.edu/acad/schcou/faithandtherapy/archives/download/FaithandTherapy_Jan_08.pdf
• http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/FR_Marriage_2006-01pr.pdf
• http://healthyaging.stanford.edu/pdfs/aging.pdf
• http://sira.ucsd.edu/pdf/Healthwise/12-09.pdf
• http://www.aaacap.org/Cummings%205X5%20keys.pdf
• http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/5000/pdf/Benefits_Grandparenting.pdf
• http://www.community.nsw.gov.au/docswr/_assets/main/documents/pargrand.pdf
• http://www.parenting.sa.gov.au/pegs/peg12.pdf
• http://cospl.coalliance.org/fez/eserv/co:6098/ucsu20622102392004internet.pdf
• http://www.ucm.es/info/psi/docs/journal/v13_n2_2010/art708.pdf
• http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/alzheimers/pdf/presentations/Matos.pdf
• http://www.stress-free-naturally.com/pdf/Lifestyles%20of%20the%20Elderly.pdf
Developmental Issues and Implications to Teaching: Mid-life Crisis, Facing Death, euthanasia
• http://www.psychiatrist.com/pcc/pccpdf/v08n06/v08n0609.pdf
• http://journey2fullness.com/documents/Oct04MidlifeCrisis.pdf
• http://www.iecounseling.com/uploads/Tools_Article_F08.pdf
• http://www.gladeanamcmahon.com/pdf/How%20to%20Cope%20with%20a%20Midlife%20Crisis.pdf
• http://www.cabezalab.org/pdf/Cohen06_MidlifCrisis_Newsweek.pdf
• http://setup19.finalweb.net/home/180003688/180003688/files/MidlifeCrisisQuiz.pdf
• http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/internet/feap/newsletters/Midlife-Updated-Newsletter.pdf
• http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2370750/pdf/canfamphys00368-0070.pdf
• http://www.recoftc.org/site/fileadmin/docs/CBNRMtrain/Tips_for_Trainers_-_November_2008.pdf
FILM VIEWING ON AS TIME GOES BY AND THE END OF LIFE
REFLECTION PAPER NO. 5: CONCLUSION (due March 15)
FINAL EXAMINATION; Submission of complete developmental life story Mar
22

IV. Course Requirements/ Grading System*


Regular and punctual attendance** 15% (less .5 per absence, less .25 per tardiness)
Class participation/ expert presentation*** 35% (see oral presentation rubric)
Reflection Papers**** 35% (less .5 per week for late submission)
Final Exam 15%
* A grade of “Inc.” is only given to student who has a “passing” class standing, but fails to take the final
examination or complete the requirement due to illness or valid reason. Otherwise, the student gets a grade
of ‘5”.
** 2 tardiness is equal to 1 absence; coming in late for more than 25 minutes is considered absence. When
the number of absences exceeds 6 meetings, the student will be advised to drop the course. Those caught
doing other things in class such as doing assignments in other class or sleeping in class will be automatically
marked absent for that day. And please, turn your cellphone ringers off.
*** In the expert presentation, your group is expected to lead the discussion of a topic of your choice. Start
working on this project as soon as the topic is assigned to you.
Time: maximum of 4.5 hours or 3 meetings per group (allot time for quiz)
You may use any audio/ visual material that you think will be useful and effective. The written report should
be 8 to 10 pages long, following the APA format and is due a week before the first day of oral presentation.
(See research project rubric for grading guidelines of the written report)
**** The developmental life story is considered the major project. Regard it with utmost importance. (See
guidelines)

V. References
• Baruth, Leroy G. (2007) Multicultural counseling and psychotherapy: a lifespan perspective
• Brown, Carol. (2008). Developmental Psychology. Sage.
• Crandell, T.L. (2009). Human Development. McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
• Current directions in developmental Psychology. Pearson: 2009.
• Dacey, J.S. (2009). Human across development across the life span. McGraw-Hill.
• Freiburg (2006). Human development. Forefront Book.
• Kail, R.V. (2010). Human development: a life-span view. Thomson/Wadsworth.
• Kaufman, A.S. (2006). Assessing adolescent and adult intelligence Forefront Books.
• Newman, B.M. (2009). Development through life: a psychosocial approach. Thomson/ Wadsworth.
• Papalia, D.E. (2009). Human Development. McGrawHill. (main library)
• Santrock, J.W. (2009). Life-span development. McGrawHill.
• Santrock, J.W. (2006). A Topical Approach to Human Development (3rd ed.) Boston: McGraw-Hill.
• Sigelman, C.K. (2009). Life-span human development. Thomson/ Wadsworth.
• Wood, C.P. (2006) Developmental psychology in action. Blackwell. BF 721 W66.
• Van Ornum, W. (2008). Psychological testing across the life span. Pearson/ Prentice Hall.
• Zander, V. & Wilfrid, J. (2009). Human development. McGraw-Hill Higher Education. (Main Library)
Note: Most of these references can be found at the reserved section of the U.P. College of Education library

VI. Instructor Information:


Instructor : Prof. Lizamarie Campoamor-Olegario
Email Address : lizamarie_olegario@yahoo.com
Mobile Phone No. : 09228972337 (no signal in U.P.), 3461685
Consultation Hours : TTh (11:30 – 1:00 p.m., 4:00 – 5:30 p.m.)
WF (11:30 - 2:30 p.m.)
Other days (by appointment)
Office : Rm. 110 Mezzanine, College of Education
* Any student in need of special accommodation should consult with the instructor

Academic Dishonesty Definitions


Activities, that have the effect or intention of interfering with education, pursuit of knowledge, or fair evaluation of a student’s
performance are prohibited. Examples of such activities include but are not limited to the following definitions:
A. Cheating: using or attempting to use unauthorized assistance, material, or study aids in examinations or other academic work or
preventing, or attempting to prevent, another from using authorized assistance, material, or study aids. Example: using a cheat
sheet in a quiz or exam, altering a graded exam and resubmitting it for a better grade, etc.
B. Plagiarism: using the ideas, data, or language of another without specific or proper acknowledgment. Example: copying another
person’s paper, article, or computer work and submitting it for an assignment, cloning someone else’s ideas without attribution,
failing to use quotation marks where appropriate, etc.
C. Fabrication: submitting contrived or altered information in any academic exercise. Example: making up data for an experiment,
fudging data, citing nonexistent articles, contriving sources, etc.
D. Multiple submission: submitting, without prior permission, any work submitted to fulfill another academic requirement.
E. Misrepresentation of academic records: misrepresenting or tampering with or attempting to tamper with any portion of a
student’s transcripts or academic record, either before or after coming to the University of Pennsylvania. Example: forging a change
of grade slip, tampering with computer records, falsifying academic information on one’s resume, etc.
F. Facilitating academic dishonesty: knowingly helping or attempting to help another violate any provision of the Code. Example:
working together on a take-home exam, etc.
G. Unfair advantage: attempting to gain unauthorized advantage over fellow students in an academic exercise. Example: gaining or
providing unauthorized access to examination materials, obstructing or interfering with another student’s efforts in an academic
exercise, lying about a need for an extension for an exam or paper, continuing to write even when time is up during an exam,
destroying or keeping library materials for one’s own use., etc.
* If a student is unsure whether his action(s) constitute a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity, then it is that student’s
responsibility to consult with the instructor to clarify any ambiguities.

(Source: Office of the Provost, 1996)


- http://www.vpul.upenn.edu/osl/acadint.html
U.P. College of Education
Oral Presentation Rubric
Name: ________________________ Teacher: Prof. Lizamarie Campoamor-Olegario
Date of Presentation: ____________ Title of Work: ___________________

Exceptional (4) Admirable (3) Acceptable (2) Amateur (1)


Content An abundance of Sufficient information There is a great deal Thesis not clear;
material clearly related to that relates to thesis; of information that is information included
thesis; points are clearly many good points made not clearly connected that does not
made and all evidence but there is an uneven to the thesis support thesis in any
supports thesis; varied balance and little way
use of materials variation
Coherence Thesis is clearly stated Most information Concept and ideas Presentation is
and and developed; specific presented in logical are loosely choppy and
Organization examples are sequence; generally connected; lacks disjointed; does not
appropriate and clearly very well organized but clear transitions; flow flow; development of
develop thesis; better transitions from and organization are thesis is vague; no
conclusion is clear; idea to idea and choppy apparent logical
shows control; flows medium to medium order of presentation
together well; good needed
transitions; succinct but
not choppy; well
organized
Creativity Very original Some originality Little or no variation; Repetitive with little
presentation of material; apparent; good variety material presented or no variety;
uses the unexpected to and blending of with little originality or insufficient use of
full advantage; captures materials/media interpretation multimedia
audience's attention
Speaking Poised, clear articulation; Clear articulation but Some mumbling; little Inaudible or too
Skills proper volume; steady not as polished eye contact; uneven loud; no eye contact;
rate; good posture and rate; little or no rate too slow/fast;
eye contact; enthusiasm; expression speaker seemed
confidence uninterested and
used monotone
Preparedness Student is completely Student seems pretty The student is Student does not
prepared and has prepared but might somewhat prepared, seem at all prepared
obviously rehearsed. have needed a couple but it is clear that to present. Does not
Shows a full understanding more rehearsals. rehearsal was seem to understand
of the topic. Shows a good lacking. the topic very well.
understanding of the topic. Shows a good
understanding of parts
of the topic.
Audience Involved the audience in Presented facts with Some related facts Incoherent;
Response the presentation; points some interesting but went off topic and audience lost
made in creative way; "twists"; held the lost the audience; interest and could
held the audience's audience's attention mostly presented not determine the
attention throughout most of the time facts with little or no point of the
imagination presentation
Length of Within two minutes of Within four minutes of Within six minutes of Too long or too
Presentation allotted time +/– allotted time +/– allotted time +/– short; ten or more
minutes above or
below the allotted
time
Collaboration Almost always listens to, Usually listens to, shares Often listens to, shares Rarely listens to, shares
with Peers shares with, and supports the with, and supports the with, and supports the with, and supports the
efforts of others in the group. efforts of others in the efforts of others in the efforts of others in the
Tries to keep people working group. Does not cause group but sometimes is group. Often is not a
well together. "waves" in the group. not a good team member. good team member.
U.P. College of Education
Oral Presentation Rubric
Name: ________________________ Teacher: Prof. Lizamarie Campoamor-Olegario
Date of Presentation: ____________ Title of Work: ___________________

Criteria Scorer 1 Scorer 2 Scorer 3 Scorer 4 Scorer 5 Scorer 6 Total


Content
Coherence and Organization
Creativity
Speaking Skills
Preparedness
Audience Response
Length of Presentation
Collaboration with Peers

Overall, the oral presentation is: (CIRCLE ONE)


Exceptional ………. 1
Admirable ………. 2
Acceptable ………. 3
Amateur ………. 4

The strong points of the oral presentation are:


Evaluator 1

Evaluator 2

Evaluator 3

Evaluator 4

Evaluator 5

Evaluator 6

The oral presentation can be improved by:


Evaluator 1

Evaluator 2

Evaluator 3

Evaluator 4

Evaluator 5

Evaluator 6

Evaluated by: GROUP NO. _____

Teacher’s Comments:
Rubric for a Research Project
Student Name(s)_____________________________Final Grade________
Thesis/Problem/Q Information Analysis Synthesis Documentation Product/Process
uestion Seeking/Selecting
and Evaluating

4 Student(s) posed a Student(s) gathered Student(s) carefully Student(s) Student(s) Student(s)


thoughtful, creative information from a analyzed the developed documented all effectively and
question that variety of quality information appropriate sources, including creatively used
engaged them in electronic and print collected and drew structure for visuals, sounds, appropriate
challenging or sources, including appropriate and communicating and animations. communication
provocative appropriate inventive product, Sources are tools to convey their
research. The licensed databases. conclusions incorporating properly cited, both conclusions and
question breaks Sources are supported by variety of quality in-text/in-product demonstrated
new ground or relevant, balanced evidence. Voice of sources. and on Works- thorough, effective
contributes to and include critical the student writer is Information is Cited/Works- research
knowledge in a readings relating to evident. logically and Consulted techniques. Product
focused, specific the thesis or creatively pages/slides. displays creativity
area. problem. Primary organized with Documentation is and originality.
sources were smooth transitions. error-free.
included (if
appropriate).
3 Student(s) posed a Student(s) gathered Student (s) product Student(s) logically Student(s) Student(s)
focused question information from a shows good effort organized the documented effectively
involving them in variety of relevant was made in product and made sources with some communicated the
challenging sources--print and analyzing the good connections care, Sources are results of research
research. electronic evidence collected among ideas cited, both in- to the audience.
text/in-product and
on Works-
Cited/Works-
Consulted
pages/slides. Few
errors noted.
2 Student(s) Student(s) gathered Student(s) Student(s) could Student(s) need to Student(s) need to
constructed a information from a conclusions could have put greater use greater care in work on
question that lends limited range of be supported by effort into documenting communicating
itself to readily sources and stronger evidence. organizing the sources. more effectively
available answers displayed minimal Level of analysis product Documentation was
effort in selecting could have been poorly constructed
quality resources deeper. or absent.
1 Student(s) relied on Student(s) gathered Student(s) Student(s) work is Student(s) clearly Student(s) showed
teacher-generated information that conclusions simply not logically or plagiarized little evidence of
questions or lacked relevance, involved restating effectively materials. thoughtful research.
developed a quality, depth and information. structured. Product does not
question requiring balance. Conclusions were effectively
little creative not supported by communicate
thought. evidence. research findings.
Teacher’s Comments:

Guidelines for Research Project


1. Choose your own lifespan topic to investigate in depth
2. Write questions about the topic that you want to answer. Always include implications to parenting and teaching.
3. Show multiple perspectives on the issue, discuss your personal experience relevant to the topic.
4. Have at least 5 key references (listed using APA format) aside from the references that I listed. Use psychological journals.
Avoid popular media and esoteric sources as references.
5. Attach photocopy or print out of your references.
6. Obtain peer feedback from one groupmate on a draft of your paper. Attach the peer commentary on the paper that you will
submit. The commentary should include minimum of five constructive suggestions.
7. Attach the rubric on top of your paper. It is where I will write your grade.
8. All papers must be original and written individually. Plagiarized papers will automatically get 5.0
9. Late papers will get .25 “deduction” per meeting day past the due date.
10. I do not accept emailed papers.
DEVELOPMENTAL LIFE STORY
The purpose of this assignment is for you to establish your identity and personality and to enhance your
knowledge on the human development concepts and theories by integrating them to your personal
experiences. Gather as much information as you can from your personal memories, parents/ guardians/
relatives, older siblings, albums, medical, and school records. Do not limit yourself to the points/ framework
that I provided. Each section should be typed, double-spaced, and at least two pages. You will be graded
according to substance, insights, and effort given in reflection. Pictures and other materials that you want
to add (which will be done towards the end of the semester) to personalize your project is not included in
the minimum number of pages required. Include only the information that you feel comfortable sharing. All
information written in the autobiography will be treated with utmost confidentiality. To avoid redundancy in
the papers, plan under which heading you plan to put significant information about yourself. In each life
stage, highlight the most significant persons or events and their contributions to your own learning
and development.

INTRODUCTION / REFLECTION ON FAMILY BACKGROUND AND BEGINNINGS OF LIFE (aids:


autograph notebook, genogram, family constellation) Tell something about yourself. What qualities make
you unique/ special? What are your best qualities and what are your worst qualities? What do you do to
improve yourself? Write something about your parents, their occupation, and ages; about your siblings,
course/ occupation and ages. How were you raised by your parents? What is their parenting style/s and
how has/ have their parenting style/s influenced you? What can you say about your brothers and/ or
sisters? What is your birth order? What is it like growing up in this particular family constellation? Are your
parents married? Are they still married to each other? How does their relationship affect you?

REFLECTION ON INFANCY AND TODDLERHOOD FOCUSING ON PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE


DEVELOPMENT (aids: physical development activity, online IQ test, multiple intelligence/ learning strength
assessment, Cognitive Development Theories)
What are the most significant things that happened to you during your infancy and toddler years? How
have those events affected who you are today? When and where were you born? What was your height
and weight at birth? What was your growth pattern from childhood to adulthood? How has your health
been? What can you say about your general appearance? What physical traits are your strengths? How
do you maintain those strengths/ advantages? What physical traits are your weaknesses? What do you do
to improve yourself in your physical weaknesses?) Describe your cognitive development. How was your
first experience in school and how has this experience affected you interest and performance in school
work? How has your cognitive development affected your life? What are your cognitive strengths? How
do you maintain your strengths? How do you maximize your brain power? What are your cognitive
weaknesses? What do you do to improve in those aspects? Any plans to pursue further studies? Why?

REFLECTION ON CHILDHOOD FOCUSING ON MORAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT (aids:


moral dilemma activity, moral development theories, how emotional are you test, psychosocial
development theories, emotional intelligence theory, online personality tests) What are the most significant
things that happened to you during your childhood years? How have those events affected who you are
today? What is your religious affiliation? Do you have the same religious affiliation as your parents/
guardians? How has your moral/ religious beliefs changed throughout your life? How important is your
religious/ spiritual life? What can you say about your morality? What stage of development do you think
you are in? What are your moral strengths? How do you maintain those strengths? What are your moral
weaknesses? What do you do to improve in those aspects? What can you say about your emotional
development? What are your emotional strengths? What do you maintain your emotional strengths?
What are your emotional weaknesses? What do you do to improve yourself in your emotional
weaknesses? Where were you born? Where did you grow up? What was it like growing up there? What
are our positive experiences and negative experiences? How have they shaped you as a person? What is
your socio-economic status? How has it contributed to your development? Why are you the person you
are today? What’s your personality and temperament? You may also discuss your relationships with other
people and how they have affected your development? How would you describe your level of happiness?
What contributes to your level of happiness today?
REFLECTION ON ADOLESCENCE AND EARLY ADULTHOOD FOCUSING ON CAREER
DEVELOPMENT AND GETTING MARRIED AND RAISING CHILDREN (aids: parenting styles, love
relationships discussion, career factor test, career mapping)
What are the most significant things that happened to you during your adolescence and early adulthood
years? How have those events affected who you are today? Are you married? If not, do you intend to get
married? At what age did you get married or plan to get married? Which do you prefer – marry or not?
Why? How would you describe your current intimate relationship (if married, with your spouse; if not
married, with your boyfriend or girlfriend?) If you don’t have a current intimate relationship yet, describe
your ideal partner and ideal relationship. How do you picture yourself in that relationship? Do you have
children? If so, how many and what are their ages? What is the most rewarding and most difficult aspect
of raising children? If you do not have children, how many children do you hope to have? What age gap?
Why? Do you want to have children? Why/ why not? What worries you most about having children?
What kind of parent do you think you are going to be? What qualities of your parents do you want to retain
and what qualities do you want to change? When you were younger, what kinds of careers did you think
about? Are any of those ideas still possibilities? What is your current major? What do you hope to be
doing after you graduate from school? What do you see yourself career-wise ten years from now? Who/
What has influenced you in your choice of career? Think of a middle-aged adult that you admire.

CONCLUSION (aids: Marcia’s identity formation) As you read over your essays, what reactions do you
have? What have you learned about yourself from doing this assignment? What do you think is your state
of identity? Why? Has it helped you in enhancing your knowledge in developmental psychology? What
was the best part of this assignment, and what was the worst part of this assignment? Note congruencies
or interactions among the various facets of development.

COMPILATION The effort you give and the creativity you put in the compilation of your essays will show
how much you value the reflections you made. You may use any medium/ media that you feel comfortable
using. You will be graded according to effort given and creativity. Happy compiling!

Rubric
Each paper is worth 10 points

10 - This paper is excellent, not only answering the questions, but also reflecting deeply about your own
views and how they compare/contrast with class discussion and readings. You took time to think about the
topics discussed in class and then expressed those thoughts in your paper. Then, you took time to express
how the topics discussed in class can be implemented in your class, or in your life.

8- This paper answers the questions and is well presented. It is overall complete, although you may have
been able to go into more depth or incorporate readings/discussions more.

6 – Your paper addressed the question, but not in depth and did not show as much reflection as was
expected. You had a very busy weekend. You took time to think about the topics discussed in class and
then expressed those thoughts in your paper.

4 – You addressed the questions but gave no evidence or insights.

2- You hastily threw this paper together not really addressing the question. But hey, you got something in.
You wrote something. But it was unclear what you wrote about. It had something sort of to do with class.
Thanks for handing something in.

0- Your paper was not completed. You probably went camping and forgot all about it.