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Myanmar Armed Forces

Tatmadaw

2009
From Wikipedia
Burma and weapons of mass destruction
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Burma is believed to have developed weapons of mass destruction, with varied reports of the country's military in possession of
chemical weapons and also working on a nuclear weapons program.
Chemical weapons The first public indications of Burma's possible possession of chemical weapons came in testimony delivered to
the United States Congress in 1991 by Rear Adm. Thomas Brooks, Director of Naval Intelligence of the United States Navy,[1] in
which Burma was included on a list of nations that "probably possess" chemical weapons. In 2005 Belgian photojournalist Thierry
Falise reported speaking to two deserters from the Burmese Army who, during their time in service, were "reportedly told to take
special precautions because they were handling chemical shells."[2] The deserters described seeing artillerymen wearing masks and
gloves to fire the munitions. In a separate report from the same year, a physician with Christian Solidarity Worldwide reported
treating injuries of anti-government Karenni rebels that were "consistent with a chemical attack."[3] In response to the Christian
Solidarity Worldwide report, the Burmese government denied the use of chemical weapons. [4] Burma signed the Chemical Weapons
Convention in 1993 but has yet to ratify the agreement.
uclear Weapons According to an August 2009 report published in the Sydney Morning Herald, Burma is working to develop a
nuclear weapon by 2014. The reported effort, purportedly being undertaken with assistance from North Korea, involves the
construction of a nuclear reactor and plutonium extraction facilities in caves tunneled into a mountain at Naung Laing, a village in the
Mandalay division .[5] The information cited in the newspaper story reportedly originated from two high-ranking defectors who had
settled in Australia.
References
1. ^ Chemical Arms; Navy Report Asserts Many Nations Seek Or Have Poison Gas[1], ew York Times, March 10, 1991,
Accessed August 9, 2009.
2. ^ Burmese junta uses chemical weapons [2], The Sunday Times, May 8, 2005, Accessed August 9, 2009.
3. ^ Burma 'using chemical weapons'[3], The Guardian, April 21, 2005, Accessed August 9, 2009.
4. ^ http://www.voanews.com/burmese/archive/2005-04/2005-04-22-voa5.cfm?moddate=2005-04-22
5. ^ Revealed: Burma’s nuclear bombshell[4], Sydney Morning Herald, August 1, 2009, Accessed August 10, 2009.

Military intelligence of Burma


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Currently it is called Military Affairs Security headed by Lieutenant General Ye Myint.
Chief of Military Intelligence
Office Name Head From
Directorate of Military Intelligence Brigadier General Tin Oo (nick name 'bespectacled') - 1980s
Directorate of Military Intelligence Major General Myo Aung -
Directorate of Military Intelligence Col. Chit Khin -
Directorate of Military Intelligence Col. Kan Nyunt -
Directorate of Military Intelligence Col. Aung Koe -
Directorate of Defence Service Intelligence Lieutenant General Khin Nyunt 1984 - 18 October 2004
Directorate of Military Affairs Security Major General Myint Swe 2004 -
Directorate of Military Affairs Security Lieutenant General Ye Myint - current
Union Troops Build Up:

Major Myanmar Warriors Reinforcement in Shan State. http://www.irrawaddy.org/article.php?art_id=16692 We all know some bad
Shans (rebels) want to break away from the Union. Because of some bad apples, the entire basket of apples can be rotten. This is the
universal accepted scenario/Truth. Union Military is and must be the ONLY military that represents the Union. One country, One
people, One constitution, One military is the norms of a civilized, unified Nation. Myanmar under the leadership of Senior General
Than Shwe the Commander-in-Chief of Myanma Tatmadaw and Head of State is marching towards a democratic Myanmar. Now I
acknowledge his brilliant strategy, his prowess in handling crisis and his immense patience and tactics in implementing a Union that
truly unified and consolidated as one Nation. Previous and late General Ne Win led military is weak not to mention he is a
womanizer. Tatmadaw under the leadership of Senior General Than Shwe is getting stronger and stronger and will unify the Union
once and for all. I am glad Kokang region is under the control of Union Military after all Kokang belongs to the Union. In no way
and under no circumstances, Myanmar land should be control by other than Myanmars. That’s the bottom line and no outside force
no matter how mighty/rich they are or they may be, must not interfere in the internal affairs of Myanmar. Let Myanma Tatmadaw
defend and consolidate Myanmar land way up to the inches of border line. Myanmars have the sovereign rights to control ALL
Myanmar land meaning the entire country. Following Map is the areas where the rebel forces occupy and conduct illegal business for
20 years. It is time to stop the illegal businesses AND the illegal occupation within Myanma Territory. All of them have 2 choices
and the choices are for these rebels to choose.

1) Surrender Peacefully and live under the legal fold.


2) Defeated and be conquered by the Union Military (Tatmadaw).
Myanmar Armed Forces

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the discussion on the talk page.
page Please do not remove this
message until the dispute is resolve
resolved. (December 2007)

Total armed forces 492,000 (Ranked


Ranked 9th
9th)
Active troops 492,000 (Ranked
Ranked 9th
9th)

total troops 564,250 (Ranked


Ranked 26th
26th)
Paramilitary 72,000 (Ranked
Ranked 26th
26th)
Conscription age 18 years of age
Availability males age 15–49:
49: 12,211,144 (2003 est.)
Fit for military service males age 18–49:
49: 6,502,013 (2005 est.)
USD figure 7.07 billion US $ (FY2005 est.) [1]
Percent of GDP 2.1% (2005 est.)[1]
Myanmar Army
Myanmar Navy
Myanmar Air Force
Myanmar Police Force
Myanmar Frontier Forces
Military history of Myanmar
Burma Independence Army
Burma National Army
Army ranks and insignia of Myanmar
Navy ranks and insignia of Myanmar
Airforce ranks and insignia of Myanmar
The military of Myanmar,, officially known as Tatmadaw (Burmese: ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀; MLCTS:: tap ma. taw; IPA: [taʔmədɔ̀])
is the military organization of Myanmar,, also known as Burma. The armed forces are administered by the Ministry of Defence and
are composed of the Army, the Navy and the Air Force. Auxiliary services include Myanmar Police Force, People Militia Units and
Frontier Forces, locally known as Na Sa Kha. All service personnel are volunteers although the government is empowered to
undertake conscription if considered necessary for Myanmar's defense. Tatmadaw has been engaged in a bitter battle with ethnic
insurgents, political dissidents and narco-armies since the country gained its independence from Great Britain in 1948. Retaining
much of the organizational structure established by the British, Myanmar Armed Forces continue to face challenges from aging
weaponry and equipment and relying on foreign purchases of military equipment. However, the armed forces are an essential to
Myanmar's strategic importance, power and capabilities in the region.
History
First phase (post-independence/civil war era) The first phase of the doctrine was developed in early 1950s to cope with external
threats from more powerful enemies with a strategy of Strategic Denial under conventional warfare. The perception of threats to state
security was more external than internal threats. The internal threat to state security was managed through the use of a mixture of
force and political persuasion. Lieutenant Colonel Maung Maung drew up defence doctrine based on conventional warfare concepts,
with large infantry divisions, armoured brigades, tanks and motorised war with mass mobilisation for the war effort being the
important element of the doctrine. The objective was to contain the offensive of the invading forces at the border for at least three
months, while waiting for the arrival of international forces, similar to the police action by international intervention forces under the
directive of United Nations during the war on Korean peninsula. However, the conventional strategy under the concept of total war
was undermined by the lack of appropriate command and control system, proper logistical support structure, sound economic bases
and efficient civil defence organisations.
At the beginning of 1950s, while Tatmadaw was able to reassert its control over most part of the country, Kuomintang (KMT) troops
under General Li Mai, with support from United States, invaded Myanmar and used the country's frontier as a springboard for attack
against People's Republic of China, which in turn became the external threat to state security and sovereignty of Myanmar. The first
phase of the doctrine was tested for the first time in Operation "Naga Naing" in February 1953 against invading KMT forces. The
doctrine did not take into account logistic and political support for KMT from United States and as a result it failed to deliver the
objectives and ended in humiliating defeat for the Tatmadaw. The then Tatmadaw leadership argued that the excessive media
coverage was partly to blame for the failure of Operation "Naga Naing". For example, Brigadier General Maung Maung pointed out
that newspapers, such as the "Nation", carried reports detailing the training and troops positioning, even went as far to the name and
social background of the commanders who are leading the operation thus losing the element of surprise. Colonel Saw Myint, who
was second in command for the operation, also complained about the long lines of communications and the excessive pressure
imposed upon the units for public relations activities in order to prove that the support of the people was behind the operation.[2]
Second phase (KMT invasion/BSPP era)
Despite failure, Tatmadaw continued to rely on this doctrine until the mid 1960s. The doctrine was under constant review and
modifications throughout KMT invasion and gained success in anti-KMT operations in the mid and late 1950s. However, this
strategy became increasingly irrelevant and unsuitable in the late 1950s as the insurgents and KMT changed their positional warfare
strategy to hit-and-run guerrilla warfare.[3][4] At the 1958 Tatmadaw's annual Commanding Officers (COs) conference, Colonel Kyi
Win submitted a report outlining the requirement for new military doctrine and strategy. He stated that 'Tatmadaw did not have a
clear strategy to cope with insurgents', even though most of Tatmadaw's commanders were guerrilla fighters during the anti-British
and Japanese campaigns during the Second World War, they had very little knowledge of anti-guerrilla or counterinsurgency
warfare. Based upon Colonel Kyi Win's report, Tatmadaw begin developing an appropriate military doctrine and strategy to meet the
requirements of counterinsurgency warfare. This second phase of the doctrine was to suppress insurgency with people's war and the
perception of threats to state security was more of internal threats. During this phase, external linkage of internal problems and direct
external threats were minimised by the foreign policy based on isolation. It was common view of the commanders that unless
insurgency was suppressed, foreign interference would be highly probable[5], therefore counterinsurgency became the core of the new
military doctrine and strategy. Beginning in 1961, the Directorate of Military Training took charge the research for national defence
planning, military doctrine and strategy for both internal and external threats. This included reviews of international and domestic
political situations, studies of the potential sources of conflicts, collection of information for strategic planning and defining the
possible routes of foreign invasion.[2]. In 1962, as part of new military doctrine planning, principles of anti-guerrilla warfare were
outlined and counterinsurgency-training courses were delivered at the training schools. The new doctrine laid out three potential
enemies and they are internal insurgents, historical enemies with roughly an equal strength (i.e. Thailand), and enemies with greater
strength. It states that in suppressing insurgencies, Tatmadaw must be trained to conduct long-range penetration with a tactic of
continuous search and destroy. Reconnaissance, Ambush and all weather day and night offensive and attack capabilities along with
winning the hearts and minds of people are important parts of anti-guerrilla warfare. For countering an historical enemy with equal
strength, Tatmadaw should fight a conventional warfare under total war strategy, without giving up an inch of its territory to the
enemy. For powerful enemy and foreign invaders, Tatmadaw should engage in total people's war, with a special focus on guerrilla
strategy.[2] To prepare for the transition to the new doctrine, Brigadier General San Yu, the then Vice Chief of Staff (Army), sent a
delegation led by Lieutenant Colonel Thura Tun Tin was sent to Switzerland, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia and East Germany in July
1964 to study organisation structure, armaments, training, territorial organisation and strategy of people's militias. A research team
was also formed at General Staff Office within the War Office to study defence capabilities and militia formations of neighbouring
countries. The new doctrine of total people's war, and the strategy of anti-guerrilla warfare for counterinsurgency and guerrilla
warfare for foreign invasion, were designed to be appropriate for Myanmar. The doctrine flowed from the country's independent and
active foreign policy, total people's defence policy, the nature of perceived threats, its geography and the regional environment, the
size of its population in comparison with those of its neighbours, the relatively underdeveloped nature of its economy and its
historical and political experiences. The doctrine was based upon 'three totalities': population, time and space (du-thone-du) and 'four
strengths': manpower, material, time and morale (Panama-lay-yat). The doctrine did not develop concepts of strategic denial or
counter-offensive capabilities. It relied almost totally on irregular low-intensity warfare, such as its guerrilla strategy to counter any
form of foreign invasion. The overall counterinsurgency strategy included not only elimination of insurgents and their support bases
with the 'four cut' strategy, but also the building and designation of 'white area' and 'black area' as well. In April 1968, Tatmadaw
introduced special warfare training programmes at "Command Training Centres" at various regional commands. Anti-Guerrilla
warfare tactics were taught at combat forces schools and other training establishments with special emphasis on ambush and counter-
ambush, counterinsurgency weapons and tactics, individual battle initiative for tactical independence, commando tactics, and
reconnaissance. Battalion size operations were also practised in the South West Regional Military Command area. The new military
doctrine was formally endorsed and adopted at the first party congress of the BSPP in 1971.[6] BSPP laid down directives for
"complete annihilation of the insurgents as one of the tasks for national defence and state security" and called for "liquidation of
insurgents through the strength of the working people as the immediate objective". This doctrine ensures the role of Tatmadaw at the
heart of national policy making. Throughout BSPP era, the total people's war doctrine was solely applied in counterinsurgency
operations, since Myanmar did not face any direct foreign invasion throughout the period. In 1985, the then Lieutenant General Saw
Maung, Vice-Chief of Staff of Tatmadaw reminded his commanders during his speech at the Command and General Staff College:
In Myanmar, out of nearly 35 million people, the combined armed forces (army, navy and air force) are about two hundred thousand.
In terms of percentage, that is about 0.01 percent. It is simply impossible to defend a country the size of ours with only this handful
of troops... therefore, what we have to do in the case of foreign invasion is to mobilise people in accordance with the "total people's
war" doctrine. In order to defend our country from aggressors, the entire population must be involved in the war effort as the support
of people dictate the outcome of the war.
Third phase (SLORC/SPDC era)
The third phase of doctrinal development of Myanmar Armed Forces came after the military take over and formation of State Law
and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) in September, 1988 as part of armed forces modernisation programme. The development
was the reflection of sensitivity towards direct foreign invasion or invasion by proxy state during the turbulent years of the late 80s
and early 90s, for example: unauthorised presence of US Aircraft Carrier Group in Myanmar's territorial waters during 1988 political
uprising as evidence of an infringement of Myanmar's sovereignty. Also, Tatmadaw leadership was concerned that foreign powers
might arm the insurgents on the Myanmar border to exploit the political situation and tensions in the country. This new threat
perception, previously insignificant under the nation's isolationist foreign policy, led Tatmadaw leaders to review the defence
capability and doctrine of the Tatmadaw. The third phase was to face the lower level external threats with a strategy of strategic
denial under total people's defence concept. Current military leadership has successfully dealt with 17 major insurgent groups, whose
'return to legal fold' in the past decade has remarkably decreased the internal threats to state security, at least for the short and
medium terms, even though threat perception of the possibility of external linkage to internal problems, perceived as being motivated
by the continuing human rights violations, religious suppression and ethnic cleansing, remains high. Within the policy, the role of the
Tatmadaw was defined as a `modern, strong and highly capable fighting force'. Since the day of independence, the Tatmadaw has
been involved in restoring and maintaining internal security and suppressing insurgency. It was with this background that
Tatmadaw's "multifaceted" defence policy was formulated and its military doctrine and strategy could be interpreted as defence-in-
depth. It was influenced by a number of factors such as history, geography, culture, economy and sense of threats. Tatmadaw has
developed an 'active defence' strategy based on guerrilla warfare with limited conventional military capabilities, designed to cope
with low intensity conflicts from external and internal foes, which threatens the security of the state. This strategy, revealed in joint
services exercises, is built on a system of total people's defence, where the armed forces provide the first line of defence and the
training and leadership of the nation in the matter of national defence. It is designed to deter potential aggressors by the knowledge
that defeat of Tatmadaw's regular forces in conventional warfare would be followed by persistent guerrilla warfare in the occupied
areas by people militias and dispersed regular troops which would eventually wear down the invading forces, both physically and
psychologically, and leave it vulnerable to a counter-offensive. If the conventional strategy of strategic denial fails, then the
Tatmadaw and its auxiliary forces will follow Mao's strategic concepts of 'strategic defensive', 'strategic stalemate' and 'strategic
offensive'. Over the past decade, through a series of modernisation programs, Tatmadaw has developed and invested in better
Command, Control, Communication and Intelligence system; real-time intelligence; formidable air defence system; and early
warning systems for its 'strategic denial' and 'total people's defence' doctrine.
Kokang incident Main article: Kokang incident In August 2009, the Myanmar Armed Forces clashed with ethnic armies including
the Kokang's Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army and the Wa's United Wa State Army. This was the largest outbreak of
fighting between ethnic armies and government troops since the signing of the cease-fire 20 years earlier.[7]
Organisational, command and control structure
Before 1988[8] Overall command of Tatmadaw (armed forces) rested with the country's highest ranking military officer, a General,
who acted concurrently as Defence Minister and Chief of Staff of Defence Services. He thus exercised supreme operational control
over all three services, under the direction of the President, State Council and Council of Ministers. There was also a National
Security Council which acted in advisory capacity. The Defence Minister cum Chief-of-Staff of Defence Services exercised day-to-
day control of the armed forces and assisted by three Vice-Chiefs of Staff, one each for the army, navy and air force. These officers
also acted as Deputy Ministers of Defence and commanders of their respective Services. They were all based at Ministry of Defence
(Kakweyay Wungyi Htana) in Rangoon/Yangon. It served as a government ministry as well as joint military operations headquarters.
The Joint Staff within the Ministry of Defence consisted of three major branches, one each for Army, Navy and Air Force, along with
a number of independent departments. The Army Office had three major departments; the General (G) Staff to oversee operations,
the Adjutant General's (A) Staff administration and the Quartermaster General's (Q) Staff to handle logistics. The General Staff
consisted two Bureaus of Special Operations (BSO), which were created in April 1978 and June 1979 respectively. These BSO are
similar to "Army Groups" in Western armies, high level staff units formed to manage different theatres of military operations. They
were responsible for the overall direction and coordination of the Regional Military Commands (RMC) with BSO-1 covering
Northern Command (NC), North Eastern Command (NEC), North Western Command (NWC), Western Command (WC) and Eastern
Command (EC). BSO-2 responsible for South Eastern Command (SEC), South Western Command (SWC), Western Command
(WC) and Central Command (CC)[9]. The Army's elite mobile Light Infantry Divisions (LID) were managed separately under a Staff
Colonel. Under G Staff, there were also a number of directorates which corresponded to the Army's functional corps, such as
Intelligence, Signals, Training, Armour and Artillery. The A Staff was responsible for the Adjutant General, Directorate of Medical
Services and the Provost Marshal's Office. The Q Staff included the Directorates of Supply and Transport, Ordnance Services,
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, and Military Engineers. The Navy and Air Force Offices within the Ministry were headed by
the Vice Chiefs of Staff for those Services. Each was supported by a staff officer at full Colonel level. All these officers were
responsible for the overall management of the various naval and air bases around the country, and the broader administrative
functions such as recruitment and training. Operational Command in the field was exercised through a framework of Regional
Military Commands (RMC), the boundaries of which corresponded with the country's Seven States and Seven Divisions.[10] The
Regional Military Commanders, all senior army officers, usually of Brigadier General rank, were responsible for the conduct of
military operations in their respective RMC areas. Depending on the size of RMC and its operational requirements, Regional Military
Commanders have at their disposal 10 or more infantry battalions ((Kha La Ya).
1988 to 2005

Tatmadaw Command Structure as of 2000


The Tatmadaw's organizational and command structure dramatically changed after the military coup in 1988. In 1990, the t country's
most senior army officer become a Senior General (equivalent to Field Marshal rank in Western armies) and held the positions of
Chairman of State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC), Prime Minister and Defence Minister, Minister as well as being appointed
Commander in Chief of the Defence Services. He thus exercised both political and operational control over the entire country and
armed forces. From 1989, each Service has had its own Commander in Chief and Chief of Staff.. The Army C-in-C C is now elevated to
full General (Bo gyoke Kyii)) rank and also acted as Deput
Deputy C-in-C of the Defence Services. The C-in--C of the Air Force and Navy
hold the equivalent of Lieutenant General rank, while all three Service Chiefs of Staff were raised to Major General level. Chiefs of
BSO, the heads of Q and A Staffs and the Director of Defence Services Intelligence (DDSI) were also elevated to Lieutenant General
rank. The reorganization of the armed forces after 1988 resulted in the upgrading by two ranks of most of the senior positions.
position
A new command structure was introduced at the Ministry ooff Defence level in 2002.The most important position created is the Joint
Chief of Staff (Army,Navy, Air Force)that commands commanders
commanders-in-chief
chief of the Navy and the Air Force.
The Office of Strategic Studies (OSS, or Sit Mahar Byu Har Lae Lar Yae Hta Hta-na) wass formed around 1994 and charged with
formulating defence policies, and planning and doctrine of the Tatmadaw. The OSS was commanded by Lt. Gen. Khin Nyunt, who is
also the Director Defencence Service Intelligence (DDSI). Regional Military Commands and Light Infantry Divisions were also
reorganized, and LIDs are now directly answerable to Commander in Chief of the Army.. A number of new subordinate command
headquarters were formed in response to the growth and reorganization of the Army. These include Regional Operation Commands
(ROC, or Da Ka Sa), which are subordinate to RMCs, and Military Operations Commands (MOC, or Sa Ka Kha), which are
equivalent to Western infantry divisions. The Chief of Staff (Army)) retained control of the Directorates of Signals, Armour,Artillery,
Defence Industries, Security Printing, Public Rel
Relations
ations and Psychological Warfare, and Military Engineering (field section),People's
Militias and Border Troops, Directorate of Defence Services Computers (DDSC), the Defence Services Museum and Historical
Research Institute. Under the Adjutant General OffiOffice,
ce, there are three directorates: Medical Services, Resettlement, and Provost
Martial. Under the Quartermaster General Office are the directorates of Military Engineering (garrison section), Supply and
Transport, Ordnance Services, and Electricaland Mechan
Mechanical
ical Engineering. Other independent department within the Ministry of
Defence are Judge Advocate General, Inspector General, Military Appointment General, Directorate of Procurement, Record Office, Offic
Central Military Accounting, and Camp Commandant. All RMC Commander positions were raised to the level of Major General and
also serve as appointed Chairmen of the State
State- and Division-level
level Law and Order Restoration Committees. They were formally
responsible for both military and civil administrative functions for their command areas. Also, three additional regional military
mil
commands were created. In early 1990, a new RMC was formed in Myanmar's north west, facing India. In 1996, the Eastern Easte
Command in Shan State was split into two RMCs, and South Eastern Command was divided to create a new RMC in country's far
south coastal regions.[11] In 1997, the SLORC was abolished and the military government created the State Peace and Development
Council (SPDC). The council includes all senior military officers and commanders of the RMCs. A new Ministry of o Military Affairs
was established and headed by a Lieutenant General. This new ministry was abolished after its minister Lt. Gen. Tin Hla was sacked
in 2001.
Current In 18 October 2004, the OSS and DDSI were abolished during the purge of General Khin Nyint and military intelligence
units. OSS ordered 4 regiment to raid in DDSI HeadQuarter in Yangon.At the same time, all of the MIU in the whole country were
raided and arrested by OSS corps.Nearly two thirds of MIU officers were arrested for long years. A new military intelligence unit
called Military Affairs Security (MAS) was formed to take over the functions of the DDSI, but MAS units were much fewer than
DDSI's and MAS was under control by local Division commander. In early 2006, a new RMC was created in the newly formed
administrative capital, Naypyidaw.
Organisational structure

• A.G = Adjutant General


• V.A.G = Vice Adjutant General
• DMS = Directorate of Medical Services
• DR = Directorate of Resettlement
• PMO = Provosts Marshal's Office
• MAS = Military Affair Security (Intelligence)
• DS = Directorate of Signal
• DDI = Directorate of Defence Industries
• DSP = Directorate of Security Printing
• DPMPW = Directorate of People Militias and Psychological Warfare
• DME = Directorate of Military Engineers
• DAA = Directorate of Armour and Artillery
• DSHMRI = Defence Services Historical Museum and Research Institute
• DPRBRT = Directorate of Public Relations and Border Troops
• DDSC = Directorate of Defence Services Computers
• BSO = Bureau of Special Operations
• RMC = Regional Military Command
• LID = Light Infantry Division
• ROC = Regional Operations Command
• MOC = Military Operations Command
• TOC = Tactical Operations Command
• Q.M.G = Quarter Master General
• V.Q.M.G = Vice Quarter Master General
• DEME = Directorate Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
• DST = Directorate of Supply and Transport
• DOS = Directorate of Ordinance Services
• Captain G.S = Captain General Staff
• Colonel G.S = Colonel General Staff
• J.A.G = Judge Advocate General
• I.G = Inspector General
• M.A.G = Military Appointment General
• DP = Directorate of Procurement
• CMA = Central Military Account
• Camp Comm = Camp Commandant
Chief of armed forces from 1945 to date
1. Major General Aung San (Founder & Father of Tatmadaw) [1945 – July 19, 1947]
2. Major General Let Yar
3. Lt General Smith Dunn
4. General Ne Win
5. General San Yu
6. General Thura Tin Oo(NLD)
7. General Thura Kyaw Htin
8. Sr General Saw Maung
9. Sr General Than Shwe (1992 – to date)
Rank structure
Myanmar army ranks and insignia Main article: Army ranks and insignia of Myanmar
Myanmar navy ranks and insignia Main article: avy ranks and insignia of Myanmar
Myanmar air force ranks and insignia Main article: Airforce ranks and insignia of Myanmar
Myanmar army (Tatmadaw Kyee) Main article: Myanmar Army
The Myanmar Army has always been by far the largest Service and has always received the lion's share of Myanmar's defence
budget.[12][13] It has played the most prominent part in Myanmar's struggle against the 40 or more insurgent groups since 1948 and
acquired a reputation as a tough and resourceful military force. In 1981, it was described as 'probably the best [army] in Southeast
Asia, apart from Vietnam's'[14]. The judgment was echoed in 1983, when another observer noted that "Myanmar's infantry is
generally rated as one of the toughest, most combat seasoned in Southeast Asia"[15].
Myanmar air force (Tatmadaw Lei) Main article: Myanmar Air Force Personnel: 15,000 The Myanmar Air Force (Tatmdaw Lei)
was formed on 24 December 1947. In 1948, the order of battle for Tatmadaw Lei included 40 Oxfords, 16 Tiger Moths, 4 Austers
and 3 Spitfires with a few hundred personnel.
Myanmar navy (Tatmadaw Yay) Main article: Myanmar avy The Myanmar Navy is the naval branch of the armed forces of
Myanmar with 19,000 men and women. The Myanmar Navy was formed in 1940 and, although very small, played an active part in
Allied operations against the Japanese during the Second World War. The Myanmar Navy currently operates more than 122 vessels.
Before 1988, the Myanmar Navy was small and its role in the many counterinsurgency operations was much less conspicuous than
those of the army and air force. Yet the navy has always been, and remains, an important factor in Myanmar's security and it was
dramatically expanded in recent years to a provide blue water capability and external threat defence role in Myanmar's territorial
waters. Its personnel number 19,000 (including two naval infantry battalions)
Myanmar police force (Myanmar Yae Tat Phwe) Main article: Myanmar Police Force Myanmar Police Force, formally known
as The People's Police Force (Burmese: ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀; MLCTS: Pyi Thu Yae Tup Pwe), was established in
1964 as independent department under the Ministry of Home Affairs. It was reorganised on 1 October 1995 and informally become
part of Tatmadaw. Current Director General of Myanmar Police Force is Brigadier General Khin Yi with its headquarters at Yangon.
Its command structure is based on established civil jurisdictions. Each of Myanmar's seven states and seven divisions has their own
Police Forces with headquarters in the respective capital cities.[16] Israel and Australia often provide specialists to enhance the
training of Myanmar's police.[citation needed] Personnel: 72,000 (including 4,500 Combat/SWAT Police)
Myanmar Frontier Forces (a Sa Kha) The Frontier Forces (Na Sa Kha) are now found on all five of Myanmar's international
borders. They consist primarily of Tatmadaw personnel (including intelligence officers) assisted by members of Myanmar Police
Force, Immigration and Custom officials. Its total strength is unknown.
Military intelligence Main article: Military Intelligence of Myanmar
Defence industries The Myanmar Defence Industries (DI) consists of 13 major factories throughout the country that produce
approximately 70 major products for Army, Navy and Air Force. The main products include automatic rifles, machine guns, sub-
machine guns, anti-aircraft guns, complete range of mortar and artillery ammunition, aircraft and anti aircraft ammunition, tank and
anti-tank ammunition, bombs, grenades, anti-tank mines, anti-personnel mines such as the M14[17][18] pyrotechnics, commercial
explosives and commercial products, and rockets and so forth. DI have produced new assault rifles and light machine-guns for the
infantry. The MA series of weapons were designed to replace the old German-designed but locally manufactured Heckler & Koch
G3s and G4s that equipped Myanmar's army since the 1960s.
Factories The major factories of the DI are the following:
• Weapons Factory
• Bombs & Grenades Factory
• Tungsten Carbide Factory
• Machine Gun Factory
• Filling Factory
• Propellants Factory
• Heavy Artillery Ammo Factory
• Small Arms Ammo Factory
• Brass Mills
• Tungsten Alloy Factory
• Tank Ammo Factory
• Explosives Factory
• Medium Artillery Ammo Factory
Heavy Industries Heavy Industries were established with Ukrainian assistance mainly to assemble the BTR-3U fleet of the
Myanmar Army. Total of 1,000 BTR-3U wheeled APCs are to be assembled in Myanmar over the next 10 years from parts sent by
Ukraine. The BTR-3U is fitted with a number of modern weapon systems including 30 mm gun, 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun,
30 mm automatic grenade launcher and anti-tank guided weapons. HI has also built APC/IFV such as MAV 1, MAV 2 and BAAC
APCs. Little is known about MAV infantry fighting vehicles but it appeared that only 60% of the components are produced locally
and some vital components such as fire control systems, turrets, engines and transmissions are imported from China NORINCO
industries. Apart from BTR 3Us, MAVs and BAACs, HI is also producing a number of military trucks and jeeps for the Army, Navy
and Air Force.
Products Products of DI are as follow:-
• BTR3U (180 nos/yr)
• MAV-1 IFV (20 nos/yr)
• Heavy Truck (400 nos/yr)
• 4x4 6 tons truck (400 nos/yr)
• Humvee (prototypes)(first seen in the 61st Armed Forces Day Parade)
• 105 mm Howitzers (production started in 2006 with the help of Singaporean technicians)
• 120 mm mortar MA 6 (50 nos/yr)
• 14.5 mm AAA (50 nos/yr)
• 12.7 mm HMG (200 nos/yr)
• 0.5" HMG (150 nos/yr)
• MA series small arms (60000 nos/yr)
• RPG (1500 nos/yr)
• Grenade Launcher (7000 nos/yr)
• 81/60 mm mortars (1200 nos/yr)
• 155/130/122/105 mm ammunitions
• 120/81/60 mm mortar bombs
• small arms ammunitions (60 millions nos/yr)
• grenades/rockets
• 57/77/122 mm rockets and up to 500 kg dumb bombs for Air Force
• 25/37/40/57 mm ammunitions for navy
References
1. ^ https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/bm.html
2. ^ a b c DSHMRI Archives
3. ^ Aung San Thuriya Hla Thaung (Armanthit Sarpay, Yangon, 1999)
4. ^ In Defiance of the Storm (Myawaddy Press, Yangon, 1997
5. ^ Strategic Cultures in Asia-Pacific Region (St. Martin's Press)
6. ^ DSHMRI
7. ^ Johnson, Tim (August 29, 2009). China Urges Burma to Bridle Ethnic Militia Uprising at Border. The Washington Post.
8. ^ Andrew Selth: Transforming the Tatmadaw
9. ^ Maung Aung Myoe: Building the Tatmadaw, p.26
10. ^ See order of battle for further details
11. ^ see Order of Battle for further details
12. ^ Working Papers – Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, ANU
13. ^ Andrew Selth: Power Without Glory
14. ^ Far Eastern Economic Review, 20 May 1981
15. ^ Far Eastern Economic Review, 7 July 1983
16. ^ http://www.myanmar.gov.mm/ministry/home/mpf/
17. ^ http://www.karenhumanrightsgroup.org/photoreports/2008photos/gallery2008/section5.html
18. ^ http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/HK04Ae01.html
See also
Current events/Southeast Asia portal

• Myanmar Army
• Myanmar Navy
• Myanmar Air Force
• Myanmar Police Force
• Myanmar Frontier Forces
• Military Intelligence of Myanmar
• Aung San
External links
• Burma Library Archives

A government poster urging unity between the Tatma


Tatmadaw and people.

Commander in Chief of Tamadaw - Ministry of Defence Flag

Armed Forces Flag


Defence Services Academy

The DSA, Pyin Oo Lwin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Motto Triumphant Elites of the Future

Established 1954[1]

Rector Colonel Zaw Win

Principal Major General Zayar Aung

Faculty 300

Undergraduates 5000

Postgraduates 1500

Doctoral students 100

Location Pyin Oo Lwin, Mandalay Division, Myanmar

The Defence Services Academy (DSA), (Burmese: ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀), located in Pyin Oo Lwin, is the premier military
service academy of Myanmar, training future officers for all three branches of Burmese military. The Ministry of Defence
administered academy offers bachelor's degree programs in liberal arts, combined physical sciences, and computer science. As of
49th intake in 2007, the academy is open only to male applicants.[citation needed] The DSA graduates are commissioned in one of the
three branches of Burmese military. As the country's premier military training school, the DSA has produced many of the top
military officers. History The DSA was established in Fort Ba Htoo in southern Shan State in 1954, and was moved to its current
home, a former British hill station of Pyin Oo Lwin (formerly, Maymyo) in June 1957.[2] Mission The purpose of the academy is to
"train a new generation of highly educated and well-rounded officers for Myanmar's armed forces who are capable of leading the
nation". The DSA emphasizes on academic curriculum alongside the military training with the intention of developing individuals
who are capable of running the entire nation. In contrast, the mission of Officer Training School of Myanmar is to train the future
commanders who can lead the Armed Forces at times of war. Further more, OTS does not offer any academic qualifications and
entry is usually open only to degree-holders. From 1999 onwards, it is open only to non-commissioned officers and servicemen
holding degrees who demonstrates extraordinary qualities to become officers and the training is carried over usually nine months
period and there are two intakes per year.
Admissions As the country's most prestigious military academy, the DSA receives many applications from high school graduates
each year. Unlike at most other Burmese universities, the selection process goes beyond the matriculation exam marks, including
physical fitness tests, teamwork and comradeship screening, psychometric assessments and general interviews. As of 49th intake in
2007, the academy is open only to male applicants.[citation needed]
Programs The DSA offers three-year bachelor's degree programs in liberal arts, combined physical sciences (with specializations in
areas such as chemistry, physics, mathematics, geology) and computer science. The undergraduate degree programs used to take 4
years but have been changed to 3 years from the 42nd intake.
Military education All cadets receive mandatory military training. The structure of the DSA is based on British and American (i.e.
Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and United States Military Academy, West Point respectively) military training traditions as
well as home-grown practices. In the tradition of American system, the senior cadet officers are assigned to mentor junior cadet
officers, overseeing day-to-day training, discipline and welfare of the juniors in general, with the aim of developing the so-called
"guardian brotherhood" so as to develop a sense of community, comradeship, faith and trust, chain-of-command and looking after
one another. This function is supervised by an officer (known as company officer), usually at the rank of Captain, who is then
supported by a senior non-commissioned officer, usually at the rank of Master Sergeant. The sergeant more closely interact with the
cadet officers and is directly in the chain-of-command, and is similar to the British system. Unlike in American and British systems,
which maintain separate military academies for different branches of armed forces, the DSA trains for all three branches of Burmese
military (army, navy and air force). Its cadets select the branch to enter upon their graduation, subject to fulfilling further health and
training requirements. In general, cadets at the DSA starts their day in the early mornings with rigorous physical training, followed
by academic lectures, then by military training. After the exams, they also spend a period devoted solely for military training which
take place at various locations across the country. As part of their study requirements, they are taught political science, general law,
international relations and other related subjects alongside their main studies regardless of specialism. In common with other
universities in the country, the cadets are required to study Burmese, English and mathematics regardless of the subject they major in.
The first few weeks of the 1st year is known as "soldier indoctrination week" when newly recruited cadet officers are trained to have
military mentality. Further more, cadet officers are not allowed to keep in touch with the outside world, not even with family (unless
under exceptional circumstances such as death of a family member), for the first six months of the first year which is a period meant
to transform these young high school graduates from civilians into potential military officers. Cadets are subject to further
disciplinary requirements such as having have to refrain from visiting the restricted areas of the city and the dress-code both while on
DSA grounds and while in the city, even during their private time. The board and room, uniform and food, as well as other essential
supplies, for the cadet officers and their tuition costs are borne by the academy. In addition, they also receive a small amount of
monthly allowance. In the past, up to 18th Intake, the academy allowed so-called private cadets who are well-qualified, and satisfied
by admission board, but do not want military service obligation upon graduation. Such applicants pay tuition fees to the academy and
fund their own cost of living while receiving education and training at the academy in exactly as the same way as the other regular
cadet officers. Such private cadets are not obliged to serve in the Armed Forces upon graduation. However, they may choose to
serve, at their own discretion, in the Armed Forces. Private cadets made up about 5~10% of each intakes. Private cadets are,
however, no longer admitted after 18th Intake. The minimum contract of the military service for the regular cadet officers upon
graduation is 10 years.
Academic and Sports Facilities
• Planetarium (One of the only two planetariums in Myanmar)
• Library
• Computer laboratory dedicated for parallel and distributed computing, and software engineering
• Computer clusters
• Computer-assisted foreign language facilities
• Telescope facilities
• Chemistry and geology teaching laboratory
• Radiation physics research laboratory
• Electronics laboratory with clean room facilities
• Olympic-size swimming pool
• Several large sports fields with football grounds and tennis courts
• Several gyms
Alumni
• Vice-Senior General Maung Aye, army chief and second senior in SPDC, State Peace and Development Council of
Myanmar - DSA 1st intake
• U Thaung, Minister of Science and Technology - Awarded Best Cadet in DSA 1st intake.
• General Thura Shwe Mann, Joint Chief of Staff (Army, Navy and Air Force) and third senior in SPDC, State Peace and
Development Council of Myanmar - DSA 11th intake
• General Thein Sein, Prime Minister - DSA 9th intake
• Lieutenant-General Tin Aye, Chief of Military Ordance - DSA 9th intake
• Lieutenant-General Thiha Thura Tin Aung Myint Oo, Secretary-1 of the SPDC, Minister of Military Affairs and
Quartermaster General - DSA 12th intake
• Lieutenant General Myint Swe, Chief of Bureau of Special Operation-5 - DSA 15th intake
• Lieutenant-General Ye Myint, Directorate of Military Affairs Security - DSA 15th intake
• Lieutenant-General Ohn Myint, Chief of Bureau of Special Operation - 1 - DSA 17th intake
• Lieutenant-General Min Aung Hlaing, Chief of Bureau of Special Operation - 2 - DSA 19th intake
• Lieutenant-General Ko Ko, Chief of Bureau of Special Operation - 3 - DSA 19th intake
• Lieutenant-General Tha Aye, Chief of Bureau of Special Operation - 4 - DSA 16th intake
• Lieutenant-General Hla Htay Win, Chief of Armed Forces Training - DSA 20th intake
See also Defence Services Technological Academy Defence Services Medical Academy Defence Services Institute of Nursing and
Paramedical Science
References ^ Helen James (2005). Governance and Civil Society in Myanmar. Routledge. p. 102. ISBN 0415355583,
9780415355582. ^ Kyi Kyi Hla (2001-04-01). Valiant Sons of Myanmar. Myanmar Perspectives.
http://www.myanmar.gov.mm/Perspective/persp2001/4-2001/val.htm.
Defence Services Technological Academy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Motto Honour, Creativity, Capability Technology for military might

Established 1993[1]

Rector Brigadier General Win Myint

Undergraduates 2000

Postgraduates None

Doctoral students None

Location Pyin Oo Lwin, Mandalay Division, Myanmar

Campus 4500 acres

Former names Defence Services Institute of Technology (DSIT)

The Defence Services Technological Academy (DSTA) (Burmese: ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀ ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀ ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀),
located in Pyin-Oo-Lwin, Myanmar, is the premier technological university of the Myanmar Armed Forces. One of the most
selective universities in the country, the academy offers various Bachelor of Engineering degrees to male cadets only. Upon
graduation, most DSTA cadets are commissioned as Engineering Officers with the rank of Lieutenant in one of the three branches of
Burmese armed forces--army, navy, and air force. Some qualified cadets may choose (or be chosen) to pursue further education in
Yangon Technological University, Mandalay Technological University or abroad. History The Defence Services Technological
Academy was established as the Defence Services Institute of Technology (DSIT) in 1993[1] when all civilian colleges and
universities in Myanmar were shut down by the military government, following the 1988 nationwide uprising. The military went on
to establish a parallel system of colleges and universities for itself, including DSTA, Defence Services Medical Academy, and
Defence Services Institute of Nursing and Paramedical Science. The first "intake" of students graduated with Bachelor of
Engineering (BE) degrees in 1999.[2] The academy's graduation ceremonies, as with those of all other military-run academies, are
attended by the highest ranks of the military government.[3] Admissions As of January, 2008, no women cadets are accepted for the
DSTA.[citation needed] As one of elite academies in military ruled Myanmar, the academy maintains a rigorous selection process,
including physical fitness testing, ability for teamwork and comradeship screening, psychometric and general interviews. The
entrance selection process takes about 5 to 7 days at Myanmar Military Officer Selection Board in Yangon. According to official
statistics, DSTA takes 1 out of 145 applicants at selection process.[citation needed] Programs The academy offers five-year Bachelor of
Engineering degree programs in various disciplines, but primarily in Mechanical Engineering and Electrical Engineering in addition
to required cadet training. Cadet training also includes basic military skills, including leadership, through a military programs that
begins on their first day at DSTA. Cadets divided into one of two battalions--Anawrahta or Bayinnaung. Each battalion is divided
into ten companies, in the structure of Burmese army. Most military training takes place during the winter, with new cadets
undergoing Cadet Basic Training--or Beast Barracks--the first year, followed by Cadet Field Training in the second year. Cadets
are housed in barracks and have leadership positions and responsibilities throughout the academic year. Qualified DSTA graduates
may pursue further education at Yangon Technological University or Mandalay Technological University. Some are selected to study
abroad. Campus The DSTA campus is located in Wet-Won, near Pyin-Oo-Lwin on the Mandalay-Lasho highway, and on the
opposite side of town from its sister school, Defence Services Academy. DSTA is part of the military education facilities established
around Pyin Oo Lwin area which is also home to Defence Services Administration School, and the Army Training Depot.[4]
See also Defence Services Academy Defence Services Medical Academy Defence Services Institute of Nursing and Paramedical
Science Yangon Technological University Mandalay Technological University
References
1. ^ a b Helen James (2005). Governance and Civil Society in Myanmar. Routledge. p. 102. ISBN 0415355583,
9780415355582.
2. ^ "Defence Services Institute of Technology". Burmese American Democratic Alliance.
http://www.badasf.org/education.htm. Retrieved 2008-12-13.
3. ^ Thet Khaing (2006-01-09). Military engineers urged to maintain adaptability. The Myanmar Times.
http://www.myanmar.com/myanmartimes/MyanmarTimes15-299/n006.htm.
4. ^ Clive Parker (2006-10-28). "Inside Myanmar's secret capital".
http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/HJ28Ae01.html. Retrieved 2008-12-13.
Defence Services Medical Academy (Burma)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Established 1992[1]

Rector Prof. Maung Maung Wint

Principal Brig-Gen. Tun Ne Lin(2008)[2]

Location Mingaladon, Yangon, Yangon Division, Myanmar

Former names Defence Services Institute of Medicine

The Defence Services Medical Academy (DSMA) (Burmese: ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀ ฀฀฀ ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀), located in
Mingaladon, Yangon, is the university of medicine of the Myanmar Armed Forces. One of the most selective universities in the
country, the academy offers M.B.,B.S. (equivalent of the M.D.) degree programs. Upon graduation, most DSMA cadets are
commissioned with the rank of Lieutenant in Myanmar Army Medical Corps. The aim of the DSMA is to produce good Medical
officers endowed with brilliant physical and mental ability to safeguard Three Main National Causes
References
1. ^ Helen James (2005). Governance and Civil Society in Myanmar. Routledge. p. 102. ISBN 0415355583, 9780415355582.
2. ^ "Burmese regime figures and supporters". Reserve Bank of Australia.
http://www.rba.gov.au/MediaReleases/2008/mr_08_23_annex.html. Retrieved 2008-12-13.

Defence Services Institute of ursing and Paramedical Science


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Established 2000[1]

Type public

Location Mingaladon 11201, Yangon Yangon Division, Myanmar[2]

The Defence Services Institute of ursing and Paramedical Science (DSIPS) (Burmese: ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀ ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀
฀฀฀฀฀ ฀฀฀฀฀฀ ฀฀฀฀฀฀ ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀), located in Mingaladon, Yangon, is one of military-run institutes
of higher learning in Myanmar. The university offers bachelor's and master's degree programs in Nursing, a bachelor's degree
program in Pharmacy, a bachelor's degree program in Paramedical Science.[3]
History DSINPS was founded in 2000 by the Burmese military as the Defence Services Institute of Nursing with assistance from the
Yangon Institute of Nursing and the Mandalay Institute of Nursing. In 2002, the institute added paramedical science and pharmacy
degree programs, and became the Military Institute of Nursing and Paramedical Science.[1] In 2003, the institute assumed its present
name.
References
1. ^ a b "Vice-Senior General Maung Aye attends graduation ceremony of 1st Intake of Military Institute of Nursing and
Paramedical Science". The New Light of Myanmar. 2003-12-06. http://www.myanmar.gov.mm/NLM-
2003/enlm/Dec06_h1.html.
2. ^ "The Yangon Centre for Evidence Based Health Care: A Collaborating Centre of the Joanna Briggs Institute, Myanmar".
The Joanna Briggs Institute. http://www.joannabriggs.edu.au/collab_ctrs/myanmar.php. Retrieved 2008-12-26.
3. ^ "Vice-Senior General Maung Aye addresses Graduation Parade of 5th Intake of DSINPS". The New Light of Myanmar.
2008-01-07. http://www.myanmar.com/newspaper/nlm/Jan08_01.html.
Myanmar Army (Tatmadaw Kyee)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

492,000 (Ranked 10th)


492,000 (Ranked 10th)
564,250 (Ranked 26th)
72,000 (Ranked 26th)

Headquarters
Naypyidaw

Armed Forces Day: 27th of March

The Myanmar Army (Burmese:Tatmadaw Kyee) is the land component of the Military of Myanmar. The Myanmar Army is the
largest branch of the Armed Forces of Myanmar and has the primary responsibility of conducting land-based military operations. The
Myanmar Army maintains the second largest active force in Southeast Asia after Vietnam's Vietnam People's Army. The Myanmar
Army has a troop strength around 492,000. The army has rich combat experience in fighting insurgents in rough terrains, considering
it has been conducting non-stop counter-insurgency operations against ethnic and political insurgents since its inception in 1948. The
force is headed by the Commander in Chief (Army), currently Vice Senior General Maung Aye. The highest rank in the Myanmar
Army is Senior General, equivalent to Field Marshal position in Western Armies and is currently held by Senior General Than Shwe.
The defence budget of the Myanmar Military is 7.07 billion US dollars.[1]
Structure of Myanmar Army The Army has always been by far the largest service in Myanmar and has always received the lion's
share of the defence budget.[1][2] It has played the most prominent part in Myanmar's struggle against the 40 or more insurgent groups
since 1948 and acquired a reputation as a tough and resourceful military force. In 1981, it was described as 'probably the best [army]
in Southeast Asia, apart from Vietnam's'.[3] The judgement was echoed in 1983, when another observer noted that "Myanmar's
infantry is generally rated as one of the toughest, most combat seasoned in Southeast Asia".[4] In 1985, a foreign journalist with the
rare experience of seeing Burmese soldiers in action against ethnic insurgents and narco-armies was 'thoroughly impressed by their
fighting skills, endurance and discipline'.[5] Other commentators throughout that time characterised the Myanmar Army as 'the
toughest, most effective light infantry jungle force now operating in Southeast Asia'.[6] Even the Thais, not known to praise the
Burmese lightly, have described the Myanmar Army as 'skilled in the art of jungle warfare'.[7] However, due to dwindling
recruitment, the military junta has been forcing enlistment of child soldiers into the army's ranks.[8] According to human rights
groups, the Myanmar Army has the world's largest number of child soldiers.[9]
Expansion The first army division to be formed after the 1988 military coup was the 11th Light Infantry Division (LID) in
December 1988 with Col. Win Myint as commander of the division. In March 1990, a new regional military command was opened in
Monywa with Brigadier Kyaw Min as commander and named North-Western RMC. A year later 101st LID was formed in Pakokku
with Col. Saw Tun as commander. Two Regional Operations Commands (ROC) were formed in Myeik and Loikaw to facilitate
command and control. They were commanded respectively by Brigadier Soe Tint and Brigadier Maung Kyi. March 1995 saw a
dramatic expansion of the Tatmadaw as it established 11 Military Operations Commands (MOC)s in that month. MOC are similar to
Mechanized Infantry Divisions in western armies, each with 10 regular infantry battalions (Chay Hlyin Tatyin), a headquarters, and
organic support units including field artillery batteries. Then in 1996, two new RMC were opened, Coastal Region RMC was opened
in Myeik with Brigadier Sit Maung as commander and Triangle Region RMC in Kengtung with Brigadier Thein Sein as commander.
Their new ROCs were opened in Kalay, Bhamo and Mongsat. In late 1998, two new MOCs were opened in Bokepyin and
Mongsat.[10] The most significant expansion after the infantry in the army was in armour and artillery. Beginning in 1990, the
Tatmadaw procured 18 T-69II tanks and 48 T-63 amphibious light tanks from China. Further procurements were made, including
several hundred Type 85 and Type 92 armoured personnel carriers (APC). By the beginning of 1998, Tatmadaw had about 100+ T-
68II main battle tanks, a similar number of T-63 amphibious light tanks and several T-59D tanks. These tanks and armoured
personnel carriers were distributed into five armoured infantry battalions and five tank battalions and formed the first Armoured
Division of the Tatmadaw under the name of 71st Armoured Operations Command with its headquarters in Pyawbwe.
Strength and organization By 2000, the Myanmar Army had reached some 370,000 all ranks. There were 337 infantry battalions,
including 266 light infantry battalions. Although the Myanmar Army's organisational structure was based upon the regimental
system, the basic manoeuvre and fighting unit is the battalion, known as Tat Yin in Burmese, which comprised a headquarters unit;
four rifle companies (tat khwe) with three rifle platoons (Tat Su) each; an administration company with medical, transport, logistics
and signals units; a heavy weapons company including mortar, machine gun and recoilless gun platoons. Each battalion is
commanded a Lieutenant Colonel (du bo hmu gyi) with a Major (bo hmu) as 2IC (Second in Command), with a total establishment
strength of 27 officers and 723 other ranks. Light infantry battalions in Myanmar Army have much lower establishment strength of
around 500; as a result this often leads to these units being mistakenly identified by the observers and reporters as under strength
infantry battalions. With its significantly increased personnel numbers, weaponry and mobility, today's Tatmadaw Kyee is a
formidable conventional defence force for the Union of Myanmar. Troops ready for combat duty have at least doubled since 1988.
Logistics infrastructure and Artillery Fire Support has been greatly increased. Its newly acquired military might was apparent in the
Tatmadaw's dry season operations against Karen National Union (KNU) strongholds in Manerplaw and Kawmura. Most of the
casualties at these battles were the result of intense and heavy bombardment by the Tatmadaw Kyee. Not only that Tatmadaw Kyee is
now much larger than it was in pre-1988, it is more mobile and has greatly improved armour, artillery and air defence inventories. Its
C3I (Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence) systems have been expanded and refined. It is developing
larger and more integrated, self-sustained formations which should lend themselves to better coordinated action by different combat
arms. The army may still have relatively modest weaponry compared to its larger neighbours, but it is now in a much better position
to deter external aggression and respond to such a threat should it ever arise.[2]
Commander in Chief (Army) Until 1990, Myanmar Armed Forces has Chief of Staff system and Myanmar Army was led by Vice
Chief of Staff (Army). In 1990, Myanmar Armed Forces was reorganized and all three branches of Armed Forces are now led by
Commander-in-Chief.
o 1. Brig-Gen. Saw Kyar Doe (1948)
o 2. Brig-Gen. Ne Win (1948-1949)
o 3. Brig-Gen. Aung Gyi (1956-1963)
o 4. Brig-Gen. San Yu (1963-1972)
o 5. Brig-Gen. Thuya Tin Oo (1972-1974)
o 6. Brig-Gen. Thuya Kyaw Htin (1974-1976)
o 7. Brig-Gen. Aye Ko (1976-1981) (later promoted to Lt-Gen.)
o 8. Lt-Gen. Tun Ye (1981-1983)
o 9. Lt-Gen. Saw Maung (1983-1985)
o 10. Lt-Gen. Than Shwe (1985-1992) (Later promoted to Full General and Senior General)
o 11.Lt-Gen. Maung Aye (1993-) (Later promoted to Vice Senior General)
Bureau of Special Operations (BSO) Bureau of Special Operations in Myanmar Army are high-level field units equivalent to Field
Army Group in Western terms and consist of 2 or more Regional Military Commands (RMC) and commanded by a Lieutenant-
General and 6 staff officers. Currently there are five Bureaus of Special Operations in Myanmar order of Battle.
BSO Regional Military Commands
Central Command
Bureau of Special Operations 1 North Western Command
Northern Command
North Eastern Command
Bureau of Special Operations 2 Eastern Command
Triangle Region Command
South Western Command
Bureau of Special Operations 3 Southern Command
Western Command
Coastal Command
Bureau of Special Operations 4
South Eastern Command
Bureau of Special Operations 5 Yangon Command
Bureau of Special Operations 6 Naypyidaw Command
Regional Military Commands (RMC) For better command and communication, the Tatmadaw formed Regional Military
Commands (Tine Sit Htar a Choke) structure in 1958. Until 1961, there were only two regional commands, they were supported by
13 Infantry brigades and an infantry division. In October 1961, new regional military commands were opened and leaving only two
brigades. In June 1963, the Naypyidaw Command was temporarily formed in Yangon with the deputy commander and some staff
officers drawn from Central Command. It was reorganised and renamed as Yangon Command on 1 June 1965. A total of 337
infantry and light infantry battalions organised in Tactical Operations Commands, 37 independent field artillery regiments supported
by affiliated support units including armoured reconnaissance and tank battalions. RMCs are similar to corps formations in Western
armies. The RMCs, commanded by Major-General rank officer, are managed through a framework of Bureau of Special Operations
(BSOs), which are equivalent to Field Army Group in Western terms. Currently there are five Bureaus of Special Operations in the
Tatmadaw's order of battle.
RMC State/Division headquarters Battalions
Northern Command 33 Infantry
Kachin State Myitkyina
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) Battalions
North Eastern Command 30 Infantry
Northern Shan State Lashio
( [[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) Battalions
42 Infantry
Battalions
including 16× Light
Infantry Battalions
Eastern Command
Southern Shan State Taunggyi under
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[)
Regional Operation
Command (ROC)
Headquarters at
Loikaw
South Eastern Command Mawlamyaing 36 Infantry
Mon and Kayin (Karen) States
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) (Moulmein) Battalions
Southern Command Bago and Magwe Divisions Toungoo 27 × Infantry
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) Battalions
South Western Command Ayeyarwady Division 11 × Infantry
Pathein (Bassein)
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) (Irrawaddy Division) Battalions
Western Command Rakhine (Arakan) and Chin 33 × Infantry
Ann
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) States Battalions
North Western Command
25 × Infantry
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[ Sagaing Division Monywa
Battalions
[[[[[[)
Mayangone
Yangon Command 12 × Infantry
Yangon Division Township-Kone-
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) Battalions
Myint-Thar
43 Infantry
Battalions
Coastal Region Command Tanintharyi Division
Myeik (Mergui) including battalions
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) (Tenassarim Division)
under 2 MOC based
at Tavoy
Triangle Region Command Kyaingtong 28 Infantry
Eastern Shan State
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) (Kengtung) Battalions
Central Command 17 Infantry
Mandalay Division Mandalay
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) Battalions
Naypyidaw Command Formed in 2006 - ? ×
Naypyidaw Pyinmana
([[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[[) Infantry Battalions
Commanders of Regional Military Commands
o 1. Natpyidaw: Maj-Gen. Wai Lwin
o 2. Eastern: Maj-Gen. Yar Pyae
o 3. North-Eastern: Maj-Gen. Aung Than Htut
o 4. South-Eastern: Maj-Gen. Thet Naing Win
o 5. Central: Maj-Gen. Tin Ngwe
o 6. Western: Maj-Gen. Thaung Aye
o 7. North-Western: Maj-Gen. Myint Soe
o 8. South-Western: Maj-Gen. Kyaw Swe
o 9. Northern: Maj-Gen. Soe Win
o 10.Southern: Maj-Gen. Hla Min
o 11.Triangle: Maj-Gen. Kyaw Phyo
o 12.Coastal Region: Maj-Gen. Khin Zaw Win
o 13.Yangon: Maj-Gen. Win Myint
Regional Operations Commands (ROC - Da Ka Sa)
o Regional Operations Command - Loikaw (headquarters at Loikaw)
o Regional Operations Command - Laukai (headquarters at Laukai)
o Regional Operations Command - Kalay (headquarters at Kalay)
o Regional Operations Command - Sittwe (headquarters at Sittwe)
o Regional Operations Command - Pyay (headquarters at Pyay)
o Regional Operations Command - Tanaing (headquarter at Tanaing)
Military Operations Commands (MOC) Military Operations Commands (MOC, or Sa Ka Kha), commanded by a Brigadier-
General, are similar to infantry divisions in Western Armies. Each consists of 10 Infantry battalions (Chay Hlyin Tatyin), HQ and
organic support units including field artillery batteries. While the MOC is equivalent to the LID, as both command ten battalions, the
ROC is much smaller in size, with only four battalions, thus ROC is the regimental level with a brigadier general as commander.
ROC is a position between LID/MOC commander and tactical Operation Command (TOC) commander, who commands only three
infantry battalions. But, the ROC commander enjoys financial, administrative and judicial authority while the MOC commander does
not have judicial authority.
o Military Operations Command 1 (headquarters at Kyaukme [[[[[[[[, Shan State)
o Military Operations Command 2 (headquarters at Loilem[[[[[[[[[, Shan State)
o Military Operations Command 3 (headquarters at Mogaung[[[[[[[[[[, Kachin State)
o Military Operations Command 4 (headquarters at Phugyi[[[[[[[, Yangon Division)
o Military Operations Command 5 (headquarters at Ann[[[[, Rakhine State)
o Military Operations Command 6 (headquarters at Pyinmana[[[[[[[[[, Mandalay Division)
o Military Operations Command 7 (headquarters at Phekon[[[[[[, Shan State)
o Military Operations Command 8 (headquarters at Dawei[[[[[[, Tanintharyi Division)
o Military Operations Command 9 (headquarters at Kyauktaw [[[[[[[[[[, Rakhine State)
o Military Operations Command 10 (headquarters at Kyeekone[[[[[[[[[[, Mandalay Division)
o Military Operations Command 12 (headquarters at Kawkareik[[[[[[[[[, Kayin State)
o Military Operations Command 13 (headquarters at Bokpyin[[[[[[[[[, Tanintharyi Division)
o Military Operations Command 14 (headquarters at Mongsat[[[[[[[[[, Shan State)
o Military Operations Command 15 (headquarters at Buthidaung[[[[[[[[[[[, Rakhine State)
o Military Operations Command 16 (headquarters at Theinni[[[[[, Shan State)
o Military Operations Command 17 (headquarters at Mongpan[[[[[[[[[, Shan State)
o Military Operations Command 18 (headquarters at Hehalsai, Shan State)
o Military Operations Command 19 (headquarters at Ye [[[, Mon State)
o Military Operations Command 20 (headquarters at Kawthaung[[[[[[[[[[, Tanintharyi Division)
o Military Operations Command 21 (headquarters at Bhamo[[[[[[[, Kachin State)
Light Infantry Divisions (LID) Light Infantry Division (Chay Myan Tat Ma), commanded by a Brigadier-General, each with 10
Light Infantry Battalions organised under 3 Tactical Operations Commands, commanded by a Colonel, (3 battalions each and 1
reserve), 1 Field Artillery Battalion, 1 Armour Squadron and other support units. These divisions were first introduced to the
Myanmar Army in 1966 as rapid reaction mobile forces for strike operations. 77th Light Infantry Division was formed on 6 June
1966, followed by 88th Light Infantry Division and 99th Light Infantry Division in the two following years. 77th LID was largely
responsible for the defeat of the Communist forces of the CPB (Communist Party of Burma) based in the forested hills of the central
Bago Yoma in the mid 1970s. Three more LIDs were raised in the latter half of 1970s (the 66th, 55th and 44th) with their
headquarters at Pyay, Aungban and Thaton. They were followed by another two LIDs in the period prior to the 1988 military coup
(the 33rd LID with headquarters at Sagaing and the 22nd LID with headquarters at Hpa-An). 11th LID was formed in December
1988 with headquarters at Inndine, Bago Division and 101st LID was formed in 1991 with its headquarters at Pakokku. Each LID,
commanded by Brigadier General (Bo hmu gyoke) level officers, consists of 10 light infantry battalions specially trained in counter-
insurgency and jungle warfare, for "search and destroy" operations against ethnic insurgents and narcotics-based armies. These
battalions are organised under three Tactical Operations Commands (TOC; Sit byu har) and Each TOC, commanded by Colonel (Bo
hmu gyi), is made up of three or more combat battalions, with command and support elements similar to that of brigades in Western
armies. One battalion was held in reserve. As of 2000, all LID have their organic Field Artillery units. For example, 314th Field
Artillery Battery is now attached to 44th LID. Some of the LID battalions have been given Parachute and Air Borne Operations
training and two of the LIDs have been converted to mechanised infantry formation with divisional artillery, armoured
reconnaissance and tank battalions[11] LIDs are considered to be a strategic asset of the Myanmar Army, and after the 1990
reorganisation and restructuring of the Tatmadaw command structure, they are now directly answerable to Chief of Staff (Army).

LID Year formed Place formed Current Commander


11th LID 1988 Inndine, Bago Division
22nd LID 1987 Hpa-An
33rd LID 1984 Sagaing
44th LID 1979 Thaton
55th LID 1980 Sagaing/Kalaw
66th LID 1976 Pyay
77th LID 1966 Hmawbi/Bago
88th LID 1967 Magway
99th LID 1968 Meiktila
101st LID 1991 Pakokku
Air Defence Command The Air Defence Command was formed during the late 1990s but was not fully operational until 1999. In
early 2000, Tatmadaw established Myanmar Integrated Air Defence System (MIADS) with help from Russia, Ukraine and China. All
AD assets except Anti-Aircraft Artillery within Tatmadaw arsenal are integrated into MIADS. Under MIADS, the country was
divided into six Air Defense sectors, each controlled by a Sector Operations Center (SOC) and reporting to the National Air Defense
Operations Center (ADOC) in Yangon.Each SOC transmitted data back to Intercept Operations Centers (IOC), which in turn
controlled SAM batteries and fighter/interceptor squadrons at Air Bases. Each IOC was optimized to direct either SAMs or
fighter/interceptor aircraft against incoming enemy aircraft or missile. Each IOC was connected to observer and early warning area
reporting posts (RP) via fibre optic cable network. There were about 100 radars located at approximately 40 sites throughout the
country. New AD radars such as 1L117 radars, Galaxy Early Warning Radar and P series radars are installed in all radar stations.
Sector Operations Centers The six Sector Operations Centers (SOCs) of MIADS are as follow:-
• Northern SOC (HQ at Myitkyina)
• Southern SOC (HQ at Myeik)
• Western SOC (HQ at Sittwe)
• Eastern SOC (HQ at Tachilek)
• South Eastern SOC (HQ at Yay)
• Central SOC (HQ at Meiktila)
Artillery and Armoured Units Artillery and armoured units were not used in an independent role, but were deployed in support of
the infantry by the Ministry of Defence as required. The Directorate of Artillery and Armour Corps was also divided into separate
corps in 2001, and the Office of Chief of Air Defense was created. A dramatic expansion of forces under these directorates followed
with the equipment procured from China, Russia, Ukraine and India.
Artillery As of 2000, the Armour and Artillery wing of the Tatmadaw has about 60 battalions and 37 independent artillery
companies/batteries attached to various regional commands, LIDs, MOCs and ROCs. For example, 314th Field Artillery Battery is
under 44th LID, 326 Field Artillery Battery is attached to 5th MOC, 074 Field Artillery Battery is under ROC (Bhamo) and 076 Field
Artillery Battery is under North-Eastern RMC. Twenty of these Artillery battalions are grouped under 707th Artillery Operation
Command (AOC) headquarters in Kyaukpadaung and 808th Artillery Operation Command (AOC) headquarters in Oaktwin, near
Taungoo. The remaining 30 battalions, including 7 Anti-Aircraft artillery battalions are under the Directorate of Armour and Artillery
(DAA). Since 2000, the Directorate of Artillery Corps has overseen the expansion of Artillery Operational Commands(AOC) from
two to 10 or more. Tatmadaw's stated intention is to establish an AOC in each of the 12 Regional Military Commands. Each AOC is
composed of an HQ battalion and 13 Artillery batteries; 9 Field Artillery Batteries,1 Medium Artillery Battery, 1 Rocket Artillery
Battery, 1 TAB and supporting units.
Armour Armoured divisions were expanded in number from one to two, each with ten armoured battalions (five equipped with tanks
and five with IFVs and APCs). In mid-2003, Tamadaw acquired 139+ T-72 Main Battle Tanks from Ukraine and signed a contract to
build and equip a factory in Myanmar to produce and assemble 1,000 BTR armored personnel carriers (APCs) in 2004. In 2006, the
Indian Government transferred an unspecified number of T-55 Main Battle Tanks that were being phased out from active service to
Tatmadaw along with 105 mm Light Field Guns, armoured personnel carriers and indigenous HAL Light Attack Helicopters in
return for Tatmadaw’s full cooperation in flushing out Indian insurgent groups operating from its soil.
Artillery Operations Command (AOC) Since 2000, the Directorate of Artillery Corps has overseen the massive expansion of
Artillery Operational Commands(AOC). Artillery Operations Commands are equivalent to Artillery Divisions in western term.
Currently there are 10 AOCs in Tatmadaw order of battle. Tatmadaw's stated intention is to establish an AOC in each of the 12
Regional Military Commands. Each AOC is composed of the following:
• HQ battalion,
• 12 Artillery Battalions:
o six light field artillery battalion equipped with 105 mm, 76 mm, 75 mm howitzers, field guns and mountain guns,
o three medium artillery battalions equipped with 155 mm, 130 mm, 122 mm howitzers and field guns ,
o one Multiple Rocket Launcher battalion equipped with 122 mm self propelled and towed launchers,
o one Air Defence Artillery battalion with 37 mm, 57 mm Anti-Aircraft guns or SA 18 IGLAs) man portable
surface-to-air missiles and
o one target acquisition battalion.
• support units
Light field artillery battalions consists of 3 field artillery batteries with 36 field guns or howitzers (12 guns per battery). Medium
artillery battalions consists of 3 medium artillery batteries of 18 field guns or howitzers (6 guns per one battery).

o Artillery Operations Command 505 (headquarters at Thaton)
o Artillery Operations Command 606 (headquarter unknown)
o Artillery Operations Command 707 (headquarters at Kyaukpadaung)
o Artillery Operations Command 808 (headquarters at Oat-Twin--Taung Ngoo
o Artillery Operations Command 909 (headquarters at [ Mai Khon])
o Artillery Operations Command 901 (headquarters unknown)
o Artillery Operations Command 902 (headquarters unknown)
o Artillery Operations Command 903 (headquarters at Loilem)
o Artillery Operations Command 904 (headquarters unknown)
o Artillery Operations Command 905 (headquarters unknown)
Armour Operations Command (AOC) Armour Operations Commands are equivalent to Independent Armour Divisions in western
term. Currently there are 5 ArOCs in Tatmadaw order of battle. Tatmadaw is to establish an ArOC in 7 of the 12 Regional Military
Commands. Each ArOC is composed of ArOC HQs, three tank regiments, three AFV regiments, one artillery regiment and one
support regiment. Support regiment also composed of an engineer squadron, two logistic squadrons and a signal company. However
some ArOC have only two tank regiments. Myanmar Army has taken delivery of 150 EE-9 Cascavels from Israeli army(?) surplus in
2005. Although EE 9 are armoured reconnaissance vehicle, Myanmar Army categorized them as light tank and deploys them in
eastern Shan State and triangle regions near Thai-Myanmar border.
Myanmar Army Staff
Strength
Myanmar Army statistics
Active Troops 492,250
Regional Military Commands 13
Infantry Divisions 30 (10 LID and 20 MOC)
Armour Divisions 10
Artillery Divisions 10
Tanks 5200
Artillery 13800
Rank Structure See: Army ranks and insignia of Myanmar The various rank of the Myanmar Army are listed below in descending
order:
Commissioned Officers
• Bo Gyoke Hmu Gyi (Senior General)
• Du Bo Gyoke Hmu Gyi (Vice Senior General)
• Bo Gyoke Kyee (General)
• Du Bo Gyoke Kyee (Lieutenant General)
• Bo Gyoke (Major General)
• Bo Hmu Gyoke (Brigadier General)
• Bo Hmu Gyi (Colonel)
• Du Bo Hmu Gyi Lieutenant-Colonel
• Bo Hmu Major
• Bo Gyi Captain
• Bo (Lieutenant)
• Du Bo (Second Lieutenant)
on Commissioned Officers (COs)
• A Yar Khan Bo (Warrant Officer))
• Du A Yar Khan Bo (Regimental
Regimental Sergeant Major
Major)
• Oak Khwè Tat Kyat Kyee (Master Master Sergeant
Sergeant)
• Tat Kyat Kyee (Sergeant)
• Tat Kyat (Corporal)
• Du Tat Kyat (Lance Corporal)
Lowest Rank
• Tat Thar (Private)
Order of Battle
• 13 x Regional Military Commands (RMC)
• 6 x Regional Operations Commands (ROC)
• 21 × Military Operations Commands (MOC)
• 10 x Light Infantry
antry Divisions (LID)
• 1 x Airborne Infantry Division
• 10 x Armoured Operation Commands (AOC) (Each with 5 Tank Battalions and 5 Armoured Infantry Battalions
(IFVs/APCs).)
• 10 x Artillery Operation Commands (AOC) (with of 113 Field Artillery Battalions)
• 10 x Anti-Aircraft
Aircraft Artillery/Air Defenc
Defence Division (Each with 3 × Medium Range SAM Battalions, 3 × Short Range SAM
Battalions, 3 × AAA/AD Battalion)
• 40+ Military Affair Security Companies (MAS Units replaces former Military Intelligence Units after the disbandment of
the Directorate of Defense Service Intelligence (DDSI))
• 45 Advanced Signal Battalions
• 54 Field Engineer Battalions
• 4 Armoured Engineer Battalions
• 55 Medical Battalions
Equipment
Armour
Type Origin Quantity otes
Main Battle Tanks
T-55[12] Soviet Union ( India) N/A Delivered by India

T-72S[13] Soviet Union ( Ukraine) 139 Delivered by Ukraine

Type 59D China 50


[14]
Type 69-II China 80-100
Light Tanks
Comet[15][16] United Kingdom 22 World War II vintage
[14]
Type 63 China 150
Armoured Fighting Vehicles
BMP-1 Soviet Union 50+
BTR-3U[17][18] Ukraine 1,000 To be assembled locally until 2013
Dingo Scout Car United Kingdom 50 World War II vintage
EE-9 Cascavel Brazil ( Israel) 200 Delivered by Israel
Ferret Scout Car United Kingdom 6
Humber Pig United Kingdom 40
MAV-1 Myanmar 72 Locally manufactured Infantry fighting vehicle

Panhard AML 90 France ( Israel)) 50+ Delivered by Israel


[14]
Type 85 China 250
Universal Carrier United Kingdom 80 World War II vintage
Artillery
Type Origin Quantity otes
Self-propelled artillery
Nora B-52[19] Serbia 30 152 mm self-propelled howitzer
Towed artillery
75mm field guns United Kingdom 80 World War II vintage 122 mm howitzer
BL 5.5 inch Medium Gun United Kingdom 230 World War II vintage 140 mm howitzer
D-30M Soviet Union 72 122 mm howitzer
KH-179 South Korea 100+ 155 mm howitzer
M48 mountain gun Yugoslavia 100 76 mm mountain gun
M-845P Israel 16 155 mm howitzer
Ordnance QF 25 pounder United Kingdom 50 World War II vintage 87.6 mm howitzer
Type 59-1 China 16 130 mm field gun
Various 105 mm howitzers Various 340+ Types: L118, M101, M56 and others
Multiple rocket launchers
/ Unknown 90 240 mm multiple rocket launcher (self-propelled)
propelled)
Type 90 China 90 122 mm multiple rocket launcher (self-propelled)
propelled)

Type 90 China 90 122 mm multiple rocket launcher (self-propelled)


propelled)
BM-21 Soviet Union 70 122 mm multiple rocket launcher (self-propelled)
propelled)
Type 63 China 48 107 mm multiple rocket launcher (towed)
BA-84 Myanmar N/A 122 mm multiple rocket launcher (towed)
Air Defence
Type Origin Quantity otes
Missile systems
Bristol Bloodhound[16][20][21] United Kingdom 2 Long-range surface-to-air
air missile system

S-75 Dvina (SA-2 Guideline) Soviet Union ( 48 Long-range surface-to-air


air missile system
Russia
Russia)

Soviet Union ( Self-propelled, medium-range


range surface-to-air
surface missile
2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful) 40
Russia
Russia) system

9K37 Buk-M1-2 (SA-11 Soviet Union ( Self-propelled, medium-range


range surface-to-air
surface missile
48
Gadfly)[22] Russia
Russia) system

9K331M Tor-M1 (SA-15 Soviet Union ( 20 Self-propelled, short-range


range surface-to-air
surface missile system
Gauntlet)[23] Russia
Russia)
2K22 Tunguska M-1 (SA-19 Soviet Union ( Self-propelled, short-range
range surface-to-air
surface gun and
24
Grison)[24] Russia
Russia) missile system

Soviet Union ( Very short-range


range portable surface-to-air
surface missile system
9K38 Igla (SA-18 Grouse) 400
Russia
Russia) (MANPADS)
Very short-range
range portable surface-to-air
surface missile system
CPMIEC HN5 China 200
(MANPADS)
Gun systems
Type 56 China 580 14.5 mm heavy machine gun in quadruple mounts
Various anti-aircraft guns Various 340 37 mm /40 mm /57 mm
Support Weapons
Type Origin Quantity otes
Mortars
Various mortars Various 400+ 60 mm / 82 mm / 120 mm
Rocket Launchers and Recoilless Guns
• N/A 57 mm M-18
• N/A 57 mm Type 36
• 200 75 mm M-20 Rocket Launchers
• N/A 75 mm Type 52 Rocket Launchers
• N/A 75 mm Type 56 Rocket Launchers
• N/A 82 mm Type 65
• N/A 82 mm Type 78
• 1800 84mm FFC Carl Gustaf M-2
• N/A 3.5in M20 Super Bazooka
• N/A 106 mm M40 recoilless rifle
Heavy Machine Guns
• NSVT
• 12.7mm Type 85 HMG
• 20mm Hispano Suiza Mk 5 Automatic Cannon
General Purpose Machine Guns (GPMG) The typical section support weapon before 1988 Tatmadaw modernisation programme
was the locally-manufactured 7.62 mm BA64 Light Machine Gun (LMG). This was essentially the G3 assault rifle fitted with heavy
barrel and bipod. The G4 replaced the British 0.30in Bren LMG. Company fire support generally consisted of German-designed
7.62 mm MG3 general purpose machine guns (made in Myanmar's own Ka Pa Sa factories) and the Belgian 7.62 mm FN MAG
GPMG.
• 0.30in Browning M1919A4
• 0.303in Bren
• 7.62mm Bren L4A4
• 7.62 mm Ka Pa Sa BA-64
• 5.56 mm Ka Pa Sa MA-2
• 7.62mm Ka Pa Sa MA15
• 7.62mm FN MAG
Individual Weapons
Assault Rifles Before 1988, the standard Myanmar infantry weapon was the 7.62 mm BA-63 assault rifle, a locally-produced version
of the Heckler & Koch G3. Myanmar also produced a shorter, lighter carbine version of the same rifle under the designation BA-72,
simply known as the G2. A third version of the G3, known as the BA-100, was more accurate and reliable, but was primarily used as
a sniper's weapon. Many soldiers, mainly officers and NCO, still carried 0.30 calibre M1 and M2 carbines provided by the US in the
1950s under the Military Assistance Programme (MAP). These world war two vintage carbines are ideal for jungle warfare. From the
beginning of 2002, 7.62 mm BA series rifles have been gradually replaced by 5.56 mm MA-series assault rifles in Myanmar Army's
frontline units, tested earlier as the EMERK-3.[25] MA-series assault rifles are similar to Israeli GALIL rifle and fire 5.56 mm NATO
rounds. As side-arm, officers used 9 mm Browning High Power/FN-35 semi-automatic pistol locally manufactured under license by
Ka Pa Sa.
• Type 81
• Type 56
• 5.56 mm MA-1 assault rifle - (licence produced Galil)
• 5.56 mm MA-3 carbine
• 5.56 mm MA-4 (MA-1 assault rifle with 40 mm M203 Grenade Launcher)
• 5.56 mm MA-11 (licence produced HK33)
• 5.56 mm MA-12 light machine gun
• 7.62 mm Ka Pa Sa BA-63 assault rifle (licence produced G3A2)
• 7.62 mm Ka Pa Sa BA-72 assault rifle (licence produced G3K)
• 7.62 mm Ka Pa Sa BA-100 assault rifle (licence produced G3A3ZF)
• Kalashnikov AK-74
• Kalashnikov AKM
• 5.45 mm AKS-74U
Submachine Guns
• 9 mm Ka Pa Sa BA-52 "Ne Win Sten" (licence produced TZ-45)
• 9 mm Ka Pa Sa BA-94 (licence produced Uzi)
• 9 mm Sterling L2A3
Grenade Launchers
• Type 56 RPG
• Type 69 RPG
• 40 mm GP-25
Training
Defence Academies and Colleges
• National Defence College - NDC ((Yangon)
• Defence Services Command and General Staff College - DSCGSC (Kalaw)
• Defence Services Academy - DSA ((Pyin Oo Lwin)
• Defence Services Technological Academy - DSTA (Pyin Oo Lwin)
• Defence Services Medical Academy - DSMA (Yangon)
• Defence Services Nursing College - DSNC (Yangon)
• Defence Services Technological College -DSTC (Hopone)
Training Schools
• Officer Training School - OTS (Fort Ba Htoo)
• Myanmar Army Combat Forces School School-I (Fort Ba Htoo)
• Myanmar Army Combat Forces School School-II (Fort Bayintnaung)
• Artillery Training School (Mone Tai)
• Armour Training School (Mine Maw)
• Electronic School (Pyin Oo Lwin))
• Engineer School (Pyin Oo Lwin)
• Information Warfare School (Yangon
Yangon)
• Air, Land and Paratroops Training School ((Hmawbi)
• Special Forces School (Ye Mon)
Transport Before 1988, Myanmar Army had less than 2000 military trucks in their inventory, bulk of them are locally assembled
a 6
ton 4x2 Hino TE 11/21 trucks, and they had to rely on civil transport systems. After the 1988 military coup, with the starting of the
defence modernization programme, Myanma
Myanmarr started to acquire hundreds of logistic vehicle mainly from China. In 1992, Myanmar
Army bought 4000 6 ton 4x2 FAW and Dongfeng EQ1093 trucks form China and delivery completed in 1995. However due to
maintenance problems with the earlier TE 11 and 21, Myanmar Army again signed contract with China to buy 4000 Jiefang CA1091
4x2 5 ton trucks. Again in 1997, Myanmar Army acquired 1000 Dongfeng EQ2102 3.5 tonne 6X6 military utility trucks and 200
Shaanqi SX 2190 6X6 military utility trucks for newly formed artillery units for towing guns. However during border clashes with
neighbouring Thailand in 2002, Myanmar Army found difficulties with the eexisting
xisting 4x2 military trucks and then they acquired 3000
Dongfeng EQ2102 3.5 tonne 6X6 military utility trucks. These trucks were delivered at ChinaChina-Myanmar
Myanmar border town of Shwe Li
between 2003 and 2006. In 2007 November, China has agreed to supply another 1500 EQ2102 3.5 tonne 6x6 military utility trucks to
Myanmar Military. As part of that agreement Myanmar has taken delivery of first bat
batch
ch of 350 EQ 2102 trucks in 2008 April and 650
trucks are to deliver in June. [3] Myanmar ordinance factories start
started assembling Chinese Aeolus 4x2 6 tonne light utility military
trucks in 1997.
Trucks
• Hino Motors TE 11/21
• Jiefang Motors EQ1093 truck People's Republic of China
• Jiefang Motors CA1091 (formerly CA141) 5 tonne tru
truck People's Republic of China
• Jiefang Motors EQ2102 3.5 tonne (6x6) truck People's Republic of China
• Shaanqi Motors SX 2190 (6x6) utility truck People's Republic of China
• Dongfeng Motor Corporation/FAW
/FAW EQ2102 3.5 tonne cargo carrier People's Republic of China
• FSC Star 266 (6x6) medium truck (Poland) Poland
• FAW CA6110/125Z1A2 6x6 6 ton People's Republic of China
Utility
• Toyota Land Cruiser
• Toyota Tiger DubleCub
• Nissan Patrol
• Isuzu Trooper
• Jiefang Langian People's Republic of China
• Ford DubleCub United States
States)
• Humvee (locally reverse engineered AMC Hummer United States
• Myanmar Jeeps (copy of US made Jeep)
• Chin Dwin Star Jeeps (copy of US made Jeep)
Communication Command and control system of Myanmar Army has been substantial substantially
ly upgraded by setting up the military fibre
optic communication network through out the country. Since 2002 all Myanmar Army regional and divisional command HQs used
its own telecommunication system. Satellite communications is also provided to forward forward-deployed
ployed infantry battalions. However,
battle field communication systems are still poor. Infantry units are still using TRA 906 and PRM 4051 which were acquired from fr
UK in 1980s. Myanmar Army also uses Thura (locally built TRA 906) and XD XD-D6M (Chinese)) radio sets. Frequency hopping
handsets are fitted to all front line units.
See also
• Aung San
• Tatmadaw
• Myanmar Navy
• Myanmar Air Force
• Military Intelligence of Myanmar
• Myanmar Police Force
References
1. ^ Working Papers - Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, ANU
2. ^ Andrew Selth: Power Without Glory (ISBN 1891936131)
3. ^ Far Eastern Economic Review, 20 May 1981
4. ^ Far Eastern Economic Review, 7 July 1983
5. ^ Bertil Lintner, Land of Jade
6. ^ AsiaWeek 21 Feb. 1992
7. ^ The Defence of Thailand (Thai Government issue), p.15, April 1995
8. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7069920.stm
9. ^ http://www.hrw.org/en/news/2002/10/15/burma-worlds-highest-number-child-soldiers
10. ^ WP 342. Australian National University
11. ^ Selth: 'Power without Glory (ISB 1891936131)
12. ^ India sells maritime aircraft to Myanmar, Times of India (May 12, 2007). Seen January 5, 2009.
13. ^ Fullbrock, David: Burma’s Generals on a Buying Spree, Asia Sentinel (December 19, 2006). Seen January 4, 2009.
14. ^ a b c Selth, Andrew: "The Burmese Army". In: Jane's Intelligence Review, November 1, 1995. Retrieved 30 January,
2009.
15. ^ IISS, The Military Balance, issue 2005, 2006, 2007.
16. ^ a b Selth, Andrew (2002): Burma's Armed Forces: Power Without Glory, Eastbridge. ISBN 1891936131
17. ^ Amnesty International, EU Office. EU arms embargoes fail to prevent German engines being incorporated into military
vehicles available in Burma/Myanmar, China and Croatia. Seen January 4, 2009.
18. ^ Ashton, William: The Kiev Connection. In: The Irrawaddy, 12, 4 (2004). Seen January 4, 2009.
19. ^ BIRN (2007):Serbia's Arms Exports to Myanmar (Burma) "Legal", Ocnus.net. Seen January 4, 2009.
20. ^ Selth, Andrew (2000): Burma's Order of Battle: An Interim Assessment. ISBN 073152778X
21. ^ IISS The Military Balance 2007
22. ^ IISS The Military Balance 2007
23. ^ IISS The Military Balance 2007
24. ^ IISS The Military Balance 2007
25. ^ [http://securityarms.com/20010315/galleryfiles/3200/3273.htm Ka-Pa-Sa MA-11/MA-12 (HK33) assault weapon system
5.54x45] Retrieved on October 28, 2007.
Army

Tamadaw Kyee [7] [8] The Myanmar Army has always been by far the largest Service and has always received the lion's share of
Myanmar's defence budget. It has played the most prominent part in Myanmar's struggle against the 40 or more insurgent groups
since 1948 and acquired a reputation as a tough and resourceful military force. In 1981, it was described as 'probably the best [army]
in Southeast Asia, apart from Vietnam's'[9]. The judgement was echoed in 1983, when another observer noted that "Myanmar's
infantry is generally rated as one of the toughest, most combat seasoned in Southeast Asia"[10]. Image File history File links Army-
flag. ... Image File history File links Army-flag. ... In 1985, a foreign journalist with the rare experience of seeing Burmese soldiers in
action against ethnic insurgents and narco-armies was 'thoroughly impressed by their fighting skills, endurance and discipline'[11].
Other commentators throughout that time characterised the Myanmar Army as 'the toughest, most effective light infantry jungle force
now operating in Southeast Asia'/[12]. Even the Thais, not known to praise the Burmese lightly, have described Myanmar Army as
'skilled in the art of jungle warfare'[13]. Thai soldiers readily acknowledge, albeit privately, the toughness and determination of their
Myanmar counterparts. Despite its preoccupation with retaining political power, the Myanmar Army has never lost sight of its
defence role, and over the past 12 years has implemented a wide range of measures which have significantly enhanced its military
capabilities.The first military division to be formed after the 1988 military coup was the 11th LID in the December of 1988 with Col.
Win Myint as commander of the division. In March 1990, a new regional command was opened in Monywa with Brigadier Kyaw
Min as commander and named North-Western RMC. A year later 101st LID was formed in Pakokku with Col. Saw Tun as
commander. Two Regional Operations Commands (ROC) were formed in Myeik and Loikaw to facilitate command and control.
They were commanded respectively by Brigadier Soe Tint and Brigadier Maung Kyi. March 1995 saw the dramatic expansions of
the Tatmadaw as it established 11 Military Operations Commands (MOC)s in that month. MOC are similar to Mechanized Infantry
Divisions in western armies, each with 10 regular infantry battalions (Chay Hlyin Tatyin), a headquarters, and organic support units
including field artillery batteries. Then in 1996, two new RMC were opened, Costal Region RMC was opened in Myeik with
Brigadier Sit Maung as commander and Triangle Region RMC in Kengtung with Brigadier Thein Sein as commander. There new
ROCs were opened in Kalay, Bamaw and Mongsat. In late 1998, two new MOCs were opened in Bokepyin and Mongsat.[14] Image
File history File links Mm-lid-101. ... Image File history File links Mm-lid-101. ... The most significant expansion after the infantry
in the army was in armour and artillery. Beginning in 1990, the Tatmadaw procured 18 T-69II tanks and 48 T-63 amphibious light
tanks from China. Further procurements were made, including several hundred Type 85 and Type 92 armoured personnel carriers
(APC). By the beginning of 1998, Tatmadaw has about 100+ T-68II main battle tanks, similar number of T-63 amphibious light
tanks and several T-59D tanks. These tanks and armoured personnel carriers were distributed into five armoured infantry battalions
and five tank battalions and formed the first Armoured Division of the Tatmadaw under the name of 71st Armoured Operations
Command with it's HQ in Pyawbwe. Image File history File links Mm-armour-flag. ... Image File history File links Mm-armour-flag.
By 2000, the Myanmar Army had reached some 370,000 all ranks. There were 337 infantry battalions, including 266 light infantry
battalions. Although the Myanmar Army's organisational structure was based upon the regimental system, the basic manoeuvre and
fighting unit is the battalion, known as "Tat Yin" in Burmese, which comprised an HQ unit; four rifle companies(tat khwe) with three
rifle platoons (Tat Su) each; an administration company with medical, transport, logistics and signals units; a heavy weapons
company including motor, machine gun and recoilless gun platoons. Each battalion is commanded a Lieutenant Colonel (du bo hmu
gyi) with a Major (bo hmu) as 2ic (Second in Command), with a total establishment strength of 27 officers and 723 other ranks. Light
infantry battalions in Myanmar Army have much lower establishment strength of around 500, as a result this often leads to these
units being mistakenly identified by the observers and reporters as under strength infantry battalions. A regiment is a military unit,
consisting of a group of battalions, usually four and commanded by a colonel. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in
NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically
commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... Artillery and armoured units were not used in an independent role, but were deployed in
support of the infantry by the Ministry of Defence as required. As of 2000, the Amour and Artillery wing of the Tatmadaw has about
60 battalions and 37 independent artillery companies/batteries attached to various regional commands, LIDs, MOCs and ROCs. For
example, 314th Field Artillery Battery is under 44th LID, 326 Field Artillery Battery is attached to 5th MOC, 074 Field Artillery
Battery is under ROC (Bamaw) and 076 Field Artillery Battery is under North-Eastern RMC. Twenty of these Artillery battalions are
grouped under 707th Artillery Operation Command (AOC) HQ in Kyaukpadaung and 808th Artillery Operation Command (AOC)
HQ in Oaktwin, near Taungoo. The remaining 30 battalions, including 7 Anti-Aircraft artillery battalions are under Directorate of
Armour and Artillery (DAA). Image File history File links Mm-artillery-flag. ... Image File history File links Mm-artillery-flag. ..
With its significantly increased personnel numbers, weaponry and mobility, today's Tatmadaw Kyee is a formidable conventional
defence force for the Union of Myanmar. Troops ready for Comabt duty have at least doubled since 1988. Logistics infrastructure
and Artillery Fire Support has been greatly increased. It's newly acquired military might was apparent in the Tatmadaw's 1994-1995
dry season operations against KNU strongholds in Manerplaw and Kawmura. Most of the casualties at these battles were the result of
intense and heavy bombardment by the Tatmadaw Kyee. Not only that Tatmadaw Kyee is now much larger than it was in pre-1988,
it is more mobile and has greatly improved armour, artillery and air defence inventories. It's C3I (Command, Control,
Communications, Computers and Intelligence) systems have been expanded and refined. It is developng larger and more integrated,
self-sustained formations which should lend themselves to better coordinated action by different combat arms. Myanmar Army may
still have relatively modest weaponry compared to it's larger neighbours, but it is now in a much better position to deter external
aggression and respond to such a threat should it ever arise.

Bureau of Special Operations (BSO) Bureau of Special Operations in Myanmar Army are high-level field units equivalent to Field
Army Group in Western terms and consist of 2 or more Regional Military Commands (RMC) and commanded by a Major-General
and 6 staff officers. Currently there are four Bureaus of Special Operations in Myanmar order of Battle.
BSO Regional Military Commands
Central Command
Bureau of Special Operations 1 North Western Command
Northern Command
North Eastern Command
Bureau of Special Operations 2 Eastern Command
Triangle Reigon Command
South Western Command
Bureau of Special Operations 3 Southern Command
Western Command
Coastal Command
Bureau of Special Operations 4 South Eastern Command
Yangon Command
o Naypyidaw command does not come under any BSO and answerable directly to the Ministry of Defence in Naypyidaw.
Image File history File links Mm-mod. ... Image File history File links Mm-mod. ...
Regional Military Commands (RMC)
13 x RMC (Tine Sit Htana Choke)

A total of 337 infantry and light infantry battalions organised in 34 Tactical Operations Commands, 37 independent field artillery
batteries supported by affiliated support units including armoured reconnaissance and tank battalions. RMCs are similar to corps
formations in Western armies. The RMCs are managed through a framework of Bureau of Special Operations (BSOs), which are
equivalent to Field Army Group in Western terms. Currently there are four Bureaus of Special Operations in the Myanmar order of
battle. A corps (a word that migrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: , but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis
meaning body; plural same as singular) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an
army with a common function (such as artillery or signals... A nations army is its military, or more specifically, all of its land forces.
...
RMC State/Division HQ Battalions
Northern Command Kachin State Myitkyina 33 Infantry Battalions
North Eastern
Northern Shan State Lashio 30 Infantry Battalions
Command
42 Infantry Battalions
including 16x Light Infantry Battalions under
Eastern Command Southern Shan State Taunggyi
Regional Operation Command (ROC)
Headquarters at Loikaw
Triangle Region Kyaingtong
Eastern Shan State 28 Infantry Battalions
Command (Kengtung)
Central Command Mandalay Division Mandalay 17 Infantry Battalions
South Eastern Mon and Kayin (Karen) States Mawlamyaing 36 Infantry Battalions
Command (Moulmein)
43 Infantry Battalions
Coastal Region Tanintharyi Division (Tenassarim
Myeik (Mergui) including battalions under 2 MOC based at
Command Division)
Tavoy
Southern Command Bago and Magwe Divisions Toungoo 27 x Infantry Battalions
South Western Ayeyarwady Division (Irrawaddy
Pathein (Bassein) 11 x Infantry Battalions
Command Division)
Western Command Rakhine (Arakan) and Chin States Sittwe (Akyab) 33 x Infantry Battalions
North Western
Sagaing Division Monywa 25 x Infantry Battalions
Command
Yangon Command Yangon Division Mingaladon 12 x Infantry Battalions
Naypyidaw Command Naypyidaw Pyinmana Formed in 2006 - ? x Infantry Battalions
Image File history File links Mm-triangle-rmc. ... Image File history File links Mm-triangle-rmc. ... Image File history File links
Mm-eastern-rmc. ... Image File history File links Mm-eastern-rmc. ... Image File history File links Mm-northern-rmc. ... Image File
history File links Mm-northern-rmc. ... Kachin State (Jingphaw Mungdan), is the northernmost state of Myanmar. ... Shan State is a
state located in Myanmar (Burma), which takes its name from the Shan people, the majority ethnic group in the Shan State. ...
Mandalay Division is an administrative division of Myanmar. ... Mandalay (Burmese: ) is the second largest city in Myanmar
(formerly Burma) with a population of 927,000 (2005 census), agglomeration 2,5 million. ... Mon States seal is a hintha (mythical
duck), which is the symbol of the Mon people. ... Kayin State is an administrative division of Myanmar and also known as Karen
State. ... Tanintharyi Division, better known by the old name Tenasserim, is a division of Myanmar, covering the long narrow
southern part of the country on the Kra Isthmus. ... Bago Division is an administrative division of Myanmar, located in the southern
portion of the country. ... Magway Division (also spelt Magwe) is a division located in central Myanmar between north latitude 18°
50 and 22° 47 and east longitude between 93° 47 and 95° 55. It is bordered by Sagaing Division is to its north, Mandalay
Division to its east, Bago Division to its south and... Ayeyarwady Division is a division of Myanmar, occupying the delta region of
the Ayeyarwady or Irrawaddy River. ... Rakhine State (formerly Arakan) is a state of Myanmar. ... Chin State is a state of Myanmar.
... Sagaing Division is a division of Myanmar, located in the north-western part of the country between latitude 21° 30 north and
longitude 94° 97 east. ... Yangon Division is an administrative division of Myanmar. ... Naypyidaw (also spelt Nay Pyi Taw,
literally Royal City) is currently the national capital of Myanmar, located in Kyatpyae Village, Pyinmana Township of Mandalay
Division. ...
Regional Operations Commands (ROC)
4 x ROC (HQs at Loikaw, Bhamo, Kalay and Mongsat)

Military Operations Commands (MOC)


20 x MOC

Light Infantry Divisions (LID)


North Eastern Command
10 x LID (Chay Myan Tat Ma) Image File history File links Mm-north-eastern-rmc. ... Image File history File links Mm-north-
eastern-rmc. ...
o 77 LID (HQ at Pegu)
o 88 LID (HQ at Magwe)
o 99 LID (HQ at Meiktila)
o 66 LID (HQ at Prome)
o 55 LID (HQ at Aungban)
o 44 LID (HQ at Thaton)
o 33 LID (HQ at Sagaing)
o 22 LID (HQ at Pa-an)
o 11 LID (HQ at Htaukkyan)
o 101 LID (HQ at Pakokku)
Other Combat Units
1 x Airborne Infantry Division (citation, confirmation needed!)
2 x Armored Divisions (Each with 5 Tank Battalions and 5 Armored Infantry Battalions (IFVs/APCs).)
3 x Field Artillery Divisions (with of 43 Field Artillery Battalions)
2 x Anti-Aircraft Artillery/Air Defence Division (Each with 3 x Medium Range SAM Battalions, 3 x Short Range SAM Battalions, 3
x AAA/AD Battalion)
Image File history File links Mm-sagaing-rmc. ... Image File history File links Mm-sagaing-rmc. ... Image File history File links
Mm-coastal-rmc. ... Image File history File links Mm-coastal-rmc. ... A Warrior vehicle with UN markings, on the making of the
eponymous film. ... East German BRDMs on parade during celebrations of the 40th anniversary of East Germany in 1989 Armoured
personnel carriers (APCs) are light armoured fighting vehicles for the transport of infantry. ... Akash Missile Firing French Air Force
Crotale battery Bendix Rim-8 Talos surface to air missile of the US Navy A surface-to-air missile (SAM) is a missile designed to be
launched from the ground to destroy aircraft. ... Akash Missile Firing French Air Force Crotale battery Bendix Rim-8 Talos surface
to air missile of the US Navy A surface-to-air missile (SAM) is a missile designed to be launched from the ground to destroy aircraft.
...
Signal, Intelligence and Support Units
40+ Military Affair Security Companies (MAS Units replaces former Military Intelligence Units after the disbandment of the
Directorate of Defense Service Intelligence (DDSI))
20+ Signal Battalions
15+ Field Engineer Battalions
16+ Medical Battalions

Equipment
Armor
Tanks
139 x T-72S MBTs (PRC/Ukraine/Russia)[1]
280+ x Type 59D MBTs (PRC)
190+ x Type 69 II MBTs (PRC)
Unknown number of Type 80 MBTs (PRC)
Unknown number of Type 85 MBTs (PRC)
Unknown number of Type 55 MBTs (India)
150+ x Type 63 Light Tanks
22 x Comet Medium Tanks (UK - WWII vintage)
The T-72 is a Soviet-designed main battle tank that entered production in 1971. ... This article is about armoured fighting vehicles. ...
For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... The Chinese Type 59 Main Battle Tank is a copy of the ubiquitous Russian T-55/54
medium tank. ... The Chinese Type 69 and Type 79 tanks were developments of the Type 59, which in turn was a copy of the Soviet
T-54/55 series of tanks. ... The Type 96 is the latest variant of Chinas second-generation main battle tank (MBT). ... Also known as
the Type 88C, the Type 96 is the final development variant of Chinas second generation main battle tank (MBT), with certain
performance approaching the standard of the third generation MBTs. ... The PT-76 is a Soviet amphibious tank which was introduced
in early 1950s and soon became the standard reconnaissance tank of the Soviet Army and the other Warsaw Pact armies. ... Image
File history File links Mm-lid-44. ... Image File history File links Mm-lid-44. ... Image File history File links Mm-western-rmc. ...
Image File history File links Mm-western-rmc. ...
Infantry Fighting Vehicles/Armored Personnel Carriers
1,000 x BTR-3U IFVs. To be assembled in Burma; order complete by 2010.
250 x Type 85 APCs (PRC)
240 x Type 90 APCs (PRC)
140 x EE-9 Cascavel AFVs
Unknown number of Panhard AML 90 armoured cars
80 x Universal T-16 Bren Gun Carriers (UK - WWII vintage)
40 x Humber APC (UK)
6 x Ferret scout car (SC) (UK)
50 x Daimler SC (UK)
72 x MAV-1 local-built IFV
44 x local-built armoured vehicles
o BAAC-83 APC
o BAAC-84 SC
o BAAC-85 SC
o BAAC-86 SC
o BAAC-87 APC
o BAAC-87 Command and Control Carrier
A Warrior vehicle with UN markings, during the making of the eponymous film. ... The EE-9 Cascavel is a 6x6 armoured car
developed in the seventies by ENGESA of Brasil. ... An armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) is a military vehicle, protected by armour
and armed with weapons. ... United Nations Panhard AML. The Panhard AML( called the AML 245 by Panhard) 60/90 is a light
armoured car with permanent 4x4 drive which gives it exceptional mobility. ... Military armored cars A French VBL reconnaissance
vehicle. ... The Universal Carrier, usually known as a Bren Gun Carrier (even when it was not carrying a Bren), was a small, tracked
British-designed military vehicle, used widely by Allied forces during World War II. Universal Carriers were usually used for
transporting personnel and equipment, mostly support weapons, or as...
Artillery
Self-Propelled and Towed Artillery
[15] [16]

30 x NORA B52 self-propelled artillery (Serbia)


16 x M-845P 155mm Howitzers (Israel)
100+ x KH-179 155mm Howitzers (ROK)
16 x Soltam 155mm Howitzers (Israel)
Unknown number of 140mm 5.5-inch medium guns (UK WWII vintage)
16 x Type 59 M-46 130mm Field Guns (North Korea)
72 x D-30M 122mm Howitzers
340+ x 105mm Howitzers (US M-101, Yugoslavia M-56 Howitzer, Indian 105-mm Light Guns)
50 x 88mm 25-Pounder Field Guns (UK WWII vintage)
80 x 75mm Field Guns
100 x M-48 B1 Mountain Guns (Yugoslavia)
Image File history File links Artillery2-flag. ... Image File history File links Artillery2-flag. ... Loading a WW1 British 15 in (381
mm) howitzer A howitzer or hauwitzer is a type of field artillery. ... The Chinese Type 59 Main Battle Tank is a copy of the
ubiquitous Russian T-55/54 medium tank. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the
Manual of Style. ... Image File history File links Mm-lid-33. ... Image File history File links Mm-lid-33. ...
Multiple Rocket Launchers (MLRS)
Unknown number of Type 63 MLRS (PRC)
42 x Type 90 122mm MLRS (PRC)
Unknown number of BM-21 MLRS (Vietnam)
30 x Type 63 107mm Towed MLRS (PRC)
Unknown number of locally made BA-84 81mm
The Type 90 is the current main battle tank (MBT) of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF). ... BM-21 battery. ... Image
File history File links Mm-yangon-rmc. ... Image File history File links Mm-yangon-rmc. ...
Surface-to-air missiles and anti-aircraft artillery
48 x TOR M1 / SA-15 SAMs (USSR)
24 x BUK-M1-2 / SA-17 SAMs (USSR)
24 x Tunguska SA-19 Gun/SAMs (USSR)
24 x SA-6 Gainful SAMs (USSR/PRC)
24 x Pechora-2M SAMs
48 x SA-2 Guideline SAMs
2 x BAe Dynamics Bloodhound Mk.II SAMs (UK/Singapore - illegal transfer)
400 x SA-18 Grouse MANPADS
200 x CPMIEC HN5 MANPADS (PRC)
100 x Igla-1E / SA-16 Gimlet MANPADS
Unknown number of FIM-92 Stinger MANPADS (US/Pakistan - illegal transfer from arms shipment from US for mujahideen)
200 x 14.5mm KPV heavy machine guns in quadruple AAA mounts (PRC)
200 x 37mm/40mm/57mm Anti-Aircraft Guns (various models)
Akash Missile Firing French Air Force Crotale battery Bendix Rim-8 Talos surface to air missile of the US Navy A surface-to-air
missile (SAM) is a missile designed to be launched from the ground to destroy aircraft. ... A surface-to-air missile (SAM) is a missile
designed to be launched from the ground to destroy aircraft. ... right Artists rendition of the Tunguska Event Tunguska
(Ð¢ÑƒÐ½Ð³ÑƒÑ ÐºÐ°) is a remote, largely uninhabited region in Siberia, Russia. ... A 3M9 TEL with missiles erected. ... V-750
missile on camouflaged launcher. ... The 9K38 Igla (Russian 9К38 Ð˜Ð³Ð»Ð°Ì â€“ needle, NATO reporting name SA-18 Grouse)
is a Russian/Soviet man-portable infrared homing surface-to-air missile (SAM) system. ... An SA-7 in use Man-portable air-defence
systems (MANPADS) are shoulder-launched surface-to-air missiles. ... An SA-7 in use Man-portable air-defence systems
(MANPADS) are shoulder-launched surface-to-air missiles. ... The 9K38 Igla (Russian 9К38 Ð˜Ð³Ð»Ð°Ì â€“ needle, NATO
reporting name SA-18 Grouse) is a Russian/Soviet man-portable infrared homing surface-to-air missile (SAM) system. ... Type
MANPADS Nationality United States Era Cold War/modern Launch platform Man portable Target aircraft History Builder Raytheon
Missile Systems Date of design 1967 Production period Service duration 1981-present Operators Britain, Germany, Israel, Iran,
Lithuania, The Netherlands, Pakistan, Switzerland, United States Variants Number built Approx. ... An SA-7 in use Man-portable
air-defence systems (MANPADS) are shoulder-launched surface-to-air missiles. ... The KPV heavy machine gun is a Soviet designed
14. ... American troops man an anti-aircraft gun near the Algerian coastline in 1943 Anti-aircraft warfare, or air defense, is any
method of engaging military aircraft in combat from the ground. ...
Heavy Mortars
400+ x 120mm Mortars
o Ka Pa Sa BA-97 (locally made)
o Hotchkiss-Brandt MO-120-60 (France)
o MA-6
o Soltam K-6 (Israel)
o Tampella Mk.2 (Finland)
o Type 53 (PRC)
o UBM-52 (Yugoslavia)
8 x 120mm Soltam M-65/Tampella M-65 (Israel/Finland)
Image File history File links Mm-army-2. ... Image File history File links Mm-army-2. ... US soldier loading a M224 60-mm mortar.
...
Support Weapons
Light and Medium Mortars
N/A x 2-inch Ordnance ML (UK, Burma)
N/A x 3-inch Ordnance ML (UK, Burma)
N/A x 60mm Ka Pa Sa BA-100 (Burma)
N/A x 60mm Type-63 (PRC)
N/A x 60mm M-19 (US)
N/A x 81mm M-29 (US)
N/A x 81mm Ka Pa Sa BA-90 (Burma)
N/A x 82mm M-43 (Russia)
N/A x 82mm Type-53 (PRC)
N/A x 82mm Type-67 (PRC)
N/A x 82mm Type-76 (PRC)
Image File history File links Mm-army-4. ... Image File history File links Mm-army-4. ...
Rocket Launchers and Recoilless Guns
N/A x 57mm M-18 (US)
N/A x 57mm Type-36 (PRC)
200 x 75mm M-20 Rocket Launchers (US)
N/A x 75mm Type-52 Rocket Launchers (PRC)
N/A x 75mm Type-56 Rocket Launchers (PRC)
N/A x 82mm Type-65 (PRC)
N/A x 82mm Type-78 (PRC)
1800 x 84mm FFC Carl Gustaf M-2 (Sweden)
N/A x 3.5in M-20 Rocket Launcher "Super Bazooka" (US WWII vintage/MAP)
N/A x 106mm M-40A1 (US)
N/A x 106mm M-40A2 (US)
Image File history File links Mm-armour2. ... Image File history File links Mm-armour2. ... Carl Gustav recoilless rifle The Carl
Gustav is the common name for the 84mm recoilless rifle anti-tank weapon from the Carl Gustav company in Sweden. ...
Heavy Machine Guns and Cannons

N/A x 0.50cal Browning M-2HB HMG (Belgium/US)


N/A x 12.7mm Type-85 HMG (PRC)
N/A x 20mm Hispano Suiza Mk.5 Automatic Cannon (UK)
Image File history File links Mm-signal. ... Image File history File links Mm-signal. ...
General Purpose Machine Guns (GPMG)
The typical section support weapon was the locally-manufactured 7.62mm BA64 Light Machine Gun (LMG), also known as the G4.
This was essentially the G3 assault rifle fitted with heavy barrel and bipod. The G4 replaced the British 0.30in Bren LMG. Company
fire support generally consisted of German-designed 7.62mm MG3 medium machine guns (made in Myanmar's own Ka Pa Sa
factories) and the Belgian 7.62mm FN MAG GPMG. The FN MAG is a machine gun manufactured by Fabrique Nationale (FN),
Belgium. ...
0.30in Browning M1919A4 MMG (US)
0.303in Bren LMG (UK)
7.62mm Bren L4A4 LMG (UK)
7.62mm Ka Pa Sa BA-64 LMG. Locally made version of Heckler & Koch G4.
7.62mm Ka Pa Sa MA-3 LMG (Burma)
7.62mm Ka Pa Sa MG-3 GMPG (Burma)
7.62mm FN MAG GPMG (Belgium)
Image File history File links Mm-artillery3. ... Image File history File links Mm-artillery3. ... A Medium Machine Gun or MMG in
modern terms, usually refers to a belt-fed, full-power rifle caliber (such as 7. ... The M249 SAW, one of the most popular 5. ...
Heckler & Koch G41 Heckler & Koch GmbH (H&K) (pronounced //) is a German weapons manufacturing company famous for
various series of small firearms, notably the MP5 submachine gun, the MP7 personal defense weapon, USP series handguns, high-
precision PSG1 sniper rifle, and the G3 and G36 assault rifles. ...
Individual Weapons
Before 1988, the standard Myanmar infantry weapon was the 7.62mm BA63 assault rifle, a locally-produced version of the Heckler
& Koch G3. Myanmar also produced a shorter, lighter carbine version of the same rifle under the designation BA72, simply known
as the G2. A third version of the G3, known as the BA1000, was more accurate and reliable, but was primarily used as a sniper's
weapon. Many soldiers still carried 0.30 calibre M1 and M2 carbines provided by the US in the 1950s under the Military Assistance
Programme (MAP). However 7.62 mm BA series rifles are replaced by 5.56 mm Ma series rifles in 2002. As a side-arm, officers
used a 9mm Browning High Power/FN-35 semi-automatic pistol. The G3 (Gewehr 3) is a family of select fire battle rifles
manufactured by Heckler & Koch. ...

Assault Rifles
5.56mm MA-1 Assault Rifle. (Locally made version of the Israeli IMI Galil assault rifle.)
5.56mm MA-2 Light Machine Gun - LMG (Locally made version of the Israeli IMI Galil carbine version.)
5.56mm MA-3 Carbine
5.56mm MA-4 (MA-1 Assult Rifle with 40 mm M203 Grenade Launcher)
5.56mm MA-11 (Assault Rifle 5.56 mm version of G3 aka BA-63)
5.56mm MA-12 Light Machine Gun - LMG (5.56 mm version of G4 aka BA-64)
7.62mm Ka Pa Sa BA-63 Assault Rifle. Produced under license from H&K - HK G3A2.
7.62mm Ka Pa Sa BA-72 Assault Rifle. Produced under license from H&K - HK G3K.
7.62mm Ka Pa Sa BA-100 Assault Rifle. Produced under license from H&K - HK G3A3ZF Sniper Version.
7.62mm Ka Pa Sa BA-64 Light Machine Gun - LMG (also known as G4)
0.30in Winchester M-1 Carbine (US)
0.30in Winchester M-2 Carbine (US)
Image File history File links Mm-lid-11. ... Image File history File links Mm-lid-11. ... The Galil is one of the standard assault rifles
used by the Israel Defense Forces. ...
Submachine Guns
9mm Ka Pa Sa BA-94. Produced under license from IMI, Israel - based on the Uzi.
9mm Sterling L2-A3 (UK)
9mm Ka Pa Sa BA-52 "Ne Win Sten". Produced under license from TZ Italy - based on the TZ-45.
Image File history File links Mm-army6. ... Image File history File links Mm-army6. ... IMI logo Israel Military Industries Ltd. ...
The Uzi (Hebrew: ) is a family of guns that started with a compact, boxy, light-weight submachine gun. ...
Grenade Launchers
40mm RPG-2 Type-56 ATGL, B40 (Russia/PRC)
40mm RPG-7 Type-69 ATGL (Russia/PRC)
40mm M-79 (US)
40mm M-203 (US)
Air Force (Tatmadaw Lei)
Air Force Flag
Personnel: 15,000 all ranks Image File history File links Airforce-flag. ... Image File history File links Airforce-flag. ...
The Myanmar Air Force (Tatmdaw Lei) was formed on 24 December 1947. In 1948, the order of battle for Tatmadaw Lei include 40
Oxfords, 16 Tiger Moths, 4 Austers and 3 Spitfires with a few hundred personnel. The Mingaladon Air Base HQ was formed on the
16 June 1950. No.1 Squadron, Equipment Holding Unit and Air HQ - Burma Air Force, and the Flying Training School, were placed
under the base. A few months later, on 18 December 1950, No. 2 Squadron was formed with nine Dakotas as transport squadron. In
1953, the Advanced Flying Unit with Vampire Mark T55s was formed under the Mingaladon Air Base and by the end of 1953,
Tatmadaw Lei has 3 Airbase HQ (Mingaladon, Hmawbi and Meiktila). In late 1955, Tatmadaw Lei formed a Maintenance Air Base
in Mingaladon, No. 501 Suadrop Group (Hmawbi Airbase) and No. 502 Squadron Group (Mingaladon Air Base). Five years later,
No. 503 Squadron Group was formed with No. 51 Squadron (Otters and Cessnas) and No. 53 Squadron *Bell 47Gs/Huskys and
Alouettes) in Meiktila. In 1962, Tatmadaw Lei opened a radar station in Mingaladon and a mobile radar station in Lwemwe (near
Tachileik). In December 1964, Tatmadaw Lei had 323 officers and 5677 other ranks and it acquired T-33 Jet trainers and a new radar
station, which could operate within a 120-mile radius was opened in Namsang. In 1966, new radar stations were opened and existing
stations were upgraded. The Namsang Radar staton was upgraded to cover about a 200-mile radius and renamed to No.71 Squadron.
In the same year Tatmadaw Lei formed No. 1 Airborne Battalion with 26 officers and 750 other ranks.[17]
In the early 1990s, Tatmadaw lei upgraded its facilities and introduced two new Air Base HQs and existing Air Base HQs were
renamed. It also significantly upgraded its radar and electronic warfare facilities.
Administrative and Support Units
Air Force HQ, Ministry of Defence
Maintenance Air Base (Mingaladon)
Ground Training Base (Meiktila)
Fly Training Base (Shante)
Air Bases
Hmawbi Air Base HQ (former 501 Air Base)
Mingaladon Air Base HQ (former 502 Air Base)
Myitkyinar Air Base HQ (former 503 Air Base)
Namsang Air Base HQ
Taungoo Air Base HQ
Equipment
Fighters/Interceptors
52 x Chengdu F-7s equipped with French R550 Magic Air-to-air missiles).
12 x MiG-29s (Russia) (** Additional Mig-29s ordered in 2006**)
J-7H belonging to the PLAAF Flight Test & Training Centre based at Cangzhou AFB, Hebei Province The Chengdu Jian-7 (export
versions F-7) is a Peoples Republic of China-built fighter jet derived from the Russian MiG-21. ... This article needs to be cleaned up
to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A US Navy VF-103 Jolly Rogers F-14 Tomcat fighter launchers an AIM-54 Phoenix
long-range air-to-air missile. ... The Mikoyan MiG-29 (Russian: * ) (NATO reporting name Fulcrum) is a fighter aircraft designed for
the air superiority role in the Soviet Union. ...
Fighters/Ground Attack
16 x Shenyang J-6s (PRC)
48 x Nanchang A-5s (PRC)
An F-6 of the Pakistan Air Force The Shenyang J-6 (designated F-6 for export versions) was the Chinese-built version of the Soviet
MiG-19 fighter aircraft. ... A5-fantan aka Nanchang Q-5 The Nanchang Q-5 (NATO reporting name Fantan), also known as the A-5
in its export versions, is a Chinese-built jet fighter bomber based on the Soviet MiG-19. ...
Counterinsurgency
12 x G-4 Super Galebs (Yugoslavia)
7 x Pilatus PC-9(Switzerland)
14 x Pilatus PC-7(Switzerland)
The G-4 Super Galeb is a tandem-seat low-wing advanced jet trainer/light attack jet of Yugoslav/Serbian origin. ...
Transport
6 x SAC Y-8D2/Antanov An-12 (PRC)
2 x Fokker F-27 (Netherlands)
3 x Fairchild-Hiller FH-227B (US)
3 x Beechcraft D-18S (US)
Training
2 x Mig-29UB (Russia) - more on order
10 x GAIC FT-7 (PRC)
4 x Shanyang FT-6 (PRC)
24 x Hongdu K-8s
5 x Pilatus PC-7 (Switzerland)
2 x Britten-Norman Islander (Transferred by India in August 2006)
The Hongdu JL-8 (or Nanchang JL-8) is a two-seat trainer aircraft built by joint-cooperation between Pakistan and the Peoples
Republic of China. ... BN-2B Islander II operated by Ryukyu Air Commuter The Britten-Norman Islander (also known as the BN-2)
is a light utility aircraft manufactured by Britten-Norman of Britain. ...
Liaison Aircraft
4 x Cessna 180 (US)
1 x Cessna 550 (US)
5 x Pilatus PC-6A/B Turbo Porter
Helicopters
11 x Mi-17s (Russia)
22 x UH-1 Iroquois (US)
20 x W-3 Sokół (Poland)
20 x Mi-2s (Poland)
?? x HAL Dhruv (India - transferred in late 2006)
6 x Bell 206 Jet Ranger (US)
6 x SA-316B Alouette III (France)
The Mil Mi-8 (NATO reporting name Hip) is a large twin-turbine transport helicopter that can also act as a gunship. ... The Bell
Helicopter UH-1 Iroquois, commonly (or officially in the United States Marine Corps) known as the Huey, is a multipurpose military
helicopter, famous for its use in the Vietnam War. ... One of armed versions during Airshow 2005 in Radom The PZL W-3 Sokół
(Polish Falcon) is a Polish medium size twin engine multipurpose helicopter manufactured by PZL Åšwidnik. ... The Mil Mi-2
(NATO reporting name is Hoplite) was a small, lightly armored transport helicopter that could also provide close air support when
armed with 57 mm rockets and a 23 mm cannon. ... The HAL Dhruv (Sanskrit:Pole Star) is a multi-role advanced helicopter made by
Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd. ...
avy (Tatmadaw Yay) Personnel: 16,000 (including two naval infantry battalions) Image File history File links Navy-flag. ... Image
File history File links Navy-flag. ... Before 1988, the Myanmar Navy was small and its role in the many counter-insurgency
campaigns waged by the government was much less conspicuous than those of the other two Services. Yet the navy has always been,
and remains, an important factor in Myanmar's security. The Myanmar Navy was formed in 1940 and, although very small, played an
active part in Allied operations against the Japanese during the Second World War. In December 1947, the Union of Burma Navy
was formed with 700 men. The fleet initially consisted of a small but diverse collection of ships transferred from the UK under the
arrangements made for Burma's independence in January 1948. It included an ex-Royal Navy River class frigate and four Landing
Craft Gun (Medium). Armed with two 25-pounder (88mm) guns and two 2-pounder (44mm) guns, these landing craft were used as
support gunboats.[18] In 1950 and 1951, the US provided 10 coast guard cutters (CGC) under the Mutual Defence Assistance Program
(MDAP). The Myanmar Navy played an important part in the government's fight against the ethnic and ideological insurgent groups
which threatened the Union Government in it's early days. The Myanmar Navy performed both defensive and offensive roles,
protecting convoys, carrying supplies, ferrying troops and giving much-needed fire support. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year
starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the
link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...
A naval infantry battalion (of 800 men) was formed in 1964, followed by a second battalion in 1967. They were deployed mainly to
the Arakan and Tenasserim areas, and to the Irrawaddy delta, to assist in counter-insurgency operations, but also performed other
security duties.

Administrative and Support Units


Naval HQ, Ministry of Defence
Strategic Naval Command (HQ in Rangoon)
Naval Training Command (Seikkyi)
Naval Shipyard Headquarters (Yangon)
Central Naval Hydrographic Depot (Yangon)
Central Naval Diving and Salvage Depot (Yangon)
Central Naval Engineering Depot (Yangon)
Central Naval Stores Depot (Yangon)
Central Naval Communications Depot (Yangon)
Central Naval Armaments Deport (Seikkyi)
Yangôn, formerly Rangoon, population 4,504,000 (2001), is the capital of Myanmar. ... Yangon (Burmese: , population 4,082,000
(2005 census), formerly Rangoon, and still known by that name in many circles, see below under History), is the largest city of
Myanmar (formerly Burma) and its former capital. ...
aval Regional Commands and Bases
Irrawaddy Regional Command (HQ in Yangon)
o Thanhklyet Soon Naval Base
o Bassein Naval Base
o Coco Island Base (Naval Radar Unit)
Danyawaddy Regional Command (HQ in Sittwe)
o Kyaukpyu Naval Base
o Sandoway Naval Base
Panmawaddy Regional Command (HQ on Hainggyi Island)
Mawyawaddy Regional Command (HQ in Moulmein)
Tanintharyi Regional Command (HQ in Mergui)
o Zadetkyi Island Naval Base
o Mali (Tavoy) Naval Base
o Palai Island Naval Base
o Kadan Naval Base
o Sakanthit Naval Base
o Lambi Naval Base
o Pearl Island Naval Base
o Zadetkale Naval Base (Radar Unit)
Ships
Class umber of ships Pennant number or name
Frigate 1 F 108
Corvette 3 771, 772, 773
FAC Missile 6 (Houxin class) 471, 472, 473, 474, 475, 476
FAC Missile 4 (Myanmar class) 557, 558, 559, 560
FAC Gun 6 (Myanmar class) 551, 552, 553, 554, 555, 556
FAC anti submarine 10 (Hainan class) 441-450
OPV 3 (Osprey class) Indaw, Inya, Inma
FPB 21(different types) -
1 x 108 metre frigate (equipped with 1 x 76 mm Oto Melara Super Rapid, 4 x 30 mm AK 230, 4x C 802, RBUs and HQ 7)
3 x 77 metre corvette (771, 772, 773(equipped with 1 x 76 mm Oto Melara Super Rapid, 2 x 30 mm AK 230, 4x C 802)
6 x Houxin Yan 037 1 G Class FAC (471, 472, 473, 474, 475, 476) (equipped with 4 x C 802 SSM, 2 x 37 mm twin, 2 x 14.5
mm twin)
2 x 45 metre Myanmar Class FAC (551, 552) (equipped with 1 x 57 mm twin, 2 x 25 mm twin, 2 x 14.5 mm twin)
4 x 45 metre Myanmar Class FAC (553, 554, 555, 556) (equipped with 1 x 37 mm twin, 2 x 25 mm twin, 2 x 14.5 mm twin)
4 x 45 metre Myanmar Class FAC (557, 558, 559, 560) (equipped with 4 x C 802 SSM, 2 x 30 mm twin, 2 x 14.5 mm twin)
10 x submarine chaser Hainan (441, 442, 443, 444, 445, 446, 447, 448, 449, 450) (equipped with 2 x 57 mm twin, 2 x 25 mm
twin, 2 x 14.5 mm twin, RBUs)
Regional Military Commands (RMC)
For better command and communication, the Tatmadaw formed regional military commands structure in 1958. Until 1961, there
were only two regional commands, they were supported by 13 Infantry brigades and an infantry division. In October of 1961, new
regional military commands were opened and leaving only two brigades. In June of 1963, the Naypyidaw Command was temporarily
formed in Yangon with the deputy commander and some staff officers drawn from Central Command. It was reorganised and
renamed as Yangon Command on 1 June 1965.

Current Regional Military Commands and their respective commanders are as follow:
Serial
o. ame Post Command School/Intake
o.
Brig-Gen Naypyidaw
01 Commander of Naypyidaw Command NA DSA 20
Wai Lwin Command
Chairman of Rangoon Division Peace and Development Council
Brig-Gen Commander of Rangoon Command Naypyidaw (also spelt Nay Pyi Taw,
Rangoon
02 Hla Htay literally Royal City) is currently the national capital of Myanmar, located in NA NA
Command
Win Kyatpyae Village, Pyinmana Township of Mandalay Division. ... Yangon
Division is an administrative division of Myanmar. ...
Chairman of Mandalay Division Peace and Development Council
Maj-Gen Central BC
03 Commander of Central Command Mandalay Division is an administrative DSA
Khin Zaw Command 13242
division of Myanmar. ...
Chairman of Shan State (East) Peace and Development Council
Brig-Gen Triangle
Commander of Triangle Region Command Shan State is a state located in
04 Min Aung Region NA DSA
Myanmar (Burma), which takes its name from the Shan people, the
Hlaing Command
majority ethnic group in the Shan State. ...
Chairman of Tenasserim (Taninthayi) Division Peace and Development
Brig-Gen Council Coastal
05 Khin Zaw Commander of Coastal Region Command Tanintharyi Division, better Region NA OTS
Oo known by the old name Tenasserim, is a division of Myanmar, covering the Command
long narrow southern part of the country on the Kra Isthmus. ...
Brig-Gen Chairman of Shan State Peace and Development Council Eastern
06 NA DSA 20
Thaung Aye Commander of Eastern Command Command
Brig-Gen Chairman of Arakan (Rakhine) State Peace and Development Council
Western
07 Maung Commander of Western Command Rakhine State (formerly Arakan) is a NA DSA 20
Command
Shein state of Myanmar. ...
Chairman of Kachin State Peace and Development Council
Maj-Gen Northern BC
08 Commander of Northern Command Kachin State (Jingphaw Mungdan), is NA
Ohn Myint Command 11031
the northernmost state of Myanmar. ...
Brig-Gen
Chairman of Shan State (North) Peace and Development Council Northeast
09 Aung Than NA DSA 20
Commander of Northeast Command Command
Htut
Chairman of Sagaing Division Peace and Development Council
Maj-Gen Commander of Northwest Command Sagaing Division is a division of Northwest BC
10 DSA 16
Tha Aye Myanmar, located in the north-western part of the country between latitude Command 13140
21° 30 north and longitude 94° 97 east. ...
Chairman of Pegu Division Peace and Development Council
Maj-Gen Southern BC
11 Commander of Southern Command Bago Division is an administrative NA
Ko Ko Command 14235
division of Myanmar, located in the southern portion of the country. ...
Brig-Gen Chairman of Mon State Peace and Development Council
Southeast
12 Thet Naing Commander of Southeast Command Mon States seal is a hintha (mythical NA OTS
Command
Win duck), which is the symbol of the Mon people. ...
Maj-Gen
Chairman of Irrawaddy Division Peace and Development Council Southwest BC
13 Thura DSA 18
Commander of Southwest Command Command 13970
Myint Aung
The Ayeyarwady River (Burmese: ; formerly known as the Irrawaddy River) flows through the centre of Myanmar (formerly
Burma). ...
Light Infantry Divisions (LID) Light Infantry Divisions (LID) were first introduced to the Myanmar Army in 1966 as rapid reaction
mobile forces for strike operations. 77th Light Infantry Division was formed on 6 June 1966, followed by 88th Light Infantry
Division and 99th Light Infantry Division in the two following years. 77th LID was largely responsible for the defeat of the
Communist forces of the CPB (Communist Party of Burma) based in the forested hills of the central Pegu Yoma in the mid 1970s.
Three more LIDs were raised in the latter half of 1970s (the 66th, 55th and 44th) with their headquarters at Prome, Aungban and
Thaton. They were followed by another two LIDs in the period prior to the 1988 military coup (the 33rd LID with HQ at Sagaing and
the 22nd LID with HQ at Pa-an). 11th LID was formed in December 1988 with HQ at Htaukkyan and 101st LID was formed in 1991
with it's HQ at Pakkoku. Image File history File links Mm-lid-55. ... Image File history File links Mm-lid-55. ... June 6 is the 157th
day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman
Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513...
1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Each LID consisted of 10 light
infantry battalions specially trained in counter-insurgency and jungle warfare, for "search and destroy" operations against ethnic
insurgents and narcotics-based armies. These battlions are organised under three Tactical Operations Commands (TOC; Sit Byu Har)
and commanded by Brigadier_General (Du Bo Mhu Choke) or Colonel (Bo Mhu Gyi) level officers. Each TOC was made up of
three or more combat battalions, with command and support elements similar to that of brigades in Western armies. One battalion
was held in reserve. As of 2000, all LID have their organic Field Artillery units. For example, 314th Field Artillery Battery is now
attached to 44th LID. Some of the LID battalions has been given Parachute and Air Borne Operations training and two of the LIDs
have been converted to mechanised infantry formation with divisional artillery, armoured reconnaissance and tank battalions[19] A
Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just
above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Colonel (IPA: or ) is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the
corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... Brigade is a term from military science which refers to a group
of several battalions (typically two to four), and directly attached supporting units (normally including at least an artillery battery and
additional logistic support). ... LIDs are considered to be a strategic asset of the Myanmar Army and after the 1990 reorganisation
and restructuring of the Tatmadaw command structure, they are now directly answerable to Chief of Staff (Army).
LID Year formed Place formed First Commander Commander as of 1998
11th LID 1988 Indine Col. Win Myint Col. Myint Swe
22nd LID 1987 Pa-An Col. Tin Hla Col. Kyaw Thu
33rd LID 1984 Sagaing Col. Kyaw Ba Col. Win Myint
44th LID 1979 Thaton Col. Myat Thin Col. Ne Win
55th LID 1980 Sagaing/Kalaw Col. Phone Myint Col. Sein Lin
66th LID 1976 Pyay Col. Taung Zar Khaing Col. Aung Min
77th LID 1966 Hmawbi/Bago Col. Tint Swe Col. Thein Soe
88th LID 1967 Magway Col. Than Tin Brig. Aye Kyae
99th LID 1968 Meikhtila Col. Kyaw Htin Col. Htay Oo
101st LID 1991 Pakkoku Col. Saw Tun Brig. Aung Thein Lay
Image File history File links Mm-lid-22. ... Image File history File links Mm-lid-22. ... Image File history File links Mm-lid-99. ...
Image File history File links Mm-lid-99. ...
References
Acronyms
DSA-Defence Services Academy
OTS-Officers' Training School
1. ^
2. ^ Starck, Peter (2005-06-07). World Military Spending Topped $1 Trillion in 2004. Reuters. Common Dreams NewsCenter.
Retrieved on 2006-07-19.
3. ^ Andrew Selth: Transforming the Tatmadaw
4. ^ Maung Aung Myoe: Building Tatmadaw, p.26
5. ^ See order of battle for further details
6. ^ see Order of Battle for further details
7. ^ Working Papers - Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, ANU
8. ^ Andrew Selth: Power Without Glory
9. ^ Far Eastern Economic Review, 20 May 1981
10. ^ Far Eastern Economic Review, 7 July 1983
11. ^ Bertil Litner, Lord of Jade
12. ^ AisaWeek 21 Feb. 1992
13. ^ The Defence of Thailand (Thai Government issue), p.15, April, 1995
14. ^ WP 342. Australian National University
15. ^
16. ^ http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/7598_1812584,000500020010.htm
17. ^ DSHMRI Documents
18. ^ p.28, Janes Fighting Ships 1963-64
19. ^ Selth: Power without Glory
2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of
the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ...
See also
Current events/Southeast Asia Portal
Aung San
Burma National Army
Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army
Kachin Independent Army
Shwe Mann
Smith Dun
United Wa State Army
Image File history File links Portal. ... Aung San General Aung San (Burmese: ; MLCTS: ); February 13, 1915 – July 19, 1947)
was a Burmese revolutionary, nationalist, general, and politician. ... The Burma National Army served as the armed forces of the
Burmese government created by the Japanese during World War II and fought in the Burma Campaign. ... General Thura Shwe
Mann Thura Shwe Mann (born 1947) is Joint Chief of Staff of the Burmese Armed Forces, and third-highest ranking member of the
State Peace and Development Council, after Than Shwe and Maung Aye. ... General Smith Dun was the Chief of Army Staff at
Burma and was noted for having won the first Sword of Honour. ... United Wa State Army is the army of tens of thousand soldiers of
nearly Wa State in Myanmar. ...
External links
Burma Library Archives
Burma Campaign UK
Irrawaddy Research Page
Categories: Cleanup from January 2007 | All pages needing cleanup | All pages needing to be wikified | Wikify from January 2007 |
Military of Myanmar
Myanmar Army flag - Bureau of Special Operations

Armour Division - Armour Division - 101st LID

707th Artillery Operation Command – 808th Artillery Operation Command

99th LID - 44th LID - 55th LID - 22nd LID - 11th LID

Triangle Region Command - Central Command - Coastal Region Command

Northern Command - North Eastern Region Command - Eastern Command


North Western Region Command - Yangon Regional Command – Engineer Flag
F
Myanmar Army

DUTIYA DATKYAT Private 1st Class DATKYAT Corporal DATKYATGYI Staff Sergeant

OKKWE DATKYATGYI Sergeant 1st


Class DUTIYA AYAKANBO Master Sergeant AYAKANBO Sergeant Major

DU BO Second Lieutenant BO Lieutenant BO GYI Captain

Bo Hmu Major Du Bo Hmu Gyi Lieutenant Colonel Bo Hmu Gyi Colonel

Bo Hmu Gyoke Brigadier General Bo Gyoke Major General Du Bo Gyoke Kyee Lieutenant General

Du Bo Gyoke Hmu Gyi Vice Senior General Bo Gyoke Hmu Gyi Senior General
Myanmar avy (Tatmadaw Yay)

Myanmar Navy Badge - Flag

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

aval Staff
19,000
Headquarters
Naval headquarters (Naypyidaw)
Strategic Naval Command (Yangon)
Naval Training Command (Seikkyi)
Irrawaddy Regional Command (Yangon)
Danyawaddy Regional Command (Sittwe)
Panmawaddy Regional Command (Hainggyi Isl
Island)
Mawyawaddy Regional Command (Mawlamyaing
Mawlamyaing)
Tanintharyi Regional Command (Mergui)

The Myanmar avy is the naval branch of the armed forces of Myanmar with 19,000 men and women. The Myanmar Navy
currently operates more than 122 vessels. Before 1988, the Myanmar Navy was small and its role in the many man counterinsurgency
operations was much less conspicuous than those of the army and air force. Yet the navy has always been, and remains, an important
impo
factor in Myanmar's security and it was dramatically expanded in recent years to a provide blue water capability and external threat
defence role in Myanmar's territorial waters.
History
Founding and WWII The Myanmar Navy was formed as the Navy of Burma in 1940 and, although very small, played an active
part in Allied operations against the Japanese during the Second World War.
Burma Independence In December 1947, the Union of Burma Navy was formed with 700 men. The fleet initially consisted of a
small but diverse collection of ships transferred from the Royal Navy under the arrangements made for Burma's independence in
January 1948. It included UBS Mayu, ex-RoyalRoyal Navy River class frigate and four Landing Craft Gun (Medium). Armed with two 25- 25
pounder (44 mm) guns, these landing craft were used as support gunboats.[1]
pounder (88 mm) guns and two 2-pounder
1950's In 1950 and 1951, the United States provided 10 coast guard cutters (CGC) under the Mutual Defence Assistance Program
(MDAP). The Myanmar Navy played an important part in the government's fight against the ethnic and ideological insurgent groups grou
which threatened the Union Government in its early days. The Myanmar Navy performed both defensive and offensive roles,
protecting convoys, carrying supplies, ferrying troops and giving much
much-needed
needed fire support. It was instrumental in relieving the port
city of Moulmein,, which was captured by Karen insurgents in 1948, and the Irrawaddy delta town of Bassein.Bassein Although one armed
patrol boat defected to the Karen insurgents, throughout the turbulent years of post independence in Myanmar, the navy was largelyla
unopposed and managed to maintain control over Myan Myanmar's crucial inland waterways. [2]
In 1956 and 1957, Myanmar government acquired five 50 50-long-ton (51 t) Saunders-Roe Dark class convertible motor torpedo/motor
gunboats,[3] followed by an 1,040-long-tonton (1,060 t) Algerine class minesweeper in 1958 from the United Kingdom.[4] In the late
1950s and early 1960s, United States sold M yanmar Navy six PGM type coastal patrol crafts and seven CGC type patrol boats[5]. In
Myanmar
the mid 1960s, Myanmar Navy took delivery of ex ex-US Navy 640-long-ton (650 t) PCE-827 class[6] corvette and a 650-long-ton
(660 t) Admirable class minesweeper,, both of which were commissioned in the mid 1940s. In 1978, United States provided Myanmar
Navy with six small river patrol crafts.[7] In 1958, Myanmar Navy took delivery of 10 Y Y-301
301 class river gunboats from Yugoslavia,
followed by 25 smaller Michao class patrol crafts.
1960's Efforts were made to produce locally made Naval vessels with assistance from Yugoslavia. In 1960, Myanmar Navy
commissioned two 400-long-ton (410 t) awarat Class corvettes. Their armaments include 25-pounder pounder field gun and 40 mm Bofors
Anti-Aircraft gun[8]. Myanmar shipyards also bu built
ilt the navy a number of smaller patrol crafts and a number of landing crafts. Landing
crafts and auxiliary ships are usually armed with Oerlikon 20 mm cannons, 40mm Bofors Anti-Aircraft Aircraft guns and Heavy machine
guns.[9]
1970's Although Myanmar Navy has expanded rapidly during 1950s and 1960s, however, the navy was unable to keep pace with loss
or deterioration of older vassels in 1970s until naval replacement progr
program
am was initiated by BSPP Government in 1979. In 1980,
Myanmar Navy acquired six Carpentaria class inshore patrol boats from Australia followed by three 128-ton 128 Swift type coastal
patrol boats from Singapore and three 385-ton Ospery class offshore patrol vessels built in Denmark. The Ospery and Swift class
boats have a range of 4,500 and 1,800 miles (7,200 and 2,900 km) respectively and were armed with Oerlikon 20 mm cannons and
40mm Bofors Anti-Aircraft guns. In the early years of 1980s, Myanmar shipyards built three 128-ton PGM type patrol boats based
upon US PGM Class patrol boats. Each were armed with two 40mm Bofors Anti-Aircraft guns and two 12.7 mm Heavy machine
guns.
1990's Myanmar Navy bought 6 Missile Escort Boats & 10 Submarine Chaser from CHINA. After 1998 Myanmar Navy built 77m
Corvette (771,772,773) and FAC (551-564).
May 2008 Cyclone argis As many as 25 Burmese naval ships may have been sunk in the storm caused by Cyclone Nargis in May
2008 while an unknown number of naval personnel and their family members were killed or are listed as missing[10]. The Network
for Democracy and Development [1], in Thailand, reported that 30 officers and 250 Burmese naval personnel have being declared
missing, while 25 vessels were destroyed by the cyclone in three naval regional command centers: Panmawaddy Regional Command
on Hainggyi Island; Irrawaddy Regional Command; and Danyawaddy Regional Command in Sittwe in Arakan State.
Role The primary task of Myanmar Navy was patrolling the country's rivers and inshore waters in support of the army's
counterinsurgency operations. One third of the fleet was dedicated for this operation under "Strategic Naval Force" (Sit Byu Ha Yay
Yin Su) at any time. The navy was used for reconnaissance, provide fire support and help maintain static defence around strategic
towns. Myanmar Navy also help supplement the army's logistics supply system during counterinsurgency campaigns. The secondary
task was coastal surveillance and fisheries protection for 148,000 kilometre maritime zone against fish poaching, smuggling,
insurgent movements and pirate activities. Long-range patrols were conducted by the navy's larger warships although operations
further afield were rare. The navy's flagship, UBS Mayu made several longer voyages including a number diplomatic visits to
regional countries before it was decommissioned. Myanmar navy does not operate a separate fleet air arm. If needed navy drew
resources from Myanmar Air Force for maritime surveillance and other forms of fleet air support.
Former and Current Commander-in-Chiefs since Independence
• 1. Commander Khin Maung Bo
• 2. Commodore Than Pe
• 3. Commodore Thaung Tin
• 4. Rear-Adm. Chit Hlaing
• 5. Rear-Adm. Maung Maung win
• 6. Vice-Adm. Maung Maung Khin
• 7. Vice-Adm. Thein Nyunt
• 8. Vice-Adm. Tin Aye
• 9. Vice-Adm. Nyunt Thein
• 10. Vice-Adm. Kyi Min
• 11. Vice-Adm. Soe Thein
• 12. Vice-Adm. Nyan Tun
Commanders of aval Region Command
aval Region Command Commanding Officer
Irrawaddy Naval Region Command Captain Htun Lwin Oo
Danyawaddy Regional Command Comodore Aung Zaw Win
Panmawaddy Regional Command Comodore Myo Myint Than
Mawyawaddy Regional Command Comodore Maung Oo Lwin
Tanintharyi Regional Command Comodore THURA Thet Swe
No(1) Naval Training School CDR Moe Aung
Naval Dorckyard Headquarters Rear-Adm Han Sein
No(1)Fleet (Yangon) Captain Mya Win
No(2)Fleet (Heinzae)
No(3)Fleet ( Kyut Phyu) Captain Zaw Oo
Organization
Administrative and Support Units
• Naval headquarters, Ministry of Defence ( Naypyidaw)
• Strategic Naval Command (headquarters in Yangon)
• Naval Training Command (Seikkyi)
• Naval Shipyard Headquarters (Yangon)
• Central Naval Hydrographic Depot (Yangon)
• Central Naval Diving and Salvage Depot (Yangon)
• Central Naval Engineering Depot (botataung,Yangon)
• Central Naval Stores Depot (Yangon)
• Central Naval Communications Depot (Yangon)
• Central Naval Armaments Deport (Seikekyi)
aval Regional Commands and Bases
• Irrawaddy Regional Command (headquarters in Yangon)
o Thanhklyet Soon Naval Base
o Bassein Naval Base
o Coco Island Base (Naval Radar Unit)
• Danyawaddy Regional Command (headquarters in Sittwe)
o Kyaukpyu Naval Base
o Thandwe (Sandoway) Naval Base
• Panmawaddy Regional Command (headquart (headquarters on Hainggyi Island)
• Mawyawaddy Regional Command (headquarters in Moulmein)
• Tanintharyi Regional Command (headquarters in Mergui)
o Zadetkyi Island Naval Base
o Mali (Tavoy) Naval Base
o Palai Island Naval Base
o Kadan Naval Base
o Sakanthit Naval Base
o Lambi Naval Base
o Pearl Island Naval Base
o Zadetkale Naval Base (Radar Unit)
aval Infantry The Myanmar Navy raised a naval infantry battalion of 800 men in 1964, followed by a second battalion in 1967,
3rd and 4th battalions may have also been raised. They were deployed mainly to the Arakan and Tenasserim areas, and to the
Irrawaddy delta, to assist in counter-insurgency
insurgency operations, but also performed other security duties.
Ships
Main article: List of equipment in Union of Myanmar avy
Vessel Type Quantity
Frigate 1
Corvettes 4
Fast Attack Craft (Gun) 15
Fast Attack Craft (Missile) 9
Fast Attack Craft (Yan 037_Sub-Chaser) 10
Missile Escort Boats (037 -1G) 6
Inshore Patrol Boats 16
River Patrol Craft 36
Gunboats 21
Survey Ships 2
Support Ships 10
Transport/Landing Ships 14
References
1. ^ p.28, Janes Fighting Ships 1963--64
2. ^ Hugh Tinker, Union of Burma, p.325
3. ^ British Military Powerboat Trust
4. ^ Jane's Fighting Ships 1963-1964
1964 p.28
5. ^ Jane's Fighting Ships 1982-83
83 p.60
6. ^ http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/120282701.jpg
7. ^ Jane's Fighting Ships 1997-1998
1998 p.79
8. ^ Janes Fighting Ships 1997-98
98 p.79
9. ^ Janes Fighting Ships 1997-98
98 p.82
10. ^ http://www.irrawaddy.org/article.php?art_id=11980
See also

Current events/Southeast Asia portal

• UBS Mayu
• Aung San
• Myanmar Army
• Myanmar Navy
• Myanmar Air Force
• Military Intelligence of Myanmar
• Myanmar Police Force
List of equipment in the Myanmar avy
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following is the list of equipment in the Union of Myanmar Navy.


Frigate
Year
Class or
Builder Type Quantity Entered Serial Armament
name
Service
1 × Oto Melara 76 mm Super Rapid Canon
Naval Dockyard 4 × 30 mm AK 230
Aung Zay Ya Frigate 1 2008,May F11
(Myanmar) 4× C-802 Surface-to-Surface
Surface Missile
RBU
Corvette
Year Entered
Class or name Builder Type Quantity Serial Armament
Service
Yan Gyi Aung Willamette Iron & Steel, patrol Yan Gyi 1 76.2mm SP, 2
1 1947/1960s
(Admirable class) Portland, Oregon, United States corvette Aung 40mm, 2 dual 20mm
2 × Oto Melara 76 mm
Super Rapid Canons
771,
Nowrat Class Naval Dockyard (Myanmar) Corvette 3 1996-2007 2 × 30 mm AK 230
772, 773
4× C-802 Surface-to-
Surface Missile
4
Fast Attack Craft
Year
Class or
Builder Type Quantity Entered Serial Armament
name
Service
4 × C-802 Surface-to-
Qiuxin Shipyards, Shanghai,, 471 - Maga, 472 -
Surface Missile
FAC Saittra, 473 - Duwa,
Houxin class People's Republic of Missile 6 1996-1997 2 × 30 mm AK 230
474 - Zeyda, 475,
China 2 × Type 69 14.5 mm twin
476
Anti-Aircraft Guns

5-Series Naval Dorckyard (myanmar) 2 × 30 mm AK 230


FAC 4 2008 561,562, 563, 564
class 2 × Type 69 14.5 mm twin
Anti-Aircraft Guns
4 × C-802 Surface-to-
Surface Missile
5-Series Naval Dorckyard (myanmar) FAC 556,557, 558, 559,
5 2004 2 × 30 mm AK 230
class Missile 560
2 × Type 69 14.5 mm twin
Anti-Aircraft Guns
1 × 37 mm AA gun
2 × Type 87 - 25 mm twin
5-Series Naval Dorckyard (myanmar) 551, 552, 553, 554,
FAC Gun 5 2002 guns
class 555
2 × Type 69 14.5 mm twin
Anti-Aircraft Guns
441-450 - 441, Yan
Sit Aung was sunk
by cyclone
Nargis[1], Yan Myat 2 × Type 66 - 57mm twin
Dalian, Qiuxin and Huangpu Aung, Yan Nyein guns
Hainan/Yan Shipyard, FAC Aung, Yan Khwinn 2 × Type 87 - 25 mm twin
Sit Aung Submarine 10 1991-1993 Aung, Yan Min guns
class People's Republic
blic of chaser Aung, Yan Ye 2 × Type 69 14.5 mm twin
China Aung, Yan Pang Anti-Aircraft Guns
Aung, Yan Win RBU
Aung, Yan Aye
Aung, Yan Zwe
Aung
Mine Hunter
Year Entered
Class or name Builder Type Quantity Serial Armament
Service
Large
In Daw/Osprey Indaw, 1 40 mm, 2
Class-50 Danyard A/S, Frederikshavn, Denmark Patrol 3 1980-1982
Inya, Inma 20 mm
Boat
Patrol Boats
Year Entered
Class or name Builder Type Quantity Serial Armament
Service
patrol
Carpentaria class Australia 6 1978-1980 ? ?
boats
small
P-90 Yugoslavia patrol 3 1990 ? ?
boats
Marinette Marine, WI;; last two by small
1 40 mm, 2 dual
PGM 43 class Peterson Builders, Sturgeon Bay, WI
WI, patrol 6 1959-1961 401--406
20 mm, 2 12.7 mm MG
United States boats
small
2 40 mm, 2 12.7 mm
412 class Burma
rma Naval Dockyard, Rangoon patrol 5 1983-1984 412--416
machine gun
boats
small
421 class/Swift Swiftships, Morgan City, LA / Vospe 1979/1980- 2 40 mm, 2 20 mm, 2
patrol 2 422--423
class r, Singapore 1982 12.7 mm machine gun
boats
river
Y311 class - Y311-
Y311
Similak, Burma patrol 2 1967 2 40 mm, 2 20 mm
modified Y301 Y312
boats
river
Y301-
Y301
Y301 class Uljanik SY, Pola, Yugoslavia patrol 10 1957-1960 2 40 mm
Y310
boats
Survey and Logistics Ships
Year
Class or name Builder Type Quantity Entered Serial Armament
Service
Tito SY, Belgrade, Yugoslavia 801 - Thu 2 40 mm, 2
Thu Tay Thi survey ship 1 1965
Tay Thi 20 mm
Miho Zosen, Shimizu, Japan coastal
802 class 1 1969/1994 802 2 20 mm
Japan survey ship
Watenabe Zosen K.K., Hakata, Japan coastal
608 class 1 1969/1991 608 None
Japan tanker
Shimoda Dockyard, Shimoda, Japan coastal
609 class 1 1975/1986 609 None
Japan tanker
coastal
Pyi Daw Aye (1) Germany logistics 1 1975 601 None
ship
coastal
Pyi Daw Aye (2) Japan logistics 1 2002 602 None
ship

A/S Nordsovaerftet, Ringkobing coastal


Ayidawaya logistics 1 1975/1991 Ayidawaya None
, Norway ship
Yan Long Aung, was 1 40 mm, 2
Yan Long
sunk by cyclone Japan Japan dive tender 1 1967 12.7 mm machine
Aung
Nargis[1] gun
References
1. ^ a b Burmese Navy Decimated in Cyclone
Type 037-IG class missile boat
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A total of 16 Type 037-1G class missile boat (also known as Houxin class) were first built by Qiuxing and Huangpu Shipyard from
1991 through 1999. This class appears to be the successor of Hegu class missile boat for the People's Liberation Army Navy. In
addition to the People's Liberation Army Navy, 6 were exported to Myanmar: 2 in 1995, 2 in July 1962, and 2 in late 1997. This boat
is the anti-ship version of the Hainan class submarine chaser armed with missiles. It is most effectively used in conjunction with
multiple missile boats to send a swarm of missiles towards its intended target and then egress from the area immediately. The swarm
of anti-ship missiles will hopefully slip past the target's air defenses for at least one or possibly more hits.
• Displacement: 478 ton
• Length: 62.8 m
• Beam: 7.2 m
• Draft: 2.4 m
• Speed: 28 kt
• Range: 750 nm @ 18 kt
• Propulsion: 2 Chinese PR 230ZC diesel engines @ 4,000 hp with 4 shafts
• Complement: 71
• Armament:
o Anti-ship missiles: 4 C-801/802/803
o Guns: 4 Type 76A 37 mm gun (II x 2) and 4 Type 69 14.5 mm heavy machine guns (II x 2)
• Radars:
o Surface search radar: 1 I-band Type 352 (Square Tie)
o Navigational radar: 1 I-band Type 723
o Fire control radar: 1 I-band Type 347 (Rice Lamp)

Burmese avy Decimated in Cyclone

By MIN LWIN Monday, May 12, 2008

As many as 25 Burmese naval ships may have been sunk in the storm caused by Cyclone Nargis last week while an unknown number
of naval personnel and their family members were killed or are listed as missing, said a source from the Burmese navy. Speaking to
The Irrawaddy by telephone on Monday, a corporal from Irrawaddy Regional Command in Rangoon said the tropical cyclone sank
five Burmese naval vessels in Thilawa Naval Shipyard on May 4: the Japanese-built dive tender Yan Long Aung with a crew of
approximately 70; the river patrol boat Y312; coastal survey ship 802; and submarine chaser Yan Sit Aung; and a smaller undisclosed
vessel. The shipyard itself was extensively damaged by the category 3 storm. The corporal also said that every crew member of the
Yan Long Aung died when the ship sank with the exception of the commanding officer, who survived. “The commanding officer is
now under investigation,” he added. According to Burmese naval sources, Cyclone Nargis hit Panmawaddy Regional Command on
Hainggyi Island on May 3. Barracks and family housing at the naval base were totally destroyed. An unconfirmed number of
personnel and their families are listed as missing. Meanwhile, a Thailand-based Burmese organization, Network for Democracy and
Development, reported that an estimated total of 30 officers and 250 Burmese naval personnel have being declared missing, while 25
naval ships were destroyed by the cyclone in three naval regional command centers: Panmawaddy Regional Command on Hainggyi
Island; Irrawaddy Regional Command; and Danyawaddy Regional Command in Sittwe in Arakan State. The modern Burmese navy
was founded in 1940 and played a key role in the central government's fight against ethnic insurgent groups and the Burmese
Communist Party in delta areas during the 1950s and 60s. The Burmese navy is responsible for patrolling the country's rivers and
inshore waters and provides coastal surveillance and protection throughout the 148,000-square-kilometer maritime zone against fish
poaching, smuggling, insurgent movements and acts of piracy
Myanmar avy

DUTIYA DATKYAT Private 1st Class DATKYAT Corporal DATKYATGYI Staff Sergeant

OKKWE DATKYATGYI Staff Sergeant DUTIYA AYAKANBO Master Sergeant AYAKANBO Sergeant Major

Du Bo Second Lieutenant Bo Lieutenant Bo Gyi Captain

Bo Hmu Major Du Bo Hmu Gyi Lieutenant Colonel Bo Hmu Gyi Colonel

Bo Hmu Gyoke Brigadier General Bo Gyoke Major General Du Bo Gyoke Kyee Lieutenant General

Du Bo Gyoke Hmu Gyi Vice Senior General Bo Gyoke Hmu Gyi Senior General
Myanmar Air Force (Tatmadaw Lei))

The Myanmar Air Force flag, featuring the Air Force roundel. It is one of the few roundels in the world not based on the national flag; rather it
features the Golden Triangle
Triangle, a reference to Myanmar's geographical location.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Founded January 16
16, 1947
Commander-in-Chief
Lieutenant General Myat Hein
(Air)
Roundel
Fighter Chengdu F
F-7 Airguard
Helicopter Mi-17
Interceptor Mikoyan MiG
MiG-29
Reconnaissance Airguard FT
FT-7M
Trainer PC-7
Transport Y-8D
The Myanmar Air Force (also known as the Burmese Air Force), officially Tatmadaw Lei,, informally the Lei tat is the air
component of the Myanmar Armed Forces, the Tatmadaw. It is involved in counter-insurgency insurgency campaigns, and after
aft the deadly
Cyclone Nargis of May 2008, in relief missions into the Ayeyarwady River delta.
History The Myanmar Air Force was formed on January 16, 1947,, while Myanmar (also known as Burma) was still under British
rule. By 1948,, the new air force fleet included 40 Airspeed Oxfords, 16 de Havilland Tiger Moths,, 4 Austers and 3 Supermarine
Spitfires with a few hundred personnel. The Mingaladon Air Base, the chief air base in the country, was formed on 16 June 1950.
No.1 Squadron, Equipment Holding Unit and Air High Command - Burma Air Force, and the Flying Training School, were placed pla
under the jurisdiction of the base. A few months later, on 18 December 1950, No. 2 Squadron was formed with nine Dakotas as a
transport squadron. In 1953, the Advanced Flying U Unit with De Havilland Vampire Mark T55s was formed under the Mingaladon
Air Base and by the end of 1953, The Burmese Air Force had 3 main airbases, at Mingaladon, H Hmawbi
mawbi and Meiktila, in central
Myanmar. In late 1955, the Burmese Air Force formed a Maintenance Air Base in Mingaladon, No. 501 Squadron Group (Hmawbi
Airbase) and No. 502 Squadron Group (Mingaladon Air Base). Five years later, No. 503 Squadron Group was formed with No. 51
Squadron (de Havilland Canada DHC-33 Otters and Cessnas) and No. 53 Squadron (Bell 47Gs/Huskys Gs/Huskys and Alouettes) in Meiktila. In
1962, a new radar station
tation in Mingaladon and a mobile radar station in Lwemwe (near Tachileik) were put into operation. By
December 1964, the Air Force had 323 officers and 5677 other ranks and it acquired T-33 33 Shooting Star Jet trainers and a new radar
station, which could operate within a 120-mile
mile radius, was opened in Namsang. In 1966, the radar arm of the airforce underwent a
complete overhaul and upgrade, with new radar stations being operated. The Namsang Radar station was upgraded to cover about a
200-mile
mile radius and renamed to No.71 Squadron. In the same year The Myanma Air Force formed the No. 1 Airborne Battalion with
26 officers and 750 other ranks.[1] In 1975 12 SIAI
SIAI-Marchetti
Marchetti SF.260 basic trainers were purchased from Italy In 1979-1986
1979 6 Turbo
porter STOL utility aircraft, 17 pilatus PC-77 and 4 PC
PC-99 turboprop trainers were aquired from Switzerland, followed
fo by 20 SOKO G-
4 Super Galeb armed jet trainers from Yugoslavia in 1990.
Modernization Programme In the early 1990s, the Myanma Air Force upgraded its facilities and introduced two new Air Base
headquarters and existing Air Base headquarters were rena renamed.
med. It also significantly upgraded its radar and electronic warfare
facilities. Between 1991 and 1997 22 PZL-Swidnik
Swidnik Mil mimi-2 and 15 W-3 3 Sokol helicopters entered service.Israel was contracted to
refurbish and upgrade all the surviving 36 F F-7s and FT-7s: these were to get the Elta EL/M-2032 air-to to-air radar, Rafael Python Mk.
III and even Litening laser-designator
designator pods. The same equipment was then installed on the two
two-seater
seater FT-7
FT fighter trainers as well. In
a related deal, Israel delivered to Myanmar at least one consignment of laser
laser-guided
guided bombs, but no deliveries of any other (except
mentioned) weapons are known. Since the Elbit contract was won in 1997, the air force has acquired at least one more squadron of F- F
7 and FT-7 7 aircraft from China, but these were not upgraded. Despite the modernization measures, the capability of Myanma Air
Force remained questionable during Battle of Border Post 9631 with Thais and the rescue missions ooff the cyclone Nargis.
Air Force Commanders
Commander-in-ChiefChief (AIR) in chronological order
• 1. Lt-Col. Saw Shwe Sho
• 2. Maj. Tommy Cliff
• 3. Lt-Col. ThuyaS. Khin
• 4. Brig-Gen.ThuyaTommy Cliff
• 5. Brig-Gen. Thaung Dan
• 6. Maj-Gen. ThuyaSaw Phyu
• 7. Maj-Gen. Ko Gyi
• 8. Lt-Gen. Tin Tun
• 9. Lt-Gen. Thein Win
• 10.Lt-Gen. Tin Ngwe
• 11.Maj-Gen. Kyaw Than
• 12.Maj-Gen Myint Swe
• 13.Lt-Gen. Myat Hein
[edit] Administrative and Support Units
Personnel: 15,000 all ranks
• Air Force headquarters, Ministry of Defence
• Aircraft Production and repair Base Headquarters (Mingaladon)
• Ground Training Base (Meiktila)
• Fly Training Base (Shante)
Air Bases
• Pathein Air Base headquarters
• Mingaladon Air Base headquarters (former 502 Air Base)
• Myitkyina Air Base headquarters (former 503 Air Base)
• Myike Air Base headquarters
• Namsang Air Base headquarters
• Taungoo Air Base headquarters
• Meikhtila(Shante)Air base for trainning and operation, another airbase at Meikthila is helicopter trainning base.
• Homemalin new Air base (at Sagaing division) can be seen at Google earth website via internet.
• Many airfields other than above mentioned hav have been prepared to be used as front-line
line fields in case of foreign invasion.
Air Defence
Myanmar Integrated Air Defence System The Burmese Air Force established Myanmar Integrated Air Defence System (MIADS)
with help from Russia, Ukraine and China in earl
early
y 2000. All Air Defence assets within the The Burmese Air Force, except the Anti- Anti
Aircraft Artillery (AAA) are formally integrated into MIADS. AAA guns are mostly unguided and deploy to use in barrage-style barrage
firing against attacking aircraft. Under the newly formed air defence system, the country was divided into Six Air Defense sectors,
each controlled by a Sector Operations Command (SOC) reporting directly to the National Air Defense Operations Command
(NADOC) Headquarter in Yangon.. Each SOC transmits early early-warning
warning and tracking data to Air Intercept Operations Centers (AIOC),
which in turn control mobile Surface to Air Missiles batteries and Fighter/Interceptor aircraft at various air bases throughout
thro the
country. IOCs are optimized to direct either SAM or interceptor aircraft against incoming missiles or enemy aircraft. Each IOC IO is
connected to observation and early warning area reporting posts (RP) via Defence Fibre Optic Cable network. There are a around 100+
radars and early warning systems located in approximately 40 sites throughout the country. New Air Defence radars such as 1L117 1L1
radars, Galaxy Early Warning Radar and P series radars are now installed and full operational at all radar stations. statio With the
introduction of new radar systems and Mobile Guided Surface to Air Missiles systems, MIADS become of the most advanced AD
systems in the region. Many young officers from The Burmese Air Force have attended several Air Defence Training courses in
Russia, Ukraine, China and Serbia.
Sector Operations Commands
• Northern SOC (HQ at Myitkyina))
• Southern SOC (HQ at Myeik)
• Western SOC (HQ at Sittwe)
• Eastern SOC (HQ at Tachilek)
• South Eastern SOC (HQ at Ye)
• Central SOC (HQ at Meikhtila)
Equipment
ame Country Type Quantity Armament
Chengdu F-7 equipped with French R550
Airguard People's Republic of China fighter interceptor 60
Magic air-to-air missiles)
12 - additional 30 mm cannon, R73 WVR
Mikoyan-
MiG-29s AAMs, R77 and R 27 BVR
Gurevich MiG- Russia multirole fighter-interceptor
ordered in 2006 AAMs, S9 and S18 rockets,500
29 [2]
and 250 kg bombs
internal cannon armament and
Shenyang J-6 People's Republic of China fighter-ground attack 2
bombs
Nanchang Q-5 People's Republic of China fighter-ground attack 36 30mm cannon, rocket pods and
bombs
tandem-seat low-wing
Soko G-4 advanced jet trainer/light guided air-to-air
air and air-to-
Serbia 6
Super Galeb attack jet surface missiles
(counterinsurgency)
single-engine, low-wing
tandem-seat turboprop
Pilatus PC-9 Switzerland 7 unarmed
training aircraft
(counterinsurgency)
Shaanxi Y-8D2
Cub People's Republic of China turboprop transport 6 unarmed
narmed

Fokker F-27
Netherlands turboprop transport 2 unarmed
Friendship
Fairchild Hiller twin-engined turboprop
United States 3 unarmed
FH-227 passenger/transport aircraft
Hongdu K-8 training/light attack &
People's Republic of China Maritime Surveillance 12 unarmed
Karakorum
now unarmed, previously armed
Pilatus PC-7 light trainer training &
Switzerland 5 with unguided rocket and used
Turbo Trainer maritime surveillance
in counterinsurgency operations
Britten-
light utility aircraft/training
Norman BN-2 United Kingdom 2 unarmed
& maritime surveillance
Islander
Cessna 180
United States light utility/liaison aircraft 4 unarmed
Skywagon
Cessna 550
United States business jet/liaison aircraft 1 unarmed
Citation
Pilatus PC-
STOL passenger and utility
6A/B Turbo Switzerland 5 unarmed
aircraft (liaison aircraft)
Porter
Mil Mi-17 Soviet Union transport helicopter 11 machine gun/gunship
Bell UH-1 multipurpose utility
United States 22 machine gun/gunship
Iroquois helicopter
twin 23 mm GSz-23Ł
GSz cannon
PZL W-3 multipurpose utility
Poland 13 and four pylons for weapons /
Sokół Falcon helicopter
gunship platform
23 mm NS-23
NS gun, 7,62 mm
small, lightly armored machine gun and 2x 57 mm
Mil Mi-2 Poland 20
transport helicopter unguided rocket pods Mars-2.
Mars
Optional 7,62 mm machine gun
Unknown
quantity antii-armour missiles, four air-to-
HAL Dhruv
India utility helicopter transferred in air missiles or four rocket pods
Pole Star
late 2006[citation for 70 mm and 68 mm rockets
needed]

Bell 206 multipurpose utility machine gun and rocket


United States 6
JetRanger helicopter launchers?
Aérospatiale
SA 316B France light utility helicopter 6 two side-mounted
side machine guns
Alouette III
Serials and Markings Myanmar national insignia (white hite triangle with yellow field in the center and borders in blue) is usually
applied on six positions. The serialling system of Myanmar Air Force aircraft is suggested to serve as both – unit and individual
aircraft identity, this could not be confirmed sso
o far, however. Most of the older airplanes carried the serials with the prefix “UB” and
the numbers in Burmese. Sometimes the serials were outlined in white. Combat aircraft generally carry serials in black.
• SA 316B Alouette III: dark green overall, large black serial on the boom: UB6101 (unit unknown).
• UH-1H: 1H: camouflage colours unknown, serials reported to be 6201 through 6218 (unit unknown).
• F27 Troopship: white overall, double black cheat line along the fuselage, black serial on the forward part of the th fin: 5001
(unit unknown).
• PC-6B:
6B: dark earth on light earth over, sky under, white serial on the rear fuselage: 50+04 (unit unknown).
• PC-7:7: dark grey or dark olive green overall, black antianti-glare
glare panels in front of the cockpit, ruder checkered in black and
yellow, serials in white, split by the national marking: 23+01 through 23+16 (two of original Swiss civil codes are also
known: HB-HQA and HB-HQB), HQB), (Flying School).
• PC-9: 9: like above; serials unknown (unit unknown).
• G-44 Super Galeb: dark olive drab ov over,
er, sky under; white serial on the nose: 371, 376 (Fighter Training School/COIN
Squadron).
• F-7M:7M: dark grey and dark green over, light blue underneath, national markings on the top of the fin and on rear fuselage
(over the trailing edge); serial in White ssplit by the national marking: 16+22.
• A-5M:5M: dark green/dark earth/sand over, sky under; black serial on the fin: 1503 (unit unknown, but could be the 1st Wing).
• W-3: 3: black or dark green overall, national marking on the fin, no serials visible.
• MiG-29: "Russian"
ussian" light blue overall, with "azur" blue and light Blue fields on upper surfaces; national markings on the fin
and behind the cockpit; serial in Arabic characters applied in black on the fin, and repeated in Burmese characters of each
side of the cockard: 27+09/2709.
• K-8: 8: white over, red under; wings in white with red wingtips, rudder checkered in yellow and black, black serials on the
fin, repeated large around the national marking on the rear fuselage: 39+07 (Flying School).
References
1. ^ DSHMRI Documents
2. ^ Bernama News: From Thai Military Blog : http://www.bloggang.com/mainblog.php?id=skyman&month=10-10-
http://www.bloggang.com/mainblog.php?id=skyman&month=10
2006&group=3&blog=1
• World Aircraft Information Files. Brightstar Publishing, London. File 333 Sheet 05
See also

Current events/Southeast Asia portal

• Aung San
• Myanmar Army
• Myanmar Navy
• Military Intelligence of Myanmar
• Myanmar Police Force
• Myanmar Frontier Forces

Myanmar Air Force Soko G-4 Super Galeb at SOKO factory in Mostar, SFR Yugoslavia.Air
Air Bases of Myanmar AF
Myanmar Air Force
Tatmadaw Lei

DUTIYA DATKYAT Private 1st Class DATKYAT Corporal DATKYATGYI Staff Sergeant

OKKWE DATKYATGYI Staff Sergeant DUTIYA AYAKANBO Master Sergeant AYAKANBO Sergeant Major

Du Bo Second Lieutenant Bo Lieutenant Bo Gyi Captain

Bo Hmu Major Du Bo Hmu Gyi Lieutenant Colonel Bo Hmu Gyi Colonel

Bo Hmu Gyoke Brigadier General Bo Gyoke Major General Du Bo Gyoke Kyee Lieutenant General

Du Bo Gyoke Hmu Gyi Vice Senior General Bo Gyoke Hmu Gyi Senior General
Myanmar Police Force (Pyi Thu Yae Tup Pwe)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Personnel
72,000 (including 4,500 Combat Police)
Headquarters
Yangon
Director General
Brigadier General Khin Yi
Components
State and Division Police Forces
Special Departments
Training Centres
Reserved Units
Combat Police Battalions
Anti-narcotic Task Force
Myanmar Police Force, formally known as The People's Police Force (Burmese: ฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀฀; MLCTS:
Pyi Thu Yae Tup Pwe), was established in 1964 as independent department under Ministry of Home Affairs. It was reorganised on 1
October 1995 and informally become part of Tatmadaw. Current Director General of Myanmar Police Force is Brigadier General
Khin Yi with its headquarters at Yangon. Its command structure is based on established civil jurisdictions. Each of Myanmar's seven
states and seven divisions has their own Police Forces with headquarters in the respective capital cities.[1] Police in Burma have a
long history, and include the national police force of Burma, as well as smaller functions and jurisdictions.
British rule in Burma The Indian Imperial Police was the primary law enforcement in Burma until 1937, when it was split from
British India. In 1872 the third mayor of Mergui District, Sir Ashly Din (1870-1875) assigned the first police officer to be stationed
at Maliwan, a village 24 miles north of current Victoria Point. Perhaps the most famous policeman in Burma from this period is the
author George Orwell, who in 1922 joined the Indian Imperial Police in Burma.
Since independence On March 16, 1988 following the killing of two students during the pro-democracy demonstrations, students
marching on Prome Road were confronted near Inya Lake by the Lon Htein security force riot police and many beaten to death or
drowned. The national police are made up of several smaller entities, including
• Burma Railways Police
• intelligence division
Organization
State and Division Police Forces There are 14 State and Divisional Police Forces and three additional State/Division Police Forces
commanded by Police Colonels. Their jurisdictions are divided according to the Civil Administration. The States and Divisions,
Additional States have the same status. Each State and Divisional Police Force consist of four components.
• Office of the Commander of the State and Divisional Police Force
• Office of the Commander of the District Police Force
• Office of the Commander of the Township Police Force
• Police Stations
The District Police Forces are classified into two classes depending on the area, population and development, namely A and B Class.
Commanders of the A Class District Police Forces are Police Lieutenant Colonels and B Classes are Police Majors. Commanders of
Township Police Forces are Police Captains and Police Station Officers are Police Lieutenants.
State and Divisional Police Forces of Burma are as follow:
State and Division Headquarters
Karen State Pa-An
Kachin State Myitkyina
Chin State Hakha
Mon State Moulmein
Arakan State Akyab
Shan State Taunggyi
Yangon Division Yangon
Sagaing Division Sagaing
Mandalay Division Mandalay
Magwe Division Magwe
Pegu Division Pegu
Tenasserim Division Tavoy
Irrawaddy Division Bassein
There are also three additional State Police Forces, with their headquarters at Lashio (Shan State North), Kengtung (Shane State East)
and Prome (Pegu West) in Pegu Division. Members of all these forces are assigned to positions at District and Police station level.
Special Departments There are four Special Departments, in which the first two Departments are headed by the Police Brigadier
Generals and the rest two are by Police Colonels.
• Special Intelligence Department (Special Branch)
• Criminal Investigation Department (CID)
• Railways Police Department
• City Development Police Department
Training Centres There are three main Training Centers, one Central Training Institute of Myanmar Police Force and two Police
Training Depots. The State and Divisional Police Forces have their own training centers for refresher courses and Junior Leader
(NCO) Courses. Bachelor Degree holders from Distance Learning University were disqualified to sit SIP exam.Thus vast amount of
bachelor holding other rank police personal upset for their future.
Central Institute of Police Training The Central Training Institute of Myanmar Police Force is situated in Maymyo, commanded
by a Police Brigadier General and is conducting the following courses:
Course ame Duration
Deputy Superintendent Cadet 12 months in Central Institute of Police Training, 6 months in Defence Service and 12 months of
Course on -the-job Training
Sub-Inspector Cadet Course 1 Years
Surveillance Officer Course 10 Weeks
Investigation Officer Course 10 Weeks
Police Station Officer Course 12 Weeks
Staff Officer Course 8 Weeks
Township Police Commander
12 Weeks
Course
District Police Commander
12 Weeks
Course
o. 1 Police Training Depot The No.1 Police Training Depot is commanded by a Police Lieutenant Colonel and undertakes:
Course ame Duration
Basic Training Course for Police Sergeants 9 months
Warrant Officer and Police Sergeants Course 12 Weeks
Basic Training Course for Constables 6 Months
o. 2 Police Training Depot The No.2 Police Training Depot is also cmmanded by a Police Lieutenant Colonel, and undertakes
only Basic Training Course for Constables, which normally takes around 6 months to complete.
Reserve Units The following units were formed with personnel formerly in the People's Militia Units.
• Highway Patrol
• Oil Field/Gas Pipeline Security guards
• Tourist Police
Combat Police Battalions (SWAT) There are sixteen Police Battalions to carry out general security duties under the command of
Battalion Control Command. The Battalion Commandants are Police Lieutenant Colonels. As the populace of the cities including
Yangon and Mandalay have been increased day after day, problems on social, economy and politics are risen up that could lead to
emergence of civil unrest and sabotage. It is necessary to prevent from destruction and harassment, VIP and project factories and
workshops, security of diplomats and their embassies. Seven of these Police Battalions are situated in the Yangon Divisional areas
and two in Mandalay and three in Arakan, one in Sagaing, one in Mon State, one in Pegu, one in Prome. These specially-trained and
combat capable battalions
ions are formed with personnel from former Riot Security Police, better known as "Lon Htein" Units. Each
battalion consists of 500+ personnel and these battalions are supported by two support battalions, which include signal and medical
m
units. These battalions
ions structure are similar to that of Army's Light Infantry Battalions and they are subordonate to their respective
r
Regional Military Commands.[2]
• 1st Combat Police Battalion (HQ at Hlawga)
• 2nd Combat Police olice Battalion (HQ at Maungtaw)
• 3rd Combat Police Battalion (HQ at Shwemyayar)
• 4th Combat Police Battalion (HQ at Patheingyi)
• 5th Combat Police Battalion (HQ at Hmawbi)
• 6th Combat Police Battalion (HQ at Shwepyitha)
• 7th Combat Police Battalion (HQ at Kyauktan)
• 8th Combat Police Battalion (HQ at Mingaladon)
• 9th Combat Police Battalion (HQ at Hlaingthaya)
• 10th Combat Police Battalion
• 11th Combat Police Battalion
• 12th Combat Police Battalion
• 14th Combat Police Battalion
• 15th Combat Police Battalion
• 16th Combat Police Battalion
Anti-arcotic Task Forces 19 special anti--narcotic
narcotic task forces have been established under the direction of the Central Committee
for Drug Abuse Control.
Weapons and equipment Myanmar Police Force uses wide range of weapons and ammunitions, ranging from Second World War
vintage to modern sophisticated weapons. Combat battalions are armed with relatively modern small arms such as M16, AK-47,
Type 56 (seized from ethnic and narco-insugents)
insugents) and Ka Pa Sa BA63 assault rifle, which are being phased out from the Army in
favour of 5.56mm MA series assault rifles. They have also been issued with 7.62mm Bren and BA-64 64 (Heavy Barrel version of G3
with bipod) Light Machine Guns for section support, BA BA-100 sniper rifles (locally
lly manufactured version of G3A3ZF Sniper Rifle),
night vision goggles and other counter terrorists and special forces equipment. Heavy Weapons companies of these battalions
batta are
equipped with 81 mm and 60 mm mortars. Members of MPF who are stationed in local police stations within States and Divisional
Police Forces and those providing general guards duties at various government establishments and public places such as airport,
a train
and bus stations are issued with Second World War vintage weapons such as British .303 3 Enfield Rifles,
Rifles M1 Grand rifles, M1
Carbines, BA-52 submachine guns (locally manufactured Italian TZ TZ-45 submachine gun) and Sten Gun.
Gun Officers and detectives have
been issued with various side arms such as the Enfield revolver, Smith & Wesson M&P, 0.38 Colt revolver and Browning HP.
Vehicles
• Mitsubishi Montero SUV(confiscated
(confiscated item)
• Land Rover Donated by Foreign Organizations for Drugs Enforcement.
• Honda CBX750 motorcycle (For Pilot and Point)
• Mercedes Benz C-class class sedan (confiscated item)
• Toyota Dyna paddy wagon (Private Owned Vehicles called as volunteer)
• Toyota Tiger Double Cab,confiscated item (Used by Police General Khin Ye,, during the period of Golden Revolution)
• Mitsubishi Double Cab,confiscated item (Used by Police Col Aung Naing, Yangon Yangon)
• Mitsubishi Pickup confiscated item (Used by Township Police Station, Yangon)
• Mitsubishi Pickup confiscated item tem (Used by Police Lt Col Aung Naing Thu, Yangon)
• Toyota Pickup confiscated item (Used by Township Police Station, Yangon)
• Honda design Chinese motorcycle (confiscated item, these motorcycles were used by motor vehicles police, Township
Police and their informer illegal and without registration number)
References
1. ^ http://www.myanmar.gov.mm/ministry/home/mpf/
2. ^ Selth, Power Without Glory
See also
Current events/Southeast Asia portal

• Tatmadaw
• Myanmar Army
• Myanmar Navy
• Myanmar Air Force
• Aung San
• Human rights in Burma
• Rangoon bombing
External links
• [1]