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HRVC Analysis for Documentary

What is a Hazard? How is it Classified?


A dangerous condition or events that threaten or have the
potential for causing injury to life or damage to property or the
environment. They can be categorized in various ways but, based on
the origin, hazards worldwide are basically grouped in two board
headings:

1. Natural Hazards (hazards with meteorological, geological


or even biological origin)
2. Unnatural Hazards (hazards with human-caused or
technological orgin)

It is also important to know that natural phenomena are extreme


climatological, hydrological, or geological, processes that do not pose
any threat to persons or property if they occur in uninhabited areas . A
massive earthquake in an unpopulated area, for example, is a natural
phenomenon, not a hazard. It is when these natural phenomena
interact with the man made environment or fragile areas which causes
wide spread damage.
The effect of a hazard results in Disaster. It means that the
ability of the Society to recover from the losses and damages cannot
be completed with their own resources and requires out side help. In
our State natural disasters are caused by Cyclone, Floods and Drought.
We shall know more about the features of the first two.
CYCLONE
Characteristics
Cyclones are caused in the sea i.e. Bay of Bengal due to low
pressure and other meteorological causes where high speed winds
rotate around a low pressure centre called the eye of the cyclone.
Speed of winds could be from 60 kmph to above 200 kmph.
Along with the winds very heavy rain takes place. The winds
cause the sea waves of heights between 3 to 7 meters in height and
can cross the coast line anywhere up to 10-15 kms inland . This is
known as Storm Surge or Uppena in Telugu. Severe damages are
caused due to high speed winds and the Uppena. Due to torrential
rains local flooding takes place and this adds to the losses suffered by
the society.
Warning

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Warning for the cyclone is given by the Indian Meteorological
Department from Visakhapatnam. Disseminated through satellite
based disaster warning systems, radio, television, telephone, fax,
Police communications, public announcements by revenue officials and
the print media.
Who is affected
Humans & Livestock. By death, injuries and diseases
What is affected
Huts and Houses - with light weight roofs – (thatched , tin
sheets), walls with mud plaster, weak foundation.
Buildings with structural weakness to high winds and flood
waters.
Storage Godowns, sheds with weak construction
Working tools/implements. (Trade tools – looms, boats, fishing
nets etc)
Electricity wires & poles,
Water supply systems.
Communication systems – Tele lines/poles, telephones,
Communication Towers,Roads,bridges, culverts
Vehicles like cycles, M/cycles/sooters,auto rickshaws,tractors,4
wheeled vehicles, Bullock carts etc.
Lowlying areas
Crops, Weak trees, Plantations like- coconut trees, fruit orchards

All 100% of the elements as identified above do not get


damaged. A rough guess is about 15 to 30 percent of the
categories would suffer losses. However the numbers or the
quantities would also increase or decrease due to other factors
like the time available before the hazard strikes, Intensity of
the hazard, Duration of the strike, Extent of area covered by
the hazard, Time of strike i.e. Daytime or night time, density of
the people and the habitations.
In all above cases the damage or loss takes place due to
existing weakness in the elements, the first being the
exposure due to the location and the weakness in not having
the strength to cope with the forces/pressures created by the
wind and water as explained above.
Analysis
See the weak spots/areas which were affected in the past, if not
get to know from the other affected areas close by.

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What is vulnerability?
Vulnerability is defined as “The extent to which a community,
structure, service or geographic areas is likely to be damaged or
disrupted by the impact of particular hazard, on account of their
nature, construction and proximity to hazardous terrain or a disaster
prone area”. For example the villages next to the sea shore are more
prone to cyclone threat than villages which are 20 kilometers away
from the shore. Therefore the villages which are about 500 yards from
the water line will be most affected. Most Elements identified earlier
will have the likelihood of facing the losses/damages.

When you look at an object this term will mean the weakness of
the object in withstanding the stress/pressure/force of a certain level.
Compare a slate pencil with the normal pencil. You will discover that
slate pencil will break into two pieces when you apply sufficient
pressure by your hands. Normal pencil however will not break with the
same pressure.

Social and economic conditions also determine the


vulnerability of a society to an extent. It has been observed
that human losses in disasters in developing countries like
India tend to be high when compared to developed countries
where material losses predominate.

What is Risk?
Risk is a measure of the expected losses (deaths, injuries,
property, economic activity etc) due to a hazard of a particular
magnitude occurring in a given area over a specific time period.

The figure on the right illustrates essentially the four factors


essentially hazards, location, exposure, and vulnerability which
contribute to risk. They are:
• Hazard (physical effects generated in the naturally
occurring event).
• Location of the hazards relative to the community at risk.
• Exposure (the value and importance of the various types of
structures and lifeline systems such as water-supply, communication
network, transportation network etc in the community serving the
population, and

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• Vulnerability of the exposed structures and systems to the
hazards expected to affect them during their useful life.

HAZARD, RISK, VULNERABILITY CAPACITY ANALYSIS

Hazard, risk vulnerability capacity analysis (HRVC) is the most


important part of the plan as the entire planning process will be based
on its outcome. Any error in identifying the frequency, magnitude and
projected impact leads to erroneous identification of major hazard and
hence an erroneous plan. The necessary outcomes of the HRV analysis
should be the type of hazards that the Village is prone to, history of
hazards, impact analysis of the worst case, the area, people and
infrastructure that is prone to the risk of these hazards and their
vulnerability of being damaged by such disasters due to their
vulnerability characteristics. Vulnerable Assessment should deal with
the socio-economic vulnerability, housing vulnerability and
environmental vulnerability. HRV analysis should also include resource
inventory/capacity analysis, preparedness analysis in terms of network
of communication systems, public distribution systems, storage
facilities, transportation facilities, medical facilities, cyclone shelters
with their capacity, presence of NGOs and other volunteers etc so as to
enable quick response.

Village profile
This section may provide an overview of the village in terms of
its Location, Area ,geography, and topography (temperatures, rainfall,
geographical area, landholding pattern, cropping pattern, rivers,
livelihood details, major drinking water sources, critical establishments
etc), demography (literacy area, poverty, economy, percapita income,
main occupation of the people), climate and weather, rivers, roads,
hospitals, and other critical infrastructure such as industries.

Demographic Details:

Name Total Population Category


of Number
Village of HH

Adul Child Total SC ST OBC GEN Total


t ren
<5
yrs
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

House Details

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Name of No.of APL HH No.of BPL HH
Village SC ST OBC GEN SC ST OBC GEN

Literacy Rate in Percentage:

Category

SC ST OBC GEN
M F M F M F M F

Details of live stock:

Category

Name of Village Bovine Cattle Poultry Sheep/Goat

B. Topographical Details:

Climate and Rainfall:

Month Average Rainfall Actual Rainfall


(in mm) (in mm)
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Geographical Area (in Hect):


a) Paddy
Agricultural Land Grazin Fores Other Total
(ha) g land t land s area
(ha)
Hig Mediu Low
h m

b) Non-Paddy

Name of Mandal Agricultural Land (ha)


High Medium Low

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Land Holding Pattern: (No. of House Holds)

Mandal Big Margina Small Agricult Landless Total


Farmer l farmers/sc ural
s farmers ale of land laborers

Crop Pattern:

Type of Crops Area Area under


Cultivated Crop
(in Hect.) insurance (in
Hect.)

Livelihood Details:

Total Agric Agric Othe Fishing Petty Servic Others


hous ultur ultura r Sweet Saline Busine e (specify)w
e e l Labo water ss holder eavers etc
hold labou ur
s r

Drinking Water Sources:

Tube well Well PHD Tanks


Stand
Function Defunc
al t

River & Creeks:

Sl.No Name of the Name of the Danger Level


river/creek Place

List of Embankments:

S.No Name of the Type of Length of


Embankments Embankments Embankments

River Carrying Capacity:

Name of Gauge Zero Level Danger Mandal Name


the River Station (in Mts.) Level (in s of
Mts.) covere irrigatio
d n
division

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Availability of Irrigation Facility:

Name of the Project Ayacut in Hect.

Irrigation Facilities and Sources:

Pond Dug LI Draft / River Creeks canal


s Wells points Shallo
w TW

Communication Facilities:

Telecom No. of No. of No. of No. of No. of No. of


municati Boats Bus Trekkers Tractors Jeeps Two
on (Y/N) Wheele
rs

Power station and electric installation:


S.No. Location Remarks

Thing to be identified during Hazard Analysis


History of Disaster and Probability of Disaster episodes in the
Village:
Type of Hazard
Year of Occurrence
Impact on Life:Deaths, Injuries
Livelihood
Live stock
Housing/ building
Telecommunication & Electricity

Seasonality of Hazard:
Type of Jan-Mar April-June July- Sep Oct-Dec
Hazards
H C A I H C A I H C A I H C A I
Cyclone
Flood
Drought
Earthquake
Sunstroke
Fire
Chemical
Accidents
Boat capsize
Epidemic
Accident

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Lightening
Farmers
suicide
H: Human, C: Crop, A: Animals, I: Infrastructure.

Note: Hazards experienced by the village only to be included.

Disaster Specific History of the Village (since 1995)

YEAR 1995 - 1996-1997 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
1996 - - - - - - - -2007
1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
CYCLONE
Families
Affected
Villages
Affected
Human
Causalities
Animal
Lost
No of
House
Damaged
Value of
property
Lost(In Rs)

FLOOD/
HEAVY
RAIN
Families
Affected

Villages
Affected

Human
Causalities
Animal
Lost
No of
House
Damaged
Value of
property
Lost(In Rs)
DROUGHT
Persons
Affected
Villages
Affected

Human
Causalities

Animal
Lost

No of
House
Damaged

Value of
property
Lost
(In Rs)

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Value of
Crop
Loss(In Rs)
YEAR 1995 1996- 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 -
- 1997 - - - - - - - 2007
1996 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
FIRE
ACCIDENTS
Persons
Affected
Villages
Affected
Human
Causalities
Animal Lost

No of House
Damaged
Value of
property
Lost(In Rs)
SUNSTROKE
Persons
Affected
Human
Causalities
LIGHTENING
Persons
Affected
Human
Causalities
Animal Lost

No of House
Damaged
Value of
property Lost
(In Rs)

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Things to be identified in the village during Risk
Assessment
Risk Assessment

TYPE OF POTENTIAL WHAT AND WHO ARE AT RISK VULNERABLE


HAZARD IMPACT AREAS
(village)
Loss of crop, 1Communication network.
infrastructure, Road network of the affected
human and block.
bovine life, Telephone connections.
livelihood Private Infrastructures.
system, Kutcha Houses, Semi Kutcha
houses, Pvt. Houses.
Public Agriculture/Horticulture.
property etc Crop (estimated Area), Others.
Irrigation Sources.
Private LI- Points, Govt. LI-Points.
Electrical Installations.
Drinking Water sources.
Tube-wells. Wells. PHD Stand
Posts
Educational Institutes.
C Primary Schools, M.E. Schools,
Y High Schools. Colleges.
Live stock.
C Cows, Buffalos, Goats/Sheep,
L Poultry Farms,
O 1 Vulnerable People.
Handicapped, Fishermen,
N Old/Aged,
E Pregnant, Sick and
ailing/diseased,
Children below 5 years.
Other vulnerable assets.
Flood embankments, Canal
embankments, Irrigation
Projects, Small scale industries,/
orchards &forest .

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F Loss of crop, 1 Communication
L infrastructure, network.
human and Road network & Telephone
O
bovine life, connections.
O livelihood Private Infrastructures.
D system, Kutcha Houses, Semi Kutcha .
houses, Pvt. Houses.
Public Agriculture.
property etc Crop (estimated Area), Others.
Irrigation Sources.
Private LI- Points, Govt. LI-
Points.
Electrical Installations.
Drinking Water sources
No of tube-wells, No of wells,
PHD Stand Posts
Educational Institutes.
Primary Schools, M.E. Schools,
High Schools, Colleges.
Live stock.
Cows, Buffalos,
Goats/Sheep, Poultry
Farms,
2 Vulnerable People.
Handicapped, Fishermen,
Old/Aged
Sick and ailing/diseased,
Pregnant,
Children aged below 5
Other vulnerable assets.
Flood embankments, Canal
embankments,
Irrigation Projects, Small-scale
industries.

HEAT Human and Loss of Human & Bovine life.


WA bovine life.
VE

VILLAGE Loss of Loss of property & Life.


FIRE property

DROUGH Loss of crop, Crop Loss, Drinking water


T livelihood scarcity.

Things to be identified in the village during


Vulnerability Analysis
Vulnerability Analysis:
Physical, Economical, Social and Environmental Vulnerability

Total Population Scheduled Castes Scheduled Tribes

Persons Males Females Males Females Males Females

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3.7 Specific Vulnerability of Systems and Services to
Disaster Events
Infrastructure vulnerability against Hazards - River
Embankments in the village:

Name of Village Reason of Contingenc


Embankme vulnerabilit y
Responsib
nt y measures
le Officer
taken.

3.8 Infrastructure Vulnerability against Hazards:

Vulnerability Vulnerability against each hazard


Cyclone Flood Drought Industrial Accidents,
accidents,Fire Road,Rail,Boa
,Chemical t
Pop Area Pop Area Popul Area Popula Area Popula Area
ulat name ulat name ation name tion name tion name
ion ion
Road network
Water ways
Water supply
Sewage
Hospital
Food stocks &
supplies
Communication
(System)
Bridges
Housing
Transportation
facilities

3.9 Alternate route structure (with map):

Vulnerable Area Main route Alternate route

Things to be identified in the village during


Vulnerability Analysis

CAPACITY ANALYSIS:

Inventories and Evaluation of Resources


Location of Mounds/Helipads

Drinking Water Facilities

Open Wells & Tube Open Wells & Tube


Sl.No
wells(Working ) wells(Defunct)

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3.10.4 PDS Dealers
Sl.N
No of PDS Dealers Kerosene Dealers
o

3.10.5 Country Boats

Boat Position at village:


Sl.No No of Fiber Contact person Contact
Boats Telephone No
Available

3.10.6. Permanent School Building-cum-Cyclone Shelters:


(Primary School)
Name of Pry./M.E.
Sl. No. G.P. Village Type of Building
Schools

High Schools

Name of
Name of Type of
Sl. No. G.P. Village High
Mandal Building
Schools

DS-Double Storied, SS – Single Storied

3.10.7 list of shelter places located

S.No Name of Shelter Place

3.10.8 Storage facilities with capacity:

Sl.No. Type of storage Locatio Capacity Contac (Address Remarks


structure n t and Phone
Person No.)

3.14 List of NGOs involved in Disaster Management.

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3.15 Earth moving and Road cleaning equipments:
Sl.
Name of NGO Contact Address
No.

Type of Contact person Telephone Remarks


Equipment and address Office/Res.

3.16 Traders:

Type of Traders Contact person and Telephone Office/Res. Remarks


address
House building
materials
Groceries
Medicine shop
Tents and
Tarpaulins
Hardware shops
Rice mill
Fuel wood
Electrical
Equipments
Restaurants
Farm inputs

3.17 Transportation (Road and water)

Type of Vehicle Contact person Government / Telephone Remarks


and address private Office / Res.
Tractors
Bus
Truck / Mini
truck
Trekker
Country boats
Motor boats

3.18 lternative energy sources (Bio gas and Solar Energy Cells)

Type of sources Contact person Phone No. Remarks


and Address
Bio Gas
Generator
Pump sets
Solar Energy Cell

3.19Private Professionals:

Expertise Name Specialty Address Phone Nos. Service facilities


available
Doctor
Health practitioner
Ex-service man /
Retd Police Officers
Mechanical / civil

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engineer
VAS
Volunteers trained
in Rescue operation
/ Expert swimmers
Volunteers trained
in operating special
equipments /
Electricians
Volunteers trained
in first aid
Skilled Mechanics
Driver (Road)
Motor Boat Drivers

8. LINKING WITH THE DEVELOPMENTAL PLAN

Linkages with the Developmental plan is established by


sensitizing the planners about the vulnerability aspects of the
location and necessary changes needed in building the capacity
of the government and other structures and institutions in
dealing with such disasters.

This section may describe how the developmental plans are


linked/sensitized about the disaster vulnerabilities of the village
and how they are taken care of in terms of building capacities at
various levels and various outlays provided for the same.

Conclusion: HRVC analysis is main part in formulating a


preparedness plan for disasters. It is to be done in our villages through
Conducting village meetings, Group discussions, Social mapping,
Resource Mapping.

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