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CHARLES ABRAHAM BRYANT )


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Plaintiff, ) Civil Docket No. 4: 10-CV-124-D
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v. )
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THE CITY OF GREENVILLE, NORTH )  ô ô 


 
CAROLINA; )       ô
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MICHAEL GEORGE; STEVEN COTTINGHAM; ) dô  
CHARLES M. VINCENT; WILTON RUSSELL )
DUKE JR; JOSHUA BOBERG; JOHN )
CRISCITIELLO; MICHAEL FOX; JOHN )
SAVAGE, )
Defendants )

COMES NOW Plaintiff, Charles Abraham Bryant, Sui Juris, in propria persona, to duly accept

Defendants Michael George and Steven Cottingham¶s Oath of Office, in admiralty, being their open

and binding offer of contract to form a firm and binding, private contract between both

Defendants Michael George and Steven Cottingham and Plaintiff.

Defendants Michael George and Steven Cottingham promised, and are bound by their word,

that they would perform all of their promises which includes protecting all of Plaintiff¶s

unalienable rights.

Plaintiff¶s consideration to this binding contract is his grant of consent, without prejudice,

to Michael George and Steven Cottingham to enforce the statutes of the legislative body of the

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA upon the juristic person CHARLES ABRAHAM BRYANT.

The organic Constitutions of the United States of American, and the State of North

Carolina and the Oath of Office of Defendants Michael George and Steven Cottingham amounts to

nothing more than an offer of an intention to act or refrain from acting in a specified way

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between the respective State and or federal governments and the private people of North

Carolina American people and for other purposes.

Be it known that PlaintiffîCharles Abraham Bryantîdo hereby accept the organic Constitutions

of the United States of America and of the State of North Carolina and the Oath of Office of Defendants

Michael George and Steven Cottingham as their open and binding offer of promise to form a firm and

binding contract between the respective State governments, their political instrumentalities and

Defendants Michael George and Steven Cottingham and Plaintiff in his private capacity.

This MOTION TO TAKE JUDICIAL NOTICE OF PLAINTIFF¶S ACCEPTANCE OF

DEFENDANTS¶ OATH OF OFFICE IN ADMIRALTY is made explicitly without recourse and

now constitutes a binding contract and any deviation there from will be treated as a breach of

contract, violation of substantive due process and private international law.

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All officers of the United States District Court of the Eastern District of North Carolina
are hereby placed on notice under authority of the supremacy and equal protection clauses of the
United States Constitution. Notice to Agent is Notice to Principal. Notice to Principal is Notice
to Agent.

The United States Constitution Article I. Section 10 [1] No State shall pass Law impairing
Obligation of Contract

Any contract between the State and another party includes by implication the existing law of the State.
Angel v. Truitt, 108 N.C. App. 679, 682, 424 S.E.2d 660 (Ct. App. (1993).

An offer is a manifestation of an intent to be contractually bound upon acceptance by another


party. An offer creates in the offeree the power to form a contract by an appropriate acceptance.
[Restatement § 24]

Absent such specification, an ‘ ‘   


, if sent by reasonable means,
e.g., by an authorized medium and with proper postage and correct address.

(1) To constitute consideration, a performance or a return promise must be bargained for.

(2) A performance or return promise is bargained for if it is sought by the promisor in exchange for his
promise and is given by the promise in exchange for that promise.

(3) The performance may consist of

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(a) an act other than a promise, or

(b) a forbearance, or

(c) the creation, modification, or destruction of a legal relation.

(4) The performance or return promise may be given to the promisor or to some other person. It may be
given by the promisee or by some other person.

All contracts commence with an offer and only become binding upon acceptance. See: "Contracts" by
Farnsworth, third edition, sect. 3.3, pages 112, 113. Infra.

Offer and Acceptance. The outward appearance of the agreement process, by which the
parties satisfy the requirement of bargain imposed by the doctrine of consideration, varies widely
according to the circumstances. It may, for example, involve face-to-face negotiations, an
exchange of letters or facsimiles, or merely the perfunctory signing of a printed form supplied by
the other party. Whatever the outward appearance, it is common to analyze the process in terms
of two distinct steps: First, a manifestation of assent that is called an offer, made by one party
(the offeror) to another (the offeree); and second, a manifestation of assent in response that is
called an acceptance, made by the offeree to the offeror. Although courts apply this analysis on a
case-by-case basis, depending on the circumstances, it gives a reassuring appearance of
consistency.

What is an "offer"? It can be defined as a manifestation to another of assent to enter into a


contract if the other manifests assent in return by some action, often a promise but sometimes a
performance. By making an offer, the offeror thus confers upon the offeree the power to create a
contract. An offer is nearly always a promise and in a sense, the action (promise or performance)
on which the offeror conditions the promise is the "price" of its becoming enforceable. Offer,
then, is the name given to a promise that is conditional on some action by the promisee if the
legal effect of the promisee's taking that action is to make the promise enforceable.
Empowerment of the offeree to make the offeror's promise enforceable is thus the essence of an
offer. When does a promise empower the promisee to take action that will make the promise
enforceable? In other words, when does a manifestation of assent amount to an offer? This is one
of the main subjects of this chapter.

What is an "acceptance"? It can be defined as the action {promise or performance} by the


offeree that creates a contract (ie, makes the offeror's promise enforceable). Acceptance, then, is
the name given to the offeree's action if the legal effect of that action is to make the offeror's
promise enforceable. When does action by the promisee make the promise enforceable? In other
words, when does the promisee's action amount to an acceptance? This is another of the main
subjects of this chapter. Because of the requirement of mutuality of obligation, both parties are
free to withdraw from negotiations until the moment when both are bound. This is the moment

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when the offeree accepts the offer. It therefore follows, as we shall see later in more detail, that
the offeror is free to revoke the offer at any time before acceptance.

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Respectfully submitted, on this the ___ day of November, 2010

By: _______________________________________________
Charles Abraham Bryant, inr r  r proceeding   
576 South Square Drive Apartment 4
Winterville North Carolina, 28590
Telephone # 252-258-3585


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I, Charles Abraham Bryant, Sui Juris, in propria persona hereby certify that I have served a copy

of the foregoing motion entitled OPPOSITION TODEFENDANTS¶ MOTION TO DISMISS on the

counsel of record, William J. Little, III, listed below by means of certified mail return receipt number

7008 2810 0002 3290 2428 and to the United States District Court Eastern District of North Carolina by

means of certified mail return receipt number 7008 2810 0002 3290 2435 on this the ____th day of

November, 2010.

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA


201 South Evans St. Rm. 209
Greenville, NC 27858

William J. Little, III


Office of the City Attorney
P.O. Box 7207
Greenville, NC 27835

Respectfully submitted, on this the ___ day of November, 2010

By: _______________________________________________
Charles Abraham Bryant, inr r  r proceeding   
576 South Square Drive Apartment 4
Winterville North Carolina, 28590
Telephone # 252-258-3585


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