You are on page 1of 283

HISPANIC EDUCATION STATUS REPORT

Diane Torres-Velásquez, Ph.D., Hispanic Education Liaison,


New Mexico Public Education Department
Susanna M. Murphy, Ph.D., Secretary Designate, Fall 2010
1
Acknowledgments:
This report could not have been completed without the help of the following individuals who provided data, feedback, editing,
contributions to the overall presentation, and other support: Dr. Susanna Murphy, Dr. Viola Flórez, Dr. Peter Winograd, Irene
Sánchez, Dr. Cindy Gregory , Minerva Carrera, Swari Hhan, Dr. José Armas, Dr. Garth Bawden, Thomas N. Scharmen, William
Gruner, Brian Patterson, Eleana Shair, Brenda Kofahl, Anne Zuni, Dr. Baji Rankin, Dr. Eugene García, Dr. Jeffrey Duncan-Andrade,
Dr. Magdalena Avila, Dr. Mari-Luci Jaramillo, Yash Morimoto, Valerie Trujillo, Dr. Valerie Romero-Leggott, Joaquín Baca, James R.
Raborn, Joshua S. Raborn, Loyda Martínez, Judy Baca, Judith Paiz, Gladys Herrera-Gurulé, Rosa Barraza, Todd Hynson, William
Jackson, Clarence Nunnally, Lori Stuite, and the Hispanic students of New Mexico.

Photography: William Gruner Photography

NM PED/NM DOH- HEAT maps: Thomas N. Scharmen, Office of Community Assessment, Planning and Evaluation New Mexico
Public Health Division, Region 1 & 3; Brian Patterson, special assistant

2
Page 3 Introduction
TABLE OF CONTENTS
42 PreK
66 K-12
172 Post-Secondary
280 Summary

Appendix Appendices
2 PreK Data –Early
Learning Outcomes
Assessment
(by Ethnicity)

27 District Profiles

123 Public School


Graduation

125
Bilingual Multicultural
Education Programs

153 Data Maps

175 Post Secondary


Education

3
 
In signing the Executive Order for 
the reauthorization of the White  Status Report on Hispanic Education in 
House Initiative on Hispanic 
Education (October, 2010),  New Mexico 
President Obama made a point of   

stating that “this is not a Latino 
problem; this is an American 
OVERVIEW of the Introduction: 
problem. We’ve got to solve it,  1. The Hispanic Education Act  
because if we allow these trends to 
continue, it won’t be just one 
2. Who Are Hispanics? 
community that falls behind – we 
all fall behind together.” 
3. Education as a Human/Civil Right 
This report provides the first 
combined accounting of Hispanic  4. (Re)Visioning Future Histories of Hispanic  
educational achievement status in 
New Mexico for Preschool, K‐12, 
Students 
and Post Secondary education.  

4
Introduction and Context 

The Hispanic Education Act in New Mexico 

New Mexico is the first and only state to pass an act such as the Hispanic Education Act.  It has 
received widespread recognition from officials at the federal level representing the White 
House including Juan Sepúlveda, director of the White House Initiative on Educational 
Excellence for Hispanic Americans, from researchers across the country interested in Hispanic 
education, and from various national foundations.  It is only appropriate and very important 
to thank the individuals who were critical to the work involved in passing this significant act.  
First and foremost, very special thanks to Governor Bill Richardson for understanding the need 
for attention to New Mexico’s underperforming majority population, for valuing education as 
a top priority, for listening to community and responding through his actions with support and 
promotion of the Hispanic Education Act and with his education initiatives on graduation and 
achievement.  Very special thanks to Representative Rick Miera, and Senator Bernadette 
Sanchez, who have long advocated for Hispanic students and who worked tirelessly before, 

5
throughout and after the 2010 legislative session to make sure that our state would address 
the unique needs of Hispanic students in New Mexico.  Heartfelt thanks to the community 
groups around the state (such as the Latino/Hispano Education Improvement Task Force).who 
sounded the alarm on the educational crisis of Hispanic students, activated grass roots efforts, 
served as the voice for Hispanic families, and were relentless in their determination to 
eliminate the achievement gap.  

This status report on Hispanic education is required by the Hispanic Education Act.  In a 
country with a dramatically growing Hispanic population, it is the only act of its kind. In New 
Mexico, Hispanics are the largest population. Throughout the country, and in our state, 
Hispanics are projected to increase dramatically and very quickly. The Hispanic Education Act 
and the Hispanic Education Status Report focus the spotlight on the academic achievement of 
Hispanics because this group’s success will have a direct impact on the economic and social 
welfare of New Mexico.  The Hispanic Education Act was passed in the 2010 New Mexico 
legislative session and was enacted on July 1, 2010.  (To see a copy of the act, click on this 
link: http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0150.pdf.)  

6
o This law calls for an Advisory Council of no more than 23 representatives 
knowledgeable of Hispanic Education to meet at least twice a year and advise the 
Secretary of Education on issues of Hispanic Education.  

o It also calls for the Hispanic Education Liaison to write a statewide report on the 
status of Hispanic Education in New Mexico.  The status report shall include 
information by school district, by state charter school and statewide. 

o The act provides for the study, development and implementation of educational 
systems that affect the educational success of Hispanic students to eliminate the 
achievement gap and increase graduation rates.  

o The Hispanic Education Act was intended to provide mechanisms for parents, 
community and business organizations, public schools, school districts, charter 
schools, public post‐secondary educational institutions, department and state and 
local policymakers to work together to improve educational opportunities for 
Hispanic students to eliminate the achievement gap, increase graduation rates, and 
to increase post‐secondary enrollment, retention, and completion. 

7
o There is a great deal of national and historical impetus behind this act.  The New 
Mexico Hispanic Education Act builds on community values, and on legislation and 
litigation that historically and significantly support the culture and language of 
Hispanic children and students in our state. Some of this historical and contextual 
background will be addressed in the next section of this report. Although New Mexico 
is the only state with this act, it is important to note the national context that helped 
move this act forward.  

Statewide Status Report 

The Hispanic Education Act calls for a Statewide Status Report, an annual report on the status 
of Hispanic Education for the state of New Mexico from preschool through Post Secondary 
Education.  The status report requires the following information, by school district, by state 
charter school and statewide: 
o Preschool (this section begins on p.43.  Additional data are provided in the appendix.) 
ƒ New Mexico PreK Program  
• Enrollment by ethnicity 

8
• Achievement by ethnicity 
o K‐12 (This section begins on p.67.  Additional data are provided in the appendix.) 
ƒ Hispanic student achievement for all grades 
ƒ Attendance for all grades 
ƒ Graduation rates for Hispanic students 
ƒ The number of Hispanic students enrolled in schools that made Adequate Yearly 
Progress and the number of Hispanic students enrolled in schools that are at 
each level of school improvement or restructuring 
ƒ Number and type of bilingual and multicultural programs in each school district 
and in each state charter school 
o Post Secondary (community colleges and universities) (This section begins on p. 159. 
Additional data can be found in the appendix.) 
ƒ Enrollment 
ƒ Retention  
ƒ Completion rates   

9
o This report does NOT address teacher preparation, teacher evaluation, curriculum, 
evaluation of the practices involved in planning and teaching, licensing, collecting 
State Based Assessment, or school and community practice.   
o This first report draws from existing and already published data. It is anticipated that 
future reports will include other types of data from community, school personnel, 
public school students, other state entities, and other sources.   

Definition and Use of the Word ‘Hispanic’  

o The selection of the term ‘Hispanic’ as the label to use to refer to a group of people 
that is highly diverse, is a complex issue. ‘Hispanic’, in this report, is used instead of 
any other ethnic label, including Latino/a, Chicano/a, Mexican‐American, South 
American, Puerto Rican, Cuban, etc. because it is the vocabulary of the Hispanic 
Education Act and The White House Initiative on Hispanic Education.  
o Hispanic families come from the U.S., from Latin American countries, Spanish‐
speaking countries, and Spanish‐speaking territories. 

10
o In New Mexico, Hispanic families include families who have recently arrived, as well 
as families who have lived on this land for over 400 years, long before this territory 
was part of the United States.    
o While country of origin and number of generations in the U.S. can be important to 
consider in analyzing achievement data, New Mexico does not currently collect or 
report data for Hispanic students in this way.  
o In collecting and reporting data, New Mexico Public Education Department does 
specify the categories Black (non Hispanic) and White (non Hispanic). 
o Hispanic does not mean the same thing as ‘race’.   
o Some of the ways in which ‘Hispanics’ differ from each other (Lapayese, 2009): 
ƒ National origin 
ƒ Socioeconomic conditions 
ƒ Generational status 
ƒ Geographical location 
ƒ Residence status (including citizenship) 
ƒ Political histories 

11
ƒ Racial identification 
ƒ Languages other than Spanish 
ƒ Dialects 
ƒ Religious and spiritual affiliations 
ƒ Histories of discrimination/oppression 
ƒ Circular migration 
ƒ Level of transnationalism (the flow of people, ideas and products across regions 
and countries across the world)  
ƒ Other 
o Given the complexity of the use of the term ‘Hispanic’, please note that in this report, 
the term ‘Hispanic’ and ‘Latino’ will be used interchangeably to refer to a diverse 
group of people who identify themselves or their children as such at times of 
enrollment and assessment in New Mexico public schools. It is also used as the 
general term to include citizens of New Mexico who have Hispanic roots here or in 
countries where Spanish is one of the primary languages, or who come from Latin 
American countries.  

12
o Please note ‐ in this report, ‘Hispanic’ may or may not be used when quoting or 
including materials that use other terms.  If data or tables are provided from a report 
that used the term ‘Latino’ or ‘Chicano’ (for example), the exact term that was used 
will be carried over to tables or charts in this report to keep the referenced material 
consistent with the original source.  

Use of the Word ‘White’ 

o The selection of the term ‘White’ is another complex issue. While White often refers 
to race, it can also refer to ethnicity. Many Hispanics are considered ‘White’ because 
of their European roots. Also, members of the White population may prefer the use 
of another term to communicate their ethnicity.   

o The terms ‘White’ and ‘Caucasian’ will be used interchangeably. The exact term that 
was used in the original source will be carried over to tables, graphs or charts in this 
report to keep the referenced material consistent. Any of these terms may be used in 
future reports.  

13
Who Are Hispanics? 
National Level 2009 – 2050  

o The U.S. Census Bureau reported the U.S. resident population at 308,745,538 
o At the national level, Hispanics numbered 48,400,000, or 16% of the total U.S. 
population as of July 2009.  Only Mexico has a larger Hispanic population than the 
United States (111 million). (http://www.infoplease.com/spot/hhmcensus1.html#ixzz18Eu58g7N) 
 
o It is projected that by the year 2050, Hispanics will number 132.8 Million, or 30% of 
the entire U.S. population.  (http://www.infoplease.com/spot/hhmcensus1.html#ixzz18Eu58g7N) 
New Mexico 2000‐2030 
o New Mexico has a population of 2,059,179 (U.S. Census, 2010), with a density ratio of 
17 people per square mile and a density rank of 47.  
 
o Specific data on the Latino population will soon be released.   
 
o In 2000, 765,386 (42.1%) New Mexicans were Hispanic.  
o Hispanics are currently 45.6 % of the total State population, or 919,410 in number. 
(NM QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau, 2009 estimate)  
ƒ Whites (not Hispanic) are 40.9% 
ƒ Native Americans are 9.7% 

14
ƒ Blacks are 3.1% 
ƒ Asians are 1.5%  
 
o Based on the 2000 Census, it is projected that New Mexico’s total population will 
grow by 15.4% by 2030. The following table shows New Mexico’s population as 
measured in the 2000 Census and where we are ranked in population among all 50 
states. Our growth during the next 30 years is projected to move us up in ranking of 
most populated states by 10 states. Most of that growth will be Hispanic.  
 
o Depending on the source, up to 54% of the New Mexico 2030 population is projected 
to be Hispanic. 
 
 

15
Projected Growth of New Mexico Overall Population 2000 to 2030 

Year  Overall NM  Ranking  of  Increase  Percent change 


Population   Entire State 
54% of this increase is 
2000   1,819,046  36   projected to be Hispanic

2030   2,009,708  26  280,662  15.4%

SOURCE:  U.S. Census Bureau http://www.census.gov/population/www/projections/projectionsagesex.html  and U.S. Census Bureau, 

DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000

http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/QTTable?_bm=y&‐geo_id=04000US35&‐qr_name=DEC_2000_SF1_U_DP1&‐ds_name=DEC_2000_SF1_U&‐

redoLog=false  

o The U.S. Department of Education, National Center on Statistics (2008) projects that 
New Mexico’s K‐12 public school student population will have grown by 10.5% from 
2000 to 2018, with Hispanic students constituting at least 55% of the school age 
population.  

16
Percentage Change in K‐12 Public School Student   Population to 2018 
More than half of 
this growth will 
be Hispanic.  

 
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center of Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), “State Nonfiscal Survey 
of Public Elementary/Secondary,” selected years 2000‐01 through 2006‐07, and State Public Elementary and Secondary Enrollment 
Model, 1980‐2006 (This table was prepared December 2008.) 

 
 
 

17
Projections for Growth in New Mexico School‐Age Populations Ages 5‐24 
  Population 2006  Projected Population  Projected Change 
2020   2006‐20  

African  11,121  11,475  3% 


American   In 2020, there 
are projected to 
be over 152,513 
Asian   7,580  9,039  more Latino 
19% 
In 2006, 
there were  than White 
Latino   283,772  only 51,622  372,636  students (3  27% 
more  times the 
Latino than  difference of 
Native  73,520  White 
93,531  2006).   27% 
American   students. 

White   232,150  220,123  ‐5% 

Total   618,143  706,804  14% 


The Education Trust calculations from the U.S. Census Bureau, State Population Projections; State Projections 1995‐2025 based on 1990 Census 
(released 1996). www.census.gov/population/www/projections/stproj.html 

18
Latinos will account for well over half of the school age population. This implies a vital impact 
on NM social and economic conditions.  
o The difference between the number of Latino and White students in New Mexico will 
triple from 2006 when there were 51,622 more Latino students than White students 
to 2020 when the difference will be 152,513 students.   
o By 2020, Latino students will account for well over half of the school‐age population.  
o Combined, Latino, Native American, and Black students will soon account for well 
over three‐fourths of the student population. If 75 % of our students are failing, this 
will certainly have a dismal effect on our economy.  
o The number of Latino students projected for 2020 (only 10 years from now), is almost 
4 times the number of Native Americans, the next largest Non‐White population.  
Reversing the trend of underperformance with Latino students has the potential to 
change the direction of the trends of our state.  

19
o The “dependency ratio" is the number of children and elderly compared with the 
number of working age Americans. In 2005, there were 59 children and elderly 
people per 100 adults of working age. That will rise to 72 dependents per 100 adults 
of working age in 2050. (Pew Hispanic Center, 2008. Publications: U.S. Population 
Projections: 2005‐2050 http://pewhispanic.org/reports/report.php?ReportID=85) In 30 years, 
young and old will depend on today’s school children, a group which will comprise 
one‐fourth of the total U.S. population.  

What is The Connection between the Growing Number of Hispanics and 
the Hispanic Education Act?  
There was a reason the Hispanic community sounded the alarm and called for the Hispanic 
Education Act.  No other state has come together using the media, the knowledge of 
community organizing and persistent pleas to state government officials to make their needs 
known the way New Mexico did in 2009‐2010. With the help of technology and the 
personal/human connection to this cause, New Mexicans exposed the crisis situation of our 
Hispanic youth and the future welfare of our state (Armas, J. 2010).  Why was so much time 
and energy given to Hispanic education?  In a state where Hispanics are the majority 

20
population and are projected to dramatically increase in number, it is no wonder the 
community took notice. There were at least four major reasons for this call to action: 

o Education is a civil right. 
o The future economy of our state depends on the success of all students, especially that of 
the largest and fastest growing population.  
o Reversing the trend of underachievement by Latino students will positively affect the 
future educational performance of all students in New Mexico.  
o Hispanic populations contribute greatly to the welfare of our state. Together with Native 
Americans, Blacks, Asians, and Whites our state has a rich history, much to learn from each 
other, and great potential for a promising future.  
 

Education as an Internationally Established and Legitimate Mandate: 
Educational Reform, and Human and Civil Rights  
In the United States, education has long been considered a key to becoming a successful and 
contributing member of our society. When our country has not kept up with the rest of the 
world in educational achievement, our nation has responded. Our current response can be 
traced back to the national reform initiatives. In the process of this reform, we need to be 

21
careful to protect the rights of all our students (Darling‐Hammond, 2010; Duncan‐Andrade, 
2009).  

A History of Federal Executive Actions  

o President Reagan 

o On April 26, 1983, the National Commission on Excellence in Education (NCEE) 
released A Nation at Risk: The Imperative for Educational Reform.  

• The report issued a call for educational reform, charging that the failure of 
America’s public schools was compared to “an act of war” (NCEE, p.2) 

• The U.S. economic decline, in a time of global economic competition, was 
blamed on the public schools 

• Federal changes included six major reform goals, including the creation of 
national standards  

22
o The White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics was 
introduced and signed under President Reagan’s term.  
• The mission of the initiative is to “help restore the United States to its role as 
the global leader in education and to strengthen the Nation by expanding 
educational opportunities and improving educational outcomes for Hispanics of 
all ages and by helping to ensure that all Hispanics receive a complete and 
competitive education that prepares them for college, a career, and productive 
and satisfying lives.” 

o President Bush 

o In 2002, the No Child Left Behind Act initiated a testing regimen aligned to measure 
student content knowledge with national standards.  

ƒ National standardized testing and its consequences created a change in how 
schools operate (Darling‐Hammond, 2010) 

23
o President Obama 
o On October 19, 2010, President Obama signed the Executive Order for the 

Reauthorization of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence 
for Hispanics. 
ƒ In signing the Executive Order for the reauthorization of the White House 
Initiative on Hispanic Education, President Obama made a point of stating that 
“this is not a Latino problem; this is an American problem. We’ve got to solve 
it, because if we allow these trends to continue, it won’t be just one 
community that falls behind – we all fall behind together.” 
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the‐press‐office/2010/10/19/  
ƒ In his speech, before signing the Executive Order, President Obama cited the 
following startling statistics on Hispanics, the largest minority group in American 
schools: 
– Hispanics are more likely to attend our lowest performing schools 
– Fewer than half take part in early childhood education 
– Only about half graduate on time from high school 

24
– Those who make it to college are unprepared for its rigors 
 
ƒ The Executive Order calls for an Executive Director of the Initiative, A Hispanic 
Education Commission, and an Interagency Working Group. 

o On September 14, 2010, President Obama addressed the nation’s public school 
children. As he commended them for taking on some of the burdens as we go 
through a ‘tough time in our country’, he motivated them to excel in reaching their 
dreams. Obama stated:  

ƒ “Nobody gets to write your destiny but you. Your future is in your hands. Your 
life is what you make of it. And nothing – absolutely nothing‐ is beyond your 
reach, so long as you’re willing to dream big, so long as you’re willing to work 
hard, so long as you’re willing to stay focused on your education, there is not a 
single thing that any of you cannot accomplish, not a single thing. I believe 
that.” http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2010/09/14  

25
ƒ The President pledged that government at all levels, working with communities 
and families, would “do its part to make it possible for students to get the best 
education.”  However, many states in great need of financial resources, 
including New Mexico, were not funded in the competitive Race to the Top 
grants.  These grants are intended to “encourage and reward States that are 
creating the conditions for education innovation and reform; achieving 
significant improvement in student outcomes, including making substantial 
gains in student achievement, closing achievement gaps, improving high school 
graduation rates, and ensuring student preparation for success in college and 
careers;” and implementing ambitious plans in educational reform. 
http://www2.ed.gov/programs/racetothetop/executive‐summary.pdf  

ƒ U.S. Secretary of Education Duncan  
• Secretary Duncan, determined to address inequities in educational resources, 
stated that the federal government “will require much greater transparency and 

26
action steps to address inequities in funding systems, to ensure low‐income 
students and the schools they attend get their fair share of dollars.” (Secretary 
Arne Duncan, Equity and Education Reform: Remarks at the Annual Meeting of 
the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Kansas City, 
MO, July 14, 2010) 
Response to President Obama’s Federal Reform Efforts: The National 
Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) 
 
o The NAACP responded that resource equity must go beyond just dollars to ensure, at a 
minimum, that all students have access to early childhood education, highly effective 
teachers, college‐preparatory curricula, and equitable instructional resources.  
o The NAACP Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights under Law, July 2010, 
concerned about issues of equity and funding for school children made the following 
points:  

27
• At a time when federal funding is competitive, and formula funding remains 
flat, we need to look at the need for students to receive more equitable funding 
opportunities.  
• If education is a civil right, children in “winning” states should not be the only 
ones who have the opportunity to learn in high‐quality environments.(p3)  
• The NAACP calls for a shift of focus from competitive grant programs to 
conditional incentive grants that can be made available to all states, provided 
they adopt systemic, proven strategies for providing all students with an 
opportunity to learn (Equity and Education Reform: Remarks at the Annual 
Meeting of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 
Kansas City, MO, July 14, 2010) 

Honoring Human and Civil Rights in a Time of Reform 
The Importance of a Caring School Culture in New Mexico Schools 
o Duncan‐Andrade (2005), stresses the importance of creating a caring school culture 
through a curriculum that honors the strengths of our communities, and that helps 
students develop a sense of hope, purpose and positive identity. This requires a 

28
critical examination of the destructive impact of our country’s history of 
underachievement, marginalization, and disenfranchisement, especially with our 
Hispanic youth.  

Documents that Protect Our Children 

o The United Nations 

o International Documents provide significant guidance for the protection of education 
as a human right, and for the elimination of the achievement gap.  Among these 
documents are some that were written up to 45 and 52 years ago: 

• UN Declaration of Human Rights, 1948 Article 26 

• UN Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) 1965, 2008  

• International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICE‐SCR), 1976 

o Articles 1 and 13 

• UN Plan of Action for the UN Decade for Human Rights Education, 1995‐2004  

29
 
State Litigation/Legislation Supporting Hispanic Students in Public Schools 
o New Mexico State Constitution (1910) 
ƒ New Mexico became a state in 1912 and the State Constitution was written in 
1910. The state constitution calls for perfect equality for all New Mexicans. In 
examining the document, it is clear that our forefathers honored the Spanish‐
speaking population and provided language in Article XII, Section 8 to protect the 
use of Spanish and transition to English at a time when New Mexico’s Hispanic 
children spoke and were educated solely in Spanish (Montez, 1974).  

o Serna vs. Portales (1974)  

ƒ The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the original decision that mandated, 
among other things, bilingual and bicultural education for the culturally distinct 
Hispanic populations and found “undisputed evidence that Spanish surnamed 

30
students do not reach the achievement levels attained by their Anglo 
counterparts.”  

o The Hispanic Education Act (2010) 

o 100 years after the State Constitution was written, this act focuses on improving 
the educational success of Hispanic students in a way that involves family and 
community. Passage of this act required a powerful collaboration between the 
governor, legislators and senators, and grass roots community members at a time 
that appears to be a turning point in the history of New Mexico.  

(Re)Visioning Future Histories of Hispanic Students in New Mexico:  
Economic Impact of Graduation 
 
o Our state’s economy is greatly affected by student achievement and dropout rates. 
Our graduation rates do indeed affect our economy.  However, the reverse is also a 
reality. Our economy also affects the opportunities offered to our Hispanic students 
for a quality education. There are critical questions that need to be asked about the 

31
national and global economies, the drive behind the development of economic 
policies, and the education of our Hispanic children in New Mexico. Open and serious 
conversations about local, national and global economic conditions and their effect 
on educational opportunities and living conditions have the potential to create 
change. Topics for this conversation could include the following:  
• The distribution of wealth in the United States and in the World 
• The changing labor market and what will be required of workers to be well‐
prepared 
• The types of jobs most typical for Hispanic workers, and compensation for those 
jobs. 
• The condition and struggles of the middle class. 
• The relationship between health, economics, and education.  
• The effects of global economic policies of the ‘80s and early 2000s on the drive 
toward educational reform, especially with changes that came about after the 
release of  A Nation at Risk  and the passage of No Child Left Behind.  
• Root causes of the underperformance of Hispanic students. 

32
• The negative aspects associated with large scale testing and identification of 
students who are driven out of education due to low performance (and the real 
effects on our economic and social welfare).  
• The motivational factors most effective in keeping Hispanic students in school. 
• A balance of formal education, life experience, and life wisdom to prepare for 
social, economic, and life success.  
• A balanced curriculum that includes the sciences, creative processes, critical 
thinking, and the arts.  
• Use of the arts as a road to the creative process 
• Freedom in following a career of one’s own choosing 
• Valuing the self as an intelligent being 
o Global Issues  
• When compared to student achievement around the world, place matters for 
New Mexico students. The comparison graph below shows a comparison of 
students from each NM County to students from Countries around the World 

33
(all ethnicities combined.) You can see the percentage of population with 2‐yr 
or 4‐yr college degrees for students ages 25‐64. 
• A bar graph then follows showing mean income based on highest degree 
earned for the year 2007.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
34
How Students in New Mexico Counties Compare to the Rest of the World 
 

Comparison of NM Counties 
50
(left side) to Countries around  Canada
48
the World (right side):  46
Percentage of population with  Santa Fe 44
Japan Israel
2‐yr or 4‐yr college degrees,  Bernalillo 40 United States New Zealand
Sandoval 38
ages 25‐64, (2008)   Korea
36 Australia
Grant Finland
Other NM Counties 34 Ireland Estonia
Lincoln San Miguel Taos
Dona Ana 32 Denmark UK Belgium Sweden
30 Iceland Switzerland
Otero
28 Spain
New Mexico Curry France
26
Chavez Rio Arriba San Juan
24 Chile Germany
Eddy Valencia Greece
22
Cibola Lea McKinley
20
Note: ‘Other NM Counties’ is an average for the 14 18
NM counties with fewer than 20,000 residents 16 Mexico
Slovak Republic
Luna 14

FROM: Winograd, P. (2010). Welcome: New Options Project Launch. p.4. SOURCES: OECD, Lumina Foundation, U.S. Census.  

35
Mean Earnings by Highest Degree Earned: 2007 
140000
The difference between NO degree and a 
Professional degree is $100,000.00 a YEAR 
120000

These figures are estimates.   $120,978
100000 There is a difference of $9,802 in  $95,565
annual earnings between having 
80000 and not having a High School 
$70,186
Diploma.  
60000
$57,181

$39,746
40000 $31,286 $33,009
$21,484
20000

0
Not a high  High school  Some  Associate's Bachelor's Master's Professional Doctorate
school  graduate only college, no 
graduate degree
 
 
Source: The 2010 Statistical Abstract: Education; Educational Attainment: 227 – Mean Earnings by Highest Degree Earned: 2007 
U.S. Census Bureau,  
Current Population Survey. For more information: http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/educ‐attn.html  or  
http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2010edition.html  

36
Why Educating Latinos is an Economic and Social Imperative for NM  

o Only 63% of the Hispanic students of the 2009 4‐year cohort graduated from 
New Mexico public schools.  
o Ninth grade school populations in 2008‐2009 were 10% or more of the general 
school populations for our state’s larger school districts (APS n= 9,320/ 
N=94,836; Las Cruces n=2,387/N=23,691; Gadsden n= 1,249/N=13,733; Santa Fe 
n=1,166/N=13,591. Total enrollment reported for 2008‐2009 was 323,882.  
o Based on the number of students that did not graduate in the 2009 cohort, we 
estimate the cost of revenue to the state for 10 years of Hispanic students 
dropping out to be well over 2.4 billion dollars annually, but we strongly 
recommend that future reports actually track the actual costs. Please also note 
that we are not including numbers in this estimate of Hispanic students who 
dropped out before 9th grade.  
o Were we to graduate these students, this would generate a massive influx of 
tax revenue but just as importantly, it would lower costs in such areas as 

37
unemployment, underemployment, public health costs, food stamps, AFDC, as 
well as prison costs (which would fall significantly). 
o More important than the economic loss, the issue of underperformance, well‐
being and welfare of the Hispanic population of New Mexico merits attention. 
Besides the severe economic loss, we are experiencing a tremendous loss of 
significant contributions to our society from the bulk of our population, not to 
mention the loss of their own sense of self‐worth and the loss of opportunity to 
use their talents and many ways of knowing. New Mexico’s quality of life is 
greatly affected when our largest population is underachieving.  

The Importance of Context and Hispanic Education in New Mexico 

As we examine student achievement in New Mexico, it will be important to consider this 
question:  

How will Hispanic population growth, academic achievement, and lifelong success affect 
the future welfare of our state? 

38
o The data in the sections that follow are required for the Hispanic Education Status 
Report and are organized by age/grade/school level (PreK, K‐12 and Post‐Secondary). 
This data includes enrollment, attendance, achievement, Hispanic students in schools 
that make AYP, graduation, and number and types of bilingual/multicultural 
programs.  
 
o As we consider how to use this data, we cannot afford to analyze it or propose 
remedies in isolation. We must consider the past, present, and future context of New 
Mexico.  
 
o The data that follows needs to be considered in a context that includes:  
o Dramatically growing Hispanic population trends  
o National Reform Initiatives  
o Protections under the law for equity in education   
o Education as a human /civil right 
o Federal and State Initiatives in Hispanic Education 
o The history of New Mexico including periods of isolation when citizens of the 
territory were under Spanish and Mexican rule 
 

39
o The impact of the United States’ acquisition of New Mexico’s territory on
Hispanics and the agreements under the Treaty of Guadalupe

o The importance of the Hispanic community in 1910 with the protection of the
use of the Spanish language for School children in New Mexico, and in 2010
with the Hispanic Education Act

o The effects of a shifting global economy and the role of the U.S. in global
developments

o The honoring of the strengths that Hispanic, Native American, Black, Asian, and
White cultures bring to the welfare of the future of New Mexico

40
  
 
“It is widely 
 
recognized that the  PreK 
 
path to our nation’s     
future prosperity and   
security begins with 
the well‐being of all 
our children”, p.2   
“Hispanic children   
Center on the Developing Child 
are an important   
Harvard University  
 
    asset for our 
     nation’s future” 
  National Task Force on 
  Early Childhood Education 
for Hispanics: La Comisión 
Nacional para la 
Educación de la Niñez 
Hispana. Executive Report 
(2007) p.2 

41
 
 
   
 
 

42
 
• The Pre-Kindergarten Act was enacted in 2005 to provide a voluntary program of
PreK services for four-year-old children.

• Programs are offered by public schools, tribes or pueblos, Head Start centers,
and licensed private providers.

• PreK is jointly administered by the Public Education Department (PED) and the
Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD).

• Data in this report is provided on the following for PED and CYFD PreK
combined:
o PreK enrollment
o 2009-2010 Early Learning Outcomes Assessment
o Spring 2010 proficiency levels by ethnicity
o 2009-2010 external evaluation

 
 
 

43
Why is PreK Important? 
• Explosive growth occurs in cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and motor
development in the early years. (Center on the Developing Child, 2007
http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu)

• The foundations of school readiness and achievement begin to be established


early in life for all children, preschool outcomes are seen well into a child’s adult
years. (National Task Force on Early Childhood Education for Hispanics: La Comisión
Nacional para la Educación de la Niñez Hispana, March 2007. Para nuestros niños:
Expanding and Improving Early Education for Hispanics, Executive Report.)

• PreK can be especially important for young children coming from even the most
toxic levels of stress from impoverished, neglectful or abusive environments.
(Center on the Developing Child, 2007 http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu )

• PreKindergarten (PreK) is considered to be an essential key to narrowing


what has been labeled the ‘School Readiness Gap’ (Sadowski, 2006).
 

44
Neural Circuits are Wired in a Bottom-Up
Sequence
(700 synapses formed per second in the early years)

Language
Sensory Pathways Higher Cognitive Function
(Vision, Hearing)

FIRST YEAR

-8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Birth (Months) (Years)

Source: C. Nelson (2000) 2


11/21/2010  

From conception through childhood and young adulthood, the human brain develops sensory 
pathways, language and higher cognitive functions. It is in the early years that synapses are 
formed at the most rapid rate, at times 700 per second.  Researchers at the Harvard Center 
for the Developing Child (2007) confirmed that “early experiences determine whether a 
child’s developing brain architecture will provide a strong or weak foundation for all future 
learning, behavior, and health.” p.3.   

45
What Patterns Exist with Preschool Hispanic Children?
• Hispanic children start kindergarten well behind the achievement levels of their
White peers.

• Some Hispanic national/regional origin segments lagged behind Whites much


more than others.

• Children with South American origins had the strongest readiness levels,
followed by children with Cuban and Puerto Rican origins.

• At the end of fifth grade, Hispanic children continued to achieve behind their
White peers in reading, but the gap was considerably smaller.

• Hispanic children of South American origin had the strongest reading skills, and
their achievement was almost identical to Whites. Cuban and Puerto Rican
children were close to the White achievement patterns in reading.
• The same patterns were found in mathematics.

• 3rd generation White students outperform 3rd generation Hispanic students.


SOURCE: National Task Force on Early Childhood Education for Hispanics: La Comisión Nacional para la Educación de la Niñez Hispana (March 2007). 
Para nuestros niños: Expanding and Improving Early Education for Hispanics Main Report. pp 49‐50. www.ecehispanic.org 

46
Who Are Hispanic Families?
Findings from the National Task Force on Early Childhood Education for 
Hispanics (2007)
• Hispanic families possess strong values that contribute to greater social equity
and social cohesion.

• Hispanics tend to honor, instill, and practice their family and educational values,
and their strong belief in the responsibility of parents to provide for their children.

• Commitment of Hispanic families to education includes school academics, and


also moral and social development.

• Two parents are more likely to be present in most Hispanic immigrant families,
providing strong structure and high levels of mental health.

• Even if employed at low wages, and even with little formal education, fathers
tend to be involved and strive to provide for the material needs of their families.
 

SOURCE: National Task Force on Early Childhood Education for Hispanics: La Comisión Nacional para la Educación de la Niñez Hispana 
(March 2007). 

47
  Strengths and Challenges of Hispanic Families 

Challenges of  Strengths of Hispanic Families
Hispanic Families 
Many Hispanic  Most Hispanic families are strongly 
parents have low  committed to education 
education levels   
 
Many Hispanic  Many Hispanic families provide for 
children live in  strong emotional well‐being 
poverty 
 
Many Hispanic  Most Hispanic families have fathers 
children are English  who are employed 
language learners 

 
SOURCE: National Task Force on Early Childhood Education for Hispanics: La Comisión Nacional para la Educación de la Niñez Hispana 
(March 2007). Para nuestros niños: Expanding and Improving Early Education for Hispanics Executive Report. pp 5‐6.  
www.ecehispanic.org . 

48
 
The Importance of Recognizing that Hispanic Families of New Mexico are Unique 
• Families of some Hispanic PreK students arrived long before the United States
included New Mexico, over 400 years ago. Some of today’s PreK students’
grandparents were taught in Spanish in NM rural public schools.

• New Mexico is the only state in the union whose state constitution addressed the
needs of Spanish-speaking students in the public schools.

• Hispanic families in New Mexico vary in their political and social engagement.
Which are the families and groups within the New Mexico Hispanic community
that hold the most power? How are resources shared between members of
Hispanic communities? What values are most prominent in these groups? How is
power transferred to the next generation?

• What strengths and challenges does New Mexico’s history and context pose for
Hispanic families? How do these challenges and strengths differ from Hispanics
in the rest of the U.S.? How does this affect school achievement?
o How is the sociopolitical history of Hispanic students in New Mexico related
to school performance? (Duncan-Andrade, J.M.R, 2005)
o How did the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and other historical markers affect
the self-concept, wealth, education of Hispanics in New Mexico?

49
o How NM Hispanic historically coped with poverty? How are they coping
now?
o How has the arrival of increasing numbers of immigrants affected already
existing Hispanic communities?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

50
New Mexico PreK 
• Legislation was implemented based on findings that quality PreK has a
positive effect on early childhood development.

• New Mexico PED PreK provides half-day preschool services for 4-year old
children in 27 public school districts (52 schools) across the state (Minimum 450
hours of instruction). New Mexico Children Youth and Families Department
(CYFD) has 41 PreK contractor agencies (83 sites).

• Although there is no income requirement for eligibility, two-thirds of enrolled


children at each New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) site must live
in the attendance zone of a Title 1 elementary school.

• PreK programs are funded in 38 states. Only 7 of 13 Western states offer PreK,
of which New Mexico is one. We are second only to Colorado in percentage of
4-year olds enrolled.

51
2010‐2011: Who Attends New Mexico PreK?
CYFD n = 2,409; PED n=2,377 
(N=4,786)
1% 2%
Asian/Pacific Islander 
(n=61)
14%
Black (Non‐Hispanic) 
21% (n=93)

62% Caucasian (Non‐Hispanic)      
(n=1,008)

Hispanic       (n=2,959)

American Indian/Native 
(n=665)
34.6% of HIspanic
PreK students are  in 
Bilingual Programs

 
SOURCE: New Mexico Public Education Department and CYFD, PreK Programs 2010‐2011 (2010). 

52
Spanish‐Speaking Hispanic Children in PreK 
• Of the 2,959 Hispanic NM PreK students in 2010-2011, 26.8% are
monolingual Spanish and 7.8% were Bilingual Spanish-English speakers
(34.6% combined).

• Teachers working with bilingual children, and with children monolingual in a


language other than English, use the child’s native language during
instruction and in oral and written communication with families.

• Monolingual Spanish-speaking children participate in dual language


programs. They maintain their native language and often by second grade
no longer need English as a Second Language Services. (speakers of both
English and Spanish)
 
 

 
 
 
53
Is PreK a Good Thing for Children in New Mexico? 
Results of Research Study on Effects of PreK vs. Control Group  

Area  Raw Score % Standard  Why Is This Important?


Difference Deviation 
from Control 
Group 
Vocabulary  +5  24%  Often is predictive of later 
success at reading and in 
general measures of cognitive 
abilities 
Early Math  +2  37%  Reflects greater success in 
important computation skills 
and telling time 
Early Literacy  +23  130%  Reflects greater knowledge in 
areas such as print concepts and 
phonological awareness 
SOURCE: Hustedt, J.T., Barnett, W.S., & Friedman, A.H. (November 2010). The New Mexico PreK evaluation: Impacts from the 
fourth year (2008‐2009) of New Mexico’s state‐funded PreK Program.  
 
 
 

54
Is PreK a Good Thing for Hispanic Children in New Mexico? (cont.d) 
 

• Clearly, for the 4,786 PreK students in New Mexico, this program has a robustly positive 
effect on later school achievement. These children will be more likely to achieve well in 
school and into their adult years.  
 
• Early language development opportunities during infant/toddler and preschool years 
have a tremendous influence on achievement in the primary grades and beyond.   
 

• Hispanic families in New Mexico recognize PreK as a key to success for their children. 
While relatively new, New Mexico preschool programs often have a waiting list of 100 
families at some school sites (Kofahl & Zuni, 2010).  
 

“Return on investment is more important than up‐front costs.”
  Harvard Center on the Developing Child (2007)
 
   

55
How is Achievement Measured in PreK? 
• Authentic Assessment is used to measure student growth in PreK 
• Early Learning Outcomes (ELOs) are things children know or are able to do. They are 
measured across the year.  Comparisons are made between what a child knows and can 
do when they enter school in the fall to what they know and can do in the spring. Based 
on observed behaviors and work products, teachers look for indicators of achievement 
and progress along a continuum of proficiency levels:  
o Not yet demonstrating 
o First steps 
o Making Progress 
o Accomplishing 
o Exceeds Expectations 
• The six domains of Early Learning Outcomes include: 
o Physical Development, Health and Well‐Being 
o Literacy 
o Numeracy and Spatial Relations 
o Aesthetic Creativity 
o Scientific Conceptual Understandings 
o Self and Family and Community 
o Approach to Learning 
 
 

56
PED PreK Student Growth from Fall to Spring 2009‐2010 
 

  All Asian Black Caucasian Hispanic American 


          Indian/Native 
      N=846  N=2,488  of Alaska 
Physical Development  84.94% 87.27% 86.11% 85.93% 84.12% 86.63%
Literacy  71.15% 75.58% 71.23% 79.64% 69.39% 65.87%
Numeracy and Spatial  67.20% 74.55% 68.06% 76.03% 65.77% 59.64%
Relations 
Aesthetic Creativity  60.49% 63.64% 63.89% 70.33% 59.20% 50.87%
Scientific Conceptual  61.70% 59.09% 61.11% 71.57% 60.07% 54.60%
Understanding 
Self, Family and  69.83% 69.09% 72.57% 73.23% 69.09% 67.75%
Community 
Approaches to Learning 76.85% 80.91% 76.04% 78.99% 76.56% 74.65%
Overall  70.54% 73.75% 71.20% 76.95% 69.34% 65.91%
 
SOURCE: NM PreK PED Assessment Data, 2010.  

This chart represents proficiency gains from fall to spring for each ethnic group overall and 
across all domains of assessment for PED PreK students. Each percentage on this chart 
represents the students in the “Accomplishing” and “Exceeds Expectations” categories added 
together.  
 
 

57
How is PreK Working for Hispanic Preschool Students in New Mexico?  
• Hispanic PreK students made significant progress in each category and overall. 
 
• Growth for Hispanic students ranged from 59.20% in Aesthetic Creativity to 84.12% in 
Physical Development.  
 
• This data clearly shows that PreK works in supporting early childhood development of 
Hispanic preschoolers.  
 

• When comparing the percentage of growth from fall to spring, Hispanic PreK students 
achieved almost the same as the mean for all groups in each category.  
 

• The 2,959 Hispanic children who participated in PreK will have a distinct advantage 
over Hispanic preschool children who did not attend PreK. These advantages will carry 
over into their adult years.  
 
 
 
 

58
PreK is highly successful for Hispanic preschool students 
• In the chart that follows, look for growth from fall to spring (Yellow = fall; Green = 
spring) 
 
• Notice the three categories on the left side of the graph (Not Yet Demonstrating, First 
Steps, Making Progress)  
 
• Notice the shift in Green (spring) bar size in the two categories on the right side of the 
graph (Accomplishing and Exceeds Expectations.)   
 
• Added together, the percentage numbers from Accomplishing and Exceeds Expectations 
become the Proficiency level used to measure and compare student growth from fall to 
spring. Hispanic Overall is 69.3% and Caucasian Overall is 76.9%. 
 
• Notice the astounding growth in the Green bars on the right for Accomplishing and 
Exceeds Expectations. Hispanic PreK students jumped from 23.2% Proficiency in the fall 
to 69.3% Proficiency in the spring – a growth of 46.1% (see graph below). 
 
• Notice the dramatic shift from the size of the yellow bars on the left‐ Not Yet 
Demonstrating, First Steps – to the green bars on the right.  
 
Hispanic PreK students made significant growth in all areas in 2009‐2010.  

59
Early Learning Outcomes 
New Mexico PreK – All Programs (Hispanic) 
Fall‐Spring Comparison SY2009‐2010 
n= 2,488 
Overall
Add the % in these 2 
Fall Spring
green bars for spring 
100% Proficiency score 69.3% 
90%

80%
Percent Distribution of Children

70%
57.9%
60%

45.4%
50%

40%
27.3% 26.3%
30% 21.8%

20% 11.4%

10% 4.2% 4.0%


0.3% 1.4%

0%
Not yet First steps Making progress Accomplishing Exceeds
demonstrating expectations
 
SOURCE:  New Mexico Public Education Department, PreK Programs (2010).   
 

60
Early Learning Outcomes 
New Mexico PreK – All Programs (Caucasian) 
Fall‐Spring Comparison SY2009‐2010 
n= 846 
 

Overall

Fall Spring Add the % in these 2 


green bars for spring 
100%
Proficiency score (76.9%) 
90%

80%
Percent Distribution of Children

70% 63.3%

60%
47.4%
50%

40%

24.9%
30% 22.3% 20.3%

20% 13.6%

10% 3.8%
0.1% 2.6% 1.5%

0%
Not yet First steps Making progress Accomplishing Exceeds
demonstrating expectations
 
SOURCE:  New Mexico Public Education Department, PreK Programs (2010).  

PED PreK Comparison Graph  

61
By ELO domain, each ethnicity’s difference to the mean 
 
 

15.00% Phys Dev  Literacy  Numeracy  Aesthetic  Scientific  Self, Fam,  Approach  Overall 


Spatial Creativity Community to  Lrng

10.00% Asian

Black
5.00%

Caucasian
0.00%
‐0.82% ‐0.74% ‐0.29%
‐1.76% ‐1.44% ‐1.29% ‐1.64% ‐1.20%
Hispanic
‐5.00%

American 
‐10.00% Indian/Native of 
Alaska

‐15.00%  
SOURCE:  New Mexico Public Education Department, PreK Programs (2010).  

62
What is Compared in the Bar Graph Above? 
• While all students made astounding progress across the year, this chart shows 
comparisons between the percentages of students in each ethnic group who achieved 
Proficiency as compared to the percentage of All Students combined who achieved 
proficiency.  
 
• We are not comparing amount of growth, but rather the percentages of students who 
achieved in the categories of “Accomplishing” or “Exceeds Expectations” in the spring. 
 
Falling into either of these categories would label a child “Proficient”.  

• This graph shows how each group differed from the mean for All Students in each 
domain and overall. 
 
• The chart above does NOT show if a child made progress from “Not Yet Demonstrating” 
to “Making Progress” (2 levels of growth within categories of “Not Proficient”) because 
the growth does not move a child into a level of  Proficiency. 
  
• Notice how Hispanic preschool students consistently scored very close to the mean (the 
0 axis).   
 
 

63
New Mexico as a Model State with Quality Programs
• All PED PreK teachers must be state licensed in early childhood education (birth to 8) 
and educational assistants have an AA degree in early childhood education.  
 

• Some teachers currently are licensed as Elementary or Special Education teachers and 
are using the TEACH scholarships to take classes to earn the required license or degree.  
 

• PreK funds were used last year to provide scholarships for 79 teachers and Educational 
Assistants to work on completion of their license.  
 
• Many teachers are bilingual and are endorsed in bilingual education.  
 
 
 

“… there is growing evidence that large state‐funded prekindergarten (pre‐K) programs 
  are producing valuable school readiness gains for Hispanic youngsters who have the 
opportunity to attend them. Head Start also is beneficial. In addition, high quality 
  infant/toddler programs can contribute to greater school readiness. Thus, the earlier 
Hispanic children have access to high quality educational programs, the better.”        
              Dr. Eugene García, Chair of the National Task Force on Early Childhood Education for Hispanics & Vice 
President for Education Partnerships, Arizona State University 

64
  K‐12 
 
STATEWIDE   

“This is not a Latino problem;  DATA   

this is an American problem. 
We’ve got to solve it, because 
if we allow these trends to 
continue, it won’t be just one 
community that falls behind –  “Resource equity must go beyond 
we all fall behind together.”                          just dollars to ensure, at a 
President Obama at Reauthorization of  minimum, that all students have 
White House Initiative on Hispanic 
access to early childhood 
Education.  
education, highly effective 
 
teachers, college‐preparatory 
  curricula, and equitable 
  instructional resources.” 
  NAACP

65
 

K‐12  
STATEWIDE DATA 
Achievement 
Attendance 
Graduation 
Hispanic Students in 
Schools that Made 
AYP 
 
 
Bilingual Programs 
   

 
 
K‐12 STATEWIDE DATA 

66
Data required for this report at the K‐12 level includes achievement, 
attendance, graduation, the number of Hispanic Students in Schools that 
Made AYP, and the number and types of Bilingual Multicultural Education 
Programs.  
As an introduction to this data, there is some basic information about the 
public schools in New Mexico and enrollment.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

67
 
Basic Facts: New Mexico K‐12 Public Schools: 2009‐2010 
Basic Information on Public Schools in New Mexico  Statewide 

State Size in Square Miles  121,596 

Number of Public School Districts  89 

Elementary/Intermediate Schools 460 

Middle Schools/ Junior High 150 

High Schools  128 

Alternative Schools 40 

Charter Schools  78 

Total Number of Public Schools 856 
SOURCE: Number of Public/Charter Schools by District, School Level / NMPED Data Collection and Reporting Bureau website: 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/IT/schoolFactSheets.html      

68
New Mexico K‐12 Public School Total 
Enrollment 2009‐2010
(most recent public data) Asian/Pacific Islander
N=325,542

0.02 1.4 2.4


African American

10.7

56.7 28.4 White

Hispanic

Only 20% of Hispanic
students were in bilingual  American Indian
programs.
Most Hispanic students 
speak  English as their 
primary language and were  Native 
not in bilingual programs.  Hawaiian/Pacific 
Islander
 

SOURCE: NMPED School Fact Sheets, Enrollment by Ethnicity. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/IT/fs/13/09.10.ethnic.pdf  

69
Enrollment maps – New Mexico Public Education Department/ 
Department of Health ‐ Health Equity Assessment Tool (HEAT).  
There are four maps provided on the following pages to show the percentage range 
of students in White, Hispanic, Native American, and African American ethnic 
groups enrolled in each of the 89 New Mexico public school districts. Each map 
shows a single ethnic group.  

How to Read the Maps:  

o One map is provided to show the population of each major ethnicity group in 
each district of the state. Maps are provided to show percentages of White, 
Hispanic, Native American, and African American students.  
 
o A map for Asian and Pacific Islander students is not shown because combined 
they represent less than 4,200 students out of 325,542 total students in the 
state. 
 
o A white background with stripes is used to indicate where there were less 
than 10 students, or where data was not reported.  
 
 
 

70
o The shade of brown on the map represents that district’s percentage of each 
group’s enrollment. The darker the brown, the closer to 100% enrollment of 
that group. 
 
o Flip between the maps. Look for the darkest and lightest colors. Compare 
each district by ethnicity.  
 
o Compare to attendance, achievement and graduation maps (All maps are also 
provided in the appendix.) 
 
Observations: 
 
o Except for Cloudcroft and the Northwest corner of the state, there are 
generally high numbers of Hispanic students across New Mexico.  
 
o In general, the districts that have a majority of White students have fewer 
Hispanic students. 
 
o Northern New Mexico has a high concentration of Hispanic students.  
 
o Native American students in New Mexico public schools are concentrated in 
the Northwest corner of New Mexico.  

71
 

72
 

73
Achievement 

   Achievement in New Mexico public schools is tested yearly with the New Mexico 

State Based Assessment.  New Mexico began using this state normed assessment in 

2004‐2005. Students at the elementary school level are tested in grades 3‐5. At the 

middle school level, students are tested in grades 6‐8. In high school, students are 

tested in grade 11.  Levels of proficiency are tested for Reading and Math.  Up until 

2010‐2011, achievement in science has been tested; but testing of science achievement 

in future years will depend on allocation of state funds. Social Studies and writing are 

tested in grade 11.  Up to this year, high school proficiency has been tested beginning at 

grade 11, and 11th grade students also were administered State Based Assessment in 

the areas of reading, writing, mathematics, science and social studies. Beginning next 

year, one assessment will be administered to 11th grade students for the combined 

74
purpose of assessing achievement and high school graduation competencies. To ensure 

consistency with future reports, achievement data was retrieved and is reported only in 

the areas of reading and mathematics in this first Hispanic Education Status Report.   

The Hispanic Education Act requires data be reported for state, district and charter 

schools.  In the area of achievement, this report provides the following graphs and 

charts to show achievement data in reading and mathematics: 

• stacked column graphs for grades 4, 8, and 11 achievement by ethnicity 

• line graphs for grades 4, 8, and 11 that indicate the trends of achievement by 

ethnicity across 6 years, starting with School Year 2004‐2005 

• Hispanic‐White gap tables for grades 4, 8, and 11 in reading and mathematics  

75
• stacked column graphs to show achievement in Reading and Mathematics for 

all school levels (elementary, middle school, and high school) by ethnicity 

• New Mexico Public School District color‐coded maps of achievement of all 

Hispanic students and all White students in the areas of reading and 

mathematics. (New Mexico Health Equity Assessment Tool)  

Proficiency maps – New Mexico Public Education Department/ 
Department of Health ‐ Health Equity Assessment Tool (HEAT).  
There are four maps provided on the following pages to show the percentage range 
of student proficiency in reading and mathematics for White, Hispanic, Native 
American, and African American ethnic groups enrolled in each of the 89 New 
Mexico public school districts. Each map shows a single ethnic group.  

76
How to Read the Maps:  

o One map is provided to show the proficiency level of each major ethnicity 
group in each district of the state. Maps are provided to show percentages for 
White, Hispanic, Native American, and African American students.  
 
o A map for Asian and Pacific Islander students is shown even though they 
represent less than 4,200 students out of 325,542 total students in the state. 
 
o A white background with stripes is used to indicate where there were less 
than 10 students, or where data was not reported.  
 
o The shade of color on the map represents that district’s percentage of 
proficiency of each group. The darker the color, the closer to 100% 
proficiency of that group. 
 
o Flip between the maps. Look for the darkest and lightest colors. Compare 
each district by ethnicity.  
 
o Compare to attendance, enrollment and graduation maps (All maps are also 
provided in the appendix.) 
 

77
o Notice that on the first two maps (reading proficiency of Whites and 
Hispanics) the percentages on the legend are the same.  This is because the 
proficiency scores of all the districts were lined up and divided into 5 equal 
subgroups. The legend represents those groupings and then also applies them 
to the Hispanic group. 
 
o On the last two reading proficiency maps, notice that the legends differ. Here, 
each group’s scores were divided into 5 equal subgroups, and are represented 
for their own group.  
 
Observations: 
 
o When White proficiency subgroups are applied to Hispanic students, only one 
district reaches the highest level of White student proficiency.  
 
o In one of the districts where White students perform in their lowest 
subgroup, Hispanic students perform two levels above them (White subgroup 
legends).  
o In general, the White students outperform Hispanic students by 2 – 4 levels.  
 
o There are many districts where Asian students are too few to report.  
 

78
o The subgroup percentage differences between Asian and Hispanic student 
quintiles are often close to 20 points.  
 
o Hispanic, White, and Asian students all score in their own group’s highest 
quintile in Los Alamos Public Schools. However, Hispanics still do not score at 
the same percentage level as Whites.  
 
o Hispanics do score in the top White quintile in Cloudcroft Public Schools.  
 
MATHEMATICS 
o Hispanics outperform Whites in mathematics in Grady and in Logan school 
districts. 
o Hispanics perform in the top White mathematics quintile in Central Public 
Schools.  
o Asian and Hispanic groups are both performing at the 4th highest subgroup 
level in mathematics in Gadsden and Gallup. 
o Asian quintile subgroups are more than 20 points above Hispanic quintile 
subgroup legends in mathematics.  
 

79
 

80
 

81
 

82
 
 

83
ACADEMIC PROFICIENCY
All Grades, NM School Districts, 2010
READING MATH
DISTRICT DISTRICT READING MATH
HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES
STATEWIDE 47.9% 69.1% 36.4% 58.9%
ALAMOGORDO 58.6% 70.0% 44.3% 58.8% LAKE ARTHUR 31.5% 70.0% 22.2% 40.0%
ALBUQUERQUE 48.0% 72.9% 37.5% 64.8% LAS CRUCES 45.5% 65.6% 35.4% 58.7%
ANIMAS 51.2% 72.7% 39.0% 65.9% LAS VEGAS CITY 49.6% 65.1% 29.9% 48.2%
ARTESIA 54.0% 69.3% 43.8% 56.8% LOGAN 53.6% 69.3% 57.1% 55.7%
AZTEC 54.9% 62.9% 43.0% 50.6% LORDSBURG 49.1% 60.9% 31.4% 43.5%
BELEN 48.1% 55.4% 33.8% 37.2% LOS ALAMOS 68.2% 85.7% 57.6% 77.8%
BERNALILLO 47.0% 64.6% 37.7% 53.5% LOS LUNAS 48.2% 64.1% 39.2% 53.1%
BLOOMFIELD 49.9% 61.7% 39.1% 50.0% LOVING 42.6% 55.7% 25.8% 36.7%
CAPITAN 62.7% 69.4% 46.3% 55.1% LOVINGTON 47.5% 65.6% 38.5% 55.2%
CARLSBAD 47.6% 63.6% 35.4% 54.9% MAGDALENA 46.7% 66.1% 30.0% 53.2%
CARRIZOZO 50.9% 55.6% 43.4% 44.4% MAXWELL 47.8% 41.2% 21.7% 43.8%
CENTRAL CONS. 69.2% 69.9% 59.0% 63.7% MELROSE 64.7% 81.0% 41.2% 67.1%
CHAMA 56.4% 65.2% 41.6% 47.8% MESA VISTA 42.2% . 26.5% .
CIMARRON 55.2% 77.4% 34.5% 53.1% MORA 50.4% 57.1% 44.3% 38.1%
CLAYTON 55.6% 69.6% 49.6% 67.6% MORIARTY 52.2% 65.1% 40.4% 55.7%
CLOUDCROFT 80.0% 76.4% 36.0% 53.3% MOSQUERO 69.2% 60.0% 23.1% 30.0%
CLOVIS 44.7% 69.3% 37.9% 61.7% MOUNTAINAIR 44.8% 65.6% 25.0% 44.3%
COBRE CONS 58.8% 71.4% 38.3% 40.5% PECOS 31.6% 40.0% 13.6% 16.0%

 
84
ACADEMIC PROFICIENCY
All Grades, NM School Districts, 2010
DISTRICT READING MATH DISTRICT READING MATH
HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES
CORONA 61.9% 52.0% 42.9% 44.0% PENASCO 47.5% . 28.0% .
CUBA 46.3% 70.0% 30.6% 45.0% POJOAQUE 51.2% 76.8% 37.3% 59.4%
DEMING 40.0% 59.6% 27.6% 43.8% PORTALES 49.8% 64.5% 30.6% 49.4%
DES MOINES 66.7% 75.0% 57.1% 70.0% QUEMADO . 59.7% . 35.8%
DEXTER 42.9% 57.4% 35.1% 44.9% QUESTA 45.1% 50.0% 28.7% 37.5%
DORA 54.3% 53.8% 31.4% 44.0% RATON 50.7% 66.4% 33.2% 53.9%
DULCE 39.1% . 26.1% . RESERVE 53.8% 67.4% 43.6% 53.5%
ELIDA 47.6% 68.5% 28.6% 55.6% RIO RANCHO 61.6% 73.6% 51.4% 67.7%
ESPANOLA 40.7% 63.6% 29.0% 45.5% ROSWELL 51.6% 64.0% 45.1% 58.2%
ESTANCIA 46.3% 59.0% 32.9% 47.5% ROY . . . .
EUNICE 38.0% 55.2% 25.9% 38.1% RUIDOSO 52.6% 65.7% 42.2% 51.5%
FARMINGTON 52.3% 69.9% 34.4% 54.2% SAN JON 60.0% 55.9% 40.0% 47.1%
FLOYD 36.8% 70.4% 21.1% 59.3% SANTA FE 40.4% 71.3% 27.6% 61.9%
FT SUMNER 53.1% 79.7% 28.4% 58.2% SANTA ROSA 41.9% 55.0% 28.2% 25.0%
GADSDEN 50.5% 65.9% 42.0% 53.6% SILVER 51.2% 69.2% 38.1% 63.1%
GALLUP 53.0% 73.6% 38.0% 60.1% SOCORRO 39.2% 63.5% 23.7% 40.9%
GRADY 33.3% 79.5% 75.0% 56.8% SPRINGER 64.5% 56.8% 40.3% 48.6%
GRANTS-CIBOLA 52.7% 64.0% 34.5% 46.0% TAOS 44.0% 68.4% 26.7% 55.6%
HAGERMAN 48.4% 74.2% 31.4% 48.5% TATUM 30.3% 71.7% 32.6% 55.0%
HATCH 39.6% 66.0% 26.4% 48.0% TEXICO 59.6% 77.8% 55.6% 66.7%
TRUTH OR
HOBBS 38.7% 58.8% 27.1% 46.1% CONSQ 47.7% 58.9% 29.9% 44.5%
HONDO 41.2% 70.0% 16.2% 10.0% TUCUMCARI 54.7% 60.6% 44.2% 52.8%

85
ACADEMIC PROFICIENCY
All Grades, NM School Districts, 2010
DISTRICT READING MATH DISTRICT READING MATH
HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES HISPANICS WHITES
HOUSE 46.2% 68.0% 30.8% 52.0% TULAROSA 51.1% 54.6% 34.9% 45.4%
JAL 41.8% 51.5% 36.4% 38.4% VAUGHN 53.8% . 40.4% .
JEMEZ
MOUNTAIN 46.7% 72.7% 23.3% 27.3% WAGON MOUND 34.2% . 15.8% .
JEMEZ VALLEY 53.3% 82.1% 31.7% 56.4% WEST LAS VEGAS 48.7% 53.1% 28.7% 46.9%
JUVENILE
JUSTICE . . . . ZUNI . . . .
Data Source: NM
PED

 
 
 
 

86
  

  GRADE 4 
 

Reading Proficiency by Ethnicity – Stacked Cylinder Graph 

Reading Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Line Graph Across 6 Years 
Reading Gap – Hispanic/Caucasian – Chart 
Mathematics Proficiency by Ethnicity –  
Stacked Cylinder Graph 
Mathematics Proficiency by Ethnicity –  
Line Graph Across 6 Years 
Mathematics Gap – Hispanic/Caucasian – Chart 
 

   

 
 
 

87
READING Proficiency by Ethnicity – All 4th Grade Students 
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 
'Advanced' and 
80% 17.8% 'Proficient'  are 
10.2% 20.8%
combined to  show 
60% 7.6% students who scored 
7.6% at Proficiency
4.7%
40%
45.8% 54.4%
20% 44.3% 43.6% 51.5%
35.8% ƒ Advanced
0% ƒ Proficient 
Advanced
ƒ Nearing 
‐20%
Proficiency 
‐40% ‐6.9% ƒ Beginning 
‐12.5% ‐5.8%
WHITE Proficiency 
‐15.7% ‐13.7% ASIAN  ‐20.0%
‐60% ALL 
AFRICAN 
AMERICAN HISPANIC AMERICAN INDIAN
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data, 2009‐2010 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html  

 
 

88
READING Proficiency by Ethnicity – All 4th Grade Students 
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 
 
  How to Read This Graph: 
ƒ In these graphs, the 0 horizontal axis indicates the cut off point for proficiency. 

ƒ Each level of proficiency is marked by a different color. 

ƒ Proficiency includes the two levels above the 0 axis (Proficient and Advanced). 

ƒ As students progress to the next grade, we want to see a larger percentage of 
Proficient scores and a lower percentage of scores below the 0 axis.  
 
Observations: 

o There are significantly lower percentages of Hispanic, African American and American 
Indian students who score at advanced levels of reading at Grade 4, as compared to 
White and Asian students (in some cases one‐third the percentages of students at this 
level.) 

89
o The reverse is true at the Beginning Steps level: significantly higher percentages of 
Hispanic, African American and American Indian students score in the lowest proficiency 
level (in some cases three or four times the percentage of students at this level as 
compared to White and Asian students.) 
 
o The percentage of scores in the Proficient and Advanced levels for Hispanic, Black and 
American Indian students do not reach the mark of the Advanced levels for White and 
Asian students. In other words: There are more students at the Proficient level (green 
layer) for White and Asian groups, than there are students in the Proficient and 
Advanced levels combined (both green and purple layers) for Hispanic, Black and 
American Indian students.  
 
o This data indicates that results in performance do vary by ethnicity.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

90
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 4 READING 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
80 This gap has
narrowed by 
70 4.4 points
60
50
White
40
30 African 
American
20 Hispanic
10 Asian
0
American 
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Indian
 
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

91
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 4 READING 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
How to Read this Graph: 
o Each line represents the percentage of scores in the Proficiency levels of performance. This 
includes students who scored at Proficient and Advanced in Grade 4 Reading.  
Observations: 
o At this grade level, there are three bands of Proficiency: Asian/Caucasian, Hispanic/African 
American and Native American. 
 
o In 2007, Proficiency scores dipped a little for White, Hispanic and Native American 
students.  
 
o Scores of White students had been steady across 2007 and 2008, and then decreased by a 
couple of points in 2009. 
 
o Except for Asian students, the percentages of students scoring Proficient across the years 
do not tend to vary more than about 5 points.  
 

92
The Grade 4 Reading Gap  
 

Grade 4  Score Gap 
READING 
2004‐ 2005‐ 2006‐ 2007‐ 2008‐ 2009‐2010 
2005  2006  2007  2008  2009 
Hispanic –  24.9  24.3  22.2  24.2  22.7  20.5 
White Gap 
 

  The gap is now 4.4 
points Lower than 6 
 
years ago.  
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

93
MATHEMATICS Proficiency by Ethnicity 4th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 

80% As the top 2 sections 
10.8% increase, the bottom 2 
60% 6.0% 16.5% sections will decrease. 
4.4% 4.0%
3.6%
40%
55.1% 52.4%
43.8% 39.9% 40.1%
20% 34.6%

0%

‐28.3% ‐26.0%
‐20% ‐39.3% ‐42.4% ‐43.3% ‐46.9% Advanced
‐5.5%
‐4.6%
‐40% ‐10.5% WHITE  Proficient
ASIAN
ALL  ‐12.9% ‐12.2% ‐14.5%
‐60% Beginning 
AFRICAN  HISPANIC AMERICAN 
Proficiency
‐80% AMERICAN  INDIAN 
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

94
MATHEMATICS Proficiency by Ethnicity 4th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 
How to Read This Graph: 
ƒ In these graphs, the 0 horizontal axis indicates the cut off point for proficiency. 

ƒ Each level of proficiency is marked by a different color. 

ƒ Proficiency includes the two levels above the 0 axis (Proficient and Advanced). 

ƒ As students progress to the next grade, we want to see a larger percentage of 
Proficient scores and a lower percentage of scores below the 0 axis.  

Observations: 
o Grade 4 Mathematics scores are significantly lower than Grade 4 reading scores.  
 
o Between 21.6% and 30.7% fewer students in Hispanic, African American and American 
Indian groups reached levels of proficiency (green and blue levels combined) than their 
White and Asian peers. 
 

95
o There are significantly lower percentages of Hispanic, African American and American 
Indian students who score at Advanced (purple) levels of mathematics, in some cases ¼ 
or even 1/5 the percentages of White or Asian students. 
 
o The percentages of White and Asian students in the Proficient level (green) are 14% to 
19% points higher than Hispanic, African American and American Indian students.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

96
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 4 MATHEMATICS 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
80
This gap has
70 narrowed by 
1.3 points
60
50
40
30
White
20 African American
10 Hispanic
0 Asian
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 American Indian
 
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

97
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 4 MATHEMATICS 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
How to Read this Graph: 
o Each line represents the percentage of scores in the Proficiency levels of 
performance. This includes students who scored at Proficient and Advanced in Grade 
4 Mathematics.  
Observations: 
o There are two bands of achievement scores.  
 
o Scores tend to parallel peaks and dips in the same years.   
 
o There is a steady increase of the scores of Hispanic students in the last two years; and 
there was a slight dip in the upward trend of the scores of White students in the last 
year. 
 

98
  The Grade 4 MATHEMATICS Gap 

Grade 4  Score         
MATHEMATICS   Gap  

2004‐ 2005‐ 2006‐ 2007‐ 2008‐ 2009‐


Year  2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   2010  

Hispanic – White  23.6  22.7  22.4   22.4  23.7  22.3 


Gap  

 
The gap is now 1.3
 
points LOWER than 6 
  years ago.  
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

99
 

 
GRADE 8   

   

 
Reading Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Stacked Cylinder Graph 
Reading Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Line Graph Across 6 Years 
Reading Gap – Hispanic/Caucasian – Chart 
Mathematics Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Stacked Cylinder Graph 
Mathematics Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Line Graph Across 6 Years 
Mathematics Gap – Hispanic/Caucasian – Chart 

100
READING Proficiency by Ethnicity 8th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 

11.3% 19.6%
80%
3.9% 3.9%
60% 3.9%

40% Advanced
65.1% 59.9%
49.5% 50.6% 46.6%
20%
Proficient
0%
Beginning
‐20% ‐4.5% ‐4.7% Step
ASIAN
‐40% WHITE  ‐11.3% Nearing
‐14.6% ‐10.6%
AFRICAN 
Proficiency
‐60% HISPANIC AMERICAN INDIAN
AMERICAN  
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data , 2009‐2010 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

101
READING Proficiency by Ethnicity 8th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 
Reading this graph: 
ƒ In these graphs, the 0 horizontal axis indicates the cut off point for proficiency. 

ƒ Each level of proficiency is marked by a different color. 

ƒ Proficient includes the two levels above the 0 axis (Proficient and Advanced). 
Observations: 

o Between 22% and 39% fewer students in Hispanic, African American and American 
Indian groups reached levels of proficiency (green and blue levels combined) than their White 
and Asian peers. 
o Hispanic, African American and American Indian groups all scored at least 50.5% 
Proficient (green and purple combined)  
o Hispanic, African American and American Indian groups had the same percentage of 
students that reached Advanced levels (purple) – 3.9% 
o The percentage of African American in Beginning Step was 10% higher than White and 
Asian groups.  

102
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 8 READING 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
90
This gap has
80 grown by .4 
points
70
60
50
White
40
African 
30
American
20 Hispanic
10 Asian
0
American 
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Indian
 
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

103
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 8 READING 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
 
How to Read this Graph: 
o Each line represents the percentage of scores in the Proficient level of performance. This 
includes students who scored at Proficient and Advanced levels in Grade 8 Reading.  
Observations: 
o The peaks of 2007 were present for all groups, but not as dramatic for White and Asian 
students as they were for Hispanic, African American and Native American students.  
 
o The gaps between the Hispanic, African American and Native American groups narrow the 
most in 2009.  
 

 
 
 

104
The Grade 8 Reading Gap  
 
Grade 8  Score Gap 
 
READING  
 

  2004‐ 2005‐ 2006‐ 2007‐ 2008‐ 2009‐


  Year  2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   2010  
 

  Hispanic – White  21.5  23.4  21.5  18.4  23.8  21.9 


  Gap  
 

 
The gap is now .4
  higher than 6 years 
  ago.  
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

105
MATHEMATICS Proficiency by Ethnicity 8th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 
27.4%
80%
14.0%
60% Advanced
4.3% 5.1%
40% 3.5%

42.4% 43.5% Proficient


20% 25.9% 27.8% 23.2%
0% ‐39.3% ‐58.0% ‐58.2% ‐25.3% Beginning
‐20% Step
‐3.2%
Nearing
‐40% ‐3.9% ASIAN ‐62.5%
Proficiency
WHITE  ‐11.5%
‐60% ‐8.5% ‐10.2%
AFRICAN  HISPANIC
‐80% AMERICAN INDIAN
AMERICAN   
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data , 2009‐2010 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

106
MATHEMATICS Proficiency by Ethnicity 8th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 
 
  How to Read This Graph: 
ƒ In these graphs, the 0 horizontal axis indicates the cut off point for proficiency. 
ƒ Each level of proficiency is marked by a different color. 
ƒ Proficient includes the two levels above the 0 axis (Proficient and Advanced). 
ƒ As students progress to the next grade, we want to see a larger percentage of 
Proficient scores and a lower percentage of scores below the 0 axis.  
Observations: 

o The percentage of Asian students at Advanced (purple) is almost 8 times that of Native 
American students at Advanced Proficiency. 
 
o The percentage of students not at proficient levels (red and blue levels combined) 
ranges from 66% to 72.7% for Hispanic, African American and American Indian groups. 
 
o Asian and White students in the Nearing Proficiency level (blue) are half the percentage 
of Hispanic, African American and American Indian students at that level.  

107
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 8 MATHEMATICS 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
80
This gap has 
70 increased by 
.6 points
60
50
White
40
African 
30 American
20 Hispanic

10 Asian
0
American 
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Indian
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

108
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 8 MATHEMATICS 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
How to Read this Graph: 
o Each line represents the percentage of scores in the Proficient level of performance. This 
includes students who scored at Proficient and Advanced levels in Grade 8 Mathematics.  
Observations: 
o The pattern is very similar to the Grade 8 Reading trends across 6 years.  
 
o Except for Asian students, peaks and dips were parallel for all groups,  
 
o The gap between Asian and White students was larger than the gap between Hispanic, 
African American and Native American students. This created three bands of performance.  
 
o The gap between Hispanic and White students remained consistent across 6 years.  
 

 
 

109
The Grade 8 Mathematics Gap  
Grade 8  Score Gap 
MATHEMATICS  

2004‐ 2005‐ 2006‐ 2007‐ 2008‐ 2009‐


2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   2010  

Hispanic – White  23  23.8  25.5  25.6  25.5  23.6 


Gap  
 

 
The gap has 
 
increased by .6 
 
points in 6 years.  
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

110
 

GRADE 11   

   
 
 
 
 
Reading Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Stacked Cylinder Graph 

Reading Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Line Graph Across 6 Years 

Reading Gap – Hispanic/Caucasian – Chart 

Mathematics Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Stacked Cylinder Graph 

Mathematics Proficiency by Ethnicity ‐ Line Graph Across 6 Years 

Mathematics Gap – Hispanic/Caucasian – Chart 

111
READING Proficiency by Ethnicity 11th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 

80% 14.2% 18.6%


60% 6.2% 6.0% 4.2%
Advanced

40% 47.0%
54.9% Proficient
40.6% 42.4% 42.8%
20%
Beginning
0% Step
‐24.5% ‐25.0% Nearing
‐34.6% ‐38.4% ‐41.4%
‐20% Proficiency
‐5.6% ‐8.8%
‐40% ‐17.0% ‐12.3% ‐10.3%
ASIAN
WHITE 
AFRICAN 
‐60% HISPANIC AMERICAN INDIAN
AMERICAN   
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data , 2009‐2010 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

112
READING Proficiency by Ethnicity 11th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 
Reading this graph: 
ƒ In these graphs, the 0 horizontal axis indicates the cut off point for proficiency. 

ƒ Each level of proficiency is marked by a different color. 

ƒ Proficient includes the two levels above the 0 axis (Proficient and Advanced). 
Observations: 

o The percentage of students at Advanced (purple) increased for White, Hispanic, African 
American and American Indian from Grade 8 Advanced percentages.  
 
o The largest gap at Beginning Step (red) was between White students (5.6%) and African 
American students (17%). 
 
o While the Asian group had the highest percentage of students (18.6%) in Advanced, 
there were more White students that reached proficiency levels (69.1%). These were 
the only groups to surpass 50% of their students at Proficiency levels.  

113
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 11 READING 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
80
The reading 
Gap has grown 
70 2.1 points 

60
50
White
40
30 African 
American
20 Hispanic
Scores dropped 
10 drastically. What 
happened in 2008? Asian
0
American 
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Indian
 
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 11 READING 

114
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
How to Read this Graph: 
o Each line represents the percentage of scores in the Proficient level of performance. This 
includes students who scored at Proficient and Advanced levels in Grade 11 Reading.  
Observations: 
o The lines representing White, Hispanic, African American and Native American students 
are very parallel in their peaks and dips.   
 
o The gaps between the Hispanic, African American and Native American groups narrow the 
most in 2005.  
 

 
 
 
 

115
The Grade 11 Reading Gap  
Grade 11  Score Gap 
READING  

2004‐ 2005‐ 2006‐ 2007‐ 2008‐ 2009‐


2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   2010  

Hispanic –  24.5  24.4  27  21.9  26.4  26.4 


White Gap  
 

 
The gap has 
  increased by 2.1 
  points in 6 years.  

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data  
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

116
MATHEMATICS Proficiency by Ethnicity 11th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 

80% 30.7%
20.2%
60%
4.1% 5.7%
40% 3.4%

20% 34.8% Advanced


24.9% 22.9% 31.1%
19.6%
0% Proficient
‐20% ‐31.7% ‐36.3% ‐27.7% ‐41.3%
‐39.8%
Beginning 
‐40% ‐12.4% ‐9.8%
Proficiency
WHITE  ASIAN
‐60% ‐32.0% ‐30.4% ‐34.5% Nearing 
AFRICAN  Proficiency
‐80% AMERICAN
HISPANIC AMERICAN INDIAN
 

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data , 2009‐2010 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

117
MATHEMATICS Proficiency by Ethnicity 11th Grade   
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by group? 
 

  How to Read This Graph: 
ƒ In these graphs, the 0 horizontal axis indicates the cut off point for proficiency. 
ƒ Each level of proficiency is marked by a different color. 
ƒ Proficient includes the two levels above the 0 axis (Proficient and Advanced). 
ƒ As students progress to the next grade, we want to see a larger percentage of 
Proficient scores and a lower percentage of scores below the 0 axis.  
Observations: 
o The percentage of students at Advanced (purple) is almost 10 times that of Native 
American students at Advanced Proficiency and 10% above the next highest group, 
White. 
 
o The percentage of students not at proficient levels (red and blue levels combined) 
ranges from 68.3% to 75.8% Hispanic, African American and American Indian groups as 
compared to 37.5% for Asian students and 44.3 for White students.  
 
o Less than 30% of Hispanic, African American and American Indian students are at 
Proficiency (Proficient and Advanced levels).  

118
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 11 MATHEMATICS 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
70 The Mathematics GAP
between Caucasian and 
60 Hispanic students has 
narrowed 2.4 points. 
50
40 White

30 African 
American
20
Hispanic
10
Asian
0
American 
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Indian
 

 
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 
 

119
NM Standards Based Assessment Grade 11 MATHEMATICS 
Proficiency by Ethnicity 
Do Results Vary Over Time? 
 
How to Read this Graph: 
o Each line represents the percentage of scores in the Proficient level of performance. 
This includes students who scored at Proficient and Advanced levels in Grade 11 
Mathematics.  
Observations: 
o There are two identifiable bands or performance 
 
o Lines for Asian and African American students tend to parallel, while lines for White, 
Hispanic, and Native American students tend to have parallel peaks and dips. 
 
o The gap between Asian and White students was larger than the gap between Hispanic, 
African American and Native American students. This created three bands of performance.  
 
o The gap between Hispanic and White students remained relatively consistent across 6 
years, and narrowed by 2.4 points.  
 

120
The Grade 11 Mathematics Gap  
Grade 11  Score Gap 
MATHEMATICS  

2004‐ 2005‐ 2006‐ 2007‐ 2008‐ 2009‐


2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   2010  

Hispanic – White  28.8  30  28.4  27   26.4  26.4 


Gap  
 

 
The gap has narrowed by 
  2.4 points in 6 years.  

SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

 
 

121
READING 
Overall Observations:  
o There are significantly lower percentages of Hispanic, African American and American 
Indian students who score at advanced levels of reading in  Grades 4, 8 and 11, as 
compared to White and Asian students (in some cases one‐third the percentages of 
students at this level.) 
 
o The reverse is true at the Beginning Steps level: significantly higher percentages of 
Hispanic, African American and American Indian students score in the lowest proficiency 
level (in some cases three or four times the percentage of students at this level as 
compared to White and Asian students.) 
 
o The percentage of scores in the Proficient and Advanced levels for Hispanic, Black and 
American Indian students do not reach the mark of the Advanced levels for White and 
Asian students. In other words: There are more students at the Proficient level (green 
layer) for White and Asian groups, than there are students in the Proficient and Advanced 
levels combined (both green and purple layers) for Hispanic, Black and American Indian 
students.  
 
o At Grade 11, the Asian group had the highest percentage of students (18.6%) in Advanced 
levels of achievement, but there were more White students that reached proficiency levels 
(69.1%).  

122
 
o This data indicates that achievement in reading proficiency does, indeed, vary across ethnic 
groups. 
 
MATHEMATICS 
Overall Observations:  
o Across  the  grades,  mathematics  achievement  scores  are  significantly  lower  than  reading 
achievement scores.  
 
o In grade 11, the percentage of students not at proficient levels (red and blue levels added 
together) ranges from 66% to 72.7% for Hispanic, African American and American Indian 
groups. 
 
o There are significantly lower percentages of Hispanic, African American and American 
Indian students who score at Advanced levels of achievement, sometimes almost 5 to 8 
times less than that of their Asian and White peers.  
 
o It appears that even more so in mathematics, achievement does, indeed, vary across 
ethnic groups. 
 

123
THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP:  
o Except for Asian students, there tend to be three parallel bands of achievement that peak 
and dip in the same years.  
 
o Trends in achievement tend to form parallel lines between ethnic groups across time, 
usually with dips and peaks in the same years, leaving us to wonder what happened that 
caused these marked changes in the performance of all groups.  
 
o While in a few instances, the White‐Hispanic gap is narrowing, this narrowing is very small 
and is insignificant for a span of six years.  
 
o These small changes in achievement could indicate the beginnings of an upward trend.  
 
 
 

124
 

STATEWIDE ACHIEVEMENT    

ACROSS ELEMENTARY, MID, AND HIGH SCHOOL by ethnicity   
 

• Reading by Proficiency Levels (stacked cylinder graph) 

• Mathematics by Proficiency Levels (stacked cylinder graph) 

125
READING Proficiency by Ethnicity, Across School Levels 
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by grade level?
2nd Bar The percentage of Hispanic 
80% Gr 6‐8
Gr. 17.8%
11 Advanced readers is less than 
10.8% 14.2% half that of White Advanced 
1st
Bar 60%
7.6% . . readers in all grades.
.
4.0% 6.0%
Gr 3‐5
. . . .
. . .
40% . .
20%

0%
Advanced

‐20%
Proficient

‐40%
Beginning 
WHITE ASIAN Proficiency
‐60%
ALL  Nearing 
BLACK HISPANIC Proficiency
‐80% NATIVE AMERICAN
 
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

126
READING Proficiency by Ethnicity, Across School Levels 
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by grade level? 
 
This graph is different from the graphs in the preceding sections. This graph shows 
achievement of all students in New Mexico public schools by ethnicity and by 
school level. For each ethnicity, the first bar represents students in grades 3‐5 
combined. The second bar represents students in Grades 6‐8 combined. The 
third bar represents grade 11, the only high school grade tested for State Based 
Assessment. These bars represent achievement for all grades tested for New 
Mexico State Based Assessment.  
 
How to read this graph: 
ƒ In this graph, the 0 horizontal axis indicates the cut off point for proficiency. 

ƒ Each level of proficiency is marked by a different color. 

ƒ Proficient includes the two levels above the 0 axis (Proficient and Advanced). 
 

127
Observations: 

o The percentage of students at Proficient levels combined (Proficient/green and 
Advanced/purple) for Hispanic, African American and American Indian students is the same 
as the first level of Proficiency (green section of cylinders) for White and Asian students.  
 
o The percentage of White students at Advanced levels across grades was at least double 
that of Hispanic students at the same grade level.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

128
MATHEMATICS Proficiency by Ethnicity, Across School Levels 
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by grade level? 
1st bar ‐ 2nd bar   Question: Why are so many  
Gr 80%
3‐5 Gr 6‐8 Hispanic, Black, and Native 
18.1% American students at Beginning 
Gr.11 Step Mathematics proficiency? 
60% 15.1% 20.2%
7.4%
40% 48.1% 5.3%
5.7%
34.8% 37.2% Advanced
20% 22.9%
37.6% 24.3% Proficient
0%
Beginning
‐20% Step
Nearing
‐40% Proficiency
ASIAN
‐60%
.

WHITE ‐34.5%
‐30.4%
ALL ‐32.0%
‐80% BLACK
HISPANIC NATIVE AMERICAN  
SOURCE: New Mexico PED Standards Based Assessment Statistics and Data 
http://www.ped.state.nm.us/AssessmentAccountability/AcademicGrowth/NMSBA.html 

129
MATHEMATICS Proficiency by Ethnicity, Across School Levels 
NM Standards Based Assessment 2009‐2010 
Do results vary by grade level? 
 
This graph shows achievement of all students in New Mexico public schools by 
ethnicity and by school level. For each ethnicity, the first bar represents students 
in grades 3‐5 combined. The second bar represents students in Grades 6‐8 
combined. The third bar represents grade 11, the only high school grade tested 
for State Based Assessment. These bars represent achievement for all grades 
tested for New Mexico State Based Assessment.  
 
How to Read This Graph: 
ƒ In this graph, the 0 horizontal axis indicates the cut off point for proficiency. 
ƒ Each level of proficiency is marked by a different color. 
ƒ Proficient includes the two levels above the 0 axis (Proficient and Advanced). 
ƒ As students progress to the next grade, we want to see a larger percentage of 
Proficient scores and a lower percentage of scores below the 0 axis.  
 
Observations: 

130
o At all grade levels, the percentage of White students at Advanced (purple) is at least 
double the percentage of Hispanic students at the same grades. The percentage of White 
students at proficient levels (green) is double the percentage of Hispanic students at that 
level in Elementary, Middle, and 11th grades. 
 
o Only in grades 3‐5 do Hispanic students achieve above 30% combined Proficiency 
(Proficient and Advanced levels).  
 
o The percentage of Hispanic, African American, and Native American students at Beginning 
Step is at least 30% in Grade 11. 
 
 

 
 
 
 

131
 
 
 
  ATTENDANCE:  
 
  
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

132
ATTENDANCE 
Attendance is one of the indicators used to determine Adequate Yearly 
Progress. Attendance in this report is provided in two ways. There are state 
maps that show the percentage rates for each district on the following pages, 
and then there is a table that shows attendance in the profile of each district 
found in the appendix.  
Four maps are provided to show statewide attendance; two for Hispanic 
students and two for White students. These maps show all 89 school districts.  
How to Read these Maps:  
o The first two maps show attendance at the elementary school level (one 
map each for Hispanic students and White students.) The third and fourth 
maps show high school attendance.  
 
o A white background with stripes is used to indicate where there were less 
than 10 Hispanic or White students, or where data was not reported.  
 

133
o The shade of each district represents the percentage of attendance for 
each ethnic group. The darker the green, the closer to 100% attendance. 
 
o Flip between the maps. Look for the darkest and lightest colors. Compare 
each district by ethnicity, and then compare by school level.  
 
o Compare to enrollment, achievement and graduation maps (All maps are 
also provided in the appendix.) 
 
Observations: 
o Districts do not always have equally high rates of attendance across 
ethnicity and across school levels. 
o Attendance for Hispanics and White students ranges from 87.6% to 100% 
at the elementary school level.  
o At least 10 districts have 97.4% to 100% attendance at the elementary 
school level for both Hispanic and White students.  
o Attendance ranges from 72.9% to 100% at the high school level.  

134
o More districts are in the 97.4% to 100 % attendance at the elementary 
school level than at the high school level. 
o Hispanic and White groups are at the top attendance level in Mosquero, 
Roswell and San Jon districts.  
 
 

135
 
 

136
 

137
 
Enrollment compared to percent 
graduated (bar graph)  STATEWIDE 
  GRADUATION DATA:  
Percentage That Graduated Compared to 
4‐Year Cohort for 2008 
Total Statewide Enrollment  
and 2009 
(Chart with numbers) 
 

 
Enrollment compared to percent 
graduated (Line graph with markers) 
 
Enrollment compared to percent 
graduated (Chart with percentages) 

138
Percentage of Total Enrollment Compared to Percentage That Graduated
4‐Year Cohorts for 2008 and 2009  STATEWIDE PUBLIC SCHOOLS

The Blue fabric shows enrollment %  56 This is the Graduation GAP


55.53
across ethnicity 

Question : What  happened 
to these kids?

29 Enrollment 
29.54 07‐08
Graduate 08

Enrollment 
08‐09
Graduate 09
10.97 11

2.61 3
1.35 1

Caucasian African American Hispanic Asian American Indian

SOURCE: NMPED School Fact Sheets, Enrollment by Ethnicity. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/IT/fs/13/09.10.ethnic.pdf
NMPED School Fact Sheets, Graduation, 4‐Year Cohort, Cohort of 2009, Cohort of 2008. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/Graduation/index.html  

139
Graduation Statewide – 4‐Year Cohort, Percentage That Graduated Compared 
to Total Statewide Enrollment (chart with numbers) 
% of Total  % of  % of Total  % of 
Ethnicity  Enrollment ‘08  Graduates ‘08  Enrollment ‘09  Graduates ‘09 
2007‐2008 2007‐2008 2008‐2009 2008‐2009
Total  100 60.3 100 66.1
Caucasian  29.54 71.3 29 74.5
African 
American  2.61  60.9  3  61.4 
Hispanic  55.53 56.2 56 63.0
Asian  1.35 80.1 1 80.0
American 
Indian  10.97  49.8  11  57.8 
 
Hispanics are more  Only a little more than 
  than half of the  half of Hispanic 
Question: How many more 
TOTAL students in  students graduated 
will graduate if given one 
  NM schools. high school in 4 years. 
more year? (5yr cohort)

SOURCE: NMPED School Fact Sheets, Enrollment by Ethnicity. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/IT/fs/13/09.10.ethnic.pdf  
NMPED School Fact Sheets, Graduation, 4‐Year Cohort, Cohort of 2009, Cohort of 2008. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/Graduation/index.html    

140
Graduation Statewide – 4‐Year Cohort, Percentage That Graduated 2008 and 
2009 by Ethnicity (line graph with markers) 

90.0 What happened in 2009?  
80.0 Hispanic and Native American 
students made the most dramatic 
70.0 increases.  How can this be 
repeated? 
60.0
63.0
56.2 57.8
50.0
49.8 American Indian
40.0
Hispanic
30.0

20.0 African American

10.0
Caucasian
0.0
2008 2009 Asian
 
SOURCE: NMPED School Fact Sheets, Enrollment by Ethnicity. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/IT/fs/13/09.10.ethnic.pdf  
NMPED School Fact Sheets, Graduation, 4‐Year Cohort, Cohort of 2009, Cohort of 2008. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/Graduation/index.html    

141
Graduation Statewide – 4‐Year Cohort, Percentage That Graduated 2008 and 
2009 by Ethnicity (chart with percentages) 
 

American  African 
Indian  HISPANIC American  Caucasian  Asian  TOTAL

2008  49.8%  56.2%  60.9%  71.3%  80.1%  63.2%

   
2009  57.8%  63.0%  61.4%  74.5%  80.0%  65.1%

 
Increase  8%  6.8%  .5%  3.2%  ‐0.1%  1.9% 
 

In one year, the Hispanic 4‐Year Cohort Graduation rate increased by 6.8%, second only to the 
increase made by Native American students of 8%.  
SOURCE: NMPED School Fact Sheets, Enrollment by Ethnicity. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/IT/fs/13/09.10.ethnic.pdf  
NMPED School Fact Sheets, Graduation, 4‐Year Cohort, Cohort of 2009, Cohort of 2008. http://www.ped.state.nm.us/Graduation/index.html    

142
 

Hispanic Students   

in Schools That   
Make  
 
Adequate Yearly 
 
Progress (table) 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
143
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) 
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) includes the annual academic proficiency targets in 
reading and mathematics that the state, school districts and schools must reach to be 
considered on track for 100% proficiency by school year 2013‐2014.   
• AYP is part of state and federal statute 
• Each state shall establish a timeline for adequate yearly progress. The timeline 
shall ensure that no later than 12 years after the 2001‐2002 school year, all 
students in each group described in the law will meet or exceed the state’s 
proficient level of academic achievement. (The Elementary & Secondary 
Education Act (ESEA) of 2001) 
• The Department shall measure the performance of every public school in New 
Mexico (New Mexico Statute §22‐2C‐3, D) 
What do schools have to do to meet AYP? 
• Achieve a 95% participation rate on state assessments 
• Reach targets for proficiency or reduce non‐proficiency 
• Reach targets for the attendance rate for elementary and middle schools and 
the graduation rate for high schools 
 
 
Who has to meet AYP? 

144
• The state, school districts, schools, and subgroups of 25 or more students within 
schools.  
• Subgroups include:  
o Ethnicity/Race: Caucasian, African American, Asian/Pacific, Hispanic, 
American Indian/Alaskan Native;  
o Economically Disadvantaged (FRLP), Students with Disabilities (SWD), and 
English Language Learners (ELL).  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SOURCE: NM PED State Report Card 2007‐2008. New Mexico Statewide.  

 
 
 

145
Hispanic Students in Schools That Make 
Adequate Yearly Progress 
 

Hispanic Enrollment, by Schools 
making Adequate Yearly Progress 
(AYP) 2010 
Non Hispanic 
School 
Hispanic  American  African  Pacific  Multiple 
AYP  Caucasian  Asian 
2010  Indian  American  Islander  Races 
N  %  N  %  N  %  N  %  N  %  N  %  N  % 
Made AYP 
(school 
n=183)  11 20 13 15 27 11
  21,251  % 16,660 % 2,489 7% 906  % 622 % 15 % 277 %
Did Not Make 
AYP  
(school 
n=644)  89 80 93 87 85 73 89
  177,034  % 67,839 % 32,083 % 6,023  % 3,505 % 40 % 2,328 %
10 10 10 10 10 10 10
Total  198,285  0% 84,499 0% 34,572 0% 6,929  0% 4,127 0% 55 0% 2,605 0%
 

  SOURCE: New Mexico Public Education Department, Chief Statistician, 2010.  

146
Student Enrollment Grades 3‐8, 11
by School AYP Status 
Hispanic  All 
Status 
Students  Students 
Progressing5  17,002 16.8% 33,439 19.4%
School 
Improvement  6,034 5.9% 11,304 6.6%

School 
Improvement  13,528 13.3% 22,410 13.0%
II 
Corrective  8,858 8.7% 14,422 8.4%
Action 
Restructuring  8,847 8.7% 14,742 8.6%

Restructuring  47,232 46.5% 75,735 44.0%
II 
Total  101,501 100.0% 172,052 100.0%
          SOURCE: New Mexico Public Education Department, Chief Statistician, 2010. 

147
 
 
 
BILINGUAL MULTICULTURAL 
  EDUCATION Programs 
  The Number and Type of Bilingual and 
Multicultural Programs (Table) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

148
The Number and Type of Bilingual and Multicultural 
Education Programs  
While the words Hispanic and Bilingual are often confused to mean the same, they are 
not. Only twenty percent of all Hispanic students are enrolled in Bilingual Multicultural 
education programs in New Mexico schools. That means that 80% of Hispanic students 
are not in these programs.  They may speak Spanish, but are not in bilingual education 
programs. It may be these students speak English or another non‐Spanish language as 
their primary language. They are not classified as English Language Learners, and are not 
learning English as a Second language.  Also, students of non‐Hispanic ethnic groups may 
be in Bilingual Multicultural Education Programs who come from families with Native 
American, Vietnamese, Russian, or other home languages. Those students are not 
counted in the programs below. This report provides the numbers and types of programs 
for Hispanic Spanish‐speaking students who are in Bilingual Multicultural Education 
Programs in New Mexico public schools.  

o Bilingual Multicultural Education Programs provide instruction in, and the study of, 
English and the home language of the students. These programs may also include 
the delivery of content areas in the home language and English; and include the 
cultural heritage of the child in specific aspects of the curriculum (Bilingual 
Multicultural Education Bureau, New Mexico PED, 2010.)  

149
o Five  program models used in New Mexico: 

1: Dual Language Immersion ‐
2: Maintenance
3: Enrichment 
4: Transitional Bilingual
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language
 

How to Read the Table: 

o The number of each program type is listed, along with the total number of 
students for each program and for each district.  
 
o Districts are not listed in alphabetical order, but in order of the New 
Mexico PED code (not included in the table).  
 
o There is also a table provided in the District Profile section that includes all 
schools, program types and number of students 

Observations: 

o Some districts have 2 total programs with few students, while other 
districts have 3 total programs with hundreds of students.  

150
 
o There are no official ‘Maintenance’ programs listed. Some districts may 
practice the principles of Maintenance programs in other program types 
that are reported.  
 

151
The Number and Type of  
Bilingual and Multicultural Programs 
 

BILINGUAL 
PROGRAMS IN NEW 
MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number Students 
DISTRICT 
ALBUQUERQUE  1: Dual Language Immersion  40
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  52
   4: Transitional Bilingual  4
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  96
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     8,940
ROSWELL  1: Dual Language Immersion  7
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  5
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  12
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     547
 
 
   
   
   

152
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR SPANISH  Hispanic 
SPEAKING STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number Students 
DISTRICT 
HAGERMAN  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  2
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  2
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     39
DEXTER  1: Dual Language Immersion  1
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  3
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     362
LAKE ARTHUR  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  3
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  3
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     24
 
 
 
 
 
 

153
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number Students 
DISTRICT 
CLOVIS  1: Dual Language Immersion  6
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  6
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     490
LAS CRUCES  1: Dual Language Immersion  21
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  0
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  16
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
  
Total Programs  37
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    3,274
HATCH  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  0
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  5
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
  
Total Programs  5
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     384
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

154
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR SPANISH  Hispanic 
SPEAKING STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
GADSDEN  1: Dual Language Immersion  7
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  20
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
  
Total Programs  27
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    4,257
CARLSBAD  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  0
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  8
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
  
Total Programs  8
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    122
LOVING  1: Dual Language Immersion  1
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  3
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     208
 
 
 
 
 
 

155
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
ARTESIA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  8
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  9
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
  
Total Programs  17
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     595
SILVER CITY  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  1
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  1
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     53
COBRE CONSOLIDATED 
SCHOOLS  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  6
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  0
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  6
  
Total Programs  12
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     890
 
 
 
 
 
 

156
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
SANTA ROSA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  5
   Total Programs  5
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     483
VAUGHN  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  0
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  0
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  2
  
Total Programs  2
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     86
LOVINGTON  1: Dual Language Immersion  7
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  1
   4: Transitional Bilingual  4
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  12
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     381
 
 
 
 

157
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
EUNICE  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  0
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  3
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
  
Total Programs  3
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     24
HOBBS  1: Dual Language Immersion  2
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  14
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  16
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     368
RUIDOSO  1: Dual Language Immersion  3
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  0
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  3
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
  
Total Programs  6
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     269
 
 
 
 

158
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
CORONA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  2
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  4
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     28
DEMING  1: Dual Language Immersion  5
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  4
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  4
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  5
  
Total Programs  18
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    1,687
GALLUP  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  14
   Total Programs  14
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     41
 
 
 
 

159
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
MORA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  3
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  0
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
  
Total Programs  3
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     291
WAGON MOUND  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  2
   Total Programs  4
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     73
TUCUMCARI  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  1
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  0
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  1
  
Total Programs  2
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     22
 
 
 
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Hispanic 

160
NEW MEXICO FOR  Students 
SPANISH SPEAKING 
STUDENTS 
DISTRICT 
CHAMA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  5
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  5
   Total Programs  10
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     231
DULCE  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  0
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  0
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  2
  
Total Programs  2
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     29
ESPANOLA  1: Dual Language Immersion  3
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  14
   4: Transitional Bilingual  1
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  14
   Total Programs  32
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    3,100
 
 
 
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN  Hispanic 
NEW MEXICO FOR  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 

161
SPANISH SPEAKING 
STUDENTS 
DISTRICT 
JEMEZ MOUNTAIN  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
  
3: Enrichment  3
  
4: Transitional Bilingual  0
  
5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  3
  
Total Programs  6
  
Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     180
PORTALES  1: Dual Language Immersion  4
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  3
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  1
   Total Programs  8
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     329
FLOYD  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  1
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  1
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.  18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

162
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
BERNALILLO  1: Dual Language Immersion  4
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  8
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  1
   Total Programs  13
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     741
CUBA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  2
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     5
FARMINGTON  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  15
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  15
   Total Programs  30
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     973
 
 
 
 
 

163
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
BLOOMFIELD  1: Dual Language Immersion  2
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  4
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  4
   Total Programs  10
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     269
CENTRAL CONSOLIDATED 
SCHOOLS  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  4
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  5
   Total Programs  9
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     58
WEST LAS VEGAS  1: Dual Language Immersion  1
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  10
   Total Programs  13
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    1,414
 

164
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
LAS VEGAS CITY  1: Dual Language Immersion  3
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  7
   Total Programs  12
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     1,207
PECOS  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  3
   Total Programs  3
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     478
SANTA FE  1: Dual Language Immersion  7
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  8
   4: Transitional Bilingual  1
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  1
   Total Programs  17
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     791
 

 
 

165
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
POJOAQUE  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  5
   4: Transitional Bilingual  1
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  5
   Total Programs  11
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     1,099
TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES  1: Dual Language Immersion  1
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  4
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  3
   Total Programs  10
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     162
SOCORRO  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  1
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  3
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    98
 

 
 

166
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
MAGDALENA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  1
   Total Programs  1
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     2
TAOS  1: Dual Language Immersion  1
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  2
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  2
   Total Programs  5
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     314
PENASCO  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  3
   Total Programs  3
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    344
 

 
 

167
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
MESA VISTA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  1
   4: Transitional Bilingual  4
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  5
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    282
QUESTA  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  6
   Total Programs  6
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    344
MORIARTY  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  5
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  5
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     204
 

 
 

168
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
RIO RANCHO  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  7
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  7
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.    464
LOS LUNAS  1: Dual Language Immersion  4
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  3
   4: Transitional Bilingual  2
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  2
   Total Programs  11
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     336
BELEN  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  8
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  8
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     234
 

 
 

169
BILINGUAL PROGRAMS IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR 
SPANISH SPEAKING  Hispanic 
STUDENTS  PROGRAM TYPE   Number  Students 
DISTRICT 
GRANTS  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  5
   Total Programs  5
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     274
COTTONWOOD  CLASS  1: Dual Language Immersion  0
   2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  1
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  1
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     36
CIEN AGUAS INTERNATIONAL  1: Dual Language Immersion  1
2: Maintenance  0
   3: Enrichment  0
   4: Transitional Bilingual  0
   5: Heritage/Indigenous Language  0
   Total Programs  1
   Hispanic Students in Bil/Mult Prog.     61

TOTAL STATEWIDE  38,015 
    SOURCE: New Mexico Public Education Department, Bilingual and Multicultural Education Bureau (2010).  

.. 

170
Post Secondary Education  

  A quality higher education is an investment that returns lifetime benefits to the 

  individual and to society at large. Mikyung Ryu, Minorities in Higher Education: Twenty‐Fourth Status Report, 2010.   
171
 

  We hold these truths to be self 
  evident, that all men are 
  created equal, that they are 
endowed by their Creator with 
  In the 21st century, it’s my 
certain inalienable rights, that 
 
judgment that the leading civil 
among these are life, liberty 
rights issue will be education 
  and the pursuit of happiness. – 
because it’s the key to equal 
U.S. Declaration of Independence 
  opportunity. – Jack Scott, 
Chancellor, California Community 
Colleges  
 

  The difference between the 
  haves and the have‐nots is an 
education and a job.  – Peter 
  Winograd, Governor’s Educational 
  Policy Advisor, New Mexico; Director, 
UNM Center for Education Policy 
  Research  

172
 

Post Secondary Education  
The Hispanic Education Act calls for accounting of enrollment, retention and completion rates 
of Hispanic students in Post Secondary Education.  That data will be provided in this section 
and also in the Appendix. To set the context for the data to follow, this section addresses 
national and local achievement and opportunities for Hispanic students at post secondary 
institutions.  In this section on Post Secondary Education, you will find:  

• A growing perspective on Post Secondary Education as a national agenda important to 
the success of our Hispanic community and important to fulfilling the American Dream 
• The facts on enrollment, retention, and completion of Hispanics at the national and 
state level 
• Strategies that have Promise  

This section deals with both Community Colleges and 4‐year institutions. It is important to 
understand that both offer opportunities to Hispanic students in New Mexico.  

The National Agenda: The White House Summit on Community Colleges 
President Obama has stated that he wants America to be the best‐educated country in the 
world by 2020.  On October 5, 2010, the first‐ever White House Summit on Community 
173
Colleges was held (http://www.whitehouse.gov/communitycollege).  President Obama asked Dr. Jill 
Biden to convene the event to highlight the critical role that community colleges play in 
developing America’s workforce and reaching our educational goals.  At this summit, 
President Obama announced his goal: 

“We are in a global competition to lead in the growth industries of the 21st century.  And 
that leadership depends on a well‐educated, highly skilled workforce...  By 2020, America 
will once again lead the world in producing college graduates.  And I believe community 
colleges will play a huge part in meeting this goal, by producing an additional 5 million 
degrees and certificates in the next 10 years.” 
 

Key points made by Dr. Biden: 

• “Community colleges are uniquely American ‐‐ places where anyone who walks through the 
door is one step closer to realizing the American Dream.  These schools are flexible and 
innovative.  For that reason, countries around the world are looking at community colleges 
as a model to increase workforce preparedness and college graduation among their own 
citizens.” 
 
• “Community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide the education and training that 
will prepare students for the jobs in the 21st century.” 
 
• “Schools are forming partnerships with businesses in their communities, ensuring that 
students are trained for jobs that need to be filled.” 
174
 
• “Getting Americans back to work is America’s great challenge.”   
 
• “Community colleges are critically important to preparing graduates for those jobs.”  
 
• “Community colleges are entering a new day in America” ‐   
o For more and more people, community colleges are the way to the future. 
o They’re giving real opportunity to students who otherwise wouldn’t have it. 
o They’re giving hope to families who thought the American Dream was slipping away.   
o They are equipping Americans with the skills and expertise that are relevant to the 
emerging jobs of the future. 
o They’re opening doors for the middle class at a time when the middle class has seen 
so many doors close to them. 
 
 
Key points made by President Obama:  
• “Community colleges aren’t just the key to the future of their students.  They’re also one of 
the keys to the future of our country.  
 
• “We know, for example, that in the coming years, jobs requiring at least an associate’s 
degree are going to grow twice as fast as jobs that don’t require college.  We will not fill 
those jobs ‐– or keep those jobs on our shores –‐ without community colleges.  So it was no 
surprise when one of the main recommendations of my Economic Advisory Board ‐– who I 
met with yesterday ‐– was to expand education and job training.  These are executives 
from some of America’s top companies.  Their businesses need a steady supply of people 

175
who can step into jobs involving a lot of technical knowledge and skill.  They understand 
the importance of making sure we’re preparing folks for the jobs of the future.” 
 
• “In recent years, we’ve failed to live up to this legacy, especially in higher education.  In just 
a decade, we’ve fallen from first to ninth in the proportion of young people with college 
degrees.  That not only represents a huge waste of potential; in the global marketplace it 
represents a threat to our position as the world’s leading economy.” 
 
• “But reaching the 2020 goal that I’ve set is not just going to depend on government.  It also 
depends on educators and students doing their part.  And it depends on businesses and 
non‐for‐profits working with colleges to connect students with jobs.  
 
• At this summit, President Obama announced: 
o  A new partnership called ‘Skills for America’s Future’ where businesses and 
community colleges will work together to match the work in the classroom with the 
needs of the boardroom (businesses from PG&E, to UTC, to the Gap have announced 
their support, as have influential business leaders.) 
o The Gates Foundation is starting a new five‐year initiative to raise community college 
graduation rates citing the fact that more than half of those who enter community 
colleges fail to either earn a two‐year degree or transfer to a earn a four‐year degree.

Hispanic Serving and Minority Institutions in New Mexico 
New Mexico has nineteen Hispanic Serving Institutions and thirteen institutions that qualify as 
Minority Institutions. These classifications give an idea of the population of a university, which can 
be very important when seeking external funding.   
176
Minority Institutions ‐ Each of the colleges and universities on this list reported an enrollment of a 
single minority group, as the term “minority” is defined under § 365(2) of the HEA (20 U.S.C. 1067k 
(2)), or combination of those minority groups, that exceeded 50 percent of its total enrollment. For 
the purposes of this list, “minority” is defined as American Indian, Alaska Native, Black (not of 
Hispanic origin) and Hispanic. [1]

New Mexico Minority Institutions 

  Institution                       % of  
                          Minority Enrollment 
Central New Mexico Community College, Albuquerque 50.89
Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture, Santa Fe 90.63
International Institute of the Americas, Albuquerque 84.05
Luna Community College, Las Vegas 82.56
Navajo Technical College, Crownpoint 98.98
New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas 62.24
New Mexico State University-Dona Ana, Las Cruces 68.59
New Mexico State University-Grants, Grants 71.08
Northern New Mexico College, Espanola 79.57
Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute, Albuquerque 100.00
University of New Mexico-Gallup Campus, Gallup 88.29
University of New Mexico-Taos Branch, Taos 58.23
University of New Mexico-Valencia County Branch, Los Lunas 61.32

177
Hispanic Serving Institutions in New Mexico 

There are 19 Hispanic Serving Institutions in New Mexico. These include all seven of the 4‐year 
Institutions of Higher Education. All are members of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and 
Universities (HACU). Hispanic‐Serving Institutions (HSIs) are defined as colleges, universities, or 
systems/districts where total Hispanic enrollment constitutes a minimum of 25% of the total 
enrollment.   

• “Total Enrollment” includes full‐time and part‐time students at the undergraduate or 
graduate level (including professional schools) of the institution, or both (i.e., headcount of 
for‐credit students).   
• Member enrollment statistics are self reported by the institution for the fall semester of the 
year prior to the membership year.  For example, year 2009 members provide Fall 2008 
enrollment statistics.  
• HACU’s mission is to Champion Hispanic Success in Higher Education http://www.hacu.net . 
HACU fulfills its mission by: 
o promoting the development of member colleges and universities;  
o improving access to and the quality of post‐secondary educational opportunities for 
Hispanic students; and  
o meeting the needs of business, industry and government through the development and 
sharing of resources, information and expertise.  

178
New Mexico (19) 
 
   Institution Name 

  Central New Mexico Community College Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.cnm.edu 

  Clovis Community College  Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.clovis.edu 

  Eastern New Mexico University, Main Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.enmu.edu 

  Eastern New Mexico University, Roswell Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.roswell.enmu.edu 

  New Mexico Highlands University Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.nmhu.edu 

  New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.nmt.edu 

  New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
  Hispanic‐Serving Institution

  New Mexico Junior College  Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.nmjc.edu 

  New Mexico Military Institute  Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.nmmi.edu 

179
  New Mexico State University, Alamogordo Hispanic‐Serving Institution
http://nmsua.edu 

  New Mexico State University, Carlsbad Hispanic‐Serving Institution
http://artemis.nmsu.edu 

  New Mexico State University, Grants Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.grants.nmsu.edu 

  New Mexico State University, Main Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.nmsu.edu 

  Northern New Mexico College  Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.nnmc.edu 

  Santa Fe Community College  Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.sfcc.edu 

  University of New Mexico, Main Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.unm.edu 

  University of New Mexico, Taos Hispanic‐Serving Institution
http://taos.unm.edu 

  University of New Mexico, Valencia Campus Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.unm.edu/~unmvc 

180

  Western New Mexico University, Main Hispanic‐Serving Institution
www.wnmu.edu 
 

Keys to ‘The Kingdom’ 
The Tomás Rivera Center  
The American Association for Higher Education (AAHHE) includes a distinguished scholar or 
prominent leader to speak on Hispanic education at its annual conference in honor of the late 
Hispanic education advocate Tomás Rivera.  The 26th annual Tomás Rivera Lecture was 
presented at this year’s AAHHE conference held on March 5, 2010. The keynote speakers of 
this year’s lecture were two very well‐respected leaders in higher education, Charles B. Reed, 
Chancellor, California State University (CSU) and Jack Scott, Chancellor, California Community 
Colleges (former California state senator). The lecture was entitled Access/Acceso: Rising to 
the Challenge of Improving Higher Education Opportunities for Latinos.  
 

181
Dr. Reed has worked hard to improve the admission and graduation rates of Latinos. His 
lecture was entitled “Keys to the Higher Education Kingdom”. Among the major points made 
by Dr. Reed: 

• CSU is focusing on Hispanic‐Latino advancement because ‘that’s what universities must 
do to say relevant in this country.” (p.7).  
• CSU administrators are very serious about creating an environment that will nurture the 
academic experiences of Hispanic students and faculty members at their institutions.  
• The presidents of the university have partnered with the Parent Institute for Quality 
Education (PIQE), an organization that helps Latino‐Hispanic parents who live in 
underserved communities of California. 
• CSU is committed to preparing more Hispanic teachers because students need more 
teachers who reflect the diversity of the state.  
• CSU has set a goal to increase graduation rates of all students by 8 percent over the next 
six years.  
• Among the successful strategies provided by Dr. Reed were encouraging students to 
succeed in Algebra 1 an 2; a poster campaign that teams with Univision, and the Bill & 
Melinda Gates Foundation to promote ways to prepare for and get into college; 
parent/student (mid school level) night and camp where students receive CSU 
Identification Cards (IDs) with a list of things they need to do to be admitted on the back 
of the card – the card gives students access to many university services; promoting 
access to financial assistance at the federal level; creating a successful pipeline of 
qualified faculty.  
 
182
Senator Scott made the point that equality has been promoted as the dream of America and 
that one of the keys to fulfilling the American dream is through higher education. While he 
served as a California State Senator, Scott authored a bill now being carried out in California’s 
seventh grade classes.  Each student in seventh grade receives information about college and 
financial aid. Among the major points made by Senator Scott:  

• Community colleges are a strong and viable option for Latino students 
• 65.7 percent of Latino parents are not knowledgeable about how to get to college (to 
some it is like a foreign country) 
• Once students have been admitted, it is critical that colleges make sure students 
succeed 
• The future of California’s economy is tied to higher education 
• Programs such as the Puente program, and Extended Opportunity Programs and 
Services are in place to increase retention rates 
• A major goal of California Community Colleges is to hire staff that share cultural bonds 
with their students. From classified staff (25% Latino) to presidents and chancellors (21% 
Latino), there is a spoken goal to increase hires of people of color and to cultivate a 
supportive environment for Latino students in the classroom and in life.   
 
 
 
 
183
Map goes

The Facts:
Post Secondary 
Education Data 
 

• Enrollment 
 

• Retention 
 

• Completion 
20    
thth ttttt
 

184
The Facts 
In this section, you will find the facts on attainment, enrollment, retention and graduation for 
Hispanic students at the national level and in New Mexico. While this report calls for Post 
Secondary data, for New Mexico, only the data for public Institutions of Higher Education will 
be provided.  New Mexico private institutions and trade schools will not be covered in this 
report and minimal data will be provided on other types of institutions of higher education at 
the national level. At the state level, only the New Mexico data required in the Hispanic 
Education Act will be reported.  Some data that could have provided a fuller picture of Post 
Secondary education was not accessible due to the time constraints for this report.  
 
Overall Attainment 
Minorities in Higher Education 2010 – The 24th Status Report (on Attainment)  
• Sponsored by the American Council on Education and the GE Foundation (philanthropic 
organization of the General Electric Company) 
 
• The report confirms that “The United States is no longer gaining ground in the 
educational attainment of its population from one generation to the next.” P. xi 
 
• Today’s young adults (aged 25 to 34) are no better educated than their parents of the 
baby boom generation (for White and minority groups) 
185
 
• Although the country’s Post Secondary attainment rates remain ‘stalled’, there are 
differences in rates of attainment of ethnic and racial groups 
 
• Each generation of younger women in the U.S. is continuing to reach higher levels of 
Post Secondary attainment, while the attainment of men is falling 
 
• These strides made by women are mostly made by Asian American and White women 
 
• Attainment rates for Hispanic and African Americans have dipped for the youngest 
group (aged 25 – 34) 
 
• Hispanics continue to exhibit the lowest educational attainment levels, even though 
they are the fastest growing population 
 
• The gap between Hispanic men and women is growing 

New Mexico Data on Attainment 

• The American Community Survey (2006) reports that over 313,000 New Mexico adults 
(ages 18 – 64) do not hold a high school diploma. The high school dropout rate is 
approximately 50%.  
 

186
• New Mexico’s Center on Education and the Workforce reports that by 2018, 61% of all 
jobs will require some college education. 
 
• It is projected that the largest share of future job openings will be ‘Middle Skill Jobs’, 
which will require more than a high school diploma 

New Mexico Educational Attainment: 
Persons 25 and Older

10.6 9.8 High School Dropout


14.3
27.4 High School Graduate
7.2 Some College, No Degree

22.5 Associate's Degree

Bachelor's 

Graduate Degree

 
SOURCE: New Mexico Higher Education Department (2010). New Mexico’s State Master Plan for Higher education: Building new 
Mexico’s Future  

Enrollment 
Enrollment data is typically collected in the fall of first‐time degree‐seeking freshmen for 
comparison of retention to the spring and then one year later.   
National Data: Minorities in Higher Education 2010 – The 24th Status Report (Enrollment) 

187
• For the traditional college‐aged population, there was uneven improvement among 
racial/ethnic groups 
o The gap widened between Hispanics and Whites, and between Hispanics and 
African Americans 
ƒ Whites had the largest increase: 31% in 1988 to 45% in 2008 
ƒ African Americans rose from 22%  to 34%  
ƒ Hispanics rose from 17% to 28 % 
• Overall Enrollment rose from 14.3 million in 1997 to 18.2 million in 2007 (28%) 
o Enrollment grew for every racial group 
o The growth among minorities (3.6 million to 5.4 million) outpaced the growth for 
Whites (9.7 million to 10.8 million) 
o Colleges and universities became more diverse during the past decade     
ƒ Minority student body grew from 25% to 30% 
• Overall enrollment (of any age), Hispanics had the largest gains (in 
growth rates  and in absolute numbers) 
ƒ White student body shrank from 68% to 59% 
ƒ During this time, minority enrollment continued to become more 
concentrated in two‐year colleges than in four‐year institutions 
 
Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics 
The following chart (NCES, 2008) shows enrollment for fall 2008 at the national level.  
• Notice that Hispanics are enrolled at a higher rate at public 2‐year institutions.  

188
Percentage Distribution of Fall Enrollment in Degree‐Granting Institutions, by Control and Type of 
Institution and Race/Ethnicity: Fall 2008  
 

For‐profit 52 27 12 6 12 White

Not for profit 4‐year 69 12 6 6 1 6 Black

Not‐for‐profit 2‐year 60 20 9 5 4 2
Hispanic

Public 4‐year 67 11 10 7 14
Asian/Pacific 
Islander
Public 2‐year 59 14 18 7 11
American Indian/ 
Alaska Native
Total 63 14 12 7 13
Nonresident alien
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
 
 
Note: Includes undergraduate and post baccalaureate students. Private institutions are presented in three categories: not‐for‐profit 
2‐year, not‐for‐profit 4‐year, and for‐profit (including both 2‐ and 4‐year) institutions. Nonresident aliens are persons who are not 
citizens of the United States and who are in this country on a temporary basis and do not have the right to remain indefinitely. 
Nonresident aliens are shown separately because information about their race/ethnicity is not available. Race categories exclude 
persons of Hispanic ethnicity.  
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. 2008 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data 
System (IPEDS). Spring 2009.  
 
 
 
189
New Mexico Data on Enrollment 
The New Mexico Higher Education Department also serves the Adult population that does not 
hold a high school diploma (313,000 students) and the student population that has English as 
a Second Language needs (107,800). The following charts show Adult Basic Education by age 
and by ethnicity. 
 
New Mexico ABE Enrollment by Age 2008‐
2009
2%

12% 18%
16‐18
19‐24
22%
25‐44
46%
45‐59
60+

 
 
SOURCE: New Mexico Higher Education Department Annual Report, 2009 
 

190
New Mexico ABE Students by Ethnicity

3%
2% 12%
Hispanic
14%
White
African American
69%
Asian
Native American

 
 
SOURCE: New Mexico Higher Education Department Annual Report, 2009 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

191
Post Secondary institutions in New Mexico served 131,219 students in fall 2008. The following 
pie chart shows the percentage by ethnicity. 
 
Higher Education Student Ethnicity in New 
Mexico Fall 2008

3%
38% Hispanic
40% American Indian
Asian
No response
Foreign
8% White
7%
Black

2% 2%
 
 
 
 
SOURCE: New Mexico Higher Education Department Annual Report, 2009 
 

192
Fall 2008 Enrollment by Student Level
40,000 37,957

35,000

30,000

25,000

20,000 18,426

15,000 13,787

10,000 7,754 8,728 8,098

5,000 3,211 3,149 2,439


1,006
0

 
 
SOURCE: New Mexico Higher Education Department Data Editing and Reporting System 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
193
2009 Enrollment data for State –Funded Colleges and Universities in New Mexico 
 
The following table shows the enrollment of each ethnicity by campus at New Mexico colleges 
and universities for fall 2009.  Numbers for Hispanic students are highlighted in yellow. Pie 
charts for each institution are included in the Appendix.  
The map on the next page shows the location of each institution in New Mexico.  

Student headcounts are unique to each institution; therefore, you cannot add these numbers 
to get a statewide total.  
 
 
Institution    Branch      Ethnicity      Head Count 
New 
Mexico 
State 
University 
(NMSU)   Alamogordo Branch          American Indian  204
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         Asian or Pacific Islander        116
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         Black, non‐Hispanic               282
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         Hispanic                           2217
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         No response                        475
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         Non‐resident Alien                108
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         White, non‐Hispanic              2449
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           American Indian 58
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           Asian or Pacific Islander        45
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           Black, non‐Hispanic               88
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           Hispanic                           1469
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           No response                        213
194
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           Non‐resident Alien                24
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           White, non‐Hispanic              1448
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           American Indian 287
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           Asian or Pacific Islander        143
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           Black, non‐Hispanic               359
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           Hispanic                           7958
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           No response                        657
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           Non‐resident Alien                268
2879

NMSU   Dona Ana Branch            White, non‐Hispanic             


The 
University 
of New 
Mexico 
(UNM)    Gallup Branch              American Indian  3049
UNM    Gallup Branch             Asian or Pacific Islander        103
UNM    Gallup Branch             Black, non‐Hispanic               20
UNM    Gallup Branch             Hispanic                           351
UNM    Gallup Branch             No response                        65
UNM    Gallup Branch             Non‐resident Alien                15
UNM    Gallup Branch             White, non‐Hispanic              300
New 
Mexico 
State 
University 
(NMSU)   Grants Branch              American Indian  521
NMSU   Grants Branch             Asian or Pacific Islander        22
NMSU   Grants Branch             Black, non‐Hispanic               77
195
NMSU   Grants Branch             Hispanic                           1164
NMSU   Grants Branch             No response                        198
NMSU   Grants Branch             Non‐resident Alien                37
NMSU   Grants Branch             White, non‐Hispanic              761
The 
University 
of New 
Mexico 
(UNM)      Los Alamos Branch          American Indian  105
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         Asian or Pacific Islander        47
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         Black, non‐Hispanic               46
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         Hispanic                           547
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         No response                        59
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         Non‐resident Alien                26
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         White, non‐Hispanic              623
Clovis 
Community 
College 
(CCC)    Main (Clovis)  American Indian  54
CCC    Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        154
CCC    Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               429
CCC    Main  Hispanic                           1859
CCC    Main  No response                        410
CCC    Main  Non‐resident Alien                132
CCC    Main  White, non‐Hispanic              3912
Central 
New 
Mexico 
Community  Main (Albuquerque)  American Indian  3081
196
College 
(CNM) 
CNM  Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        963
CNM  Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               1529
CNM  Main  Hispanic                           16776
CNM  Main  No response                        4161
CNM  Main  Non‐resident Alien                690
CNM  Main  White, non‐Hispanic              14574
Eastern 
New 
Mexico 
University 
(ENMU)   Main (Portales)  American Indian  189
ENMU   Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        96
ENMU   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               320
ENMU   Main  Hispanic                           1836
ENMU   Main  No response                        404
ENMU   Main  Non‐resident Alien                171
ENMU   Main  White, non‐Hispanic              3554
Luna 
Community 
College 
(LCC)    Main (Las Vegas)  Asian or Pacific Islander        18
LCC    Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               39
LCC    Main  Hispanic                           2322
LCC    Main  No response                        73
LCC    Main  Non‐resident Alien                Less than 10
LCC    Main  White, non‐Hispanic              424
Mesaland  Main (Tucumcari) American Indian 80
197
Community 
College 
(MCC) 
MCC  Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        21
MCC  Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               46
MCC  Main  Hispanic                           736
MCC  Main  No response                        175
MCC  Main  Non‐resident Alien                Less than 10
MCC  Main  White, non‐Hispanic              921
New 
Mexico 
Highlands 
University 
(NMHU)   Main (Las Cruces)  American Indian  319
NMHU   Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        81
NMHU   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               259
NMHU   Main  Hispanic                           2448
NMHU   Main  No response                        169
NMHU   Main  Non‐resident Alien                157
NMHU   Main  Two or More 61
NMHU   Main  White, non‐Hispanic              1455
New 
Mexico 
Institute of 
Mining and 
Technology 
(NMIMT)  Main (Socorro)  American Indian  95
NMIMT  Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        106
NMIMT  Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               45
198
NMIMT  Main  Hispanic                           907
NMIMT  Main  No response                        75
NMIMT  Main  Non‐resident Alien                284
NMIMT  Main  White, non‐Hispanic              2457
New 
Mexico 
Junior 
College 
(NMJC )  Main (Hobbs)  American Indian  47
NMJC   Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        57
NMJC   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               278
NMJC   Main  Hispanic                           1979
NMJC   Main  No response                        346
NMJC   Main  White, non‐Hispanic              2562
New 
Mexico 
Military 
Institute 
(NMMI)   Main (Roswell)  American Indian  16
NMMI   Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        57
NMMI   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               88
NMMI   Main  Hispanic                           164
NMMI   Main  Non‐resident Alien                50
NMMI   Main  Two or More 10
NMMI   Main  White, non‐Hispanic              231
New 
Mexico 
State 
University 
(NMSU)   Main (Las Cruces)  American Indian  752
199
NMSU   Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        353
NMSU   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               697
NMSU   Main  Hispanic                           9162
NMSU   Main  No response                        1898
NMSU   Main  Non‐resident Alien                1205
NMSU   Main  White, non‐Hispanic              7540
Northern 
New 
Mexico 
College 
(NNMC)  Main (Española)  American Indian  306
NNMC  Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        38
NNMC  Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               36
NNMC  Main  Hispanic                           2115
NNMC  Main  No response                        50
NNMC  Main  Non‐resident Alien                Less than 10
NNMC  Main  White, non‐Hispanic              710
Santa Fe 
Community 
College 
(SFCC)   Main (Santa Fe)  American Indian  285
SFCC   Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        146
SFCC   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               155
SFCC   Main  Hispanic                           3419
SFCC   Main  No response                        1654
SFCC   Main  Non‐resident Alien                40
SFCC   Main  White, non‐Hispanic              4125
San Juan 
College  Main (San Juan)  American Indian  4267
200
(SJC)   
SJC    Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        134
SJC    Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               175
SJC    Main  Hispanic                           2533
SJC    Main  No response                        895
SJC    Main  Non‐resident Alien                72
SJC    Main  Two or More 26
SJC    Main  White, non‐Hispanic              10222
The 
University 
of New 
Mexico 
(UNM)    Main (Albuquerque)  American Indian  2086
UNM    Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        1208
UNM    Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               1003
UNM    Main  Hispanic                           10228
UNM    Main  No response                        1546
UNM    Main  Non‐resident Alien                1157
UNM    Main  White, non‐Hispanic              14590
Western 
New 
Mexico 
University 
(WNMU)   Main  (Portales)  American Indian  145
WNMU   Main  Asian or Pacific Islander        73
WNMU   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic               119
WNMU   Main  Hispanic                           2089
WNMU   Main  No response                        287
WNMU   Main  Non‐resident Alien                91
201
WNMU   Main  White, non‐Hispanic              1643
UNM    Medical School            American Indian 13
UNM    Medical School            Asian or Pacific Islander        20
UNM    Medical School            Black, non‐Hispanic               Less than 10
UNM    Medical School            Hispanic                           77
UNM    Medical School            No response                        25
UNM    Medical School            White, non‐Hispanic              181
Eastern 
New 
Mexico 
University 
(ENMU)   Roswell Branch             American Indian  202
ENMU   Roswell Branch            Asian or Pacific Islander        60
ENMU   Roswell Branch            Black, non‐Hispanic               150
ENMU   Roswell Branch            Hispanic                           2705
ENMU   Roswell Branch            No response                        321
ENMU   Roswell Branch            Non‐resident Alien                44
ENMU   Roswell Branch            White, non‐Hispanic              2976
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch American Indian 125
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch Asian or Pacific Islander        14
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch Black, non‐Hispanic               35
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch Hispanic                           450
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch No response                        60
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch Non‐resident Alien                11
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch White, non‐Hispanic              1010
UNM    Taos Branch American Indian 144
UNM    Taos Branch Asian or Pacific Islander        18
UNM    Taos Branch Black, non‐Hispanic               26
UNM    Taos Branch Hispanic                           1067
202
UNM    Taos Branch No response                        118
UNM    Taos Branch Non‐resident Alien                47
UNM    Taos Branch White, non‐Hispanic              810
CNM  UNM Site                  American Indian 120
CNM  UNM Site                  Asian or Pacific Islander        49
CNM  UNM Site                  Black, non‐Hispanic               103
CNM  UNM Site                  Hispanic                           686
CNM  UNM Site                  No response                        52
CNM  UNM Site                  Non‐resident Alien                16
CNM  UNM Site                  White, non‐Hispanic              336
UNM    Valencia Branch           American Indian 209
UNM    Valencia Branch           Asian or Pacific Islander        32
UNM    Valencia Branch           Black, non‐Hispanic               63
UNM    Valencia Branch           Hispanic                           1970
UNM    Valencia Branch           No response                        105
UNM    Valencia Branch           Non‐resident Alien                16
UNM    Valencia Branch           White, non‐Hispanic              1173
Source: New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2010 
 
Notice the head count for the institutions with the highest numbers of Hispanic students. For 
institutions with lower numbers, notice where they are on the New Mexico map. How far are 
they from the next closest Post Secondary institution? In most cases these institutions may be 
the only site within hours for opportunities to obtain a degree or certificate.  
 
2010 State Master Plan for Higher Education: December 2010 
• Currently, New Mexico serves over 140,000 students in Higher Education. 
o Hispanics account for 42.1% (12.5% nationally) 
o Native Americans account for 10.5% (1.5% nationally) 
203
Retention  (Persistence) 
National Data: Minorities in Higher Education 2010 – The 24th Status Report (on Enrollment) 

• College persistence rates (definition): the percentage of first‐time freshmen who remain 
enrolled or compete their certificates or degrees anywhere in higher education during a 
three year period after enrolling  

• Overall, Hispanics showed the sharpest drops in persistence of all racial/ethnic groups.  

• Reductions were more pronounced for students beginning their education at two‐year 
institutions 

• At four‐year institutions, persistence rates decreased slightly from 83% (1995 cohort) to 
81% (2003 cohort) 
National Retention Rates at Two‐ and Four‐Year Institutions by Ethnicity:2003 Cohort 
Ethnicity    Two‐year institutions   Four‐year institutions 
Asian  67%  89% 
Whites  56%  83% 

Hispanics  54%  76% 


African Americans  47v  73% 

204
 
New Mexico Data: Retention 
Fall 2009 to Spring 2010 of students in New Mexico Post Secondary Institutions is represented 
in the table below. Overall, it appears that New Mexico is doing better than national averages 
in keeping Hispanic students in school at the Post Secondary level.  
Returned  Campus        Ethnicity             Numbers/   Percent Retention 
Less 
Spring  CCC    Main  American Indian  than 10  66.7%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  CCC    Main  Islander          than 10  100.0%
Black, non‐
Spring  CCC    Main  Hispanic                19  70.4%
Spring  CCC    Main  Hispanic                  121  69.1%
Less 
Spring  CCC    Main  No response           than 10  N/A 
Non‐resident 
Spring  CCC    Main  Alien                 14  77.8%
White, non‐
Spring  CCC    Main  Hispanic                125  83.9%
Spring  CNM  Main  American Indian 173  75.9%
Asian or Pacific 
Spring  CNM  Main  Islander          33  89.2%
Black, non‐
Spring  CNM  Main  Hispanic                66  80.5%
Spring  CNM  Main  Hispanic                  871  80.7%
Spring  CNM  Main  No response           200  81.6%
Spring  CNM  Main  Non‐resident  30  85.7%
205
Alien               
White, non‐
Spring  CNM  Main  Hispanic                585  81.4%
Spring  ENMU   Main  American Indian 22  95.7%
Roswell  Less 
Spring  ENMU   Branch             American Indian  than 10  N/A 
Ruidoso  Less 
Spring  ENMU   Branch  American Indian  than 10  83.3%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  ENMU   Main  Islander          than 10  75.0%
Roswell  Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  ENMU   Branch             Islander          than 10  100.0%
Roswell  Black, non‐
Spring  ENMU   Branch             Hispanic                12  85.7%
Black, non‐
Spring  ENMU   Main  Hispanic                45  76.3%
Ruidoso  Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  ENMU   Branch  Hispanic                than 10  50.0%
Ruidoso 
Spring  ENMU   Branch  Hispanic                  22  88%
Spring  ENMU   Main  Hispanic                  155  75.2%
Roswell 
Spring  ENMU   Branch             Hispanic                  229  75.6%
Less 
Spring  ENMU   Main  No response           than 10  N/A 
Roswell  Less 
Spring  ENMU   Branch             No response           than 10  N/A 
Ruidoso 
Spring  ENMU   Branch  No response           0  0%
Spring  ENMU   Main  Non‐resident  Less  N/A
206
Alien                than 10
Ruidoso  Non‐resident  Less 
Spring  ENMU   Branch  Alien                 than 10  66.7%
Roswell  Non‐resident 
Spring  ENMU   Branch             Alien                 0  0%
Ruidoso  White, non‐
Spring  ENMU   Branch  Hispanic                19  59.4%
Roswell  White, non‐
Spring  ENMU   Branch             Hispanic                120  74.1%
White, non‐
Spring  ENMU   Main  Hispanic                229  79.5%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  LCC    Main  Islander          than 10  100.0%
Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  LCC    Main  Hispanic                than 10  66.7%
Spring  LCC    Main  Hispanic                  111  79.3%
Less 
Spring  LCC    Main  No response           than 10  50.0%
White, non‐
Spring  LCC    Main  Hispanic                14  45.2%
Less 
Spring  MCC  Main  American Indian  than 10  28.6%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  MCC  Main  Islander          than 10  0.0%
Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  MCC  Main  Hispanic                than 10  20.0%
Spring  MCC  Main  Hispanic                  25  48%
Less 
Spring  MCC  Main  No response           than 10  75.0%
Spring  MCC  Main  White, non‐ 32  69.6%
207
Hispanic              
Spring  NMHU   Main  American Indian 20  64.5%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  NMHU   Main  Islander          than 10  16.7%
Black, non‐
Spring  NMHU   Main  Hispanic                28  70.0%
Spring  NMHU   Main  Hispanic                  166  77.9%
Spring  NMHU   Main  No response           0  0%
Non‐resident  Less 
Spring  NMHU   Main  Alien                 than 10  N/A 
White, non‐
Spring  NMHU   Main  Hispanic                38  61.3%
Spring  NMIMT  Main  American Indian N/A N/A
Asian or Pacific 
Spring  NMIMT  Main  Islander          N/A  N/A 
Black, non‐
Spring  NMIMT  Main  Hispanic                N/A  N/A 
Spring  NMIMT  Main  Hispanic                  N/A  N/A
White, non‐
Spring  NMIMT  Main  Hispanic                N/A  N/A 
Less 
Spring  NMJC   Main  American Indian  than 10  100.0%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  NMJC   Main  Islander          than 10  100.0%
Black, non‐
Spring  NMJC   Main  Hispanic                31  73.8%
Spring  NMJC   Main  Hispanic                  93  66.9%
Spring  NMJC   Main  No response           27  67.5%
Spring  NMJC   Main  White, non‐ 94  63.9%
208
Hispanic              
Less 
Spring  NMMI   Main  American Indian  than 10  85.7%
Asian or Pacific 
Spring  NMMI   Main  Islander          26  100.0%
Black, non‐
Spring  NMMI   Main  Hispanic                29  72.5%
Spring  NMMI   Main  Hispanic                  68  91.9%
Non‐resident  Less 
Spring  NMMI   Main  Alien                 than 10  N/A 
Spring  NMMI   Main  Two or More 0  0%
White, non‐
Spring  NMMI   Main  Hispanic                89  86.4%
Dona Ana 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            American Indian  14  77.8%
Grants 
Spring  NMSU   Branch              American Indian  31  77.5%
Spring  NMSU   Main  American Indian 64  84.2%
Alamogordo  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch          American Indian  than 10  66.7%
Carlsbad  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            American Indian  than 10  50.0%
Asian or Pacific 
Spring  NMSU   Main  Islander          28  90.3%
Alamogordo  Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch          Islander          than 10  100.0%
Carlsbad  Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Islander          than 10  100.0%
Dona Ana  Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Islander          than 10  75.0%
209
Grants  Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch              Islander          than 10  100.0%
Alamogordo  Black, non‐
Spring  NMSU   Branch          Hispanic                12  85.7%
Dona Ana  Black, non‐
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Hispanic                19  79.2%
Black, non‐
Spring  NMSU   Main  Hispanic                55  88.7%
Carlsbad  Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Hispanic                than 10  83.3%
Grants  Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch              Hispanic                than 10  0.0%
Grants 
Spring  NMSU   Branch              Hispanic                  40  83.3%
Alamogordo 
Spring  NMSU   Branch          Hispanic                  61  80.3%
Carlsbad 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Hispanic                  83  71.6%
Dona Ana 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Hispanic                  630  83%
Spring  NMSU   Main  Hispanic                  841  85.4%
Dona Ana 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            No response           22  75.9%
Spring  NMSU   Main  No response           139  93.9%
Alamogordo  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch          No response           than 10  N/A 
Carlsbad  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            No response           than 10  80.0%
Grants  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch              No response           than 10  N/A 
210
Non‐resident 
Spring  NMSU   Main  Alien                 27  75.0%
Dona Ana  Non‐resident 
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Alien                 35  85.4%
Alamogordo  Non‐resident  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch          Alien                 than 10  85.7%
Grants  Non‐resident  Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch              Alien                 than 10  100.0%
Carlsbad  White, non‐
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Hispanic                80  76.2%
Alamogordo  White, non‐
Spring  NMSU   Branch          Hispanic                103  80.5%
Dona Ana  White, non‐
Spring  NMSU   Branch            Hispanic                118  84.9%
White, non‐
Spring  NMSU   Main  Hispanic                705  89.0%
Grants  White, non‐ Less 
Spring  NMSU   Branch              Hispanic                than 10  N/A 
Spring  NNMC  Main  American Indian 18  72.0%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  NNMC  Main  Islander          than 10  0.0%
Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  NNMC  Main  Hispanic                than 10  50.0%
Spring  NNMC  Main  Hispanic                  118  80.3%
Less 
Spring  NNMC  Main  No response           than 10  100.0%
White, non‐ Less 
Spring  NNMC  Main  Hispanic                than 10  N/A 
Less 
Spring  SFCC   Main  American Indian  than 10  N/A 
211
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  SFCC   Main  Islander          than 10  50.0%
Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  SFCC   Main  Hispanic                than 10  60.0%
Spring  SFCC   Main  Hispanic                  152  77.9%
Spring  SFCC   Main  No response           43  72.9%
Non‐resident  Less 
Spring  SFCC   Main  Alien                 than 10  100.0%
White, non‐
Spring  SFCC   Main  Hispanic                40  83.3%
Spring  SJC    Main  American Indian 280  83.1%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  SJC    Main  Islander          than 10  100.0%
Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  SJC    Main  Hispanic                than 10  75.0%
Spring  SJC    Main  Hispanic                  119  79.9%
Spring  SJC    Main  No response           39  78.0%
Non‐resident  Less 
Spring  SJC    Main  Alien                 than 10  80.0%
Spring  SJC    Main  Two or More 251  74.7%
Spring  UNM    Main  American Indian 104  85.2%
White, non‐
Spring  SJC    Main  Hispanic                251  69.1%
Los Alamos  Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch          American Indian  than 10  100.0%
Less 
Spring  UNM    Taos Branch  American Indian  than 10  N/A 
Valencia  Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch            American Indian  than 10  N/A 
212
Asian or Pacific 
Spring  UNM    Main  Islander          113  99.1%
Gallup  Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch              Islander          than 10  100.0%
Los Alamos  Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch          Islander          than 10  100.0%
Valencia  Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch            Islander          than 10  100.0%
Black, non‐
Spring  UNM    Main  Hispanic                92  93.9%
Gallup  Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch              Hispanic                than 10  0.0%
Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  UNM    Taos Branch  Hispanic                than 10  100.0%
Valencia  Black, non‐ Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch            Hispanic                than 10  33.3%
Gallup 
Spring  UNM    Branch              Hispanic                  18  64.3%
Los Alamos 
Spring  UNM    Branch          Hispanic                  36  73.5%
Spring  UNM    Taos Branch Hispanic                  66  84.6%
Valencia 
Spring  UNM    Branch            Hispanic                  171  77.4%
Spring  UNM    Main  Hispanic                  1073  95%
Spring  UNM    Main  No response           114  74.0%
Gallup  Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch              No response           than 10  100.0%
Los Alamos  Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch          No response           than 10  100.0%
Spring  UNM    Taos Branch No response           Less  150.0%
213
than 10
Valencia  Less 
Spring  UNM    Branch            No response           than 10  50.0%
Non‐resident 
Spring  UNM    Main  Alien                 13  100.0%
Non‐resident  Less 
Spring  UNM    Taos Branch  Alien                 than 10  100.0%
White, non‐
Spring  UNM    Taos Branch  Hispanic                11  84.6%
Gallup  White, non‐
Spring  UNM    Branch              Hispanic                12  80.0%
Los Alamos  White, non‐
Spring  UNM    Branch          Hispanic                17  70.8%
Valencia  White, non‐
Spring  UNM    Branch            Hispanic                73  74.5%
White, non‐
Spring  UNM    Main  Hispanic                1114  94.2%
Spring  WNMU   Main  American Indian 13  100.0%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
Spring  WNMU   Main  Islander          than 10  85.7%
Black, non‐
Spring  WNMU   Main  Hispanic                12  80.0%
Spring  WNMU   Main  Hispanic                  188  84.7%
Spring  WNMU   Main  No response           17  81.0%
Non‐resident 
Spring  WNMU   Main  Alien                 14  93.3%
White, non‐
Spring  WNMU   Main  Hispanic                100  75.8%
Spring  NMHU   Main  Two or More N/A N/A

214
 

• Retention and persistence of Hispanic students is affected by many factors.  

• More than half of all Hispanic students who graduated from high school and attended a 
Post Secondary institution last year needed remedial classes compared with a third of 
Anglo students (2010 State Master Plan for Higher Education: December 2010) 
o 27 million is funded by New Mexico for remedial education, which is offered at 
two‐year colleges. While this is a major investment, it is important to look at why it 
is necessary.  
o The following graphs (after the definition of ‘Killer Questions’) show the need for 
remedial Post Secondary education in New Mexico. 
 
 

215
The Notion of Killer Questions 
• The term “Killer Questions” was developed by several states working with The 
Wallace Foundation in an effort to improve the data‐informed decision‐making 
process of principals and other school leaders.  
 
• Killer questions refers to the key policy and political questions that come up over 
and over when leaders look at good data (e.g. student achievement, graduation, 
dropout, health and safety indicators, financial resources, workforce needs) and 
say, “How do I use these data to make a difference?” 
 
• Answering killer questions requires judgment, the ability to deal with ambiguity, 
and the authority to allocate time, people, and money. 
 
• Identifying and addressing the killer questions is important whether one is at the 
school house or the state house.  
 
• The better one’s data system, the more one is confronted with the killer questions. 
 
• SOURCE: Winograd, P. (November 22‐23) Using Data to Support Education In New Mexico: Past, Present, and Future 

   
216
How Many Students Who Enter Public High Schools As Ninth‐Graders End Up 
Five Years Later Ready For College? (Numbers of students who entered high school in 
2001‐2002 and entered college in fall of 2005) 

  35,000 Data Question: What 
Happened To These 
  30,000 28,816 Students In High School? 
Data Question: What 
Happened To These  Data Question: What 
  Happened To These 
25,000 Students After High  Students In College?
  School?  What Happened To The 
Students Who Did Take 
20,000
17,307 Remediation?
 
15,000
 

  10,000
7,668

  5,000 3,805

 
0
High School Ninth Graders in High School Graduates in 2004- High School Graduates Who HS Grads Who Did NOT Need
  2001-2002 (100%) 2005 (60.1%) Were Freshman In NM Colleges Remediation (13%)
in Fall of 2005 (27%)
 
SOURCE: Winograd, P. (November 22‐23) Using Data to Support Education In New Mexico: Past, Present, and Future 

 
 
217
Percentages Of New Mexico Public High School Graduates Who Took Remedial
Classes Only In Math Or Only In Reading: 2000-2009
Killer Question: What changes
in curriculum and teacher
45% training will reduce the need for
this remediation? 42.5% 43.2% 43.4%
40.7%
39.1%
40% 40.3%
37.2%
38.7% 39.0% 37.3%

35%
32.3%
30.6% 31.0% 31.5% 32.6% 32.9%
30.5% 31.9%
31.3%
30%
29.2%

25%

6)
7)

0)

3)
6)

3)

0)

8)

6)

8)

34

71
68

90
69

62

17

61

61

66

,
,

,
,

=9
=6

=7

=7

=7

=8

=9
=6

=7

=7

(n

(n
(n

(n

(n
(n

(n

(n
(n

(n

07

08

09
00

03

04
01

02

05

06

20

20

20
20

20

20

20
20

20

20
Numeracy & Computation Literacy & Communication

11
Note: Data does not include charter schools or alternative schools
 
SOURCE: Winograd, P. (November 22-23) Using Data to Support Education In New Mexico: Past, Present, and Future  
 
 
 
218
Percentage Of New Mexico Public High School Graduates Who Took
Remedial Classes By Ethnicity: 2000 - 2009
Killer Question: How Do We
Close This Achievement Gap?
75%
70%

65%

60%
55%

50%
45%

40%
35%

30%
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
25%

Native Americans Hispanics Whites Blacks Asians

12 Note: Data does not include charter schools or alternative schools


 
SOURCE: Winograd, P. (November 22-23) Using Data to Support Education In New Mexico: Past, Present, and Future  
 
 
 
219
What Is The Relationship Between The New
Mexico 11th Grade Standards-Based
Assessment (NMSBA) And The Need For
College Remediation?

1
 
 
SOURCE: Winograd, P. (November 22-23) Using Data to Support Education In New Mexico: Past, Present, and Future  
 
 
 
220
 
 

The Relationship Between Performance Level On The NMSBA And The Percentage Of
Students Who Took Remedial Courses In Reading In College

80%

The higher students


70% 67.2%
score on the 11th
NMSBA - reading, the
60% fewer remedial courses
in reading they take in
52.0%
college.
50%

40%

30%

20% 17.5%

10%
1.6%
0%
Beginning Step (n=389) Nearing Proficiency (n= 2,215) Proficient (n=3,714) Advanced (n=563)

15
 
SOURCE: Winograd, P. (November 22-23) Using Data to Support Education In New Mexico: Past, Present, and Future  
 
221
 
 
 
 

The Percentage Of Students Who Scored Proficient Or Above On The 11th Grade New
Mexico Standards-Based Assessment In Reading And Took Remedial Courses In
Reading In College Two Years Later By Ethnicity
40%
Data Question: Why do these students
36.0%
end up taking more remedial courses?
35% Policy Question: What else can we do
to ensure these students are ready for
college?
30%
Political Question: How do we get high
schools and colleges to pay attention
25% to this issue

19.3%
20%
16.5%
15%

10% 9.2%
6.3%
5%

0%
Proficient & Advanced
Asian (n=80) Black (n=97) Hispanic (n=1,807) Native American (n=286) White (n=1,999)

16
 
SOURCE: Winograd, P. (November 22-23) Using Data to Support Education In New Mexico: Past, Present, and Future  
 
 
222
 

Percent of Students Who Entered College in Fall of 2003 and Who Obtained Degrees
or Certificates Within Six Years by Number Of Remedial Courses Taken During Their
Freshman Fall (2003) Semester (n=2,976)

70% 67%

60% Data Question: Which


remedial classes are effective
50% and which are not? Killer
Question: How do we improve
40% the quality of these classes?

30%

20%
20%

9%
10%
4%
1%
0%

None One Remedial Course Two Remedial Courses Three Remedial Courses Four Remedial Courses

18

 
SOURCE: Winograd, P. (November 22-23) Using Data to Support Education In New Mexico: Past, Present, and Future  
 
These statistics demonstrate the need for much collaboration between Teacher Preparation 
programs, the public schools (PreK – 12) and Post Secondary Educational systems and personnel.  
223
Completion 
National Data: Minorities in Higher Education 2010 – The 24th Status Report (Degrees 
Conferred) 
• Overall, the number of Master’s and doctoral degrees increased in the last decade, with 
MA degrees almost doubling from 429,000 to 627,000 (46%) 
• The total number of Master’s degrees awarded to Hispanics more than doubled in the 
last decade (15,000 to 33.000) 
• The number of doctoral degrees rose (4,500 in 1997 to 6,400 in 2007 – increase of 42%) 
• Given these increased numbers, Hispanics accounted for a small share of the total 
degrees received at each level. (5% of all Master’s degrees, 4% of all doctoral degrees) 
• In 2007 nearly twice as many MA degrees were awarded to Hispanic women as 
compared to Hispanic men 
• At the doctoral level, women also out performed men (women earned 3,500; men 
earned 2,900) 

New Mexico Data: Completion 
Two‐Year Institutions 
The following data represents the 2009 four‐year cohort (students who started in fall 2004) at 
two‐year institutions in New Mexico. Notice that completion of Hispanic students ranges from 
0% (at numerous campuses) to 36.7% at the Grants branch of New Mexico State University.  
 
Institution/Location       Ethnicity              Cohort   Number     Percent  
Completed      Completed 
CCC    Main  Black, non‐Hispanic        10 0 0%
CCC    Main  Hispanic                          83 10 12.0%
CCC    Main  No response                    Less than  Less than 10 50.0%
224
10
CCC    Main  White, non‐Hispanic      93 14 15.1%
CNM  Main  American Indian 137 29 21.2%
Asian or Pacific 
CNM  Main  Islander          21 Less than 10  N/A 
CNM  Main  Black, non‐Hispanic        40 Less than 10 N/A
CNM  Main  Hispanic                          612 71 11.6%
CNM  Main  No response                    108 15 13.9%
CNM  Main  White, non‐Hispanic      510 63 12.4%
Less than 
ENMU   Roswell Branch             American Indian  10  Less than 10  14.3%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
ENMU   Roswell Branch             Islander          10  0 0%
Less than 
ENMU   Roswell Branch             Black, non‐Hispanic        10  Less than 10  12.5%
ENMU   Roswell Branch            Hispanic                          245 32 13.0%
ENMU   Roswell Branch            No response                    11 Less than 10 N/A
ENMU   Roswell Branch            White, non‐Hispanic      170 11 6.5%
Roswell Extended  Less than 
ENMU   Service   White, non‐Hispanic      10  Less than 10  100.0%
Less than 
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch  American Indian  10  0 0%
Less than 
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch  Black, non‐Hispanic        10  Less than 10  100.0%
Less than 
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch  Hispanic                          10  Less than 10  11.0%
Less than 
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch  Non‐resident Alien         10  0 0%
ENMU   Ruidoso Branch White, non‐Hispanic      22 Less than 10 N/A
225
Less than 
LCC    Main  American Indian  10  0 0%
Less than 
LCC    Main  Black, non‐Hispanic        10  0 0%
LCC    Main  Hispanic                          66 18 27.3%
LCC    Main  White, non‐Hispanic      17 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
MCC  Main  American Indian  10  Less than 10  50.0%
Less than 
MCC  Main  Black, non‐Hispanic        10  Less than 10  50.0%
Less than 
MCC  Main  Hispanic                          10  Less than 10  21.7%
MCC  Main  White, non‐Hispanic      39 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
NMJC   Main  American Indian  10  0 0%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
NMJC   Main  Islander          10  0 0%
NMJC   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic        21 Less than 10 N/A
NMJC   Main  Hispanic                          149 27 18.1%
NMJC   Main  No response                    36 11 30.6%
NMJC   Main  White, non‐Hispanic      154 27 17.5%
Less than 
NMMI   Main  American Indian  10  0 0%
Asian or Pacific 
NMMI   Main  Islander          18 0 0%
NMMI   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic        36 0 0%
NMMI   Main  Hispanic                          31 0 0%
NMMI   Main  Non‐resident Alien         10 0 0%
NMMI   Main  White, non‐Hispanic      132 0 0%
226
Less than 
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         American Indian  10  Less than 10  25.0%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         Islander          10  0 0%
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         Black, non‐Hispanic        11 Less than 10 N/A
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         Hispanic                          41 Less than 10 N/A
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         No response                    16 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         Non‐resident Alien         10  Less than 10  75.0%
NMSU   Alamogordo Branch         White, non‐Hispanic      96 11 11.5%
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           American Indian N/A  N/A N/A
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           Black, non‐Hispanic        N/A  N/A N/A
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           Hispanic                          81 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch            No response                    10  Less than 10  16.7%
NMSU   Carlsbad Branch           White, non‐Hispanic      71 Less than 10 N/A
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           American Indian 20 Less than 10 N/A
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch            Islander          10  0 0%
Less than 
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch            Black, non‐Hispanic        10  0 0%
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           Hispanic                          326 59 18.1%
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           No response                    19 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch            Non‐resident Alien         10  Less than 10  33.3%
NMSU   Dona Ana Branch           White, non‐Hispanic      74 12 16.2%
NMSU   Grants Branch             American Indian 25 Less than 10 N/A
NMSU   Grants Branch             Hispanic                          30 11 36.7%
NMSU   Grants Branch             No response                    Less than  Less than 10 25.0%
227
10
NMSU   Grants Branch             White, non‐Hispanic      17 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
NNMC  El Rito                    American Indian  10  0 0%
Less than 
NNMC  El Rito                    Hispanic                          10  Less than 10  22.2%
Less than 
NNMC  El Rito                    White, non‐Hispanic      10  0 0%
NNMC  Main  American Indian 15 0 0%
NNMC  Main  Hispanic                          79 10 12.7%
Less than 
NNMC  Main  White, non‐Hispanic      10  Less than 10  11.1%
Less than 
SFCC   Main  American Indian  10  0 0%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
SFCC   Main  Islander          10  0 0%
Less than 
SFCC   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic        10  0 0%
SFCC   Main  Hispanic                          125 18 14.4%
Less than 
SFCC   Main  No response                    10  Less than 10  20.0%
SFCC   Main  White, non‐Hispanic      71 Less than 10 N/A
SJC    Main  American Indian 230 30 13.0%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
SJC    Main  Islander          10  Less than 10  50.0%
Less than 
SJC    Main  Black, non‐Hispanic        10  Less than 10  20.0%
SJC    Main  Hispanic                          112 15 13.4%
SJC    Main  White, non‐Hispanic      450 88 19.6%
228
UNM    Gallup Branch             American Indian 187 20 10.7%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
UNM    Gallup Branch              Islander          10  Less than 10  100.0%
Less than 
UNM    Gallup Branch              Black, non‐Hispanic        10  0 0%
UNM    Gallup Branch             Hispanic                          26 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
UNM    Gallup Branch              No response                    10  0 0%
Less than 
UNM    Gallup Branch              White, non‐Hispanic      10  Less than 10  12.5%
Less than 
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         American Indian  10  0 0%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         Islander          10  0 0%
Less than 
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         Black, non‐Hispanic        10  0 0%
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         Hispanic                          50 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         No response                    10  0 0%
UNM    Los Alamos Branch         White, non‐Hispanic      37 Less than 10 N/A
Los Alamos Extended  Less than 
UNM    Service  Hispanic                          10  0 0%
Less than 
UNM    Taos Branch  American Indian  10  0 0%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
UNM    Taos Branch  Islander          10  0 0%
UNM    Taos Branch  Hispanic                          18 Less than 10 N/A
Less than 
UNM    Taos Branch  No response                    10  Less than 10  33.3%
UNM    Taos Branch  White, non‐Hispanic      14 Less than 10 N/A
229
Less than 
UNM    Valencia Branch            American Indian  10  Less than 10  14.3%
Asian or Pacific  Less than 
UNM    Valencia Branch            Islander          10  0 0%
UNM    Valencia Branch           Black, non‐Hispanic        10 0 0%
UNM    Valencia Branch           Hispanic                          134 16 11.9%
Less than 
UNM    Valencia Branch            No response                    10  0 0%
UNM    Valencia Branch           White, non‐Hispanic      66 Less than 10 N/A
 
 
Four‐Year Institutions 
The following data represents the 2009 four‐year cohort (students who started in fall 2004) at 
four‐year institutions in New Mexico. Notice that completion of Hispanic students ranges from 
30.7% to 47.4% at New Mexico State University.  
 
Institution/Location       Ethnicity              Cohort   Number     Percent  
Completed      Completed 
ENMU   Main  American Indian 19 Less than 10 N/A
Asian or Pacific  Less 
ENMU   Main  Islander          than 10  Less than 10  50.0%
ENMU   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic       42 Less than 10 N/A
ENMU   Main  Hispanic                          192 59 30.7%
ENMU   Main  No response                    23 Less than 10 N/A
Less 
ENMU   Main  Non‐resident Alien         than 10  0 0.00%
ENMU   Main  White, non‐Hispanic      260 82 31.5%
NMHU   Main  American Indian 16 Less than 10 N/A
230
Asian or Pacific  Less 
NMHU   Main  Islander          than 10  Less than 10  40.0%
Less 
NMHU   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic       than 10  Less than 10  11.1%
NMHU   Main  Hispanic                          149 32 21.5%
NMHU   Main  No response                    10 Less than 10 N/A
NMHU   Main  White, non‐Hispanic      34 Less than 10 N/A
Less 
NMIMT  Main  American Indian  than 10  Less than 10  50.0%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
NMIMT  Main  Islander          than 10  Less than 10  42.9%
Less 
NMIMT  Main  Black, non‐Hispanic       than 10  Less than 10  50.0%
NMIMT  Main  Hispanic                          62 26 41.9%
Less 
NMIMT  Main  Non‐resident Alien         than 10  Less than 10  50.0%
NMIMT  Main  White, non‐Hispanic      214 117 54.7%
NMSU   Main  American Indian 48 14 29.2%
Asian or Pacific 
NMSU   Main  Islander          25 13 52.0%
NMSU   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic       36 16 44.4%
NMSU   Main  Hispanic                          563 267 47.4%
NMSU   Main  No response                    83 47 56.6%
NMSU   Main  Non‐resident Alien         10 Less than 10 N/A
NMSU   Main  White, non‐Hispanic      681 369 54.2%
UNM    Main  American Indian 86 18 20.9%
Asian or Pacific 
UNM    Main  Islander          79 37 46.8%
UNM    Main  Black, non‐Hispanic       72 30 41.7%
231
UNM    Main  Hispanic                          871 379 43.5%
UNM    Main  No response                    133 68 51.1%
UNM    Main  Non‐resident Alien         11 Less than 10 N/A
UNM    Main  White, non‐Hispanic      1189 604 50.8%
Less 
WNMU   Extended Service  Black, non‐Hispanic       than 10  0 0.00%
WNMU   Extended Service Hispanic                          58 Less than 10 N/A
Less 
WNMU   Extended Service  No response                    than 10  Less than 10  40.0%
WNMU   Extended Service White, non‐Hispanic      29 Less than 10 N/A
WNMU   Main  American Indian 11 0 0.00%
Asian or Pacific  Less 
WNMU   Main  Islander          than 10  Less than 10  50.0%
WNMU   Main  Black, non‐Hispanic       10 0 0.00%
WNMU   Main  Hispanic                          160 21 13.1%
WNMU   Main  No response                    23 Less than 10 N/A
WNMU   Main  White, non‐Hispanic      94 13 13.8%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
232
Graduation from Four‐Year Institutions 
The following data looks at graduates by cohorts. If we look at four‐year cohorts of 2004, we 
are looking at all the students who started four years earlier in 2000. If we look at the six year 
cohort of 2006, we are looking at all the students who started six years earlier in 2000. The 
table below shows what percentage of students who started in 2000 graduated in four years, 
and what percentage took six years to graduate with a four‐year degree. The following graph 
shows graduation in New Mexico. By ethnicity, you can see what percentage of that ethnic 
group graduated in four and in six years (including those students who had graduated in four 
years). From this data it is not possible to know what the whole of the ethnic group looked 
like. For example, you can’t tell how many students comprised the original sample. However, 
you can see that between 2+ to seven times more students graduated given six years to do so. 
This table is followed by data from the 2010 six year cohort.  
 

233
Who Graduates from Public Colleges and Universities in New Mexico? 

    Four‐Year Graduation Rate Six‐Year Graduation Rate
 
2004   2006  
  African American  7%  27% 
 
Asian   12%  46% 
 

  Latino   10%  34% 


 
Native American  4%  29% 
 

  White   15%  43% 


 
Overall   12%  38% 
 

SOURCE: The Education Trust. Education Watch State Report, New Mexico, April 2009. This table represents the proportion of students 
who enrolled as first‐time Bachelor’s degree‐seeking freshmen in fall 2000. Education Trust calculations from the U.S. Department of 
Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated postsecondary Education Data System, Graduation Rate Survey, 
http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/.  

 
234
New Mexico Four‐Year Institutions: 2010 Cohort 
The following graph represents the percent of each group that graduated from New Mexico 
four‐year institutions. Data are combined from Western New Mexico University, New Mexico 
Highlands University, Eastern New Mexico University, New Mexico State University, New 
Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the University of New Mexico. Northern New 
Mexico College and community colleges are not included in this data. 

Percent of Enrolled Students that Graduated

0.6
51%
0.5 46%

37% 36%
0.4

0.3 % of enrolled students that 
19% graduated
0.2

0.1

0
African  American  Asian Hispanic White
American Indian
.  

SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

235
The graph above shows the percentage of each ethnic group that graduated. For example, 
36% of all the Hispanic students that were enrolled in the six New Mexico four‐year 
institutions’ 2010 6 year cohorts graduated in six years or less. What it doesn’t show is how 
these percentages compare to the actual enrollment of ethnic groups. In other words, you see 
that 46% of White students graduated, but what percentage of the total population was 
White? You see that 51% of Asian students graduated, but it is not possible to tell how many 
Asian students there were compared to other ethnic groups.  
 
Comparison of Enrollment to Ethnic Group 
The graph that follows uses blue cloth covered cylinders to show each group’s percentage of 
enrollment from the whole population of students that started at these universities in 2000. 
The cloth bar is followed by a gradient blue bar that shows what percentage of each group 
graduated in 6 years.  
 

236
Enrollment of Each Ethnic Group and
Percent of that Group that Graduated in Six Years  
(New Mexico 2010 cohort) 

42.9
40.6

% Enrolled
% Graduated

46%
36%

3.7 4.9
1.8

Hispanic White African American American Indian Asian


 
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

237
Enrollment of Each Ethnic Group and
Percent of that Group that Graduated in Six Years  
(New Mexico 2010 cohort) 
4.9

3.7
% of Enrollment
% that Graduated

1.8
37%
19% 51%

African American American Indian Asian


 

SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

This graph shows the percentage of African American, American Indian and Asian students 
that graduated in six years next to all the students from that ethnic group who enrolled in 
2000 in New Mexico four‐year institutions.   

238
For comparison, here are the figures for the New Mexico public school enrollment of 2009‐
2010.  

New Mexico K‐12 Public School 
Total Enrollment 2009‐2010
most recent public data N=325,542
Asian/Pacific Islander
1.4 2.4

10.7 African American

28.4
56.7 White

Hispanic

American Indian

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
0.02
 
SOURCE: NM Public Education Department, 2010.  

 
239
Four‐Year Institutions 
The following graphs show enrollment and graduation for 6 year cohorts at each of New 
Mexico’s 4‐year institutions. These are followed by tables on fall‐to‐fall retention for 2000, 
2008 and 2009.  

How to Read the Graphs: 
• The grid has two sets of rows.  
• The rows that go across with the columns in the same color represent one ethnic group. 
• The rows that go front to back represent cohort enrollment and graduation after six  
years.   
• Each graph represents the comparison between enrollment and graduation 
• Please refer to the chart that follows each graph for actual numbers and percentages.  
• When less than 10 students are enrolled, the data is ‘suppressed’, or not shown.  

Observations:  
• Only in rare cases (3) do any groups complete at rates of 50% or more in six years.  
 
• It is not uncommon to find completion rates in the teens or 20%s. 
 

240
WNMU Main
2009‐2010
N=4,069

American Indian
4% 2% 3%

Asian or Pacific 
40% Islander        

Black, non‐Hispanic   
51%

Hispanic   

White, non‐Hispanic   

 
New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2010.  
 

 
   

  241
Western New Mexico University Graduation  

161 Hispanic students enterered 
Western NMU in 2004. Six years 
later 16.1 (10%) had  graduated..

African American
White/Other American Indian
Hispanic
Asian
American Indian Asian
African American Hispanic

White/Other

SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
* = less than 10 ; Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
 

  242
 

STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS


What are Western NM University’s graduation rates?

Race & Cohort %Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s


Ethnicity N Degrees N Degrees N Degrees
through through through
Summer 2000 Summer 2009 Summer 2010
African * 0 11 0 12 25
American
American 15 0.4 10 23.1 7 0
Indian
Asian * 0.4 * 50 2 0
Hispanic 141 10.9 166 25.2 161 16.1
White/Other 100 8.7 100 21.3 114 28.9
Overall 265 21.5 309 23.3 325 20.6
Graduation rates of first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen after 6 years
* = less than 10 
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
 
   

  243
 

STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS


How many freshmen return for their second year?

Entered Fall 2000 Entered Fall 2008 Entered Fall 2009


Race & Cohort %still enrolled Cohort %still Cohort %still enrolled
Ethnicity N Fall 2001 N enrolled Fall N Fall 2010
2009
African 20.0 16 56.3 14 42.9
American
American 66.7 * 25.0 13 76.9
Indian
Asian 0 * 80 * 42.9
Hispanic 64.4 156 52.6 213 57.3
White/Other 51.2 114 49.1 127 49.6
Overall 39.757.2 313 52.1 408 54.9
“Cohort” is defined as first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen
* = less than 10 
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  

SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

  244
 

NMHU Main
2009‐2010
N=4,562

2%
7%
32% 6%

American Indian

Asian or Pacific 
Islander        
Black, non‐Hispanic   
53%
Hispanic   

White, non‐
Hispanic            

 
 
 
 

  245
New Mexico Highlands University Graduation 

African American
American Indian
White/Other
Hispanic Asian
Asian
Hispanic
American Indian
White/Other
African American

* = less than 10 ; Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  

SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

  246
 

STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS


What are NMHU’s graduation rates?

Race & Cohort %Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s


Ethnicity N Degrees N Degrees N Degrees
through through through
Summer 2000 Summer 2009 Summer 2010
African 15 26.7 * 11.1 12 8.3
American
American 25 28 16 0 36 11.1
Indian
Asian * 0 * 50 * 0
Hispanic 260 28.1 147 20.4 158 21.5
White/Other 51 27.5 34 20.6 37 21.6
Overall 352 27.8 220 18.6 254 18.9
Graduation rates of first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen after 6 years
* = less than 10         
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
 
 
 
 
 

  247
 
STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS
How many freshmen return for their second year?

Entered Fall 2000 Entered Fall 2008 Entered Fall 2009


Race & Cohort %still enrolled Cohort %still Cohort %still enrolled
Ethnicity N Fall 2001 N enrolled Fall N Fall 2010
2009
African 11 36.3 53 30.2 40 57.5
American
American 10 60.0 21 33.3 31 38.7
Indian
Asian 0 0 * 60.0 * 16.6
Hispanic 196 49.4 272 46.0 214 51.4
White/Other 42 38.0 53 49.1 62 41.9
Overall 268 47.8 437 45.3 379 48.3
“Cohort” is defined as first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

 
 
 

  248
ENMU Main
2009‐2010
N=5,995

2%

3% 5%

American Indian
31%
Asian or Pacific Islander   
59%
Black, non‐Hispanic   
Hispanic   
White, non‐Hispanic   

 
 
 
   

  249
Eastern New Mexico University Graduation 

African American
American Indian
White/Other
Hispanic Asian
Asian
American Indian Hispanic
African American White/Other

* = less than 10; Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  

SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

  250
STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS
What are Eastern NM’s graduation rates?

Race & Cohort %Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s


Ethnicity N Degrees N Degrees N Degrees
through through through
Summer 2000 Summer 2009 Summer 2010
African 34 21 42 23.8 46 4.35
American
American 13 16 18 27.8 20 5
Indian
Asian * 38 4 50 * 50
Hispanic 147 26 198 27.8 169 24.3
White/Other 370 36 261 31 311 24.1
Overall 573 32 547 29.2 580 24.1
Graduation rates of first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen after 6 years
* = less than 10 
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010. 
 
 
  
   

  251
 
STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS
How many freshmen return for their second year?

Entered Fall 2000 Entered Fall 2008 Entered Fall 2009


Race & Cohort %still enrolled Cohort %still Cohort %still enrolled
Ethnicity N Fall 2001 N enrolled Fall N Fall 2010
2009
African 38 68.4 40 57.5 61 42.6
American
American 15 53.3 10 70.0 23 60.9
Indian
Asian * 100.0 * 50.0 * 75.0
Hispanic 177 56.5 170 52.9 205 64.9
White/Other 290 65.5 319 66.4 293 64.2
Overall 542 62.0 575 61.2 622 61.6
“Cohort” is defined as first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen
* = less than 10 
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
 
 

  252
NMSU Main
2009‐2010
N=18,504

2%
4%
4%

41%
American Indian
Asian or Pacific Islander   
Black, non‐Hispanic   
49%
Hispanic   
White, non‐Hispanic   

 
 
 
   

  253
New Mexico State University Graduation 

African American
American Indian
White/Other
Hispanic
Asian
Asian Hispanic
American Indian
African American White/Other

* = less than 10 
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

  254
 

STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS


What are NMSU’s graduation rates?

Race & Cohort %Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s


Ethnicity N Degrees N Degrees N Degrees
through through through
Summer 2000 Summer 2009 Summer 2010
African 32 43.8 54 42.6 69 37.7
American
American 67 19.4 74 23 68 30.9
Indian
Asian 17 47.1 31 48.4 21 42.9
Hispanic 529 49.3 901 40.7 955 41
White/Other 855 57.2 840 49.6 831 49.7
Overall 1,519 52.2 2,016 44.7 2,061 44.6
Graduation rates of first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen after 6 years
* = less than 10 
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
 

  255
STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS
How many freshmen return for their second year?

Entered Fall 2000 Entered Fall 2008 Entered Fall 2009


Race & Cohort %still enrolled Cohort %still Cohort %still enrolled
Ethnicity N Fall 2001 N enrolled Fall N Fall 2010
2009
African 52 71.2 85 64.7 97 63.9
American
American 67 68.7 92 62.0 115 63.5
Indian
Asian 29 89.7 32 84.4 42 73.8
Hispanic 826 75.1 1,094 75.0 1,263 74.4
White/Other 959 73.7 999 77.4 1,045 77.8
Overall 1,961 74.2 2,337 75.4 2,608 74.8
“Cohort” is defined as first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen
* = less than 10 
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  

 
 

  256
NMIMT Main
2009‐2010
N=3,610

1%
3% 3%

25%
American Indian
Asian or Pacific Islander   
Black, non‐Hispanic   
68%
Hispanic   
White, non‐Hispanic   

 
 
 

  257
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Graduation 

African American
American Indian
White/Other
Hispanic Asian
Asian
American Indian Hispanic
African American White/Other

* = less than 10 
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
.  

  258
 

STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS


What are NMIMT’s graduation rates?

Race & Cohort %Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s


Ethnicity N Degrees N Degrees N Degrees
through through through
Summer 2000 Summer 2009 Summer 2010
African 0 -- * 50 * 0
American
American 13 38.5 10 33.33 12 16.67
Indian
Asian * 66.7 * 42.86 * 37.50
Hispanic 46 39.4 67 32.26 69 46.38
White/Other 145 42.1 210 49.77 173 47.98
Overall 214 38.8 300 45.97 271 45.02
Graduation rates of first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen after 6 years
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
* = less than 10 
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
 
 
 
 

  259
STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS
How many freshmen return for their second year?

Entered Fall 2000 Entered Fall 2008 Entered Fall 2009


Race & Cohort %still enrolled Cohort %still Cohort %still enrolled
Ethnicity N Fall 2001 N enrolled Fall N Fall 2010
2009
African 100 * 40.0 * 66.67
American
American 55.6 11 45.45 10 60.0
Indian
Asian 100 12 83.33 * 50.0
Hispanic 73.7 74 70.27 77 66.23
White/Other 80.7 181 73.48 161 78.26
Overall 79.0 286 71.33 255 73.33
“Cohort” is defined as first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen
* = less than 10 
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
 

 
 

  260
UNM Main
2009‐2010
N=29,115

7% 4%
4%

50% American Indian
Asian or Pacific Islander   

35% Black, non‐Hispanic   
Hispanic   
White, non‐Hispanic   

 
 
   

  261
University of New Mexico Graduation 

African 
American
American 
Indian
White/Other Asian
Asian

African American Hispanic

White/Other

* = less than 10  SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010. Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ 
and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
 

  262
STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS
What are UNM’s graduation rates?

Race & Cohort %Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s Cohort % Bachelor’s


Ethnicity N Degrees N Degrees N Degrees
through through through
Summer 2000 Summer 2009 Summer 2010
African 53 26.4 92 38.0 108 42.6
American
American 92 17.4 141 20.6 179 24.6
Indian
Asian 66 43.9 99 48.5 95 54.7
Hispanic 572 37.4 1,101 38.6 1,133 38.8
White/Other 912 43.9 1,352 47.6 1,327 50.2
Overall 1,729 39.7 2,944 42.7 3,018 44.4
Graduation rates of first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen after 6 years
* = less than 10 
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  
 

   

  263
 

STUDENT PROGRESS AND STUDENT SUCCESS


How many freshmen return for their second year?

Entered Fall 2000 Entered Fall 2008 Entered Fall 2009


Race & Cohort %still enrolled Cohort %still Cohort %still enrolled
Ethnicity N Fall 2001 N enrolled Fall N Fall 2010
2009
African 53 26.4 92 38.0 108 42.6
American
American 92 17.4 141 20.6 179 24.6
Indian
Asian 66 43.9 99 48.5 95 54.7
Hispanic 572 37.4 1.101 38.6 1,133 38.8
White/Other 912 43.9 1,352 47.6 1,327 50.2
Overall 1,729 39.7 2,944 42.7 3,018 44.4
“Cohort” is defined as first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen
* = less than 10 
SOURCE: Performance Effectiveness Report – New Mexico’s Universities – November 2010.  
Numbers for ‘Nonresident Alien’ and ‘Unknown’ are not provided in this table.  

  264
Hispanic Immigrant Students in Higher Education at the National Level 
It is worrisome for policy makers, business leaders, and educators that young Hispanics have 
lower levels of education than their older peers. For this reason, the Minorities in Higher 
Education 2010 – The 24th Status Report dedicated an entire section to Hispanic students in 
higher education.  “Therefore, they have the potential to help the United States cope with the 
social and economic costs associated with an aging population. Further, tapping their human 
capital will be key to helping fill the projected knowledge and skills gaps in the U.S. workforce 
to remain competitive in the global economy” p. 7 This year’s section mainly addressed 
Hispanic immigrants. While it is important to recognize that not all Hispanics are immigrants 
(and in New Mexico may have been on this land before New Mexico was part of the U.S. ), 
immigrants are an important part of our Hispanic community.  
 
Quick Facts About Hispanic Immigrants  
(Minorities in Higher Education 2010 – The 24th Status Report) 
• In 2008, about one in five U.S. residents (aged 25 to 64), or 27 million people, were 
immigrants. Half of these immigrants were Hispanic. 
• Immigrant adults (aged 25 to 64) who were not Hispanic had a much higher rate of 
postsecondary degree attainment (53 percent) than their U.S.‐born peers (39 percent). 
• Two‐thirds of adult Hispanic immigrants (aged 25 to 64) were of Mexican origin. Their 
educational attainment levels were low compared with other immigrants. 
• The remaining Hispanic immigrants came from many countries and had a range of 
educational levels. 
• The postsecondary educational attainment of Colombian immigrants was on a par with 
U.S.‐born whites, at 40 percent. 
 
265
Other facts to consider at the National level 
• At the high school level, Hispanic immigrants are more than twice as likely as U.S.‐born  
  Hispanics to have dropped out of high school (50% vs. 20%) 
• Nationally, 37% of Hispanic adults lack a high school credential  
• At the Post Secondary level, Hispanic immigrant adults’ degree attainment rate is 14%,  
  compared to their U.S.‐born peers at 25% 
• Hispanic Population 2008: 
o 16 Million under age 18 
ƒ U.S. –born 91% 
ƒ Immigrant 9% 
o 31 Million age 18 & Older 
ƒ U.S. –born 47% 
ƒ Immigrant 53% 
o The highest percentage of immigrants, by far, come from Mexico. 
ƒ 64% of total immigrants 
ƒ 76% do not have a high school diploma 
ƒ 36% do have an associate’s degree or higher 
• A young immigrant’s prior history of schooling is a critical factor in whether or not they 
continue their education in the U.S.  
• Immigrants may have high aspirations for higher education than the population in 
general, but these are not matched by results, perhaps because of their unfamiliarity 
with the U.S. educational system and limited access to key information and resources.  
• As of 2008, about 12 million people were residing in the U.S. without legal status 
o About 7 million were of Mexican origin.  
SOURCE: Ryu, M. (2910). Minorities in Higher Education 2010 – The 24th Status Report. American Council on 
Education.  
266
New Mexico Hispanic Immigrants 
Facts from the Immigration Policy Center http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just‐
facts/new‐americans‐land‐enchantment  

Immigrants are integral to New Mexico’s economy as students. 

• New Mexico’s 2,622 foreign students contributed $49.9 million to the state’s economy 
in tuition, fees, and living expenses for the 2008‐2009 academic year, according to NAFSA: 
Association of International Educators. 

Naturalized citizens excel educationally. 

• In New Mexico, 21.9% of foreign‐born persons who were naturalized U.S. citizens in 
2008 had a bachelor’s or higher degree, compared to 11.2% of noncitizens.  At the same time, 
only 32.7% of naturalized citizens lacked a high‐school diploma, compared to 60.4% of 
noncitizens. 

• The number of immigrants in New Mexico with a college degree increased by 42.0% 
between 2000 and 2008, according to data from the Migration Policy Institute. 

• In New Mexico, 81.0% of all children between the ages of 5 and 17 in families that spoke 
a language other than English at home also spoke English “very well” as of 2008. 
Immigration Policy Center http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/just‐facts/new‐americans‐land‐
enchantment 
 
 

267
Based on these facts, it will be critical for many of New Mexico’s immigrants to have access to 
Adult Basic Education, English as a second language and workforce training as part of their 
Post Secondary education. This is especially important given that New Mexico is a border 
state that supports bilingual education and values the diverse ethnic groups in its population.  
 
 

268
Promising Practices 
 
Just as it was important to clarify the use of the words ‘Hispanic’ and ‘White’ in the first 
section of this report, here it is equally important to clarify not only which words we use, but 
how we use them.  We can choose to use a language that either stresses deficits, struggles 
and challenges, or we can use a language that focuses on assets, strengths and priorities.  
Given the disparities that exist in academic achievement and dropout rates, it would be very 
easy to slip into a deficit‐based language. How we speak of ourselves and of our future 
determines how we move forward.  As we face the data and address the current 
underachievement of Hispanic students, we can either see ourselves in a negative light as 
survivors of a never‐ending struggle, making little or no steps of progress in eliminating the 
achievement gap, or we can see the tremendous potential that we have to offer solutions in a 
context that is rapidly changing (Santiago, D., 2010; Valdes, A., 2010).  Nowhere is this 
potential clearer than at the point following high school, when our young adults are in actual 
preparation for a career. As much as possible, we need to move forward recognizing our 
assets and our strengths. For this reason, this section ends with a few strategies that show 
much promise in supporting a successful learning environment for Latino students.  The 
following practices engage students actively in their education and have demonstrated 
269
promise in bringing students to higher education, keeping them enrolled, and helping them 
complete their education. While they are reported as part of a research study with 
community colleges, these strategies hold promise for Hispanic students in many settings.  

Strategies from the Center for Community College Student Engagement 

• The Center for Community College Student Engagement focuses on teaching and 
learning as the heart of student success.  The Center explores the challenges associated 
with college completion and how these strategies address them. This section comes 
from the report of the Center’s study on Community Colleges.  
• The Center published a report on student success at the Community College level 
entitled The Heart of Student Success: Teaching, Learning, and College Completion 
(2010 CCCSE Findings). Austin, TX: The University of Texas at Austin, Community 
College Leadership Program. 
• The following opening quote from a student sums up one of the major reasons students 
choose community colleges:  
 “All my [high school] teachers told me, ‘Your teachers in college, they wouldn’t care whether 
you showed up, they wouldn’t care if you turned in your assignments, they wouldn’t care if you 
failed.’  But  at  the  community  college,  all  my  teachers  are  really  showing  that  they  are 
interested in us succeeding. I didn’t expect that.”  
— STUDENT 
 
• The center utilized data from three surveys focused on student engagement, — the 
Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE), the Survey of Entering Student 
270
Engagement (SENSE), and the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement 
(CCFSSE). The following are some significant findings:  
ƒ Some faculty still believe some students cannot or will not succeed. The potential 
for damage is most severe when individuals working with students hold these attitudes. 
Students sense this belief.  It takes courage to do the work necessary to change faculty 
attitudes.  
ƒ There are also indications that many students are encouraged to spend significant 
time studying. About a fourth of students who responded to surveys self‐reported that 
they do not prepare adequately for assignments before turning them in.  
ƒ About a third (37%) of full‐time CCSSE respondents reported spending five or fewer 
hours per week preparing for class.  
ƒ Almost half (44%) of SENSE respondents and 69% of CCSSE respondents reported 
coming to class unprepared once or twice. 
ƒ About one‐fourth (26%) of SENSE respondents reported skipping class once or 
more in the first three weeks of class.  
ƒ Students appreciate faculty members who are both demanding and encouraging.  

 
 
• The Center highly recommends keeping a focus on hiring and developing faculty  
members who : 
• enjoy working with students even more than they enjoy their discipline 
ƒ are convinced that students are capable of learning 
ƒ have the skills to engage students actively in the learning process.  
271
ƒ “In so doing, we will increase the odds that our faculty and staff are well prepared 
to “make magic” in community college classrooms.” 
 
• Who goes to Community Colleges? 

o almost three‐quarters of American young people enter some kind of 
postsecondary training or education within two years of graduating from high  
school.  
o “for far too many community college students, the open door also has been a  
revolving door” 
o Only 28% of first‐time, full‐time, associate degree‐seeking community college 
students graduate with a certificate or an associate degree within three years.

o Fewer than half (45%) of students who enter community college with the goal of  
a degree or certificate have met their goal six years later. 

o Slightly more than half (52%) of first‐time full‐time college students in public  
community colleges return for their second year.  
 

Key  strategies that have been identified as successful at Community Colleges: 

• Strengthen classroom engagement  

• Integrate student support into learning experiences  
272
• Expand professional development focused on engaging students  
• Focus institutional policies on creating the conditions for learning  
• Promote active, engaged learning (small group work, student‐led activities) 
• Develop and use personal connections  
o Just knowing and using someone else’s name can make a wary student feel more 
comfortable.  
o Being called by name, does not allow the student to hide behind anonymity, 
and is a powerful motivator.  
ƒ Ensure that students know where they stand  
o Providing feedback identifies areas of strength and weakness, so students have a  
greater likelihood of improving and ultimately succeeding.  
o Regular and appropriate assessment and prompt feedback help students progress  
from surface learning to deep learning.  
• Build a culture of evidence.— one in which administrators, faculty, and staff use data to 
set  goals,  monitor  progress,  and  improve  practice,    understanding  and  using  data  to 
build credibility, ownership, and support for change.  
• Conduct courageous conversations. 
• Design institutional policies that foster student success.  
• Colleges that use successful practices  
• State College (OH) codified a personal touch philosophy: Personal Touch — Respect,  
  Responsibility and Responsiveness in all relationships.  
 
• Lone Star College‐North Harris (TX) has a comprehensive early intervention program  
273
  When an instructor thinks a student needs additional support, he or she refers the  
  student to intervention staff (could be due to attendance, problems with schedule, etc.).  
  The intervention staff then contacts the student and encourages him or her to take  
  advantage of services, including one‐on‐one tutoring.  

o Kodiak College, University of Alaska Anchorage (AK), Tells students where they stand  
  before they even get to campus, providing early college placement testing to high school  
  juniors and seniors. College advisors work on site with high school counselors to offer  
  interventions to improve students’ scores.  
• When students arrive at Kodiak College, they are given assessments to determine their  
  “skill and will” for college success, and advising is based on the results. 

Four‐Year Institutions 
Just weeks after the release of the Minorities in Higher Education 2010 – The 24th Status 
Report by the American Council on Education; the same group sponsored a Teleconference to 
discuss the findings and their implications.  

The following recommendations were made for colleges and universities by key organizers of 
the teleconference: 

• View the published report as a Call to Action 
• Link institutional diversity initiatives to the academic mission of the college or university 

274
• Provide faculty mentoring for faculty of color and professional development for 
academic leaders and faculty who sit on promotion and tenure committees 
• Hold statewide summits on Inclusive Education, meet with University councils, boards of 
regents, and university Presidents to develop a strategic statewide process and inclusive 
education plan 
• Link this discussion across states – all are experiencing rapid increase in number of 
Hispanic students, some steeper than others  
• Examine roots to access and barriers 
• Faculty overwhelming hold low aspirations and expectations of students and there is 
lack of communication about Hispanic student support, recruitment, retention, 
completion 
• Link to K‐12 system and preschool system – students are coming to college unprepared 
• Work with high school counselors with low expectations and serve as a bridge to a 
holding higher aspirations for Hispanic students  
• Interventions that work are not necessarily new gimmicky strategies with extensive 
costs 
• Effective interventions are relatively simple, but are not easy to implement in a system 
not designed to change for the needs of students of color 
• Generalize a responsibility to serve all, not just the students the system was designed to 
graduate 
• Engage family support, and empower families to provide needed support for student 
success 
275
• Involve more role models and mentors 
• Change is hard. Normalize the discomfort of change. Don’t be surprised about ongoing 
resistance. 
• Set measurable goals for success in life, not just for a glass framed document 
• Enhance ‘cultural competence’ 
• Maintain a relentless focus 
• Begin outreach early in the pipeline (middle school or earlier) 
• Teach students and families about the college experience (what is needed to apply and 
be accepted, financial aid, administration, etc.) 
• Increase hiring of faculty and staff of color. Be prepared to deal with arguments about 
having already filled quotas 
• Provide materials in Spanish for students and families, provide translations and send the 
message that the student’s and family’s home culture is valued 
• Identify partners and community linkages 

Promising Practices in New Mexico 
The Office for Equity and Inclusion: The University of New Mexico 

• The University of New Mexico is the only university in New Mexico to have a Vice‐President, 
Dr. Jozi DeLeón, and an office dedicated to Equity and Inclusion. The office provides 
opportunities year‐round for students and faculty to become involved in activities that 
support inclusion of all student populations.  

276
UNM Health Sciences Vice‐President and Office of Diversity 

• In addition to the UNM Office of Equity and Inclusion, the UNM Health Sciences Center has an 
Office of Diversity and a Vice President for Diversity, Dr. Valerie Romero‐Leggott.  
o Among the diversity programs at the Health Sciences Center are:  
ƒ Minority Women in Medicine and the Health Sciences, Health Careers Academy 
New Mexico Clinical Education Program, and the Undergraduate Health Sciences 
Enrichment Program.  
ƒ Hope, Enrichment, And Learning Transform Health in New Mexico (H.E.A.L.T. H. 
NM) reaches out to both rural and urban areas of the state to levels that range 
from College Graduates to Middle School, and there it is expected this program will 
go to the elementary school level very soon.  The philosophy is that an entering 
biology freshman who wants to go to medical school really began their college 
education many levels and many grades prior to applying to UNM. At the middle 
school level, after school programs are provided that involve hands‐on activities. 
As students grow older the programs provide more intensive workshops, non‐
residential summer programs for high school students, a six‐week residential 
program for undergraduate students, immersion programs for professional 
students, and a premedical enrichment program.  
ƒ The demands of medical school are highly demanding. The office and staff are 
prepared to provide support, including preparation for rigorous licensing exams.  
ƒ The Combined BA/MD Programs is designed to address the physician shortage in 
New Mexico.  
277
• 28 high school seniors are accepted each year 
• The 8 year combined degree program earns students a Bachelor of Arts and a 
medical degree at UNM 
• The program is committed to finding diverse students from areas of need in 
New Mexico 
• High levels of student support include: 
o Personalized academic advisement 
o Individualized tutoring and group supplemental instruction 
o Supplemental scholarship and financial aid package 
o MCAT preparatory course 
o Peer, medical student and faculty mentors 
o Dormitory housing with BA/MD students 

Senate Bill 600 

The provision of health services to New Mexico’s diverse population is extremely important to 
the citizens of this state. SB 600 mandates that the Higher Education Department form a 
Cultural Competence Task Force to study and make recommendations on specific cultural 
competence curricula for each health‐related education filed offered in New Mexico’s public 
post‐secondary institution. The Task Force was charged with addressing issues related to 
health disparities: racism, sexism, ageism, discrimination. A Senior Advisor to the Executive 
Vice President for the Health Sciences Center (Professor Margaret Montoya) co‐coordinates 
278
these efforts and co‐chairs the Task Force with Dr. Romero‐Leggott. In each discipline of 
career and study, the following core competencies are addressed.  Each discipline examined 
their current curriculum to examine strengths and areas for improvement, and then worked 
to identify significant curriculum recommendations.   

Socio‐Cultural Factors in Health Care  Population Health Disparities
Delivery  Establish a knowledge base of the existence 
Examine the mistrust, unconscious bias and  and magnitude of health disparities in New 
stereotyping which practitioners and  Mexico’s population, including the 
patients bring to clinical health encounters  multifactorial causes of health disparities 
 
Intercultural Communication Historical Trauma
Develop skills to effectively communicate  Understand the impact of historical trauma 
and negotiate across cultures, languages,  on health, as it relates to patients and 
and literacy levels, including the use of key  families from diverse cultural backgrounds 
tools to improve communication 
 

279
 

280
 

In the midst of crisis, we   

cannot afford to ignore that   

 
which is Moral, Just, and 
 
Humane…  Susan Muñoz, Ph.D., Iowa 
 
State University, 2010 
 
   

Summary Statement   

 
 
 

281
Summary Statement 
New Mexico stands out from our neighboring states in many ways. While our neighbors chose 
not to protect the language of its children a hundred years ago, New Mexico included its 
protection in the state constitution. More recently, some neighboring states chose not to 
support the educational rights of immigrant children. One state’s educational board voted to 
change the way historical contributions of civil rights leaders were represented in the public 
school curriculum, downplaying their significance. In contrast, New Mexico created an act 
that would provide for the study, development and implementation of educational systems to 
promote the success of Hispanic students.  Throughout New Mexico’s history, advocacy for 
and protection of the educational rights of all children has been promised in the law.  Does 
New Mexico fulfill its promise? 
 
Throughout this report, we have seen data and figures that confirm the achievement gap and 
graduation gap of Hispanic students at all levels of education. Despite small gains in some 
cases, the gap is persistent. The numbers are staggering and we have seen that the disparities 
get wider as we go up in grade level and education level. We have also seen that the 
achievement of Hispanic students has a profound effect on the economic and social welfare 
of New Mexico. The collection and reporting of data is useful, but it does not go far enough. 
In this report, there were topics not explored and there were observations made throughout 
that leave us with many more questions to be answered.  For example, we still need to know:  

282
• How and where are Hispanic students making gains?  
• Where do our graduates get jobs? 
• How many graduates leave New Mexico? 
• How many graduates are underemployed or unemployed? 
• Which are the most critical health issues affected by a strong education?  
• What are the chances for success of our Hispanic families and their future generations? 

Given the data presented in this report, we implore education policy makers, legislators, 
government officials, educators, and community to create a climate that fully recognizes the 
reality of the current condition, and the severity of the consequences of keeping the status 
quo.  It is time to own the facts.  At this crucial turning point in our history, it is imperative 
that we work even more collaboratively, recognizing each other’s expertise in securing a 
promising future for all of New Mexico’s children.  Now is the time to identify our allies and 
partners and to strengthen opportunities for leadership and for collaborative and thoughtful 
response to this call for action.  

More than creating value and policy statements, more than documenting and reporting of 
data, it is time to understand why our students are underperforming and take bold action to 
move us forward in a way that continues to honor the unique cultures of New Mexico. 

283