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Table of Contents

Introduction.........................................................................................................................................................1

What's New in Campcaster?..............................................................................................................................2

Different packages for different use..................................................................................................................3

Campcaster Studio..............................................................................................................................................4

Campcaster Web.................................................................................................................................................5

Advanced Setup: Campcaster Studio, Web, and Storage...............................................................................6

Installation...........................................................................................................................................................7

Adding the Repository via Terminal.................................................................................................................8

Adding the Campcaster repository to Synaptic (for Ubuntu 9.10)................................................................9

Installing Campcaster Debian packages using apt-get..................................................................................10

Installing from source.......................................................................................................................................11

Installing Campcaster from the Repositories CD..........................................................................................12


Adding the Campcaster Repositories CD to the list of software sources..............................................12
Installing Campcaster.............................................................................................................................12

Installing Using dpkg........................................................................................................................................14

Installing On Windows Using VMware Player..............................................................................................15

Configuring Campcaster for Internet Radio..................................................................................................17


2. Installing JackIt, Darkice, and flux routing ALSA to Jack................................................................17
2.3. Routing the ALSA input flux of the jackit audio-server.................................................................18
3. Configuration of Campcaster Scheduler and DarkIce.......................................................................19
4. Launching JackIt, DarkIce, and Campcaster Scheduler....................................................................19
4.2 Automate the launch of the audio server Jackit and the Darkice streamer:.....................................20
5. Conclusion.........................................................................................................................................23

Configuring Campcaster on Two Computers................................................................................................24


1. Set up the server.................................................................................................................................24
2. Set up the client...........................................................................................................................25
Notes................................................................................................................................................27

Using Campcaster.............................................................................................................................................28

A live radio show assistant...............................................................................................................................29

Getting started with Campcaster Studio........................................................................................................30

Log In.................................................................................................................................................................31

Configuring Soundcards..................................................................................................................................33
Introduction to soundcards and Campcaster..........................................................................................33
Configuring an internal soundcard.........................................................................................................33

i
Table of Contents
Configuring Soundcards
Configuring an external USB soundcard...............................................................................................33

Master Panel......................................................................................................................................................36

Navigation Menu...............................................................................................................................................37

Live Mode..........................................................................................................................................................38
Live Assist mode...................................................................................................................................38
Live Automatic mode............................................................................................................................39
Using mini-playlists in Live Mode........................................................................................................39

Upload file..........................................................................................................................................................41
Upload file palette elements...................................................................................................................41

ScratchPad.........................................................................................................................................................45

Playlists / Simple playlist editor.......................................................................................................................47


Removing playlists from the Scheduler.................................................................................................48

Scheduler...........................................................................................................................................................49
Adding playlists to the Scheduler..........................................................................................................49

Search.................................................................................................................................................................51
Browse...................................................................................................................................................51
Simple search.........................................................................................................................................52
Advanced Search...................................................................................................................................53

Options palette..................................................................................................................................................55
Sound tab...............................................................................................................................................55
ALSA sound card notation..............................................................................................................55
Using the Sound tab to set up your sound cards..............................................................................56
Keyboard Shortcuts tab..........................................................................................................................57
Default keyboard shortcuts..............................................................................................................58
Servers tab..............................................................................................................................................58
Scheduler tab..........................................................................................................................................59
Backup tab.............................................................................................................................................60
Importing backup files.....................................................................................................................61
Making and saving backup files......................................................................................................62
RDS........................................................................................................................................................62
Using placeholders with Clip info...................................................................................................63
About tab................................................................................................................................................64
Campcaster 1.2.0 "Kotor" credits....................................................................................................64

Campcaster Web: Browser based administration and scheduling..............................................................67

Accessing Campcaster Web.............................................................................................................................68

Master Panel......................................................................................................................................................69

Login/Logout.....................................................................................................................................................70

ii
Table of Contents
Navigation Menu...............................................................................................................................................71

Active working area..........................................................................................................................................72

The ScratchPad.................................................................................................................................................73

Add audio...........................................................................................................................................................75
Add Audioclip........................................................................................................................................75

Media Library...................................................................................................................................................76
Search.....................................................................................................................................................76
Browse...................................................................................................................................................77
Library Search........................................................................................................................................79
Hub search.............................................................................................................................................79
Transfers................................................................................................................................................79

Playlist Editor....................................................................................................................................................80
Create New Playlist................................................................................................................................80
Playlist Metadata....................................................................................................................................81
Playlist Editor........................................................................................................................................81
Changing fades between files................................................................................................................82
Moving files in playlist....................................................................................................................82

Scheduler...........................................................................................................................................................84
Daily View.............................................................................................................................................84
Weekly View.........................................................................................................................................84
Monthly View........................................................................................................................................85
Today's View.........................................................................................................................................85
Schedule Navigator................................................................................................................................85
Adding playlists to the scheduler...........................................................................................................85
Remove Playlist from Scheduler...........................................................................................................86

Station Settings (Preferences)..........................................................................................................................87


Create Station Settings...........................................................................................................................87
Users/Groups..........................................................................................................................................88
File List..................................................................................................................................................88
Special Tab.............................................................................................................................................88

Troubleshooting................................................................................................................................................89
File Upload............................................................................................................................................89

Using the Network Hub to share program material between stations.........................................................90

Playlists and the Network Hub........................................................................................................................91

Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Web............................................................................................92


Uploading files to the Network Hub from Campcaster Web.................................................................92
Searching for files on the Network Hub................................................................................................92
Downloading files from the Network Hub in Campcaster Web............................................................92
Using the Transfers window to check file transfer status......................................................................93

Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Studio.........................................................................................94


Uploading files to the Network Hub from Campcaster Studio..............................................................94
Searching for files on the Network Hub................................................................................................94

iii
Table of Contents
Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Studio
Downloading files from the Network Hub in Campcaster Studio.........................................................94
Transfers Window..................................................................................................................................94

Sharing program material offline with Campcaster.....................................................................................96

Exporting playlists from Campcaster Web....................................................................................................97

Additional information.....................................................................................................................................98

Features..............................................................................................................................................................99
Inputs.....................................................................................................................................................99
Audio Outputs........................................................................................................................................99
Campcaster Studio: The Desktop Application.......................................................................................99
GUI Windows & Features...................................................................................................................100
Web Interface.......................................................................................................................................101

Using the campcaster-import script to import large numbers of files.......................................................102

Changing the station logo in Campcaster.....................................................................................................103

How to report bugs.........................................................................................................................................104

Where to go for more help.............................................................................................................................105


Other help.............................................................................................................................................105

iv
Introduction
In this section:

• What's new in Campcaster 1.4?


• Different packages for different use
• Campcaster Studio: inside the broadcast studio
• Campcaster Web: scheduling radio programs
• Advanced Setup: Campcaster Studio, Station, and Storage

Campcaster is free and open radio management software, providing live studio broadcast capabilities
as well as remote automation in one integrated system. The scalability of Campcaster allows
implementation in a number of use scenarios, ranging from an unmanned broadcast unit accessed
remotely through the Internet, to a local network of Campcaster machines inside a radio station
handling live broadcasts and delivering program automation by accessing a central audio storage
system. Campcaster is capable of combining local audio files and remote web streams, supporting the
widely used MP3 format and the open equivalent OGG Vorbis.

As in all Sourcefabric products, multilinguality is a central feature in Campcaster: virtually everything


in the user interface can be translated into any language using Unicode. Multilinguality is
implemented in all levels of the user interface as well as for the metadata for audio files in the storage
system.

Campcaster has been designed for a GNU/Linux environment. However, the developers have built it
on top of standardized, cross-platform classes. This architecture could enable the porting of
Campcaster to different operating systems in the future.

Introduction 1
What's New in Campcaster?
The main work in the 1.4 "Monrovia" release involves a rewriting of its interface with the Gstreamer
multimedia layer under Linux. What this means is that sound handling is much faster, numerous file formats
(including WAV and FLAC) can be supported and the system will be able to use other plugins from the
Gstreamer multimedia framework. This will greatly improve Campcaster's playback reliability and keep
Campcaster on the right path for future development.

The full new features list is:

• upgraded to the latest gstreamer (0.10.x)


• fixed numerous playout bugs
• added cue in/cue out functionality to playout
• added graceful resumption after scheduler crashes
• added Twitter "Now playing" functionality for scheduled items
• changes to the code to make it Debian/Ubuntu friendly

What's New in Campcaster? 2


Different packages for different use
As Campcaster has been intended to provide a solution for a wide range of radio projects, from community to
commercial radio stations, we have decided to provide distinct packages of Campcaster that would cater best
to the needs of different kinds of user groups and use scenarios.

The sections below describe the key features and components of the different Campcaster configurations.

Different packages for different use 3


Campcaster Studio
Campcaster Studio is the part of Campcaster that is running inside the live studio of a radio station. Here the
presenter or DJ manages his or her content to be broadcast live on the air. Campcaster Studio can be added to
an existing radio station and will slowly become the center of all audio sources besides voice input such as
phone or studio guests. Connected to an audio mixer, Campcaster Studio can be combined with other audio
sources, such as phone-lines, microphones or media the station is used to (CD or MiniDisc).

Campcaster Studio will be used to access the Campcaster Storage component and the presenter / DJ can
search and browse the audio archive in the studio. Files and playlists can be lined up for the radio broadcast.
In short: Campcaster Studio is the perfect assistant for a live radio show, providing easy access to the ever
growing media archive of Campcaster.

Campcaster Studio 4
Campcaster Web
Campcaster Web manages the scheduler, accessing the same media archive in Campcaster Storage that the
Studio component relies on. The editors can use the Studio to build playlists and manage files (upload,
translate metadata, manage advertisement) inside the office or through the internet, using a standard web
browser such as Firefox or Internet Explorer. The web interface allows similar functionality as Studio in
accessing the media archive, such as upload files and manage webstreams. It also allows access to the
scheduler system, which is the core of Campcaster Web.

The scheduler in Campcaster Web comes with an intuitive calendar view, organized by months, weeks and
days. Here the program editors can schedule playlists and webstreams for their radio station. In connection to
the Studio, the web functionality may be used mostly for broadcasting times where nobody is present in the
live studio. In many use scenarios, however, the Station may be the only running component in many use
scenarios, for example, in cases where the radio transmitter is situated outside the reach of the editors and all
program management has to be maintained through the remote interface. Possible reasons for such a use
scenario might be of pragmatic nature (running many stations from one central office due to limited human
resources) or an emergency (running a transmitter in a crisis area without putting staff at risk).

Campcaster Web 5
Advanced Setup: Campcaster Studio, Web, and
Storage
Combining Campcaster Studio, the Campcaster Web interface and Campcaster Storage, you can supply a
radio station with all functionality needed for broadcasting and automation.

Image 5: Complete radio solution based on Campcaster. Live broadcasts, remote access, and scheduling in
one system.

Campcaster Web functions as the access to the audio database (Storage) from inside and outside the studio
building. The switch between live broadcasts and scheduled radio programs can be done inside the station at a
master audio mixer, connecting the Studio machine and the scheduler of Storage with the transmitter.

Advanced Setup: Campcaster Studio, Web, and Storage 6


Installation
In this chapter:

• Adding the Campcaster repository to your sources (for Debian, Ubuntu and Knoppix distributions)
• Adding the Campcaster repository to Synaptic
• Installing Campcaster Debian packages using apt-get
• Installing from source
• Installing Campcaster from the Repositories CD
• Using dpkg with Campcaster packages (for Debian, Ubuntu and Knoppix distributions)

Campcaster can be installed from Subversion or from the precompiled packages. All components can
be downloaded via the Campcaster section of the Sourcefabric website.

Installation 7
Adding the Repository via Terminal
All Linux distributions include large collections of programs and supporting libraries called repositories.
These repositories exist online, and once they are added to your computer's list of repositories, you can
download software from them. In addition, when updates become available, you can be automatically notified
and install them. For more information on this process see
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Repositories/Ubuntu To add the repository that contains the Campcaster
software, open a terminal within Applications > Accessories > Terminal. Then type

$ sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list

Write your password and a text file will open. Go to the bottom of this document and add the following line
(use copy and paste):

deb http://apt.64studio.com/backports/ karmic-backports main

(NOTICE: If you get an error while updating, try to type the above line manually in gedit. For unknown
reasons, gedit seems to have trouble with copy and paste at times...)

Then we need to add the 64studio package which contains the package signing key for security reasons.

sudo apt-get install 64studio-apt

Save the current file and close gedit. Return to the terminal window.

You now need to update your sources. Type:

sudo apt-get update

After this, you can install Campcaster packages using the apt-get command.

Adding the Repository via Terminal 8


Adding the Campcaster repository to Synaptic (for
Ubuntu 9.10)

1. Firstly, we need to add a repository. This is the software archive that we will install Campcaster from. For
more information on this process see https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Repositories/Ubuntu

For now, go to the menu (usually located in your top panel on the desktop) System>Administration>Software
Sources.

Click on the 'Other Software' tab. Click 'Add'. Copy and paste the following line

deb http://apt.64studio.com/backports/ karmic-backports main

Click 'Add Source', then 'Close'

2. Go to System>Administration>Synaptic Package Manager. Click on Reload. You will recieve an error


about a public key. You can safely ignore this.

Click on the search icon (the quick search bar does not always find it) and type 'campcaster' and select
Description and Name on the 'Look in:' pull down menu. Click search and you should see four items appear in
the window.

3. Click on the box next to 'campcaster-station'. You will see a range of installation options. Click mark for
installation. You will recieve a warning screen. Press 'Mark' to continue.

Do the same for 'campcaster-studio'. You should then see all four items in the list have been selected for
installation.

4. To install them, click 'Apply' in the main tool bar and then 'Apply' again in the warning window that
appears. The items will install. When finished, close the window.

5. To run Campcaster Studio, open a terminal (Application>Accessories>Terminal) and type

campcaster-studio

Campcaster studio will load. Now you are ready to Log In.

Adding the Campcaster repository to Synaptic (for Ubuntu 9.10) 9


Installing Campcaster Debian packages using
apt-get
After adding the Campcaster packages repository, you can simply get Campcaster and all its dependencies by
doing the following:

sudo apt-get install campcaster-libs campcaster-station campcaster-studio

This will install all the Campcaster components.

Installing Campcaster Debian packages using apt-get 10


Installing from source
The latest source code is always available in our Git repositories. For more information about this, see the
Sourcefabric developer wiki and read "Setting up a Development Environment".

Installing from source 11


Installing Campcaster from the Repositories CD
Table of Contents
Adding the Campcaster Repositories CD to the list of software sources
Installing Campcaster
The Campcaster repositories CD is meant for situations where connectivity is poor or nonexistent. It
includes the installation packages for all of the Campcaster components, as well as the packages of
the other programs and files Campcaster depends on in order to run.

To use the Campcaster repositories CD, you must first have Ubuntu Linux 6.06 ("Dapper") or newer
already installed on your computer.

The easiest way to work with the Campcaster repositories CD is to use the Synaptic Package
Manager, which is located in the System Menu -> Administration -> Synaptic.

Adding the Campcaster Repositories CD to the list of


software sources
Synaptic is a program that shows all the programs and libraries that are either available or already installed.
But you must update the list of available sources of software. Usually these are online, but they can also be
offline, usually in the form of CDs or DVDs.

Add Campcaster to the list of available sources by selecting:

Settings -> Repositories

then click: Add CD-ROM

You will be prompted to "insert a disk in the drive"; do so, if the CD is not in the drive already, and then click
on OK.

In the window which says "Unmounting CD-ROM", click on Close.

If it prompts you to enter a name for the CD, do so; for example, you could call it "Campcaster".

After this, the CD will be read and added to the list of sources.

If bandwidth is low, uncheck all other sources in the list, to make sure that the packages will be installed from
the CD, and not from the Internet.

Update the whole list of programs by pressing the "Refresh" button in the upper left of the Synaptic window.

Installing Campcaster
To install Campcaster, first click the "Search" button at the upper right of the Synaptic screen. Then type in

campcaster

Installing Campcaster from the Repositories CD 12


and press 'search'. It will then find the Campcaster packages.

Mark the campcaster-studio package by right clicking on it and selecting 'Mark for Installation.'

Click the 'Apply' button at the top of the Synaptic window.

A menu will appear asking you to confirm the installation. Click 'Apply.'

Congratulations! Campcaster has been installed!

To start Campcaster-Studio, go to the Applications menu at the top of the screen, select Sound and Video ->
Campcaster-Studio.

Installing Campcaster 13
Installing Using dpkg
Installing from a Debian package using dpkg (for Debian, Ubuntu and Knoppix distributions)

sudo dpkg -i /path/to/Campcaster/packages/withFilename

Removing Campcaster using dpkg (for Debian, Ubuntu and Knoppix distributions)

sudo dpkg -r campcaster-libs campcaster-station campcaster-studio

Completely purging Campcaster using dpkg (for Debian, Ubuntu and Knoppix distributions)

<<>>sudo dpkg -P campcaster-libs campcaster-station campcaster-studio>

Installing Using dpkg 14


Installing On Windows Using VMware Player
Although it's a fair amount of work, it's possible to install a functional copy of Campcaster on Windows.
(Technically, it's still running an entire copy of Linux in a virtual machine, but it may be useful for people
who are interested in trying out Campcaster and Linux).

What you will need:

• A relatively new computer (probably best with one with a dual core CPU)
• The VMware Player application
• An Ubuntu image file. This is an entire, functional copy of Ubuntu Linux that runs on your Windows
computer.
• 5 gigabytes of free disk space

Steps to installing

The first step is to download and install the free (but not Free) VMware player for Windows (it's about a 400
megabyte download). You can download it here: http://www.vmware.com/download/player/

Once the VMware Player is installed, you can then download an image of Ubuntu from this location (it's
about 900 megs): http://www.vmware.com/appliances/directory/1258

When the Ubuntu image file is downloaded, you must unpack it. You'll need a copy of 7Zip if you don't have
one, but it's a free download from here: http://www.7-zip.org/ The unpacked Ubuntu image file will take up
almost 4 gigabytes of space.

Start the VMware Player and select the Ubuntu image file. You must make sure that sound card support and
ethernet support are enabled for the Ubuntu image. A window will open for Ubuntu.

At the Ubuntu login, you will have to supply the username and password that came with the image. In the case
of the image file I used, it was user/user.

You will then have a fully functional Ubuntu desktop running under Windows. Then you can follow the steps
to install the Campcaster Development Environment.

TODO:

• Update this page when the Campcaster 1.4 beta packages are ready.
• Check to see if and how multiple sound card support works (so far it has only been tested with a
single sound card)
• Create a smaller VMWare image file with Ubuntu and Campcaster preinstalled (possibly based on
gOS). This will require someone to have a full version of VMware Fusion.
• Figure out if the Campcaster web interface is accessible from outside the virtual machine

Notes

While performance is slower than under a native Ubuntu install, playout from Campcaster Studio is
surprisingly responsive, with playout taking about 25 % of CPU load when a file is playing. Import seems to
require the most CPU resources, getting to about 50 % of CPU load.

Make sure to exit other Windows applications that use sound, especially things like Skype, iTunes or
WinAMP.

Installing On Windows Using VMware Player 15


You can use the Campcaster mass import script to link to files that are on your Windows disk, but you must
first enable shared folders in the VMware Player preferences. In the Development Environment, the mass
import script is in src/campcaster/src/modules/storageAdmin/bin/campcaster-import.

Make sure the shared folders are not read-only, otherwise you will get errors from Campcaster. VMware
Player mounts the Windows folders in the /mnt/hgfs directory, not in /media/ as might be expected. In this
case, linking is probably better than importing, because it will take up less space.

Installing On Windows Using VMware Player 16


Configuring Campcaster for Internet Radio
This English translation is by Peter Whitehead from the French original by Philippe Drouot at Openradio.info.
The article can be found at this address:

http://www.openradio.info/spip/spip.php?article2

1. Problem

The objective is to use Campcaster Station for programming a web radio station â not only from the user's
station but also from a server housed in a data center, so that programming from different geographical
locations can be collectively broadcast.

Streaming sound from the Campcaster scheduler without using an audio card?

Most hosted servers donâ t integrate an audio card. A sound card isnâ t expensive but it is usually
impossible to add one to your server (no access to the machine and/or no PCI slots).

The Campcaster solution requires the ALSA system to function. We donâ t want to hear the sound directly
on the server, but instead want to send it to a streaming server using Darkice as an intermediary. The idea is
therefore to send the sound from the Campcaster scheduler directly to Darkice without passing through the
sound card. ALSA offers the imitation/artificial audio peripheral snd-dummy but it redirects the sound to
/dev/null which doesnâ t get us very far.

Proposed solution: Interconnect Campcaster and Darkice via the audio server Jackit

The audio server Jackit offers a pefectly functional imitation/artificial dummy interface, which allows you to
connect audio applications between themselves without passing through a sound card.

2. Installing JackIt, Darkice, and flux routing ALSA to Jack


Requirements:

Use a datacenter server installed under Debian or Ubuntu and install the campcaster-libs and
campcaster-station packages (see the article Launching a webradio for installation). Use an IceCast 2 server
that is installed and operational (on the same server or a different one).

2.1. Installing the audio server JackIt

#!sh
sudo apt-get install jackd libjack0.100.0-0

Please note that if you encounter difficulties when interconnecting the Campcaster scheduler and the Darkice
streamer, it might be a good idea to install the Jackit server-control graphic interface qjackctl.

2.2. Installing Darkice with Jack support (and mp3 format)

To deal with the non-free format mp3 and Jack support, you must compile darkice yourself.

To deal with the mp3 format: add the multiverse repository for Ubuntu or the debian-multimedia.org
repository for Debian (deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org sid main).

#!sh
sudo apt-get install liblame0 liblame-dev libvorbis-dev libasound2-dev

Configuring Campcaster for Internet Radio 17


We have also added the packages: libvorbis-dev and libasound2-dev to support ogg and alsa.

Development library for Jack support:

#!sh
sudo apt-get install libjack0.100.0-dev

Downloading darkice sources:

#!sh
wget http://ovh.dl.sourceforge.net/sourceforge/darkice/darkice-0.17.1.tar.gz
tar xvf darkice-0.17.1.tar.gz
cd darkice-0.17.1

Compiling Darkice:
If you have never compiled on your server, start with:

#!sh
sudo apt-get build-essential

Before compiling Darkice, we are going to modify a line of source code! The name of the Jack output is the
form darkice-pid (pid being the process number); which isnâ t very practical because it means we have to
change the name of the jack port each time we launch or the alsa flux will be rerouted.

We modify the file src/JackDspSource.cpp and replace line 189:

#!sh
snprintf(client_name, 255, "darkice-%d", getpid());

with:

#!sh
snprintf(client_name, 255, "darkice");

We can now compile and install Darkice:

#!sh
./configure --with-lame --with-vorbis --with-alsa --with-jack --prefix=/usr/local/darkice
make
make install

Darkice is now installed in /usr/local/darkice and deals with the ogg (--with-vorbis), the mp3 (--with-lame)
and supports ALSA and Jackit.

2.3. Routing the ALSA input flux of the jackit audio-server


Installation of additional ALSA plug-ins before disposing of the module libasound_module_pcm_jack.so :

#!sh
sudo apt-get install libasound2-plugins

Creating the virtual peripheral ALSA jackplug is done by creating the file /etc/asound.conf as below:

#!sh
pcm.jackplug {
type plug
slave { pcm "jack" }
}

2. Installing JackIt, Darkice, and flux routing ALSA to Jack 18


pcm.jack {
type jack
playback_ports {
0 darkice:left
1 darkice:right
}
}

3. Configuration of Campcaster Scheduler and DarkIce


Configuring Campcaster Scheduler
The configuration of the Campcaster scheduler is done by editing the file
/opt/campcaster/etc/campcaster-scheduler.xml and by providing information to the audio peripheral by:

#!sh
<audioPlayer>
<gstreamerPlayer audioDevice = "jackplug" />
</audioPlayer>

We are clarifying here that the peripheral is not an audio card type hw:0,0 but the ALSA jackplug virtual
peripheral created earlier.
Donâ t forget to relaunch the Campcaster scheduler by the command /etc/init.d/campcaster-scheduler restart

Configuring Darkice
Start by copying the configuration file example in the Campcaster configuration directory.

#!sh
cp /usr/local/darkice/etc/darkice.cfg /opt/campcaster/etc/

Then modify the configuration file /opt/campcaster/etc/darkice.cfg as required.

• In the section general, you must replace duration = 60 by duration = 0 if not youâ ll go mad
(darkice stops automatically after 60 seconds in the default configuration).

• In the section input, instruct the peripheral used by replacing /dev/dsp with jack. In this same section,
set the sampling frequency: typically 44100 Hz for CD quality. The frequency should be identical to
that used in the launch parameters of jackd (see Launching section).

• Delete all the following sections except the sectionicecast2-0

• In the section icecast2-0, input the information allowing the sending of the flux to the IceCast 2
server: server, port, password and mountPoint. Make sure the information is in the format (format =
mp3 or format = vorbis) and the (bitrate).

4. Launching JackIt, DarkIce, and Campcaster Scheduler


4.1 Test:
To test that everything works, you can launch two different consoles as a superuser:

#!sh
sudo jackstart -vv -R -d dummy -r 44100 -C 0 -P 0

and

#!sh

2.3. Routing the ALSA input flux of the jackit audio-server 19


/usr/local/darkice/bin/darkice -c /opt/campcaster/etc/darkice.cfg

And check the functioning of the station by playing the programming in a navigator with a url of the type
http://domain.tld/campcaster/ and listening to your IceCast flux.

4.2 Automate the launch of the audio server Jackit and the
Darkice streamer:
We have created launch scripts /etc/init.d/jackd and /etc/init.d/darkice as follows:

In /etc/init.d/jackd :

#!sh
#! /bin/sh

set -e

PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin
DESC="Jackit audio server"
NAME=jackd
DAEMON=/usr/bin/$NAME
PIDFILE=/var/run/$NAME.pid
SCRIPTNAME=/etc/init.d/$NAME

# Gracefully exit if the package has been removed.


test -x $DAEMON || exit 0

#
# Function that starts the daemon/service.
#
d_start() {
start-stop-daemon --start --quiet --background --make-pidfile \
--pidfile $PIDFILE --exec $DAEMON -- -vv -R -d dummy -r 44100 -C 0 -P 0 &> /dev/n
|| echo -n " already running"
}

#
# Function that stops the daemon/service.
#
d_stop() {
kill `cat $PIDFILE` \
|| echo -n " not running"
}

#
# Function that sends a SIGHUP to the daemon/service.
#
d_reload() {
start-stop-daemon --stop --quiet --pidfile $PIDFILE \
--name $NAME --signal 1
}

case "$1" in
start)
echo -n "Starting $DESC: $NAME"
d_start
echo "."
;;
stop)
echo -n "Stopping $DESC: $NAME"
d_stop
echo "."
;;

4. Launching JackIt, DarkIce, and Campcaster Scheduler 20


#reload)
#
# If the daemon can reload its configuration without
# restarting (for example, when it is sent a SIGHUP),
# then implement that here.
#
# If the daemon responds to changes in its config file
# directly anyway, make this an "exit 0".
#
# echo -n "Reloading $DESC configuration..."
# d_reload
# echo "done."
#;;
restart|force-reload)
#
# If the "reload" option is implemented, move the "force-reload"
# option to the "reload" entry above. If not, "force-reload" is
# just the same as "restart".
#
echo -n "Restarting $DESC: $NAME"
d_stop
# One second might not be time enough for a daemon to stop,
# if this happens, d_start will fail (and dpkg will break if
# the package is being upgraded). Change the timeout if needed
# be, or change d_stop to have start-stop-daemon use --retry.
# Notice that using --retry slows down the shutdown process somewhat.
sleep 1
d_start
echo "."
;;
*)
echo "Usage: $SCRIPTNAME {start|stop|restart|force-reload}" >&2
exit 3
;;
esac

exit 0

In /etc/init.d/darkice :

#!sh
#! /bin/sh

set -e

PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin
DESC="Darkice"
NAME=darkice
DAEMON=/usr/local/darkice/bin/$NAME
PIDFILE=/var/run/$NAME.pid
SCRIPTNAME=/etc/init.d/$NAME

# Gracefully exit if the package has been removed.


test -x $DAEMON || exit 0

#
# Function that starts the daemon/service.
#
d_start() {
start-stop-daemon --start --quiet --background --make-pidfile \
--pidfile $PIDFILE --exec $DAEMON -- -c /opt/campcaster/etc/darkice.cfg -v 0 &> /
|| echo -n "already running"
}

#
# Function that stops the daemon/service.

4.2 Automate the launch of the audio server Jackit and theDarkice streamer: 21
#
d_stop() {

start-stop-daemon --stop --quiet --pidfile $PIDFILE \


--name $NAME \
|| echo -n " not running"

#
# Function that sends a SIGHUP to the daemon/service.
#
d_reload() {
start-stop-daemon --stop --quiet --pidfile $PIDFILE \
--name $NAME --signal 1
}

case "$1" in
start)
echo -n "Starting $DESC: $NAME"
d_start
echo "."
;;
stop)
echo -n "Stopping $DESC: $NAME"
d_stop
echo "."
;;
#reload)
#
# If the daemon can reload its configuration without
# restarting (for example, when it is sent a SIGHUP),
# then implement that here.
#
# If the daemon responds to changes in its config file
# directly anyway, make this an "exit 0".
#
# echo -n "Reloading $DESC configuration..."
# d_reload
# echo "done."
#;;
restart|force-reload)
#
# If the "reload" option is implemented, move the "force-reload"
# option to the "reload" entry above. If not, "force-reload" is
# just the same as "restart".
#
echo -n "Restarting $DESC: $NAME"
d_stop
# One second might not be time enough for a daemon to stop,
# if this happens, d_start will fail (and dpkg will break if
# the package is being upgraded). Change the timeout if needed
# be, or change d_stop to have start-stop-daemon use --retry.
# Notice that using --retry slows down the shutdown process somewhat.
sleep 1
d_start
echo "."
;;
*)
echo "Usage: $SCRIPTNAME {start|stop|restart|force-reload}" >&2
exit 3
;;
esac

exit 0

4.2 Automate the launch of the audio server Jackit and theDarkice streamer: 22
To check that it works, you only need to make the two scripts executable (chmod +x) then launch them:

#!sh
/etc/init.d/jackd start
/etc/init.d/darkice start

Beware, the audio server JackIt must always be launched with the Darkice streamer.
To make sure that the daemons are automatically launched when starting the machine, you only need to do:

#!sh
update-rc.d jackd defaults 85
update-rc.d darkice defaults 86

The priorities 85 and 86 are purely arbitrary. You must observe the fact that these figures are available, that
they are lower than the launch priority of Campcaster scheduler, and that jackd precedes darkice! Add ls
/etc/rc2.d/ to the preliminary commands update-rc.d

5. Conclusion
By redirecting the ALSA flux from Campcaster Scheduler into the input of the Jackit audio-server and by
connecting with the Darkice streamer at the output, we are able to work on the programming of a webradio
from a server that doesnâ t have a sound card.
There are probably other solutions. Donâ t hesitate to have your say in the campcaster-dev forum or mailing
list.

5. Conclusion 23
Configuring Campcaster on Two Computers
Campcaster-station (the server components) and campcaster-studio (the graphical client) can be installed on
separate computers on a local network. Unfortunately, at the moment, the setup is not as simple as it should
be. This page will tell you how to do it.

The solution involves the use of the Network File System protocol to allow the client computer to access files
over the network as easily as if the networked devices were attached as local disks.

We will assume that you are running Ubuntu on both computers; commands and file locations may be
different in other distributions.

The instructions differ somewhat between the official releases (referred to here as Packaged Versions) and the
development environment.

Notes:
You don't need to do any of following if you only want to use the web interface. In that case, you don't even
need to install the campcaster-studio package. Just open http://<server>/campcaster (where
<server> is the name or IP address of the server computer) with a browser on any computer which can
access the server.

If your network has a firewall, it must be set up to allow NFS traffic. Depending on your firewall, this can
be fairly difficult. Here are links to howtos for Ubuntu Gentoo.

1. Set up the server


Package version

On the server computer, install campcaster-station. Start a file browser (Places ->
Computer -> Filesystem), open the folder /opt/campcaster/var/Campcaster, and right-click
on storageServer. Click on "Share folder" (enter your password, if prompted),
and select "NFS" from the "Share with" drop-down menu.

Ubuntu will automatically install the packages necessary for NFS file sharing.

In the Share Folder window, click on "Add host", and select an option from the drop-down
menu which includes your client computer. The default setting will probably be OK.
You can check the "Read only" box; Campcaster only needs read access to this directory.

Next, edit the storage server configuration file as root; for example you can type

sudo gedit /opt/campcaster/var/Campcaster/storageServer/var/conf.php

find the line

'storageUrlHost' => 'localhost',

and replace localhost with the name or IP address of the server computer under which it
can be accessed from the client computer.
This will probably be something like '192.168.0.123'.

Development Environment version

Configuring Campcaster on Two Computers 24


On the server computer, install Campcaster using the steps described on the Setting up a Dev Environment
page.

Start a file browser (Places ->


Computer -> Filesystem), open the folder /home/<your user
name>/src/campcaster/src/modules, and right-click
on storageServer. Click on "Share folder" (enter your password, if prompted), and select "NFS" from the
"Share with" drop-down menu.

Ubuntu will automatically install the packages necessary for NFS file sharing.

In the Share Folder window, click on "Add host", and select an option from the drop-down
menu which includes your client computer. The default setting will probably be OK.
You can check the "Read only" box; Campcaster only needs read access to this directory.

Next, edit the storage server configuration file as root; for example you can type

gedit /home/<your user name>/src/campcaster/src/modules/storageServer/var/conf.php

find the line

'storageUrlHost' => 'localhost',

and replace localhost with the name or IP address of the server computer under which it
can be accessed from the client computer. This will probably be something like '192.168.0.123'.

When you create an NFS share, you must tell the kernel that there are changes in the sharing:

sudo exportfs -ra

and then to be sure, restart the NFS daemon and the NFS kernel daemon.

sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server restart

and

sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-common restart

Now your server should be ready to accept the connections from the client.

2. Set up the client


Package Version
On the client computer, install both the campcaster-station and the campcaster-studio packages,
as well as the nfs-common package:

sudo apt-get install campcaster-station campcaster-studio nfs-common

Add the following line to the /etc/fstab file (as root):

<server>:/opt/campcaster/var/Campcaster/storageServer /opt/campcaster/var/Campcaster/storageServe

where <server> is the name or IP address of the server computer under which it
can be accessed from the client computer.

1. Set up the server 25


Mount the share for the first time (later it will be mounted automatically when the system boots up).

sudo mount /opt/campcaster/var/Campcaster/storageServer

Now, start up Studio. Log in, open Options -> Servers, and change all three 'localhost' entries to '<server>'
(the name or IP address of the server computer). Click on OK, exit Studio,
and start it again; it should be accessing the storage and scheduler on the server computer
now.

To change the configuration of the Scheduler, edit the file


/opt/campcaster/etc/campcaster-scheduler.xml as root, and change the "localhost"
entries under authenticationClientFactory and storageClientFactory to "<server>",
and modify the

<user login="..." password="..." />

entry to a user name and password valid on the server computer.

Development Environment version

On the client computer, install the development environment version as described here as well as the
nfs-common package:

sudo apt-get install nfs-common

Open the fstab file (as root):

sudo gedit /etc/fstab

Add the following lines to the file:

# Campcaster remote storage server


<server>:/home/<user name on server>/src/campcaster/src/modules/storageServer /home/<username on

where:

• <server> is the name or IP address of the server computer under which it can be accessed from the
client computer
• <user name on server> is the user name where the Campcaster development environment is
installed
• <user name on client> is the user name on the client computer where the Campcaster
development environment is installed

Mount the shared remote directory for the first time (later it will be mounted automatically when the system
boots up).

sudo mount /home/<your user name>/src/campcaster/src/modules/storageServer

Now, start up Studio. Log in, open Options -> Servers, and change all three 'localhost' entries to '<server>'
(the name or IP address of the server computer). Click on OK, exit Studio,
and start it again; it should be accessing the storage and scheduler on the server computer
now.

To change the configuration of the Scheduler, edit the file


/opt/campcaster/etc/campcaster-scheduler.xml as root, and change the "localhost"
entries under authenticationClientFactory and storageClientFactory to "<server>",

2. Set up the client 26


and modify the

<user login="..." password="..." />

entry to a user name and password valid on the server computer.

Notes
• When the remote storageServer directory is mounted, it will hide the local storageServer directory; if
you unmount it, the local directory will reappear.

• If your server is running the development environment, the storage server configuration file is at
~/.campcaster/storageServer.conf.php, and the storage server directory you need to
share is /home/<username>/src/campcaster/src/modules/storageServer. You
need to create this directory, with the same path (including the same user name), on the client
computer, and mount it there. If your client computer is also running the development environment,
you first need to rename the storageServer directory that's already there, in the same way as
shown above.

Notes 27
Using Campcaster
The Campcaster interface for station managers, DJ's or editors comes in two different flavors: Campcaster
Web, and Campcaster Studio. Both flavors enable you to add files to playlists, edit saved playlists, and
schedule program start times.

Campcaster Web offers remote control for the Campcaster system. It allows password-protected access to
the Campcaster scheduling server via a web browser on any type of computer, and can be used inside the
radio station as well as via the Internet.

Campcaster Studio is a native desktop application for GNU/Linux. It is designed to be used at the radio
station, on the same local network as the Campcaster scheduling server. It is also password-protected, so that
not just anyone can change the station schedule.

Using Campcaster 28
A live radio show assistant
In this chapter:

• Getting started with Campcaster Studio


• Log In
• Master Panel
• Navigation Menu
• Live Mode
• Upload file
• ScratchPad
• Playlists / Simple playlist editor
• Scheduler
• Search
• Options palette

Campcaster Studio is the part of Campcaster that completely does the on air playback function inside
a radio station's live studio but also includes all known automation elements.

Campcaster Studio can be installed on the userâ s machine placed inside the broadcast studio and
connected with the audio mixing board that distributes an audio signal to the transmitter or live stream
system. From there, the user can manage the content to be broadcast live on-air. Users also have the
option of searching and browsing the audio library of the radio station or the system it belongs to -
starting from general search criteria to the smallest search details.

Note: Campcaster Studio does not include functions for dynamic reduction equalization or audio
signal post processing - it doesnâ t perform any major dynamic signal improvement.

If you want to edit and do the additional make-up of radio signals afterwards - we recommend (before
any distribution of audio signal towards the transmitter) to use a standalone dynamic reduction tool
(dynamic compression, DeEsser, level maximizing) for pseudoacoustic improvements of the sound
spectrum and listening impression.

Campcaster Studio is intended to be used on an independent playback machine that has two working
modes:

· Live Automatic mode - which broadcasts a radio program without studio crew with a system
of permanent automation and outside programming

· Live Assist mode - that does the live programming, and works as a live assistant machine.
Users can manage the contents to be broadcast live on-air. In addition, by searching and browsing the
audio archive on the Campcaster Storage component, the user can line up and set files and playlists to
be ready for broadcast.

Campcaster Studio, whether in Automatic or Live Assist mode, has almost the same appearance.

A live radio show assistant 29


Getting started with Campcaster Studio
Open a terminal. Type

$ campcaster-studio

This will start the Campcaster Studio. You may recieve a warning that the scheduler is not running. The
scheduler is not essential for the live studio functionality. We will get back to this later.

After starting the Campcaster Studio application on your studio machine, the Master Panel will appear,
allowing you to login into the system and giving you essential information about the station time and logo as
well as what is currently in the program.

Getting started with Campcaster Studio 30


Log In

Clicking the â log inâ button on the Master Panel takes you to the 'Log In' palette, which displays the
following :

• Login field - where you need to enter your personal user name assigned to you by your system
administrator

• Password field - where you enter your password as assigned by your system administrator (the
default password is q)

IMPORTANT: When you first start using Campcaster, the default user name is 'root' and the password is 'q'
although your system administrator should immediately change this to something more secure.)

• The Language drop-down menu â where you can select one of the available user interface
localizations of Campcaster Studio from the list. The default language is English, but you can use one
of the other localized versions we supply. The selected language will last as long as you are logged
into the Campcaster Studio application. When you log out and then log in for a second time, you
wonâ t have to choose the interface language again, as it will be remembered. You will only need to
choose the language again if you quit Campcaster Studio completely and start the program again.

• Cancel and OK buttons - which allow you to confirm the login or cancel the operation.

After successfully presenting on the system and logging in into Campcaster Studio, you will be able to see the
following:

• The Master Panel - with basic information of your radio station (time and logo), the track currently
being played out by the scheduler and play/stop functions of the audio slot.

• The Navigation Menu â buttons for all the main functions you need for operating Campcaster
Studio, depending on your user rights and permissions (as previously determined by your system's
administrator).

Log In 31
Recommendation:

We recommend that users log out after every session, when finishing your part of the radio program. The
reason for this is that special settings and user rights that are connected only to you and nobody else.

If you are using Live mode after another user, you can simply log your colleague out and log yourself in â
in order to start the new session that logs you as an author with your personal specified rights and saved
settings, and all audio files and playlists you left in the ScratchPad the last time.

Log In 32
Configuring Soundcards

In this chapter we explain how to configure the soundcards and how to troubleshoot a few common problems.

Introduction to soundcards and Campcaster

Campcaster Studio has two possible uses for a soundcard. The primary use is to playout the files, in other
words to play your station ('Live Mode'). The second possible use is to preview or 'cue' tracks. To do both at
the same time (i.e. preview tracks whilst your station is on air), you need two soundcards, one for each
function.

You can use your internal soundcard, or an external soundcard (for instance one that connects to your
computer via USB), or both if you wish to playout and preview.

Configuring an internal soundcard

Select Options in the Master Panel, then the tab "Sound".

Two functions appear, to which we must assign soundcards. 'Live Mode audio device' is the device that will
play your station. 'Cue audio device' is the device that will play your preview.

If you are only using one soundcard, we should configure this for playout. To preview tracks you would need
to add an external card also.

Under "Live mode audio device" write "hw:0,0" to assign your internal sound card to 'Live Mode'.

(Notice: Currently the 'Test' buttons do not function)

Click Apply. A warning window reminds you that to save these changes, you will have to restart Campcaster
and login in once more. when you do so, your soundcard should function with the 'Live mode.

If, for whatever reason, you want to configure your internal sound card to preview (meaning you cannot
playout without an additional, extra soundcard), then follow the above steps but enter hw:0,0 in the field that
says 'Cue audio device'.

Configuring an external USB soundcard

This follows much the same steps as above, but may require additional configuration.

Plug in the external soundcard to your USB port.

Go to terminal and type

Configuring Soundcards 33
$ aplay -l

You should see the external sound card listed amongst others. For instance:

card 1: Aureon51MkII [Aureon5.1MkII], device 0: USB Audio [USB Audio]

Here, Aureon51MkII is the make of the soundcard. There are two other useful piece of information here; the
card number and the device number. In this instance the card number is 1 and the device number is 0.
Remember this as 1,0 .

Now open Campcaster Studio, login if you have not already and select Options in the Master Panel, then the
tab "Sound".

As previously, two functions appear, to which we must assign soundcards. 'Live Mode audio device' is the
device that will play your station. 'Cue audio device' is the device that will play your preview.

If you are using only the external soundcard, we should configure this for playout. To preview tracks you
would need to add another card also (usually your internal card).

Under "Live mode audio device" write "hw:1,0" (or whatever the number you remembered from above was!)
to assign your external sound card to 'Live Mode'.

At this moment, your internal soundcard is unused. So why not use it as the 'Cue audio device'? To do this
type "hw:0,0" into the 'Cue audio device field.

Now you have two soundcards configured; your internal soundcard for the preview and the external
soundcard for the playout. External soundcards are often better quality than internal, so it usually make sense
to have it this way round. However, you can choose. To use them the other way round, simply write "hw:1,0"
in 'cue audio device' and "hw:0,0" in 'Live Mode audio device'. whichever way you choose, restart
Campcaster and log in for the changes to take affect.

Occasionally, your computer assigns different numbers to the internal and external devices than above. To
check out which device has which number type again in a terminal the following:

$ aplay -l

The terminal should display:

**** List of PLAYBACK Hardware Devices ****


card 0: Intel [HDA Intel], device 0: AD198x Analog [AD198x Analog]
Subdevices: 1/1 Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
card 0: Intel [HDA Intel], device 1: AD198x Digital [AD198x Digital]
Subdevices: 1/1 Subdevice #0: subdevice #0
card 1: Aureon51MkII [Aureon5.1MkII], device 0: USB Audio [USB Audio]
Subdevices: 1/1

The Analog device is your internal soundcard (0,0 in this case), and the external one you should be able to
recognise by name (1,0). The card number and device number are the ones used by your computer to identify
the soundcards and by you to assign their functions.

(Notice: Occasionally with some sound cards, the above method does not work. If this happens, on your
computer go to System > Preferences > Sound. select the output tab and select your external soundcard as the
default. Then fire up Campcaster, login and go to options and the sound tab. Assign the 'Cue audio device to

Configuring an external USB soundcard 34


your internal card with "hw:0,0" and Live Mode Audio Device to your external card by writing: "default".
Restart Campcaster, log in, and everything should work.)

Configuring an external USB soundcard 35


Master Panel

When starting Campcaster Studio, the Master Panel appears in the upper part of the screen, remaining on the
screen as your friendly assistant the whole time you work on your computer.

No matter in what mode of Campcaster Studio you are working in, the Master Panel displays:

• Time field - displays the time at your radio station

• Play/pause button - with the function of playing or pausing the currently playing item

• Stop button - Stops the currently playing item directly

• Now Playing field â Displays the name of the file that is being broadcast, together with the
additional information such as elapsed time and remaining time of the audio file, its creator and the
album

• Logo of your radio station - this can be set from a separate administration panel

• â Log inâ button - you need to click 'log in' if you want to enter the Campcaster Studio
environment. When you are logged in, the button changes to â log outâ ;

• Exit button, which you need to click if you want to exit the whole application. The popup window
will then appear asking you to confirm if you are sure in this action.

Master Panel 36
Navigation Menu

The Navigation Menu contains all the main functions you need for operating Campcaster Studio. It is located
in the lower part of the Master Panel, and is visible there throughout the userâ s entire session.

The Navigation Menu consists of the following functions:

• Live Mode button â for quick change of your working mode during the broadcast
• Upload file button - for uploading sound files into either the playlist or the ScratchPad
• ScratchPad button â opens the palette containing all recent files and playlists uploaded and
created by currently logged-in user
• Playlists button â for creating and editing simple playlists (changing file place in the list, changing
fades...)
• Scheduler button â for playlist scheduling and reviewing of daily broadcast schedule
• Search button â search and browse audio clips available in the Campcaster storage server using the
search criteria you set
• Options button - for setting various program options such as sound card setup, RDS and backup

The buttons in the Navigation Menu work as toggles, meaning that when you pressing them once makes the
palette appear, while pressing it again makes it disappear.

Navigation Menu 37
Live Mode
Clicking on the â Live Modeâ button in the Navigation Menu opens up a new palette on the
screen below the Master Panel.

The Live Mode palette contains:

♦ Play button (large in size)â plays the selected files immediately, interrupting whatever is
currently playing
♦ Preview (cue) buttons â play/pause and stop button â gives users the option of
pre-listening to audio files before playing them on air. The space under the preview and play
buttons contains the list of audio slots (either playlists or single files) that are created by the
user .
When the Live mode palette opens, the space below the play and preview buttons is blank. User can
create there the list of audio files (if he or she works in Live mode), that are going to be broadcasted
by the determined order. Playlist cannot be saved in this palette, but from the other function palettes
that user access on some other way.

Note: Live Mode currently works â automaticallyâ (files are played automatically one after
another). An upcoming version will also include working as â live assistantâ (that means that
user plays one song after another).

The list of files in Live Mode represents your temporary playlist that will be broadcast either song by
song or automatically, depending on how you set it.

Inserted audio files display as rows, one after another. Each row contains:
♦ each file's number in the playout order (a file in the master panel is always #1)
♦ the file's title, its creator, and duration
Right-click options
Right-clicking your mouse on an audio file inserted into Live Mode will bring up a context menu
offering you the following options:
♦ Play (has the same function as the play button above the list. When the 'play' option is
selected, the already-scheduled playlist in the Master Panel's 'Now Playing' window
automatically interrupts and plays the selected file from Live mode)
Preview (has the same role as the preview buttons in the upper part of the Live Mode palette,
allowing the user to pre-listen to an audio file before playing it)
♦ Add to Playlist takes the currently selected item and adds it to a playlist. If no playlist is
active, one will be created.
♦ Remove (gives the user the option to remove a file from the live mode list)
♦ Upload to Network Hub puts the selected item in the queue to be uploaded to a Network
Hub if one is configured.

Note: A playlist is the physical list of audio files that will be broadcast in the order the user determines. A
created playlist, when saved in the system, appears as a single file and not as the whole list. When playing, a
playlist will appear as a single audio file with the total duration of its parts.

You may also 'drag and drop' items to reorder them in the Live Mode window.

Live Assist mode

Live Mode 38
Live Assist mode can be considered as a live jingle machine with the function of adding audio material by
users, whether they are program moderators, audio technicians, announcers, DJs or MCs (depending on your
radio stationâ s orientation).

As a live jingle machine, Live Assist mode broadcasts audio files one by one (song by song), according to the
broadcast scheduler and previously-created playlists. After the audio file is played, the list stops, waiting for
the userâ s next start command.

So that the broadcast process looks like: song â stop â manual play - next song.

Note: Live Assist mode is not included in the 1.2 version, but is planned for the 1.3 version.

Live Automatic mode

In Live Automatic mode, a radio program is broadcast without studio personnel. Files in playlists in this mode
are snapped together automatically one after another (clean snap), together with all user-predefined functions
and settings determined in the playlist editor.

Basically, the broadcast process looks like this: song â mix - next song.

Note: Live Automatic mode is currently the only mode Campcaster Studio has. Changes take place frequently,
so check the Campcaster homepage at http://campcaster.sourcefabric.org/ often.

Using mini-playlists in Live Mode

Live Assist mode 39


Creating mini-playlists is usually very important and highly recommended.

One common example would be when the station's sales department create a playlist of commercials that lasts
from 2-4 minutes and contains up to 10 short audio commercial spots. These mini-playlists are saved in the
system as a block and can either be used in Scheduled Mode or in Live Mode.

In the studio, the program creator than can simply load the complete advert playlist from the sales department,
instead of having to insert ads file by file.

Using mini-playlists in Live Mode 40


Upload file
Table of Contents
Upload file palette elements

The 'upload file' option allows you to upload files from your local computer, Campcaster server or
any other available source into the system. It then appears in the ScratchPad.

Browsing the audio archive or any other source or disc, user can find the audio file they wanted, add
or edit its metadata information (the descriptions that help others to find the file) and upload it to the
ScratchPad, where the uploaded file becomes the topmost item in the ScratchPad list.

This information helps others to find information that helps them to make their broadcasts. The more
information you input, and in a consistent manner, the easier it will be to find the files later.

Upload file palette elements

Upload file 41
The 'upload file' palette consists of the following elements:

• Browse button â gives you the option of browsing all available sources from your local computer
and Campcaster server and selecting the desired file. Clicking the browse button opens the 'Open File'
window shown above.
• File name tab - where the selected file path will appear
• Main, Music and Talk tabs â where metadata information (such as the information stored in an
MP3 file's ID3 tags) can be added or edited.
• The Main tab is the default active tab which stores basic metadata for any sound file. Main tab
contains the following metadata fields:
♦ Title (lets you specify the title of the clip)
♦ Creator (lets you specify the author of the clip)
♦ Genre (lets you specify the genre of the clip)
♦ Description (lets you create a short description for the audioclip)
♦ Duration (is automatically detected and cannot be altered)

Note: If an MP3 file is uploaded, Campcaster will automatically use the information stored in its ID3 tags, if
there is any.

Upload file palette elements 42


The Music tab allows you to view, add and store metadata that is specific to music files. A large number of
description fields available for users to input, such as: Album, Year, BPM, Rating, Mood, and so on. All of
the fields in the Music tab are from the ID3 specification.

The Voice tab allows you to specify information that is relevant for voice recordings (e.g. news reports,
interviews, soundbites, etc.). It allows reporters to input:

• Time and date the reported voice file is about, which is likely to be different than the time it is
uploaded. For example, a report could be about the moon landing in 1969, or about the 2000

Upload file palette elements 43


Olympics. This value is different than the value used for the file upload.

• The location of the item being covered. GPS coordinates can be entered, as can verbal descriptions.
• The organization being covered. Examples could include the Parliament, the Red Cross/Red
Crescent, or the local football team.

The Cancel button cancels the whole operation and exits the palette.

Clicking the Upload complete the uploading process and uploads the selected file to Campcaster's storage
server.

Once you finish with uploading and creating the file's metadata, the selected file will be transferred to the
ScratchPad. You can see that it appears at the top of the ScratchPad list.

Upload file palette elements 44


ScratchPad

The ScratchPad represents your workspace during your entire session. It can be used for loading all the
materials (audio files, playlistsâ ¦) you find necessary for creating your program. The ScratchPad also
displays a list of all files you have worked with recently, and could be described as a cross between a web
browser's history window and the clipboard.

Clicking on the ScratchPad button on the Navigation menu opens the ScratchPad palette. It consists of the
following elements:

• Preview buttons â play/pause and stop button - gives you the option of pre-listening and
quick-checking audio files before using them in Live Mode or a playlist.
• The Type column â contains icons indicating the type of item you are working with. An icon's
appearance is the same as in Campcaster Station â audioclips are marked with a green note,
playlists with a red note, and webstreams with a blue transmission symbol.
• The Title column â displays the title of the items (audioclips, playlists, webstreams)
• Add to playlist button - allows you to insert the selected file into a playlist by opening the Playlist
palette and placing the selected file into it.
• Clear list button â deletes all items from the ScratchPad
• Remove item(s) button â deletes one or more files from the ScratchPad

In order to perform operations with individual files, you can click the right mouse button on an individual
item in the ScratchPad. A popup menu will appear, offering you the following options (referring to the
audioclips and playlists):

• Preview for pre-listening and quick-checking audio clips in the ScratchPad


• Add to Playlist where you can add the selected item into a new playlist
• Add to Live Mode (for adding the selected file into the Live Mode list, waiting for the user's
command to be played, or to be played automatically)
• Remove gives you the option of removing the file from the ScratchPad list
• Upload to the Network Hub sends the file or playlist to the Network Hub, where it shared with other
stations in your network

ScratchPad 45
The ScratchPad has additional options for playlists only. If you right-click on a playlist, additional actions
offered will include:

• Edit playlist (redirects you to the simple playlist editor in the Playlist palette, for adding or removing
files from the playlists, additional playlist editing, changing transitions or file order)
• Schedule (redirects you to the Scheduler palette, for scheduling and programming the whole playlist
by selecting the exact date and time for its broadcast)

ScratchPad 46
Playlists / Simple playlist editor
Table of Contents
Removing playlists from the Scheduler

Playlists can be edited and created in the Playlists palette, which, at the same time, works as a simple
playlist editor.

This function allows you to execute various operations such as:

• Creating a new playlist


• Adding and removing files from the ScratchPad to a playlist, which may includes adding
playlists inside playlists (such as commercial breaks or mini playlists inside a larger show)
• Editing â simple edit functions, such as changing file order, changing transitions and other
features
You can add a file (sound file or playlist file) from the ScratchPad to the active or new empty
playlist by:

· right- clicking on the item (either a sound file or playlist) in the ScratchPad and

· selecting Add to playlist.

Also you can edit the existing playlist in the Playlists palette by:

· right-clicking on the playlist in the ScratchPad and

· selecting Edit from the popup menu

The Playlists palette will then appear, displaying:

Playlists / Simple playlist editor 47


· The Name field in the upper part of the palette, where you have to enter the title of your
playlist

· The first column on the left displays the start time of the playlist, file by file, starting from
zero. Start time for the next item is calculated automatically.

· The Title column displays names of the files, playlists or streams.

· The Length column lists the duration of each item

· The Fade in and Fade out column displays the increasing/decreasing curve transition value
during the item's enter/exit, from zero to full level (for fade in) and from full level to zero (for fade
out). The transition value for fade in or fade out is measured in milliseconds (1/1000 of a second), and
the default transition is set to zero.

♦ Under the table there is a checkbox , offering you the option to lock a fade out to follow the
previous fade in, so that there is a mix between items â like a crossfade.
If there are no items entered in the playlist, the space below the Name field remains blank.

♦ The Save button enables you to save all your changes and your work.
The saved playlist will now be visible in the ScratchPad, and the text in the lower left part of the
palette will inform you that your playlist have been saved. This includes saving all actions (moving
files, adding or removing, changing fades) that will be visible in the playlist the next time you open it.

♦ The close button will close the current playlist, cancel the whole operation and exit the
Playlists palette. Before exiting, popup window will appear offering you to previously save
the playlist.
Right-clicking on the items in the playlist gives you additional options for playlist editing:

• Move Up â lets you move the file up in the opened playlist and change its file order
• Move Down â lets you move the file down in the opened playlist
• Remove â lets you remove a file from the playlist. The file still remains in the system,
however.)

Removing playlists from the Scheduler


You can remove a playlist from the Scheduler by right clicking on a scheduled playlist in the table and
selecting Delete. This removes the playlist from the Scheduler , but does not remove it completely from the
system. The playlist and the items inside it stays in the ScratchPad for the next use.

Removing playlists from the Scheduler 48


Scheduler
Table of Contents
Adding playlists to the Scheduler

The Scheduler palette allows you to automate (schedule) your playlist for broadcast at a predefined
date and time.

Clicking on the Scheduler button in the Navigation menu opens up a palette similar to the Scheduler
Navigator from Campcaster Station. The palette appears as a monthly calendar and contains the
following elements:

♦ Monthly calendar, with selected date marked in blue. Above the calendar is a row where you
can select the month and year you want to review. Changes will then alter the calendar below
according to the selected month and year.
♦ A table displaying precisely scheduled playlists (â to the secondâ ) on the selected date
from the calendar.
◊ The first column displays the exact date and time for the playlist start
◊ The second column displays the title of the playlist
◊ The third column displays the exact date and time for the playlist end

Adding playlists to the Scheduler


After you have created and edited a playlist in the Playlists palette, it will be available in the ScratchPad and
can be added to the Scheduler by:

• right- clicking on the saved playlist in the ScratchPad and


• selecting the Schedule option from the popup menu.

Scheduler 49
That action opens a new Schedule palette, similar to the previous one, allowing you to determine the exact
date and time for the selected playlist to start and to enter it into the scheduler table. The default date will be
your current date. Besides the monthly calendar, this Schedule palette contains:

• Hour and minute field â where you have the option to enter the exact time for the selected playlist
to start, consistent with existing scheduled playlists.
• Schedule button - accepts all entered information for scheduling date and time. Clicking on the
Schedule button automatically closes the palette and enters the playlist into the scheduler at the
specified date and time. You can now see itâ s title, start and end time, in the table under the
calendar with already scheduled playlists.
• Close button closes the palette and cancels the whole operation

Adding playlists to the Scheduler 50


Search
In this chapter:

• Browse
• Simple search
• Advanced Search

The search palette allows you to search (on either a simple or advanced level) and browse the archive
of available files in Campcaster's storage server, in order to use them for creating playlists, scheduling
or creating Live Mode lists. You can start looking for audioclips not only by title, but also by general
searching metadata criteria down even to the smallest search details.

The main part of the Search palette are tabs that gives you the option to choose what type of searching
and browsing you want to use:

Search - that works as a simple search engine

Advanced Search â lets you set multiple criteria for searching

Browse - lets you list all available files within a certain criteria

All functions allow you to search for sound files as well as playlists.

Whether you choose simple Search, Advanced search or Browse option, the search results will appear
at the bottom of the palette in the table containing Type, Title, Creator and Length of the resulting
file.

By right clicking on an item (audio file, playlist or a webstream) in the search result table, a menu
appears offering operations:

♦ Add to ScratchPad
♦ Add to Live Mode
♦ Upload to Network Hub
A fourth tab on the Search palette, Transfers, allows you to monitor the status of transfers to and
from the Network Hub. For more information about the Transfers function, see "Transfer Window" in
the Network Hub section.

Browse

Search 51
The Browse function in Campcaster Studio allows you to browse all files from the server according to general
criteria you specify. In order to narrow search results as much as possible, the browse function gives you the
opportunity to choose between similar files that are in the same subcategory.

The browsing process is divided into three columns with the same list of offered criteria.

• The first column lets you choose the metadata category to browse from. You can choose any
metadata that users have input to describe the files.

• Under that category, the second column allows you to choose one of the options that appear in the
chosen category, which refines the number of displayed files.
• The third column works the same way and lets you continue refining and narrowing your results by
entering first the category, and then selecting the option or an item displayed in the field below.

Note: It is in your best interest to choose as many categories as you need, in order to refine and narrow
search results and to find the file quickly among the thousands of files in the server.

Simple search

Browse 52
The Search (simple search) option works as a basic simple search engine. The user types a keyword into the
search field, and then presses the Search button.

In the simple search option, the search process is based on keywords that you enter, and can represent
complete words, phrases, or only a part. Keywords must refer to the information stored in either the title or
creator fields; these are the only metadata criteria enabled in the simple search mode.

Advanced Search

Simple search 53
Advanced Search also works like a regular search engine. As in simple search mode, you can search the
metadata that you and other Campcaster users have input during the upload process. The main difference is
that Advanced Search allows you to select as much metadata criteria as you find relevant to make your search
successful. All the search results will appear at the bottom of the search palette.

The Advanced Search tab contains the following elements:

• Search field with three types of criteria in one row;

• The left pulldown menu allows you to select one metadata criterium you find relevant for the search.
You can choose any metadata that Campcaster offers and users have input to describe audio content
(title, genre, length, album, mood, bitrate).

• The middle pulldown menu enables you to refine your search by selecting whether the word you
enter will represent full file name, only part of the name or its prefix.

• In the third blank field, you should enter the keyword you are searching for.

• The + sign located on the right allows you to add extra sets of criteria by clicking on the + sign
located on the right of the search terms. You can add as many rows you need to refine your search.
Clicking on the X sign removes a row.

By selecting more categories in the pulldown menu, and adding additional search rows, you can set your
search process to be more precise and narrow your search results.

• Clicking on the Search button starts the searching process.

Advanced Search 54
Options palette
In this chapter:

• Sound tab
• Keyboard Shortcuts tab
• Servers tab
• Scheduler tab
• Backup tab
• RDS
• About tab

Originally based on feedback from community radio representatives in South Africa, the Options
palette is designed to make many of the setup and administration tasks in Campcaster Studio easier
for users who were not familiar with a command-line interface. It is divided into 7 clickable tabs.

Sound tab
In this article:

• ALSA sound card notation


• Using the Sound tab to set up your sound cards

The Sound tab lets you change Campcaster Studio's sound card outputs. Because Campcaster uses
three sound cards in an optimal configuration, this tab comes in really handy when setting the
program up.

Before we set up the sound cards in the Sound tab, a little bit about how Campcaster handles sound
under Linux. Those with experience in Linux sound can skip this and move on to the next section.

ALSA sound card notation


Campcaster uses the ALSA sound subsystem for its sound output. This means that the fields that are in the
Sound tab must follow ALSA notation, which can be as follows:

• default
• hw:x,0
• plughw:x,0

where x is the number of the sound card you want to use for the output. Generally you should use hw:x,0 as
the notation style.

Note: To see which number your sound card as been assigned by ALSA, you will need to open a terminal
window and type the following:

user@computer: $ cat /proc/asound/cards

Options palette 55
What you will get is a listing like this:

0 [ICH5 ]: ICH4 - Intel ICH5


Intel ICH5 with ALC655 at 0xfebffa00, irq 201
1 [CA0106 ]: CA0106 - CA0106
Live! 7.1 24bit [SB0410] at 0xbc00 irq 169
2 [YMF724F ]: YMF724F - Yamaha DS-1 (YMF724F)
Yamaha DS-1 (YMF724F) at 0xfeaf8000, irq 185

The numbers at the beginning are the important ones for us. They tell us which card has which number. In this
case, 0 is the Intel ICH5, 1 is the SoundBlaster Live! 7.1 24 bit, and 2 is the Yamaha DS-1.

In this computer, Sound Card 1, the SoundBlaster Live! is the one with the best sound quality, so we will use
it as the Live Mode output. We'll use the Yamaha DS-1 as the Scheduler output, and we'll use the Intel ICH5
as the cue output.

Using the Sound tab to set up your sound cards


Now that we know where our sound cards are and which numbers they have, we can start to change the
default Campcaster settings.

Default sound card values


When you first install Campcaster Studio, the sound cards are assigned as follows:

• hw:0,0 - Scheduler output


• hw:1,0 - Live Mode output
• hw:2,0 - Cue output

The Sound tab has two lines:

• Cue audio device


• Live Mode audio device

Cue audio device


The Cue audio device field is where you set the values for the sound card you want to use for cue (preview)
output from Campcaster Studio.

Live Mode audio device


The Live Mode audio device field is where you set the values for the sound card you want to use for the
broadcast output from Campcaster Studio's Live Mode.

Test button
You can test the sound output by pressing the 'Test' button. If you hear a cowbell (more cowbell!), then you
have the sound card set up correctly.

Note: To change the sound card location of the Scheduler output, you must edit a file called
campcaster-scheduler.xml. This file is in your home directory in the .campcaster directory.

user@computer: cd /home/<your user directory>/.campcaster

ALSA sound card notation 56


Gnome users should type:

gedit campcaster-scheduler.xml

KDE users type:

kate campcaster-scheduler.xml

In that file, look for a value that reads:

<audioPlayer>

<gstreamerPlayer audioDevice = "hw:0,0">

</audioPlayer>

Change this value to the sound card you want.

Luckily, once these values are set up, you probably won't have to change these settings until you get another
sound card.

Keyboard Shortcuts tab


In this article:

• Default keyboard shortcuts

The Keyboard Shortcuts tab lets you assign certain Campcaster Studio functions to keys on your
keyboard (or numeric keypad).

Using the Sound tab to set up your sound cards 57


In the Options palette, click the Keyboard Shortcuts tab. You will see a listing of different Campcaster
Studio functions. With your mouse, click on the function you want to change the keyboard shortcut
for. Then press the keyboard key you want to reassign to that function.

Default keyboard shortcuts


The default keyboard shortcuts are as follows:

Master Panel
Play - x
Pause - v
Stop - c
Next track - b

Live Mode
Move item up - <Alt>Up
Move item down - <Alt>Down
Remove item - Delete
Play - x

Scratchpad
Move item up - <Alt>Up
Move item down - <Alt>Down
Remove item - Delete

Edit Playlist
Move item up - <Alt>Up
Move item down - <Alt>Down
Remove item - Delete

Servers tab

Keyboard Shortcuts tab 58


The Servers tab allows users to change the locations of their various Campcaster server components.

Generally, most users will not have to change the default values that come when Campcaster is installed. This
tab is useful, for example, when users need to set up Campcaster with a central storage server and multiple
Campcaster Studio installations that draw from it.

For more detailed information on setting up Campcaster in a multiple-computer setup, see


http://en.flossmanuals.net/bin/view/Campcaster/TwoComputerSetup.

The three server configurations on this tab modify the location Campcaster Studio looks for the:

• Authentication server
• Storage server
• Scheduler server

Each of the items includes:

• the server address, which a URL


• the port the server listens on
• the path to the script

Scheduler tab

Servers tab 59
The Scheduler tab allows users to see the status of Campcaster's scheduler, as well as to stop or start the
scheduler. This is important when a user needs to stop a scheduled item from playback.

When it is running, items that are placed in it will be played at the appointed date and time.

When the scheduler is stopped, all items that are in the scheduler will be stopped.

Backup tab
In this article:

• Importing backup files


• Making and saving backup files

Scheduler tab 60
Campcaster's Backup function is extremely important because it provides system administrators with
a way to save the contents of the station's storage server for restoring at a later date.

Considering how frequently computers and hard drives fail, as well as how important your station's
archive is, we strongly recommend that stations regularly back up their storage servers on a regular
basis.

How frequently you should back up depends for a large part on how many new files are added to the
storage server, as well as how much confidence you have in the your storage server's hardware. We
recommend to back up at least weekly.

Put another way, the frequency of your backup should be directly tied to how angry your station's
personnel will be at you in the event everything is lost :-)

Importing backup files


To import a backup file, a user must take the following steps:

• Open the 'Upload File' palette in Campcaster Studio


• Click the 'Browse' button
• Locate the backup file on your hard disk
• Click 'Open' in the File Manager window
• Click 'Upload'

You do not have to input any metadata in the File Upload window (such as Title, Creator, Genre, etc.) for the
backup files; the system will automatically detect that it is a backup, and it will import all metadata for the
backup files.

After a moment, the 'Restore Backup' window will appear. It will display its status, and when the restore is
completed, it will display 'Upload finished.'

Backup tab 61
Making and saving backup files
Campcaster uses an innovative backup function that backups to occur according to:

• Date modified
• Search terms

This means that if you only want to back up part of your station's archive (such as files with the word 'News'
in the title), you can do so by searching for the certain metadata terms.

You can also give your backup a name that will help you later to find it and work with it.

Note: When the 'Modified since' and search windows are left blank, all items that are in the storage server
will be prepared for backup.

Items prepared for backup appear in a list below the search window. These items are listed by the name you
give the backup, the date and time it was prepared and its status.

When an item appears in this list with a status of 'Ready', the backup can be saved to a .tar file by clicking
'Save.' (.tar is the Linux equivalent of .zip)

Pressing 'Delete' removes the prepared backup from the list.

Any backup that appears in the list can be saved to a file. This list is kept when a user logs out of Campcaster
Studio and logs in again. This can be useful as a 'time machine' for retrieving older backups.

Note: The prepared backup files can be quite large, so we recommend removing them from the list if they are
not needed.

Backup files can then be saved to an external file location for archival on CD-ROM, DVD-ROM or another
hard disk.

This process can take a long time, so please be patient.

RDS
In this article:

• Using placeholders with Clip info

Making and saving backup files 62


The Radio Data System (RDS) is a European Broadcasting Union standard for sending text
information to the display of compatible radios.

Campcaster Studio has the ability to send information to RDS encoder hardware via your computer's
serial port.

The RDS tab has the following fields:

♦ Serial port - for setting which serial port you will use to connect your RDS hardware to
♦ Station name - a text field for inputting the name of your station
♦ Station code - a field for inputting the station's PTY code
♦ Clip info - a text field for inputting information about the item now playing.

There is a check box in front of Station Name, Station Code and Clip Info; you need to have the checkbox
selected in order to send the info in that field.

Using placeholders with Clip info


Clip info placeholders
You may also use the following variables to automatically update the Clip Info field.

• %c - Creator
• %t - Title
• %d - Duration
• %s - Album
• %y - Year

Placeholders can be combined, so that using the following in the Clip Info field:

%c - %t - %s - %y

RDS 63
would display on listeners' RDS radios as:

The Beatles - Yesterday - A Hard Day's Night - 1965

This will automatically update with the items in the Live Mode output.

Note: These placeholders only work for items played in Live Mode. They do not currently work for Scheduled
Mode.

For more info on RDS placeholders, please see the Campcaster technical documentation entry.

About tab
In this article:

• Campcaster 1.2.0 "Kotor" credits

The About tab displays information about the version and the people who have worked so hard to
bring it to you.

If you'd like to see your name in this field as a future contributor to the Campcaster project, please
contact us at contact@sourcefabric.org.

Campcaster 1.2.0 "Kotor" credits


For more information about Campcaster, see http://campcaster.sourcefabric.org/

The original Campcaster (formerly LiveSupport) concept was drafted by Micz Flor. It was fully developed by
Robert Klajn, Douglas Arellanes, à kos Maróy, and Sava TatiÄ .

Using placeholders with Clip info 64


The user interface has been designed by Charles Truett, based on the initial work done by a team of his
then-fellow Parsons School of Design students Turi McKinley, Catalin Lazia and Sangita Shah. The team was
led by then-head of the school's Department of Digital Design Colleen Macklin, assisted by Kunal Jain.

Version 1.2.0 - "Kotor"


-----------------------
In alphabetical order:

Douglas Arellanes
- Tester and user feedback

Paul Baranowski
- Project manager, HTML UI, storage server

Ferenc Gerlits
- Studio GUI, scheduler, packaging

Tomáš Hlava
- Bug fixes

Robert Klajn
- Superuser feedback, End-user manual

Mark Kretschmann
- Audio player

Sava TatiÄ
- Manager

Version 1.1 - "Freetown"


--------------------------
In alphabetical order:

Douglas Arellanes
- Tester and user feedback

Paul Baranowski
- Project manager, HTML UI, storage server, scheduler

János Csikós (retired)


- HTML UI

Ferenc Gerlits
- Studio GUI, scheduler, packaging

Tomáš Hlava
- Storage server, network hub

Mark Kretschmann
- Audio player

à kos Maróy (retired)

Campcaster 1.2.0 "Kotor" credits 65


- Architecture design, scheduler, audio player

Sava TatiÄ
- Manager

Version 1.0
-------------------
In alphabetical order:

Douglas Arellanes
Michael Aschauer
Micz Flor
Ferenc Gerlits
Sebastian Göbel
Tomáš Hlava
Nadine Kokott
à kos Maróy
Sava TatiÄ
Charles Truett

Campcaster 1.2.0 "Kotor" credits 66


Campcaster Web: Browser based administration
and scheduling
In this chapter:

• Campcaster Web: Browser based administration and scheduling


• Accessing Campcaster Web
• Master Panel
• Login/Logout
• Navigation Menu
• Active working area
• The ScratchPad
• Add audio
• Media Library
• Playlist Editor
• Scheduler
• Station Settings (Preferences)
• Troubleshooting

Campcaster Web enables you to completely manage your radio station whether you are in it or miles
away. All you need is a web browser.

The whole process can be roughly divided into several phases:

• configuring your the users and the station and opening user accounts depending on the
priorities and authorization level;
• uploading audio files to ScratchPad;
• creating playlists from the items in the ScratchPad;
• searching and browsing playlists and files through the audio database (Media Library) using
different criteria
• creating and editing playlists, adding and removing audio files, determining fade duration,
changing file order;
• scheduling and programming playlists for broadcast;
• checking and starting the scheduler.
The Campcaster web interface can be used on any modern web browser (FireFox 1.0 and higher, I.E.
6.0 and higher, etc.). The upload speed, search, and similar functions requiring large data transfers
will depend on the quality and speed of your Internet (or LAN) connection.

Campcaster Web: Browser based administration and scheduling 67


Accessing Campcaster Web
You can go to the access page of your radio's web installation by pointing a modern browser of your choice
to:

http://IP_or_domain/campcaster/

In the case of running Campcaster Web inside your office LAN, the server might have a static IP address or
an LAN internal name. Accessing Campcaster Web remotely through the Internet, your server either has a
registered domain or an IP address accessible through the WorldWideWeb.

Your browser will load the Master Panel, displaying some essential information about your site and allowing
you to log into the system.

Accessing Campcaster Web 68


Master Panel
On the login page you will see the Master Panel, which remains on the top of the screen throughout your
whole session, from logging in until logging out. The Master panel displays:

• login button, which you need to click if you want to login into the admin interface. If you are logged
in, the button changes to 'logout';
• logo and frequency of the radio station (these can be changed and uploaded in the admin interface
after login, through the 'Station Settings' menu);
• on-air/off-air icon , indicating whether a something is being broadcast by the scheduler
• Station Time, indicating the time at the radio station
• Now playing field displays information about the current track played by the scheduler. If the field is
empty, no track is being played. For the moment, the now playing field displays the status at the time
of the loading of the web page, so you may need to refresh the page between tracks.

Image 6: Screenshot of Web Master Panel after successful login.

Master Panel 69
Login/Logout
By clicking the login button, you get to the login palette, where things are pretty much straightforward. You
will see the following:

• The Language drop-down menu, where you select from the list of available user interface
localizations of Campcaster Station. The default language is English, but you can either use one of the
localized versions we supply.
• The selected language will last throughout your session. When you logout and then login for the
second time, you will have to choose the interface language again.
• The Username field, where you need to enter your user name assigned to you by your system
administrator (the default user name is root).
• The Password field, where you will enter your password, as assigned by your system administrator
(the default password is q).
• Cancel and Submit buttons, which let you complete the login or cancel the operation.

Image 7: Screenshot of login popup window .

Campcaster Station looks different to different kind of users. Each user sees only options and functions that he
has the right to access. A typical user (journalist, sound editor) will get to see only a part of the options
available to a fully authorized user (e. g. administrator).

Note: After you login for the first time with the default administrator user name (root) and password (q), you
will reach the admin interface. As an administrator you should change the default administrator password and
then proceed to create other users and assign appropriate user rights to them.

After successfully logging in, you will reach the home page, where you will see the following:

• The Master Panel, with basic information of your radio station and the track currently being played
out by the scheduler.
• The Navigation Menu, with all the functions you need for operating Campcaster Station;
• Working Area, where all the active palettes are displayed.

Login/Logout 70
Navigation Menu
To navigate through Campcaster Web, you will use the drop-down menus located between the Master Panel
and the Working Area. The Navigation Menu displays all the main functions (and its subcategories) you need
for operating Campcaster Web during your session. The Navigation Menu consists of the following
categories:

• Add Audio - upload audio clips and streams to the Campcaster server;
• Media Library - search and browse available audio clips on the Campcaster server;
• Playlist Editor - create new and edit existing playlists;
• Scheduler - program (schedule) playlists, audioclips and streams for broadcast;
• Station Settings - change system and station settings, manage users and files. (This menu is available
only for users with administrator rights).

Navigation Menu 71
Active working area
The Working Area changes depending on the functions you choose in the Navigation Menu. The default
palettes that appear after login are:

• the Scheduler, defaulting to today's schedule,


• the Scheduler Navigation, displaying the current month with marked dates with scheduled
broadcasts,
• the ScratchPad, a history and clipboard assistant tool that contains all items you touch during your
Campcaster session.

Active working area 72


The ScratchPad
The ScratchPad is your permanent working accessory that is visible in all working modes. The ScratchPad
acts as history and as clipboard during your Campcaster session. As such, the Scratchpad is more responsive
and wieldy than the Media Library, and you can use it to load all the materials you think you may need during
your session. The ScratchPad also provides you with the list of all files (audio clips, webstreams and playlists)
you have worked with recently. The ScratchPad can be loaded from all search and adding tools.

Image 8: Screenshot of ScratchPad. The ScratchPad is always available and allows to move and access files
and playlists within the system.

The ScratchPad consists of the following elements:

• The first column on the left contains check boxes for selecting files. You can select one or more items
in the ScratchPad. If you click on the check box in the header of the table, all items will be selected.
Selected files can be manipulated via the pulldown menu at the bottom of the ScratchPad
• The Title column lists the name of items (audioclips, webstreams, or playlists).
• The Duration column lists the length of each item
• The Type column contains icons that indicate what type of item you are looking at. These can be
audioclips, playlists or webstreams. audioclips are marked with a green note, playlists with a red note
and webstreams with a blue transmission symbol. If you move the mouse over an item, more
information (metadata) will be displayed.
• The pulldown Multiple actions allows you to select actions that can be applied to the items in the list
whose check boxes have been ticked. You can choose one of the following actions:
• Remove audioclips
• Add audioclips to open Playlist
• To perform operations with individual files, click the left mouse button on the individual item in the
ScratchPad. A menu will pop up offering you the following options:
• Remove from ScratchPad
• Listen to audio clip, (which will let you download and play the audio clip) or Schedule
Playlist (if the selected item is a playlist)
• Add to open playlist (if there is an active and opened playlist), or New playlist using
audioclip (if there are no currently active and opened playlists) / Schedule Playlist (if the
selected item in the ScratchPad is a playlist)
• Edit audioclip (where you can add or edit metadata information stored in ID3 tags. The
palette offers you three tabs-Main, Music and Talk, depending on your audioclip content) /
Edit Playlist (adding and removing files to/from active playlist,editing - changing file order,
changing transition�)
• Delete file

The ScratchPad 73
The ScratchPad has additional options for playlists. Active playlists will automatically be locked and will
appear in bold text. If you left-click on it, the offered actions will be:

• Remove from ScratchPad

• Close Playlist.

Closed playlists appear in normal text in the ScratchPad and can be manipulated similarly to all other items in
the ScratchPad.

The ScratchPad 74
Add audio
In this chapter:

• Add Audioclip

The Add audio menu enables you to upload a file from your local computer (e.g. an audio report, a
music file, etc.) or a webstream to the sever. In the drop-down menu you can choose between the
Audioclip or Stream options.

Add Audioclip
This option allows you to upload files to the Campcaster server. To do so, choose Add Audio - Audioclip. The
New Audioclip palette will appear containing the following:

• Browse button, which allows you to select an audio file and upload it from your local hard drive or
local network storage to the Campcaster server.
• Cancel button, that cancels the operation and exits the whole palette.
• Submit button, which you need to click to upload the selected file.

Once the selected file has finished uploading (the length of this operation will depend on your connectivity),
you will see the Edit audioclip palette (you will also notice that the uploaded audioclip has become the
topmost item in the ScratchPad.)

In the Edit audioclip palette, you can add or edit metadata information stored in ID3 tags (if you have
uploaded an MP3 file, for example, Campcaster will use the ID3 tags stored with that particular file). The
palette opens with Main tab active, which stores the basic metadata for any sound file:

• The Language pulldown lets you select the language in which you want to create metadata. (The
default language is English)
• Title lets you specify the title of the clip
• Creator lets you specify the author of the clip
• Genre lets you specify the genre of the clip
• File format (automatically detected and cannot be altered)
• Length (automatically detected and cannot be altered)
• The Music tab allows you to view and add additonal metadata that is relevant for music files. (The
Campcaster administrator can customize this screen to contain only the metadata your station uses and
needs).
• The Talk tab lets you specify metadata specific for voice recordings (e.g. news reports, interviews,
soundbites, etc.). It allows the reporter to include time and date of the reported voice file, the covered
organization and the location where the report was recorded, short info about its content and theme.

If you make a mess in the metadata editing process, you can resort to the trusty Reset button at the bottom of
the palette. A click on it will reset all the metadata fields you have edited.

Add audio 75
Media Library
In this chapter:

• Search
• Browse
• Library Search
• Hub search
• Transfers

The Media Library menu gives you the option to search and browse the repository of available audio
files on the Campcaster server, which you can use for creating your playlists.

The Browse and Search functions allow you to look for audio materials not only by file titles, but also
by other metadata criteria. Both functions allow you to search for sound files as well as playlists and
webstreams.

Search

Search works like a regular search engine. You can type in a keyword into the Search field, define criteria for
searching (offered in the drop-down menu) and then press the Submit button. The main difference is that you
are searching the metadata that you and other Campcaster Web users have input during the upload process.
The search results appear on the bottom of the search palette.

The Search tab contains the following elements:

• Search field with three types of criteria in one row. The left-most pulldown menu allows you to select
one metadata criteria you find relevant for the search. You can choose any metadata that Campcaster
users have input to describe the audio content (title, genre, length, album, mood, bitrate).
• The middle pulldown menu enables you to refine your search by selecting if the word you enter will
represent full file name, only part of the name or its prefix.

Media Library 76
• In the third blank field, you should enter the word or term you are searching for.
• To add extra sets of criteria, click on the + sign located on the right of the search terms. You can
have up to eight rows of search criteria. To remove a row, click on the - sign.
• The Operator drop-down is the option connected with the multiple term search. It gives you the
possibility to choose whether you want the search string to be contained in all the search criteria and
rows (by selecting And from the pulldown menu), or to be contained in one of the search criteria (by
selecting Or).
• File type field, where you determine the type of your file by selecting it from the pulldown menu.
• Rows per page drop-down, where you can select and determine maximum number of rows for
refining search that you can add by clicking the + sign.
• The Reset Criteria button returns you to the beginning of the search, and reset and erases all the fields
and criteria you entered.
• The Submit button, which you need to click to start the searching process.

At the bottom of the palette will appear all the search results in the similar table as in the ScratchPad
containing Title, Creator, Duration and Type of the file. As is the case in all lists in the Campcaster Web user
interface, by left-clicking on an item in the search result palette, you can carry out a number operations:

with Audio Clips:

• Add to ScratchPad
• Listen to audioclip
• New playlist using audioclip
• Edit audioclip
• Delete audioclip

with Playlists:

• Add to ScratchPad
• Schedule Playlist
• Edit Playlist
• New Playlist using audioclip
• Delete audioclip

with Webstreams:

• Add to ScratchPad
• New Playlist using audioclip
• Edit audioclip
• Delete audioclip

Note: When you enter the keyword in the search field and press Submit, you will probably have tens, maybe
thousands of similar audio file names that will be listed below in the search window. That is why you need to
use multiple search terms. By selecting more categories in the drop-down menu (adding an additional search
row with the + sign, and removing rows with - sign), you can set your search process to be more precise and
narrow your search results.

Browse

Search 77
The Browse function allows you to browse all files from the server according to general criteria you specify.
It has similar function as the search option, only it gives us the opportunity to choose between similar files
that are in the same subcategory.

• The first column lets you choose the category (metadata) to browse from. You can choose any
metadata that users input to describe the files.
• Under that category, you can choose one of the options that appears in the chosen category, which
refines the number of displayed files.
• The second and third column work the same way and let you continue refining and narrowing your
results more and more, by entering first the category, and then the option or an item displayed in the
field below.
• File type field, where you determine the type of your file by selecting it from the pulldown menu, like
in the Search window.
• Rows per page field, where you can select and determine maximum number of rows that will appear
in the table with search results below.

At the bottom of the screen will appear all the search results in table containing information: Title, Creator,
Duration, and Type of the file. Over the resulted item can be performed the same number of operations (listen,
edit, add to playlist, add to scratchpad..) like with all items you are dealing with in Campcaster Web.

Note: In searching and browsing dance music we recommend categories like 'bpm' or 'mood', to refine and
narrow search results as much as possible, because it is in your best interest to find the file fast among
thousands of files in the server.

Library Search and ScratchPad are your work accessories and they are always visible in every working mode.
You can always add files you found(in both browse and search) either to your ScratchPad or directly to a new
playlist. Left-click on a file in the palette with search results offers you several actions like:

• Add to ScratchPad
• Listen to file
• New Playlist using file
• Edit file
• Delete file

Browse 78
Library Search
Library Search is present in your working area as a form field for fulltext search and only disappears in the
Scheduler mode. It gives you the opportunity to find any item (file, playlist, webstream) you need in that
moment, and that is stored on the server. You can enter any criteria (title, creator, album). Clicking the Go
button, will automatically open the Search tab in Search / Browse palette, and the results of the search will
appear in the bottom of the palette. Like in Search and Browse option, you can change searching criteria and
narrow the search results if needed.

Here it becomes clear that well created metadata for every file and item in the library is crucial to find files at
later searches. Good metadata will help you and other colleagues to later find and use the material you upload.
And it is in your best interest to be as thorough as possible in inputting this metadata.

Library Search is a useful tool for the situations when you have to search for a file immediately and to add it
to Scratchpad.

Hub search
Hub search allows users to search the content available on a pre-assigned 'network hub' that has been
uploaded from other stations. To use the hub search, select 'Media -> Hub Search' from the web menu.

The search works the same as it does on a station's local storage server. Because it needs to connect via the
internet, hub search may take a little while to finish, so please be patient.

When the results are shown in the results pane, users can begin the process of downloading files by clicking
on a file and selecting 'Download from Network Hub.' The files will then go into a queue for downloading.

To check on the status of a download, click on the 'Transfers' tab at the top of the search box.

Transfers
The Transfers menu lets users check on the status of the uploads and downloads between their station and the
Network Hub.

Items are placed in the transfer queue by selecting 'Upload to Network Hub' from the context menu or
'Download from Network Hub' from the search results menu.

Transferred items are either displayed as 'In Progress' or 'Ready'. When a file is marked as 'Ready,' it will
normally appear in the station's local storage. It will appear in both the Search and Browse menus.

Both files and playlists can be transferred to and from the Network Hub. If a playlist is transferred, all of its
component sound files - including embedded playlists - will also be sent. These component files will appear in
the search results both independently of their playlist as well as part of it. This can be useful in making new
playlists made of older items, for example.

Library Search 79
Playlist Editor
In this chapter:

• Create New Playlist


• Playlist Metadata
• Playlist Editor
• Changing fades between files

Playlists are at the core of Campcaster. You add sound files to the playlist, and then schedule that
playlist for the date and time you choose.

Playlists can be edited in Playlist Editor. This function allows you to execute various operations of:

• Creating new playlist ,


• Searching on server for already created playlist that is ready for reviewing and additional
editing ,
• Adding and removing files from the ScratchPad to playlist,
• Editing - changing file order, changing transitions and other features
You can also include playlists inside playlists (like several commercial breaks, each with their own
playlist, inside the one-hour show).

Create New Playlist


By selecting the Playlist Editor option from the Navigation Menu, the new editor palette will appear, offering
you to create new playlist, clicking on the Create New Playlist button.

Playlist Editor 80
Playlist Metadata
Clicking on the Create New Playlist button, the new Playlist Metadata palette appears containing information
about the playlist metadata you need to enter so that the playlist can be properly created. Playlist Metadata
palette displays:

• Language pulldown enables you to choose language in which you want to create playlist metadata.
The default language is English.
• Title field, where you enter name of the new created playlist for easier identification in the
ScratchPad and easier operability.
• Creator field, where each user that has right to create playlist can enter its name, a personal
identification or signature, so that he can easily be recognized and found in the storage server.
• Length of the playlist, automatically detected and cannot be altered
• Description field, should contain the short description of the new created playlist, info about the
playlist content that can be useful for other users etc.
• Cancel button, cancels the operation and exits the Playlist Metadata palette
• Reset button returns to the beginning of the metadata entering, and resets all the fields you entered to
the last saved content.
• Submit button saves the created playlist. You will now see it in ScratchPad.

Playlist appears in the ScratchPad differently from audioclips. A playlist that has been activated and opened
will appear in bold, and a playlist that has been 'released' and closed will appear in normal text. You cannot
perform any actions over the active playlist (an alert popup window will remind you of that), until you close
it.

Playlist Editor
After creating a new empty playlist, confirming it by clicking on Submit button and assigning it to the storage
server, the Playlist Editor palette will appear. Since there are no entered files in the playlist, you are going to
see the empty No entry field in the playlist table.

You can add a file (sound file or playlist file) from the ScratchPad to the active playlist by

• left-click on the ScratchPad and


• selecting Add to open playlist.

It will add it to the end of the active playlist.

• In the top right corner of the Playlist Editor palette, you see the name of the playlist and its duration
displayed. The duration changes depending on the length of the items we are uploading from the
ScratchPad to the active playlist
• The first column on the left contains the checkboxes for selecting files. You can select one or more
items in the Playlist Editor. Clicking the checkbox in the header of the table, all items are being
selected.
• The Name column, displays names of the files, playlists or streams.
• The Duration column lists the length of each item / file, playlist or stream (if it is the Live stream,
it�s duration will be set to 0)
• The Artist column lists the names of artists (for the sound files) or playlist creators .
• The Type column indicates with an icon what type of item you are looking at. These can be files,
playlists or webstreams. Files are marked with the green note, playlists with red note and webstreams
with blue transmitting sign. If you move the mouse over the item, you can see more information

Playlist Metadata 81
(metadata) in the small window appearing at the mouse indicator.
• Move column that gives you the option to change file order in the playlist by clicking the up or down
arrows in the right.

Changing fades between files


Table of Contents
Moving files in playlist
The Row between two items in the playlist editor represents the Fade line, i.e. total fade length of the
end of previous file together with the beginning of the next file.

Fade duration can be changed by clicking on the Fade row between two files in the Playlist Editor
palette and selecting Change transition option. If you left click on the Fade row on the beginning of
the playlist, you will be offered the option Change fadein. And if you left click on the Fade row on the
end of playlist, you will have the option Change Fadeout.

The default transition between files is set to 0ms. After selecting needed option (change transition,
change fadein, change fadeout), the new palette will appear displaying:

• The name of the files between which you want to change fade duration
• Duration field, where the length of the fade duration (in milliseconds) appears
• + and - buttons for increasing and decreasing fade duration value. The result of pressing + or
- buttons will be visible in the Duration field above.
• Cancel button, for canceling the entire process and returning to the Playlist Editor
• Reset button, for reverting fade duration value on the starting position (starting from zero)
• Submit button, for accepting the duration value setup and return to the Playlist Editor palette.
The same palette will appear if you click on the Change Fade button on the end of the playlist table.

Note: Our recommendation is to avoid any cross fading in news programs. You should leave your
voice and talking blocks with a clean start and end. It is also recommendable to use offered cross fade
mix values only in the musical parts of the program.

Moving files in playlist


Left click on each item entered in the playlist, allows you to:

• Listen to the file (preview of the selected file and checking for errors)
• Remove the file from playlist (that has the same function as the Remove selected button at the bottom
of the table)

At the bottom of the table, the displayed buttons allows you to perform actions for simple playlist editing:

• Change Fades button, to change transitions between selected files, playlist fadein or playlist fadeout.
After selecting Change Fades, new window appears allowing you to change fade duration by clicking
on the + or - buttons to increase or decrease value.
• Remove selected allows you to erase selected files and remove them from the playlist. You select
files by clicking on the checkboxes in the first table column. Removed files are then erased from the
playlist, but not from the server, and you can still find them with Library search and use them again.
• Clear Playlist allows you to remove all items from the playlist and. This command does not erase the
whole playlist from the server but clears all items inside the playlist.

Playlist Editor 82
At the bottom of the table you can see options for managing the current playlist. The displayed buttons are:

• Save Playlist, enables you to save your changes and your work on the open playlist. All actions
(moving files, adding or removing, changing fades) will be saved and visible in the playlist the next
time you open it.
• Revert to Saved, gives you the opportunity to return to the last saved state in the playlist. In case you
have made a mistake during the edit, by clicking on this button you can return to the latest saved state.
• Delete Playlist deletes the entire playlist from the server, but not the files listed inside the playlist.
Before removing entire playlist, you will see the popup window checking if you are sure in erasing it.
• Close Playlist will close the current playlist and exit the Playlist Editor. Before closing, the popup
window will appear asking you if you want to save all changes before closing.

If you haven't saved and closed your playlist, the next time you log in, this will be the first window you see on
your working area.

Moving files in playlist 83


Scheduler
In this chapter:

• Daily View
• Weekly View
• Monthly View
• Today's View
• Schedule Navigator
• Adding playlists to the scheduler
• Remove Playlist from Scheduler

The Scheduler menu allows you to automate (schedule) your playlist for broadcasting at a certain
time.

You have the option to select a schedule view that suits your needs:

• by opening Scheduler palette and choosing the tab of a schedule view that suits your needs
(today's, daily, weekly and monthly view),
• or by selecting schedule view from the drop-down menu in the Navigation Menu
The Scheduler palette offers you several views that are important for managing the exact time and
date of the broadcast of your program.

Daily View
The Daily View tab shows a table with precisely scheduled playlists ('to the second'). It displays:

• The first column displays the time of day from 00:00 till 23:00 showing one row for each hour.
• The second column displays the basic info of the playlist entered in the Scheduler, such as title,
duration and playlist author.

You can select the daily view for any day you need by clicking on it in the Scheduler Navigator palette on the
right part of the screen.

Weekly View
The Weekly View tab shows a table with all scheduled playlists for an entire week, sorted by date and time.
The scheduled playlists are displayed the same way as in the Daily view , with title, duration and author
description. The weekly view tab displays:

• The header of the table contains dates for each day of the week and their names, each day in one
column, sorted from Monday till Sunday
• The first column of the table displays the time, one row for each hour

Scheduler 84
Monthly View
The Monthly View tab shows a table with the monthly view of all scheduled playlists, sorted by days of the
week and dates in the month. The monthly view tab represents a monthly calendar, where today's date is
marked in blue. All the fields with days containing scheduled playlists have bars below the date number. The
size of the bars depend on the length of all scheduled playlists in the program for that day. It indicates how
much time is intended to be on automated broadcast.

Today's View
Today's View tab jumps straight to todays daily view in the scheduler. Also, when a user is loging to the
system, this is the first palette appearing on the screen and displaying the broadcasting schedule for that day.

Schedule Navigator
The Schedule Navigator is displayed on the right part of the screen and it is visible the entire time you are
inside the Scheduler mode. The navigator has a simple calendar form and works like a reminder. In the upper
part of the screen in the pulldown menu you can select month and year you want to review. Changes will alter
the below calendar and jump to the selected month and year. Days that have scheduled playlists are marked
with blue squares, today's date is marked with square line.

Adding playlists to the scheduler

After you have created a playlist it will be available in the ScratchPad and can be added to the scheduler in
several ways:

Monthly View 85
• Left-click the playlist you want to schedule inside the ScratchPad and select Schedule Playlist in the
context menu, or
• Left-click the exact date and time field inside the schedule table, and choose Insert Playlist here
option.

Note: Only closed playlists can be added to the scheduler. If you have a playlist open in the Playlist editor
you need to close it first.

That action opens a popup window, allowing you to select the exact start date and time as well as the playlist
to enter into the scheduler table. The default date will be your current date. This popup window displays:

• Date, including year, month and day. You need to choose from the dropdown menu to determine the
exact date for your broadcast
• Time, including hour, minute and second. You need to enter the exact time using the dropdown menu.
This way, you are scheduling the precise time for starting your playlist in the scheduler.
• Playlist field, where you choose the playlist which is going to be scheduled. In the dropdown menu
you find all the playlist available in the ScratchPad.
• Snap to previous button enables you to schedule your playlist by snapping it directly to the end of
the playlist you already programmed in the scheduler. This means that the new playlist will begin
after the end of the already scheduled playlist. The software offers the default delay of 5 seconds
between those two playlists (that is optional and can be changed in the Time pulldown menu).
• Snap to hour button, that enables you schedule your playlist by snapping it exactly to the beginning
of the hour you selected.
• Snap to next button gives you the option to schedule playlist so it ends exactly when the next
scheduled playlist begins. The software gives you the default delay of 5 seconds between those two
playlists.
• Cancel button closes the window and cancels the whole scheduling playlist operation
• Reset button reverts all entered data for scheduling (date, time, select playlist) to the default settings
• Submit button accepts all entered information for date, time and playlist. Clicking on Submit
automatically closes the palette and enters the playlist into the scheduler at the specified date and
time. Before you see your playlist in the scheduler, a popup window will appear with the information
that your entry was successfully added on the selected date, in the selected time, and gives you the
schedule ID.

Remove Playlist from Scheduler


You can remove a playlist from the scheduler by left clicking on the playlist title and choosing Remove
Playlist. This action removes the playlist from the scheduler but does not delete the playlist and/or items
inside the playlist.

Adding playlists to the scheduler 86


Station Settings (Preferences)
Table of Contents
Create Station Settings
Users/Groups
File List
Special Tab

Station Settings are available only for users with full administrative rights (administrators and
program managers).

Create Station Settings


Create Station Settings include general information about the radio station. Entered information will be visible
in the Master Panel. The options are:

• Frequency,
• Station name,
• Station URL ,and
• Station logo - has only an aesthetic function for the admin interface
• Maximum length of ScratchPad which you select from the drop-down menu, gives you the option
to extend or reduce the ScratchPad by entering maximum number of rows for uploaded items.

Station Settings (Preferences) 87


Users/Groups

Administrator and program managers also manage groups and users on the system, assigning their access
privileges. Administrator has the highest authority and can assign login name and password for common users
and generate user groups.

File List
File Management - Administrator and program moderators have the option to manage all the files, to see their
type, title, and to handle the actions offered for file management. They can move and copy files as well as
assign special permissions for each file (determining actions that users and groups can apply to the file).

Special Tab
The Special Tab in the Preferences menu is Start Scheduler. It informs you via a popup window about the
successful start of the Scheduler.

Users/Groups 88
Troubleshooting
Table of Contents
File Upload
This section will address commonly-reported issues with Campcaster and will suggest ways of
solving them. You may add your own tips and suggestions in the comments field here as well.

File Upload
If you encounter the message "Uploaded file is bigger than system setting," the file size is most probably
larger than that allowed in the PHP system settings of the machine you are running Campcaster on.

Campcasterà ´s installer tries to increate those setting to 100MByte using the .htaccess file. On some
Apache/PHP configurations this is not supported. You have to increase the setting "upload_max_filesize" and
"post_max_size" manually in php.ini, which can normally be found in /etc/php/apache/ or a similar folder.

Donà ´t forget to restart Apache. On most systems you can do this with the command "/etc/init.d/apache
restart".

Note: "apache" could be "apache2", "php" could be "php4" or "php5" in above sentences. You will need
superuser-permission to do that.

Troubleshooting 89
Using the Network Hub to share program material
between stations
In this chapter:

• Playlists and the Network Hub


• Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Web
• Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Studio

Stations can share their program material with other Campcaster users via a 'Network Hub', which is a
specially-designated central storage server that is available for other stations to access.

Campcaster makes it easy for stations to upload files via the Network Hub. It's also easy to search for
files and then download them from the Network Hub.

Using the Network Hub to share program material between stations 90


Playlists and the Network Hub
Campcaster can share both individual sound files as well as playlists with the Network Hub. If you're
uploading a playlist, Campcaster automatically packs up all of the individual sound files and uploads them all
to the Network Hub. From there, other stations can either search for the individual playlist or any of the files
that are part of it.

Conversely, if you select a playlist for download from the Network Hub, it will automatically include all of
the files it uses.

Playlists and the Network Hub 91


Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Web
In this chapter:

• Uploading files to the Network Hub from Campcaster Web


• Searching for files on the Network Hub
• Downloading files from the Network Hub in Campcaster Web
• Using the Transfers window to check file transfer status

Campcaster Web can use all Network Hub functions. This includes uploading, downloading and
search. This section will explain how to use those functions.

Uploading files to the Network Hub from Campcaster Web


Files that are uploaded to the Network Hub must be first loaded into your station's local storage server. From
there they will be uploaded to the Network Hub.

There are several ways you can upload a file to the Network Hub. You can upload from the Search, Browse
and Scratchpad windows. Click on a file to select it, and the context menu will appear. The last item is
'Transfer to the Hub.' Select this and the file will automatically be placed in the Transfers queue.Uploading
files to the Network Hub
Files that are uploaded to the Network Hub must be first loaded into your station's local storage server. From
there they will be uploaded to the Network Hub.

There are several ways you can upload a file to the Network Hub. You can upload from the Search, Browse
and Scratchpad windows. Click on a file to select it, and the context menu will appear. The last item is
'Transfer to the Hub.' Select this and the file will automatically be placed in the Transfers queue.

Searching for files on the Network Hub


Search for files on the Network Hub
Searching for files from the Network Hub is very easy from the Campcaster Web interface. From the Media
menu, select 'Hub Search'. From there you can input the criteria for your search and results will be displayed
below. To download an item, click on it to bring up the context menu. There will be only one option, which is
'Transfer from the Hub.' The file will be placed in the Transfers queue.

Downloading files from the Network Hub in Campcaster


Web
Once you've found a file you want to download from the search results, you can start the download process by
clicking on it and selecting 'Download from the Network Hub'. This will place the file in the transfers queue.

When a file is marked 'Ready' in the Transfers window, that means it has been copied from the Network Hub
to your station's local storage. You can now use the file by switching the search back over to local storage and
searching for it.

Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Web 92


Using the Transfers window to check file transfer status
You can check on the status of the transfers in your queue by clicking on the Transfers tab at the top of the
Browse, Search or Hub Search windows, or by selecting Media -> Transfers.

Downloading files from the Network Hub in CampcasterWeb 93


Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Studio
In this chapter:

• Uploading files to the Network Hub from Campcaster Studio


• Searching for files on the Network Hub
• Downloading files from the Network Hub in Campcaster Studio
• Transfers Window

Campcaster Studio has completely integrated all of the file sharing capabilities offered by the
Network Hub. It's very easy to use. This section will describe what you can do with Campcaster
Studio and the Network Hub.

Uploading files to the Network Hub from Campcaster Studio


You can upload a file to the Network Hub from either the Live Mode, Search and Scratchpad palettes. Simply
select a file and right-click on it. Select the last option in the menu, 'Upload to Network Hub'. The file will
then be placed in a queue for upload in the background to the Network Hub. You can check on the progress of
your files in the Transfers window (see below).

Searching for files on the Network Hub


It's easy to search for files on the Network Hub. To do so, open the Search palette and select either 'Search' or
'Advanced Search'. At the top of the palette there is an option for 'Search or browse on: Local storage'.
Clicking on the 'local storage' pulldown allows you to switch your search between local and the Network Hub.

Downloading files from the Network Hub in Campcaster


Studio
Once you've found a file you want to download from the search results, you can start the download process by
one of two ways: Double-click on the file or Right-Click on it and select 'Download from Network Hub'. This
will place the file in the transfers queue.

When a file is marked 'Ready' that means it has been copied from the Network Hub to your station's local
storage. You can now use the file by switching the search back over to local storage and searching for it.

Transfers Window

Using the Network Hub from Campcaster Studio 94


The Transfers window is found on the last tab in the Search palette.

The Transfers window works for both Network Hub uploads and downloads. It displays the files that are in
the current queue, the date and time they were added to the queue, as well as their status. Generally files will
report two status messages, either 'In Progress' or 'Ready.'

You can cancel a transfer by right-clicking on an item and selecting 'Cancel Upload'.

Transfers Window 95
Sharing program material offline with Campcaster
Table of Contents
Exporting playlists from Campcaster Web
Many stations still do not have Internet connectivity. For this reason, Campcaster has been designed
to support the import and export of playlists to files, which can then be copied either to CDs or
memory sticks.

The export functionality can also be useful for making copies of playlists for use in other media
players, or for providing program tracklistings.

Sharing program material offline with Campcaster 96


Exporting playlists from Campcaster Web
To export a playlist from Campcaster Web, click on a playlist either from the Scratchpad or from the
search/browse results. Then select 'Export Playlist' from the context menu.

A popup window will appear that asks you for the type of export and file format.

Type
With the type of export, you can either choose to export the playlist only (useful for listing the songs played
on a show on your station's website, for example) or to export all components.

File format
Campcaster playlists can be exported in one of two formats: either the SMIL format (this is what Campcaster
uses) or the M3U playlist format (popular with other MP3 players).

For exchanging programs with other Campcaster-powered stations, select Type: 'All components' and File
Format: 'SMIL.

Exporting playlists from Campcaster Web 97


Additional information
In this chapter:

• Using the Campcaster-import script to import large numbers of files


• Changing the station logo in Campcaster
• How to report bugs
• Where to go for more help

Additional information 98
Features

This is a detailed list of all the features in Campcaster. This is meant to be technical, and it is useful if you are
comparing systems or trying to determine if Campcaster fits your needs.

Inputs
Import MP3 and OGG audio files through the Desktop GUI, the Web interface, or by using the mass-import
command-line script. Songs can also be downloaded from other installations of Campcaster in a networked
fashion.

Audio Outputs
Campcaster has three audio outputs: one for live output, one for automated (scheduled) playback, and one for
previewing audio.

Components

• Studio: a desktop application which allows you to do live shows or schedule automated playback.
• Web: an HTML interface which allows you to schedule automated playback.
• Scheduler: a daemon which plays songs at their designated time. There is an XML-RPC interface for
the Scheduler.
• Storage Server: stores audio files and playlists and allows access to them via XML-RPC.

Campcaster Studio: The Desktop Application

Campcaster Studio is mainly targeted at doing live shows, though it is possible to do automated scheduling
through this interface as well. Note that the Web component has a much more robust interface for handling
automated scheduling.

The primary tasks in Campcaster Studio are:

• Creating live shows ("Live Mode"): in Live Mode, you find songs using the search window or the
scratchpad, and then add them to the Live Mode window. The large "play" button at the top of the
window begins the playback. You can rearrange the songs at any time.
• Creating playlists: creating a playlist is very similar to using live mode, except that you have the
ability to save the playlist for future use and set fade in/fade out values between tracks.
• Scheduling playlists: scheduling a playlist allows you to select a date and time for a playlist to being
playing.
• Importing audio files from your hard disk
• Edit audio metadata

Features 99
GUI Windows & Features

• Master Panel - this is a big panel at the top of the screen that shows:
♦ Currently playing song: title, artist, remaining time, elapsed time
♦ Currently playing playlist, and whether the current playlist in nested inside of others.
♦ Pause button
♦ Stop button
♦ Your station logo

• Playlist Editor
♦ The Playlist Editor window allows you to rearrange the order of songs, remove songs, and set
fade-in and fade-out values between the songs. Songs are added from the Live Mode window,
the Scratchpad, or the Search window.
♦ Playlists can have playlists inside of them. This is useful for scheduling a block of advertising
in between songs, or vice-versa.
♦ Entire playlists can be uploaded to the Network Hub or exported to hard disk or removable
media so they can be shared with other stations.
♦ Scratchpad window: this window shows you most recently used audio files. You can preview
songs from this window.

• Search window: there are two ways to search your audio archive:
♦ Keyword-search: matches anything you type
♦ Browse: browse by artist/album/genre/etc. You can choose up to 3 categories to narrow your
search.
• Preview: you can preview songs in Live Mode and the Scratchpad windows by right-clicking on them
or using the preview buttons.
• Automated playout: basic functionality for scheduling automated playout is included, though the Web
interface has many more features in this regard.
• Import music: you can import new music from your local hard drive and edit its metadata(song title,
artist, etc).
• Keyboard Shortcuts: most actions in GUI can be mapped to a keyboard shortcut for quicker access.
• Sound card configuration: configure which sound card should be used for live playback and preview.
• Search-based backup: you can backup all station archives at the click of a button, or only backup
certain files based on search terms, so that backup files can be made of only a certain program or of
all files created by a certain user.
• Localization: Campcaster is multi-lingual and supports Unicode. It also is very easy to create new
language localizations.
• Network Hub - if you have a community of radio stations, you can optionally set up a "Network Hub"
to which all stations can upload and download content. The following features are available in the
GUI once you have this set up:
♦ Network hub search: If you have set up a central "network hub", you can search through its
audio archives using keyword searches.
♦ Download from network hub: download audio files or entire playlists from the network hub.
Current downloads will show up in the "Transfers" window.
♦ Upload to network hub (available by right-clicking on any song or playlist): you can transfer
your files to the network hub with a click of a button.

GUI Windows & Features 100


Web Interface

The web interface was designed to make automated playout easy. This allows your broadcasting equipment to
be located anywhere and you can remotely schedule your playout from the comfort of your own home.

• The main panel at the top shows you what is currently playing and the time remaining. Your logo also
appears here.
• Upload new music: upload new songs and edit their metadata(title, artist, etc).
• Scratchpad: this list shows you the most recently used audio files. The length of the scratchpad is
user-adjustable.
• Users: add or remove users.
• Search: there are two ways to search your audio archive:
♦ Keyword-search: matches anything you type
♦ Browse: browse by artist/album/genre/etc. You can choose up to 3 categories to narrow your
search.
• Schedule
♦ Calendar shows you which days have scheduled content
♦ View schedule by month, week, or day
♦ Day View allows you to automatically put the starting time of a playlist at the end of the
previous one, or place the ending time at the beginning of the next scheduled playlist.
• Options
• Network Hub - if you have a community of radio stations, you can optionally set up a "Network Hub"
to which all stations can upload and download content. The following features are available in the
GUI once you have this set up:
♦ Network hub search: If you have set up a central "network hub", you can search through its
audio archives using keyword searches.
♦ Download from network hub: download audio files or entire playlists from the network hub.
Current downloads will show up in the "Transfers" window.
♦ Upload to network hub (available by right-clicking on any song or playlist): you can transfer
your files to the network hub with a click of a button.

Web Interface 101


Using the campcaster-import script to import large
numbers of files
If you have a large number of files, the usual method of importing single files can be time consuming and
tedious. That's why we have created a script that imports an entire directory of files.

The script works from the terminal, so you must first open a terminal and change directories to this directory:

user@computer: ~$ cd /opt/campcaster/bin

You must specify one of two options for using the import script: Either to copy files into Campcaster's storage
server or to link to files elsewhere. Copying is handled with a -c switch in the command:

user@computer: /opt/campcaster/bin$ ./campcaster-import -c /<path>/<to>/<your>/<files>

Linking is handled with a -l switch in the command:

user@computer: /opt/campcaster/bin$ ./campcaster-import -l /<path>/<to>/<your>/<files>

Copying and Linking: Advantages and disadvantages


Each option (copying and linking) has their advantages and disadvantages, so you will have to think about
how the files will be used in your station long-term.

For example, for files that are linked to external hard disks, you must make sure that the files are actually
going to be there at playout time, otherwise they will be skipped! For this reason, we don't recommend using
the linking option for easily-removable hard disks (like iPods or USB memory sticks) because there's a strong
likelihood that the disk might be unplugged and taken away. It's also important to make sure the external hard
disk is turned on and stays on.

On the other hand, for files that are copied, you may run into problems later on with hard disk space if you
keep copying files into your hard disk.

Good metadata: Garbage in, garbage out


The campcaster-import script automatically imports any information that is in the files' ID3 tags. If these tags
include 'junk' information, you will have to either edit the metadata later or live with potentially inaccurate
information.

Using the campcaster-import script to import large numbers of files 102


Changing the station logo in Campcaster
Both Campcaster Studio and its web interface can be changed to add your station's logo in the upper left. It is
a very simple process to change this logo - all you have to do is replace a file.

Changing the logo in Campcaster Studio

The file is called stationLogo.png, and it is in this directory:

/opt/campcaster/var/Campcaster

For best results, your logo must be a graphic that is 120 pixels wide and 104 tall, and must be saved as a PNG
file. You must rename your logo file to stationLogo.png. Please note that the name is case-sensitive.

Changing the logo in Campcaster's web interface

To change the station logo in the Campcaster web interface, you must log into the Campcaster web interface
and go to Preferences -> Station Settings. There is an item called "Station Logo" where you can specify your
station's logo file. The maximum size is 120 pixels x 120 pixels.

Changing the station logo in Campcaster 103


How to report bugs
Campcaster needs your input to constantly improve. If the software doesn't behave as it should, please let us
know about it by entering a trouble ticket at http://dev.sourcefabric.org/. That way, the Campcaster team can
keep track of your problem and notify you when it has been fixed.

How to report bugs 104


Where to go for more help
Forum and mailing list: You can visit the Campcaster online support forum, and sign up for the mailing list,
at http://forum.sourcefabric.org/index.php/f/14/.

This forum is mirrored by the mailing list, so posts on the forum appear on the mailing list and vice versa.
You can therefore also post a message there by emailing: campcaster-support@lists.sourcefabric.org.

To subscribe to forum updates via mail, please register or login to the forum by clicking the appropriate link.
Then click the 'Subscribe' button at the top of each forum page.

Bug reporting: If you think you've found a bug, please visit http://dev.sourcefabric.org and sign in, using the
same login and password that you registered for the Campcaster forum. Create a bug report by selecting
Create Issue, then Campcaster, and then Bug. You can also suggest improvements and new features for
Campcaster there.

Contact: Finally, when all other avenues have been exhausted, email us directly at contact@sourcefabric.org
and we'll try to help!

Other help
The wiki at Community Radio - A userâ s guide to the technology features a very comprehensive guide to
setting up a community radio station. This guide is aimed at people thinking about setting up a radio station in
India, but includes lots of practical advice that would be useful in any country.

Where to go for more help 105