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A STUDY ON COMPETENCY MAPPING FOR SHOP FLOOR ASSOCIATES

(With reference to SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC INDIA PRIVATE LTD, HYDERABAD)

A project Report submitted to the GITAM University,


Visakhapatnam
In partial fulfillment for the award of the degree of
MASTER OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

By

S. DIVYA
Regd. No.1225309121
Under the esteemed guidance of
Dr. C. PRASEEDA

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES


GITAM INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT

(Accredited by NAAC with A+ grade)

Rushikonda-530045

VISAKHAPATNAM

2009-2011

DECLARATION

I hereby declare that the dissertation titled “ A study on


COMPETENCY MAPPING FOR SHOP FLOOR ASSOCIATES” at

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SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC INDIA PRIVATE LIMITED, Hyderabad,
submitted by me is a bonafied work undertaken by me, and is
not submitted to any other institution or university for the
award or any degree/diploma certificate or published any
time before

Date:

S. Divya

GITAM INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT

GITAM UNIVERSITY

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Certified that the project report on “COMPETENCY MAPPING FOR
SHOP FLOOR ASSOCIATES”, with reference to Schneider Electric India
Pvt Ltd, Hyderabad is the bonafide work of S.DIVYA, with Reg No.
1225309121 who carried out project work under my supervision.
Certified further that to best of my knowledge the report herein does
not from part of any other project report or dissertation on the basis of
which a degree or award was conferred on an earlier occasion on this
or any other candidate.

__________________

Dr. C. Praseeda

Project Guide

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

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My sincere thanks to Professor K. Siva Rama Krishna, Dean &

Principal, GITAM Institute of Management and Professor. G.

Raghaviah Head of the Department, MHRM, for their guidance

and advice all through our project.

I would like to express my deep gratitude to my Guide Dr. C.

Praseeda, Program co-coordinator, MHRM for her guidance and

motivation; without her invaluable help and support this project work

would have never have been possible.

I would like to express our gratitude to my mentor Mrs. Vijaya

Reddy, Senior Executive HR , SEIL, for her cooperation and

guidance and also Ms. Soma Pal, Deputy manager HR, for her guidance

and also for giving me an opportunity to do my internship at SEIL.

I would also like to thank all the Employees of SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC

INDIA PVT LTD, HYDERABAD for their cooperation which helped me a

great deal in successfully completing my project.

CONTENTS

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SNO CONTENTS PAGE NO
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF
COMPETENCY MAPPING AND
1 TRAINING NEED IDENTIFICATION 7
PRESENT STUDY /METHODOLOGY OF
COMPETENCY MAPPING FOR SHOP
2 FLOOR ASSOCIATES 36
ORGANIZATION PROFILE OF
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC INDIA PVT
3 LTD, HYDERABAD 42
DATA ANALYSIS OF COMPETENCY
LEVELS OF THE SHOP FLOOR
4 ASSOCIATES 57
5 FINDINGS AND SUGGESTIONS 81

LIST OF TABLES

5
S NO TABLES PAGE NO
1 LINE WISE
1.1 ACHIEVE RESULTS 59
1.2 FOCUS ON CUSTOMER 62
1.3 PC SOFTWARE LITERACY 65
1.4 MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT 68
1.5 MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS 71
1.7 MANUFACTURING PERFORMANCE 74
1.8 HEALTH AND SAFETY 77
1.9 OVERALL SUMMARY 80

2 EXPERIENCE
2.1 ACHIEVE RESULTS 60
2.2 FOCUS ON CUSTOMER 63
2.3 PC SOFTWARE LITERACY 66
2.4 MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT 69
2.5 MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS 72
2.6 MANUFACTURING PERFORMANCE 75
2.7 HEALTH AND SAFETY 78

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COMPETENCY
MAPPING

COMPETENCY MAPPING

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Competency Mapping is processes of identifying key competencies for

an organization and/or a job and incorporating those competencies

throughout the various processes (i.e. job evaluation, training,

recruitment) of the organization. It generally examines two areas:

emotional intelligence or emotional quotient (EQ), and strengths of the

individual in areas like team structure, leadership, and decision-

making. Large organizations frequently employ some form of

competency mapping to understand how to most effectively employ

the competencies of strengths of workers. . Competency mapping can

also be done for contract or freelance workers, or for those seeking

employment to emphasize the specific skills which would make them

valuable to a potential employer. These kinds of skills can be

determined, when one is ready to do the work.

COMPONENTS OF COMPETENCY

There are four major components of competency:

1. SKILL: capabilities acquired through practice. It can be a financial

skill such as budgeting, or a verbal skill such as making a

presentation.

2. KNOWLEDGE: understanding acquired through learning. This refers

to a body of information relevant to job performance. It is what people

have to know to be able to perform a job, such as knowledge of

policies and procedures for a recruitment process.

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3. PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES: inherent characteristics which are

brought to the job, representing the essential foundation upon which

knowledge and skill can be developed.

4. BEHAVIOR: The observable demonstration of some competency,

skill, knowledge and personal attributes. It is an essentially definitive

expression of a competency in that it is a set of action that,

presumably, can be observed, taught, learned, and measured.

COMPETENCY MODEL:

Competency model is a set of competencies that include the key

behaviors required for excellent performance in a particular role.

DESIGN DECISION

In term of grand design, competency model should be guided by firm’s

strategy which is shaped by four factors: vision & mission, stakeholder

requirements, market realities and core capabilities of the firm.

In a more technical design, competency model development should be

determined in the process of design decision. In this stage, one should

discuss the design of the model with clients, based on their specific

needs and expected outcomes of the competency model.

The following are some factors that need to be considered in deciding

the design of the competency model.

1. CONTEXT:

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Competencies are actually context bound. They answer the question

‘What does a superior performer look like in a specific setting?’ In

other words, effective competencies are linked to a particular

organizational target or goal. Therefore, depending on the context, the

design of models may be geared toward:

• the total organization (e.g., core competencies or values)

• an entire function (e.g., finance, human resources)

• a specific role (e.g., HR generalist)

• a specific job (e.g., compensation analyst)

2. LEVEL OF ORIENTATION:

This factor deals with the level of orientation of the model: will the

model reflect future or current job requirements. The degree of future

orientation depends on how the organization plans to apply the model

and the pace and nature of changes occurring within the organization.

If an organization decides that their model will be based on future

requirements, they might use future performance needs (i.e.,

benchmark data; best practices) to create competencies.

3. LEVEL OF COMPLEXITY:

Two other critical factors should be considered in developing

competencies the length of models and the degree of complexity and

detail described in behavioral indicators. Frequently, competency

initiatives fail because models are too long and too detailed or

because organizations spend too much time and too many resources

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researching and editing behaviors. Consequently, organizations fail to

provide a simple framework to users in a timely manner. Models that

work best follow the 80-20 rule. They provide the 20% of behaviors

that drive 80% of excellent performance.

4. THE MODEL SHOULD BE LINKED TO STRATEGY:

Effective competency models support and contribute to the company's

and the function's strategy and goals. For instance, if a goal of the

company is to transcend functional barriers, the model needs to

describe the behaviors that demonstrate that competency. Likewise,

if a goal is ensuring that all employees communicate and work

together effectively, the model should describe the behaviors that

demonstrate that competency.

5. THE MODEL SHOULD BE COMPANY SPECIFIC:

Unlike many job descriptions, competency models are not easily

transferable among companies. Competencies needed for a company

are determined by the company's unique characteristics, such as

culture, strategy, size, and industry. This is true even of the

competencies needed for a position common to many companies, such

as the job of a financial analyst. The competencies required of a

financial analyst at an automobile manufacturer are vastly different

from those required of a financial analyst at a health care company, for

instance.

6. THE DEVELOPED MODEL SHOULD BE FLEXIBLE:

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A good competency model functions as a performance management

tool. It provides enough detail to distinguish between employees who

are operating at different levels of proficiency. It also helps a company

articulate why an employee is at the current level and the

competencies needed to advance. In this sense, a competency model

is prescriptive, yet it must not be too binding. It needs to be flexible

enough to accommodate differing approaches to success, simple

enough to be easily understood, and readily adaptable to changing

business environments.

7. THE MODEL SHOULD BE FUTURE-ORIENTED:

Competency models with a forward-looking perspective stimulate

organizational change. Rather than defining competencies in the

context of "tasks," or how a job has traditionally been carried out,

useful competencies articulate how the job is evolving and will best be

performed in the future. Not only does this approach increase a

model's shelf life, it ensures that employees have enough time to

understand what the required competencies are and to develop them.

MAPPING PROCESS:

There are about five stages while performing competency mapping.

The following are the five stages discussed in detail.

FIRST STAGE:

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The first stage of mapping requires understanding the vision and

mission of the organization.

SECOND STAGE:

Second stage requires understanding from the superior performers the

behavioural as well as the functional aspects required to perform job

effectively.

THIRD STAGE:

Third stage involves thorough study of the BEI Reports/ Structured

Interview Reports.

• Identification of the competency based on competency frame

work.

• Measurement of competency.

• Required levels of competency for each job family.

• Development of dictionary which involves detail description of

the competency based on the indicators.

• Care should be taken that the indicators should be measurable

and gives objective judgment.

FOURTH STAGE:

a. This stage requires preparation for assessment.

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b. Methods of assessment can be either through assessment

centers or 360 Degree Feedback

c. If assessment centre is the choice for assessment then tools

has to be ready beforehand.

i. Tools should objectively measure the entire competency

required.

ii. Determine the type of the tools for measuring competency

ii. Prepare the schedule for assessment

iv. Training to the assessor should indicate their thorough

understanding of the competencies and the tools and also as to how

the behavior has to be documented.

FIFTH STAGE:

This stage involves conducting assessment centre. Usually it is a two

day program which would involve giving a brief feedback to the

participant about the competencies that has been assessed and where

they stand to.

SIXTH STAGE:

Sixth stage involves detailed report of the competencies assessed and

also the development plan for the developmental areas.

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BENEFITS OF USING COMPETENCY MODEL

There are some useful benefits of using competency model for the

company, managers, and employees as well.

FOR THE COMPANY

• Reinforce corporate strategy, culture, and vision.

• Establish expectations for performance excellence, resulting in a

systematic approach to professional development, improved job

satisfaction, and better employee retention.

• Increase the effectiveness of training and professional

development programs by linking them to the success criteria

(i.e., behavioral standards of excellence).

• Provide a common framework and language for discussing how

to implement and communicate key strategies.

• Provide a common understanding of the scope and requirements

of a specific role.

• Provide common, organization-wide standards for career levels

that enable employees to move across business boundaries.

FOR MANAGERS:

• Identify performance criteria to improve the accuracy and ease

of the hiring and selection process.

• Provide more objective performance standards.

• Clarify standards of excellence for easier communication of

performance expectations to direct reports.

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• Provide a clear foundation for dialogue to occur between the

manager and employee about performance, development, and

career-related issues.

FOR EMPLOYEES:

• Identify the success criteria (i.e., behavioral standards of

performance excellence) required to be successful in their role.

• Support a more specific and objective assessment of their

strengths and specify targeted areas for professional

development.

• Provide development tools and methods for enhancing their

skills.

• Provide the basis for a more objective dialogue with their

manager or team about performance, development, and career

related issues.

• Competency mapping not only acts as a useful tool for the

organization but also aids an individual's competency.

It has been a general observation that hard work, sincerity,

knowledge, intelligence alone does not make a person a star

performer in his/her profession. There are other factors that help

an individual excel in his job. Good managers are generally aware

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about different qualities a person must possess to do a job

effectively, and they make use of their knowledge to select and

train their subordinates. Organisational psychologists have

refined this understanding and converted it into a structural and

formal process called Competency Mapping. It has emerged as

one of the most powerful tools aiding the improvement for the HR

professionals in finding the right employee for a job and

development of the employed person in doing the assigned job

effectively. Thus, Competency Mapping can be defined as a

process through which one assesses and determines one's

strengths as an individual worker and in some cases, as part of

an organisation.

Generally speaking, competency mapping examines two areas:

emotional intelligence and strengths of the individual in areas

like team structure, leadership and decision-making. Large

organisations frequently employ some form of competency

mapping to understand how to most effectively employ the

competencies of strengths of workers.

The general steps involved in this process can be described as

follows:

• Every employee is asked to fill up a questionnaire that asks

them what they are doing and what skills and abilities are

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needed to have to perform it well.

• Having discovered the similarities in the questionnaires, a

competency based job description is crafted and presented to

the personnel department for their agreement and additions, if

required.

• The final step involves mapping of an employee's abilities to the

benchmarks and deciding his future accordingly.

Competency-based HR is considered the best HR. In India,

however, this process has gained force only during the last

couple of years. Companies like Zensar Technologies and L&T

InfoTech follow competency mapping. Other big companies like

TCS, HCL Technologies, SBI, Idea Cellular, Exide Industries, Birla

Cellulosic, etc. have got their employees trained in competency

mapping course but it remains unclear if they strictly follow the

line.

According to Lynette D'Silva, manager-HR, learning &

development, Zensar Technologies, "Competency mapping helps

identify the success criteria required for individuals to be

successful in their roles."

Competency mapping not only acts as a useful tool for the

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organisation but also aids an individual's competency. But,

organisations strictly following the process of competency

mapping do face some hurdles in achieving overall efficiency.

Firstly, the organisations do the ultimate mistake of realising the

map as the desired end result. The map is nothing but a colossal

waste of time and money without proper analysis. Secondly, the

mission must be to sustain a knowledge flow that is more

profitable to the organisation. If the organisation is already rich

beyond wildest dreams then the mission should be to measure

against the current "ideal" knowledge flow. Lastly, incorrect

assessments of results lead to flawed decisions and cause a big

damage to the concern.

Competency mapping tailored to an organization is necessary to

train, define and retain talent in a company. As a result of

competency mapping, all the HR processes like talent induction,

appraisals and training yield much better results.

TRAINING NEED ANALYSIS

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An analysis of training need is an essential requirement to the design

of effective training. The purpose of training need analysis is to

determine whether there is a gap between what is required for

effective performance and present level of performance.

Why training need analysis?

Training need analysis is conducted to determine whether resources

required are available or not. It helps to plan the budget of the

company, areas where training is required, and also highlights the

occasions where training might not be appropriate but requires

alternate action.

Training Need arises at three levels:

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Corporate

need and training need are interdependent because the organization

performance ultimately depends on the performance of its individual

employee and its sub group.

Organizational Level – Training need analysis at organizational

level focuses on strategic planning, business need, and goals. It starts

with the assessment of internal environment of the organization such

as, procedures, structures, policies, strengths, and weaknesses and

external environment such as opportunities and threats.

After doing the SWOT analysis, weaknesses can be dealt with the

training interventions, while strengths can further be strengthened

with continued training. Threats can be reduced by identifying the

areas where training is required. And, opportunities can be exploited

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by balancing it against costs.

For this approach to be successful, the HR department of the company

requires to be involved in strategic planning. In this planning, HR

develops strategies to be sure that the employees in the organization

have the required Knowledge, Skills, and Attributes (KSAs) based on

the future KSAs requirements at each level.

Individual Level – Training need analysis at individual level focuses

on each and every individual in the organization. At this level, the

organization checks whether an employee is performing at desired

level or the performance is below expectation. If the difference

between the expected performance and actual performance comes out

to be positive, then certainly there is a need of training.

However, individual competence can also be linked to individual need.

The methods that are used to analyze the individual need are:

• Appraisal and performance review

• Peer appraisal

• Competency assessments

• Subordinate appraisal

• Client feedback

• Customer feedback

• Self-assessment or self-appraisal

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Operational Level – Training Need analysis at operational level

focuses on the work that is being assigned to the employees. The job

analyst gathers the information on whether the job is clearly

understood by an employee or not. He gathers this information through

technical interview, observation, psychological test; questionnaires

asking the closed ended as well as open ended questions, etc. Today,

jobs are dynamic and keep changing over the time. Employees need to

prepare for these changes. The job analyst also gathers information

on the tasks needs to be done plus the tasks that will be required in

the future.

Based on the information collected, training Need analysis (TNA) is

done.

Training can be described as “the acquisition of skills, concepts or

attitudes that result in improved performance within the job

environment”. Training analysis looks at each aspect of an operational

domain so that the initial skills, concepts and attitudes of the human

elements of a system can be effectively identified and appropriate

training can be specified.

Training analysis as a process often covers:

• Review of current training

• Task analysis (of new or modified system)

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• Identification of training gap

• Statement of training requirement

• Assessment of training options

• Cost benefit analysis of training options

Training Analysis is most often used as part of the system

development process. Due to the close tie between the design of the

system and the training required, in most cases it runs alongside the

development to capture the training requirements.

Design Integrated Training Analysis

K. Tara Smith proposed and developed tools and methods for an

integrated approach Design Integrated Training Analysis, where the

trade-offs between design and training are both assessed in the light

of the understanding of the operational tasks.

This approach also used information regarding recorded critical

incidents to review proposed training and to provide traceability

between hazards and training.

This single integrated approach to human factors and training analysis

has been successfully used on a number of defence projects.

Training Analysis Process

Over the last 20 years the critical nature of the man-in-the-loop has

changed from simply manual dexterity and procedural operation to a

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state in which their decision making, cognitive abilities, data

assimilation, communication skills, and attitude are all crucial. In

addition the job structure of the personnel operationally involved with

modern systems has diversified in direct proportion to the complexity

of the technology. This has fuelled the need for a formal approach.

The task of training can be broken down into a number of discrete

components, each addressing a different part of the overall learning

process. This breakdown is as follows:-

• Psycho-motor Skills

• Procedural Skills

• Knowledge Transfer

• Communication Skills

• Colossal Thinking

• Attitude Learning

• Performance Training.

The role of training analysis is to build a formal bridge between the

available design data and the training media and training objectives, in

order to facilitate the transfer of training elements into the operational

environment.

For complex multi-user system a user-to-task map is often constructed

to present the relationship between the tasks and the identified team

structure and also to identify new groups of users that would need to

have an understanding of the system. The training gap is assessed by

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a comparison between the goals and tasks undertaken by the

individuals and the existing training.

There is a wide variety of training media that can be used, ranging

from traditional lecture-based teaching to sophisticated simulators.

Different media will be more or less appropriate for different activities.

It is necessary to determine the most suitable and cost-effective

training media for the different areas.

There have been many different approaches defined, however, the

system approach to training has been the most successful.

Training Needs Analysis (TNA) is defined as the “Identification of

training requirements and the most cost effective means of meeting

those requirements”.

A TNA should always be performed where a major new development in

policy, equipment acquisition or procedures is deemed to have

potential impact upon the current training regime.

TST has considerable experience of successfully employing the

accepted techniques applied to the development of training systems,

including the Systems Approach to Training (SAT) in both the defence

and civilian domains using customer specific standards such as JSP

822 where required.

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Carrying out all TNA activates in accordance with SAT principles

ensures rigorous visibility in each design stage with clear audit trails

from the initial Scoping Study through to the recommended solution.

Training Needs Analysis Purpose

A Training Needs Analysis (TNA) is used to assess an organization’s

training needs. The root of the TNA is the gap analysis. This is an

assessment of the gap between the knowledge, skills and attitudes

that the people in the organization currently possess and the

knowledge, skills and attitudes that they require to meet the

organization’s objectives.

The training needs assessment is best conducted up front, before

training solutions are budgeted, designed and delivered. The output of

the needs analysis will be a document that specifies why, what, who,

when, where and how. More specifically, the document will need to

answer these questions:

• why do people need the training?

• what skills need imparting?

• who needs the training?

• when will they need the new skills?

• where may the training be conducted? and

• how may the new skills be imparted?

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There are so many ways for conducting a Training Needs Analysis,

depending on your situation. One size does not fit all. Is the purpose of

the needs assessment to:

• lead in to a design of a specific purpose improvement initiative

(e.g., customer complaint reduction)

• enable the design of the organization’s training calendar

• identify training and development needs of individual staff during

the performance appraisal cycle

… and so on and so on.

In clarifying the purpose of the TNA, consider the scope of the TNA. Is

it to determine training needs?

• At the organization level?

• At the project level for a specific project? or

• At the department level for specific employees?

Your answer to these questions will dictate:

• who will conduct the TNA

• how the TNA will be conducted, and

• what data sources will be used

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Training Needs Analysis Method

Below are three scenarios in which you may find yourself wanting to

conduct a Training Needs Analysis. This is not an exhaustive

treatment, however, it will give you some tips on what to do.

Employee Performance Appraisal

In many organizations, each employee’s manager discusses training

and development needs during the final part of the performance

appraisal discussion. This method suits where training needs are

highly varied amongst individual employees. Typically, the manager

constructs an employee Performance Development Plan in

collaboration with the employee being appraised. The Plan takes into

consideration:

• the organization's strategies and plans

• agreed employee goals and targets

• the employee’s performance results

• the employee’s role description

• feedback from internal/external customers and stakeholders, and

• the employee’s stated career aspirations

The employee’s completed Performance Development Plan should

document the area that requires improvement, the actual development

activity, resource requirements, expected outcomes and an agreed

time frame in which the development outcome will be achieved.

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Check out our Training Management Template Pack for a customizable

Performance Development Plan and instructions for use.

You may find some commonality amongst individual training and

development needs identified in the various performance appraisals. In

this case, it may pay the organization to review and classify each of

the needs and convert them into appropriate training courses (or other

interventions). The next step is to prioritize their importance and

aggregate the results so that you end up with a list of courses and

participant numbers against each. Then negotiate a delivery schedule

that fits in with managers/supervisors and employees whilst keeping

an eye on your budget.

Improvement Project

Most, if not all, improvement projects have some employee training

associated with them. Examples of improvement projects include

planned and structured attempts to reduce the incidence of product

defects, increase sales volume and decrease the number of customer

complaints. Here, the Training Needs Analysis begins by clarifying the

measurable organizational improvement targets and the employee

behaviors required to meet these targets. For example, the

organization might set a target of a 50 percent reduction in customer

complaints by the end of the year. Employee behaviors required to

achieve this target might be:

• empathetic listening to customer complaints

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• regular follow up of complaint resolution

... and so on.

To get to this point, though, the cause of the underperformance needs

to be determined through a series of structured questions. If there is

no one else to perform this initial diagnosis, you as the training

professional may be called upon to do this job. A performance

consulting approach can help you here. With this approach, the person

doing the diagnosis first asks managers to identify their problems in

concrete terms. Next, possible causes and solutions are discussed

and training solutions identified, where appropriate.

To do this successfully, the performance consultant needs to be well-

versed in process improvement methods and employee motivation

theory and practice. For small projects, you can use a simple

employee performance flow chart in working with managers to help

identify the cause of performance deficiencies.

Where training is identified as an appropriate solution or as part of the

solution, we then recommend that you work through a training needs

analysis questionnaire with the appropriate stakeholders. This will

give you the information you need to move to the training program

design phase.

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Constructing a Training Calendar

When constructing an annual training calendar, be wary of simply

asking managers what training they want delivered. Assessing training

needs this way, you will most probably get a wish list with little

connection to the real needs of the organization. When the time comes

and they and their workers are pressed for time, you may find it

difficult to fill seats. Training is expensive, and there is no better

method for wasting your scare training dollars.

Why is this so? We find that many managers are not skilled in

identifying which of their problems can be solved by training and

which cannot. For a training calendar to be effective, it needs to be

tailored for your specific organization’s real needs. Ask your managers

what training they need. However, make sure you engage them in

constructive dialog about what their real problems are and which of

them can realistically be addressed through training. If the

performance shortfall is a one-off problem, such as an increasing

number of customer complaints, it may be more effective and cost

efficient to address the issue on an improvement project basis.

Training calendars are best suited to repeatable and regular demand,

such as refresher skills training for infrequently performed technical

tasks and for new recruits joining the organization. In these cases,

review what training is required on a regular basis and look at what

new recruits need to be proficient at soon after they join your

organization. Generally speaking, consult with your management team

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by checking off which of the following areas require inclusion in your

training calendar:

• management, leadership and supervision skills

• soft skills, such as communication and conflict resolution

• environment, health and safety

• human resource processes, such as performance management

• business skills, such as strategy, planning and process

improvement

• technical line and staff skills such as telephone etiquette and

inventory management

In constructing your training calendar, we suggest you also consider

looking at one or more of the data sources listed in the next section.

Once you have composed your list of courses, assess demand for each

course and the required frequency, all the while, keeping an eye on

your budget. With a limited budget, we suggest you get your

management team to help you assess priorities.

Data Sources

In conducting your training needs analysis, you may have a variety of

data sources available to you. Which data sources you use will depend

on a number of factors. These factors include:

• the amount of time you have available

• the human resources you have available

• the level of accuracy you require

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• the reliability of each data source

• the accessibility of each data source

The data sources that you have available may include:

• interviews/surveys with supervisors/managers

• interviews/surveys with employees

• employee performance appraisal documents

• organization’s strategic planning documents

• organization/department operational plans

• organization/department key performance indicators

• customer complaints

• critical incidents

• product/service quality data

For example, if you are considering providing training in project

management to project managers, you may want to interview the

prospective participants, the project managers, and their managers on

what problems they are facing. It may also pay to review planning and

procedural documents to ascertain what project management

methodology and tools your organization is using, or is planning on

using.

Data sources that may show light on where the training needs to focus

the most are project performance data and post-implementation

reviews. Which sources you will actually use and how much time and

effort you expend on each will depend on your particular

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circumstances. Needless to say, there is no magic formula and you

will need to exercise a fair amount of judgment in most cases.

Although there are no hard and fast rules in conducting a Training

Needs Analysis, we have outlined above some general guidelines and

helpful hints. We can also help you with some practical TNA tools,

such as a training needs analysis questionnaire and training

needs analysis spreadsheet, in our customizable template packs

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PRESENT

STUDY

AND

METHODOLOGY

36
NEED FOR THE PROJECT

The training for shop floor associates at SEIL is totally taken


care of by the Methods department, and it is purely technical
in nature. This project was done so as to bring training of the
associates under the HR department, so that it is totally need
based. Also this was done to get a comprehensive view of the
competency levels of the associates through competency
mapping.

37
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE
To align the training of shop floor associates with the
principles of Schneider Production System.

SECONDARY OBJECTIVES
• Prepare job descriptions for the shop floor associates

• Do competency mapping for all the on roll associates

• Arrive at the training needs of the on roll associates

38
SCOPE OF THE STUDY

This project relates to both the HR as well as the Methods


department at SEIL. The job descriptions would help the HR
department to get the right candidates for the job. The
competency mapping would help the Methods and HR
department to decide the kind of training programs to be
given to associates.

39
DATA COLLECTION
• The data for preparing the job descriptions was
collected by interviewing the supervisors of the
associates, for whose positions the job descriptions had
to be prepared.

• For competency mapping, the supervisors were all given


questionnaires that contained the seven competencies
on which each associate was to be rated.

 There was a pre defined format for the job descriptions.


The information collected by interviewing the
supervisors for the purpose of preparing job descriptions
was entered in the given format.

 For competency mapping-

1. The list of all the on roll associates was prepared.

40
2. The competencies and the definitions of the levels of
these competencies were drawn from the system of
reference, which is a common language shared by the SE
plants all over the world. The system of reference works
as a dictionary for competency mapping and career and
competency review.

3. All the competencies have been defined on a 5 point


scale in the competencies, but for internal purposes it
has been reduced to a 3 point scale.

4. In the system of reference, level 1 is called novice, level


2 is called basic and level 3 is called competent.

5. The definition of level 1, i.e. novice is the same as in the


system of reference.

6. For the definition of level 3, i.e. competent, the


definition of level 2 has been used.

7. Level 2, i.e. basic is not defined so as to incorporate


those associates who have slightly more competencies
required to qualify for level 1 and have lesser
competencies than required to qualify for level 3.

DATA ANALYSIS

• Data analysis has been done line wise for each

competency by calculating the percentage of associates

at each competency level from each function

• In a similar way analysis has been done for experience

of the associates versus their competency levels

41
LIMITATIONS
• The supervisors were always busy. So data collection
was difficult
• The associates are sometimes shifted to other lines as
per the requirements. So their supervisors also changed
and it was difficult for the new supervisor to rate the
associate.

ORGANIZATION
PROFILE-
42
SCHNEIDER
ELECTRIC

SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC

• Global leader in the field of Electrical Distribution, Industrial

Control and Automation.

• Known for its unique vision, progressive management, and

futuristic attitude and above all for its exemplary quality that

redefines excellence.

• Energy demand is continuously increasing year after year, also

the need to bring down the CO2 emissions to avoid dramatic

climatic changes.

• Schneider Electric believes that Energy Management is the key

to address this dilemma

• The company works towards the mission:

43
“Helping People make most of their energy”

BRANDS

Some of the major global brands under its umbrella

• Merlin Gerin

• Telemecanique

• Square D

• Clipsal

• APC

HISTORY

From 1836 to today, Schneider Electric has transformed itself

into the global specialist in energy management. Starting

from its roots in the iron and steel industry, heavy machinery,

and ship building, it moved into electricity and automation

management. After 170 years of history, Schneider Electric

has become today the solution provider that will help you

make the most of your energy. Discover its transformation

below.

Steel Industry → Power and Control → Energy Management

19th century 20th century 21st century

44
19th century

• 1836: The Schneider brothers took over the Creusot foundries.

Two years later, they created Schneider & Cie. Their main

market was steel, heavy industry, railroads & ship building.

• 1891: Having become an armaments specialist, Schneider

innovated by launching itself into the emerging electricity

market.

First half of the 20th century

• 1919: Installation of Schneider in Germany and Eastern Europe via

the European Industrial and Financial Union (EIFU). In the years

that followed, Schneider associated with Westinghouse, a major

international electrical group. The Group enlarged its activity to

manufacturing electrical motors, electrical equipment for power

stations and electric locomotives.

• Post war: Schneider gradually abandoned armaments and turned

to construction, iron and steel works and electricity. The

company was completely reorganized in order to diversify and

open up to new markets.

Late 20th century

• 1981-1997: Schneider Group continued to focus on the electrical

industry by separating from its non-strategic activities. This

policy was given concrete form through strategic acquisitions by

45
Schneider Group: Telemecanique in 1988, Square D in 1991 and

Merlin Gerin in 1992.

• 1999: Development of Installation, Systems and Control with the

acquisition of Lexel, Europe’s number two in electrical

distribution. In May 1999 the Group was renamed Schneider

Electric, to more clearly emphasising its expertise in the

electrical field. The Group engaged in a strategy of accelerated

growth and competitiveness.

• 2000-2009: Period of organic growth, positioning itself in new

market segments: UPS (uninterruptible power supply), movement

control, building automation and security through acquisitions of

APC, Clipsal, TAC, Pelco, Xantrex, and more.

HR DEPARTMENT

• The HR department at SEIL is one that strives for

excellence and perfection in each and every activity

of the organization.

• All the activities are undertaken with utmost care

and total planning.

46
HR POLICY

The basic policies of SEIL human resources policies include-

RECRUITMENT

• Recruitment is mostly through campus placements from

all over the country. The recruitment of staff executives

is taken care of by the corporate head quarters at

Gurgaon. This ensures a constant infusion of fresh blood

into the organization.

• Apart from this, the HR department keeps hiring interns

for a period ranging between 3 to months to 1 year. This

provides the students an exposure into the corporate

world and the real working knowledge.

• The recruitment of the shop floor associates for the

Hyderabad plant is done only in Andhra Pradesh. SEIL is

a women centric organization. One of its main focuses is

to develop the women. 95% of the shop floor associates

are women. The minimum educational qualification

required for this is 10 th . Associates are hired through the

District Rural Development Authority, Job fairs, campus

placements etc.

• Associates are hired for mainly 2 categories-trainees or

supplementary and apprentices. Students who have

completed their ITI are hired for a one year

47
apprenticeship. And students who have completed 10 th or

intermediate are hired as supplementary for a period of

6 months at the end of which they will all be awarded a

work experience certificate.

• Their performance is evaluated every month. And at the

end of their contract if their performance levels exceed

the requirements, then they are made permanent.

• The HR department strives for excellence in this by-

1. Sustain motivated and quality workforce through

appropriate and fair performance evaluation, reward

and recognition systems.

2. Identify training needs within the organization and

design and implement those need based training

programs resulting in continuous up gradation of

knowledge and skills and attitudes of the

employees.

HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING

48
• The Department heads project the required resources

(both financial and human resources) for the coming

financial year and the number of human resources

required for that year is done based on the budget.

• The human resource planning for the shop floor

associates is done every week on Friday and the

required number of associates is hired by coming

Monday.

HRD AT SEIL

SEIL gives a lot of importance to training. All the employees

undergo a lot of training as per their requirements. The staff

executives have a career competency review, where they are

all rated on various competencies related to their job by their

supervisors. If their rating is equal to or greater than the

required rating, they can continue in the same job. If it is

less than the required rating, then they are given another job

within the company, which suits their competencies.

SEIL does not leave its employees if they do not perform as

required. They rather find out the cause and try and rectify

49
that and try to retain the employee with them for as long as

possible.

COMPENSATION

The governing theme in this organization is the well being of

the employees. The salary and the benefits offered are on par

with the best available in the industry. It is aimed at not only

attracting but retaining talent. A few important welfare

schemes are highlighted below-

• Special facilities for employees working in shifts

• Special medical insurance schemes

• Retirement benefits

• Education of employee’s children

• Additional benefits at managerial level

TRAINING

SEIL Human Resources department believes that quality is

the hallmark of any successful venture.

Quality Training and Development of Human Resources is

realized through-

• Identifying training needs within the organization and

designing and implementing those need based training

50
programs to bring about continuous up gradation of

knowledge, skills and employee attributes.

• SEIL strongly believes that to be in business, up

gradation of employee’s knowledge and skills is

essential. Hence investment in human resources is one

of the top priorities of the management.

• SEIL’s training plan includes Software, Mechanical,

Electrical, Finance related and Behavioral programs

covering a wide cross section of employees, as follows-

1. A week long Supervisory development program

and a 10-day Executive development program

are designed to provide an exposure to

functional management and behavioral skills to

the site based managers.

2. Development of Managerial staff is through

intensive two week long programs providing

exposure to holistic understanding of the

Business, Strategic Planning, Customer

relationship, Enhancing share holder value,

financial management.

The training program is finalized in consultation with the

department heads

51
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

There are no Trade Unions in SEIL. Since most of the shop

floor associates are women, they have a women’s forum

whose main objective is to empower the women, protect

them from sexual harassment etc.

For the staff executives, Grievance redressal is through e-

mails and interactions.

WELFARE-There are many welfare schemes available to the

employees of SEIL like-Insurance, Reimbursement of

education fees. Apart from these, there are many other

welfare schemes available to them.

There are standard guidelines for absenteeism, turnover,

leave and holidays.

TIME OFFICE MANAGEMENT-

Unauthorized leaves are not at all permitted. There is a

procedure to avail leaves.

Leave cards are available with the supervisors. So anybody

who wants to avail leave should take that card from the

supervisor at least one day before, fill up the reason for

taking leave and get it approved by the supervisor. It is

52
mandatory that all the employees report to duty 15 minutes

before their work time starts.

ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY


DEPARTMENT

• At SEIL, Environment, Health & Safety (EHS) is given


the highest priority. The EHS Policy enunciated by the
Corporate Management lays emphasis on
Environment, Health & Safety through a structured
approach and a well defined organization. Systems
and procedures have been established for
implementing the requisites at all stages of
construction.

Salient EHS Management Systems

Proactive Measures Corrective and Preventive


Project EHS Plan Measures
Project EHS Committee Accident Reporting
Meeting System

53
Group Risk Assessment Analyzing the first aid
EHS Training cases
PEP Talk
Performance Measurement
Daily Safety Pledge and Review Systems
Work Permit System Internal EHS Audits
Screening & Induction of Management Review
workmen meeting
Evaluation of Sub-
Contractors
Accident Statistics

Monitoring Measures EHS Reward & Reprimand


General EHS Inspection Annual Safety Trophy
Equipment Fitness Scheme
certificate Million Man hour
Plant & Machinery Certificates
Inspection Zero Accident Certificate
Electrical Inspection EHS Violation Memo
Environment, Health &
Hygiene Inspection

FINANCE

The finance department at SEIL does not perform any major

function. It only does the budgeting for the coming financial

year and other small activities.

54
PRODUCTION

The production department works day in and out to set

targets in order to assemble the products on time and the

production supervisors ensure that they achieve the targets.

They have regular short interval meetings daily to check the

progress.

METHODS

This department designs the work processes for the entire

plant ensuring an easy and stress free work environment for

the shop floor associates.

MAINTENANCE

This department ensures the smooth functioning of all lines

by checking them regularly and they also check the raw

materials.

55
TECHNICAL ANTENNA

This department designs the products as per the customer’s

requirements to ensure that all the products are tailor made

as per the customer’s requirements.

WAREHOUSE

SEIL has a warehouse that performs many functions such as

receiving the raw materials, unloading, repacking, internal

replenishment cycle counting, date entry etc. they co-

ordinate closely with the production associates so as to

ensure smooth flow of the production process

INTERNAL QUALITY CONTROL

At SEIL Quality is not a responsibility that is to be fulfilled;

but it is a habit. They have a separate quality department

that works diligently to maintain the quality standards.

Customer satisfaction is of utmost importance there. They

never compromise on any small issue.

56
57
58
DATA
ANALYSIS OF
COMPETENCY
LEVELS

59
LINE WISE ANALYSIS AND EXPERIENCE
VS COMPETENCE ANALYSIS

60
ACHIEVE RESULTS

NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY


SNO FUNCTION LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 HARMONY 13 74 13
2 IQC 50 50 0
3 KIWI 8 84 8
4 MASTERPACT 0 100 0
5 TESYS 0 91 9
6 RN2C & RM6 0 57 43
7 MAINTENANCE 0 33 67
8 METHODS 33 67 0
9 WAREHOUSE 28.5 28.5 43
10 LOGISTICS 0 100 0
11 CP TOOL 100 0 0
12 LINE LEADERS 0 25 75

61
NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY
SNO EXPERIENCE LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 >=5 0 100 0
2 >=4 18.5 26 55.5
3 >=3 10 20 70
4 >=2 0 82 18

62
• Here the required level is competent level. Most of the

line leaders and most of them from maintenance and

warehouse are at the required level

• All of them from masterpact and logistics, and most of

them from harmony, kiwi, RN2C and RM6 and methods

and half of them from IQC are at the basic level

• The associate from CP tool and half of the IQC

associates are still at the novice level

• People with greater than 5 years of experience are still

at the basic level. On the other hand, more number of

people who have greater than 4 and 3 years of

experience are at the competent level.

• Competence has not increased with the increase in

experience

• Overall, more number of associates are still at the basic

level in achieving results, when the required level is the

competent level

• This is mainly because the associates do not have the

willingness to learn, lack of initiative and team spirit

63
FOCUS ON CUSTOMER

NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY


SNO FUNCTION LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 HARMONY 75 25 0
2 IQC 100 0 0
3 KIWI 100 0 0
4 MASTERPACT 75 17 18
5 TESYS 0 82 12
6 RN2C & RM6 57 14 29
7 MAINTENANCE 33 67 0
8 METHODS 0 33 67
9 WAREHOUSE 14 57 29
10 LOGISTICS 100 0 0
11 CP TOOL 0 100 0
12 LINE LEADERS 12.5 12.5 75

64
NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY
SNO EXPERIENCE LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 >=5 50 0 50
2 >=4 44 26 30
3 >=3 55 32.5 12.5
4 >=2 64 36 0

65
• Here the required level is the competent level

• Most of the line leaders and most of the associates from

methods, are at the competent level

• The associate from CP tool and also most of them from

tesys, warehouse and maintenance are at the basic level

• More number of associates from harmony, masterpact,

logistics, kiwi, IQC and RN2C are still at the novice level

66
• 50% of associates with greater than 5 years of

experience are competent

• Also a considerable percentage of associates having

greater than 4 and 3 years of experience are at the

competent level

• Comparatively, competence has increased with increase

in experience

• Overall, there are more number of people at the novice

level in focusing on the customer, when the required

level is the competent level

• This could be due to communication gap between the

supervisors and the associates or the associates not

paying attention during their Short Interval Meetings

PC SOFTWARE LITERACY

NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY


SNO FUNCTION LEVEL (IN %)

67
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 HARMONY 75 25 0
2 IQC 83 17 0
3 KIWI 100 0 0
4 MASTERPACT 83 17 0
5 TESYS 100 0 0
6 RN2C & RM6 100 0 0
7 MAINTENANCE 33 67 0
8 METHODS 33 67 0
9 WAREHOUSE 0 100 0
10 LOGISTICS 0 100 0
11 CP TOOL 0 100 0
12 LINE LEADERS 12 88 0

NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY


SNO EXPERIENCE LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 >=5 0 100 0
2 >=4 55.5 44.5 0

68
3 >=3 77.5 32.5 0
4 >=2 82 18 0

• The required level is the basic level

69
• No one has exceeded the requirements

• All the associates from the warehouse and most of them

form maintenance and most of the line leaders qualify

for the required level

• All the associates from IQC, kiwi, tesys and most of

them from harmony and masterpact are still at the

novice level

• Associates with greater than 5 years of experience are

at the basic level

• A considerable percentage of people with greater than 4

and 3 years of experience are also at the basic level

• Competence has increased with the increase in

experience

• Overall, there are more number of associates at the

basic novice level, when the required level is basic

• The competency gap here could be due to wrong

selection during recruitment

70
MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT

NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY


SNO FUNCTION LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 HARMONY 100 0 0
2 IQC 100 0 0
3 KIWI 0 100 0
4 MASTERPACT 75 25 0
5 TESYS 0 100 0
6 RN2C & RM6 43 57 0
7 MAINTENANCE 0 100 0
8 METHODS 0 100 0
9 WAREHOUSE 43 14 43
10 LOGISTICS 0 0 0
11 CP TOOL 0 0 0
12 LINE LEADERS 50 12.5 37.5

71
NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY
SNO EXPERIENCE LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 >=5 0 100 0
2 >=4 37.5 46 16.5
3 >=3 40 57.5 2.5
4 >=2 36 54.5 9.5

72
• This competency does not apply to the associates from

logistics and CP tool

• The required level here is basic

• Some associates from the warehouse and some of the

line leaders exceed the required competency levels

73
• All the associates from kiwi, tesys and maintenance and

most of them form RN2C are at the required level, i.e. at

the basic level

• All the associates from harmony, most of them from

masterpact and some of them from warehouse and some

of the line leaders are at the novice level

• Competence has increased with the increase in

experience

• Overall, most of the associates are at the required, i.e.

basic level

MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS

74
NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY
SNO FUNCTION LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 HARMONY 100 0 0
2 IQC 100 0 0
3 KIWI 100 0 0
4 MASTERPACT 100 0 0
5 TESYS 0 100 0
6 RN2C & RM6 43 57 0
7 MAINTENANCE 100 0 0
8 METHODS 100 0 0
9 WAREHOUSE 71 29 0
10 LOGISTICS 0 0 0
11 CP TOOL 0 0 0
12 LINE LEADERS 75 12.5 12.5

NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY


SNO EXPERIENCE LEVEL (IN %)

75
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 >=5 50 0 50
2 >=4 50 46 4
3 >=3 72.5 25 2.5
4 >=2 54.5 45.5 0

• This competency does not apply to the associates from

logistics and CP tool

• The required competency level is basic

76
• Very few line leaders exceed the required level

• All the associates from tesys and most of them from

RN2C and most of the line leaders qualify for the

required level, i.e. the basic level

• All of them from harmony, masterpact, IQC, maintenance

and methods and most of them from the warehouse are

at the novice level

• Comparatively, competence has not increased with the

increase in experience

• Overall, most of the associates are at the novice level

MANUFACTURING PERFORMANCE

77
NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY
SNO FUNCTION LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 HARMONY 0 100 0
2 IQC 100 0 0
3 KIWI 100 0 0
4 MASTERPACT 83 17 0
5 TESYS 0 100 0
6 RN2C & RM6 100 0 0
7 MAINTENANCE 100 0 0
8 METHODS 100 0 0
9 WAREHOUSE 100 0 0
10 LOGISTICS 0 0 0
11 CP TOOL 0 0 0
12 LINE LEADERS 12.5 62.5 25

NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY


SNO EXPERIENCE LEVEL (IN %)

78
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 >=5 100 0 0
2 >=4 58 37.5 4.5
3 >=3 57.5 42.5 0
4 >=2 82 18 0

• This competency does not apply to the associates from

logistics and CP tool

79
• The required level here is the basic level

• Few line leaders exceed the required level

• All the associates from harmony and tesys and most of

the line leaders qualify for the required level, i.e. the

basic level

• All from IQC, kiwi, RN2C, methods, maintenance,

warehouse and most of them from masterpact are at the

novice level

• Competence has not increased with the increase in

experience

• Overall, most of the associates are at the novice level,

when the required level is basic level

80
HEALTH AND SAFETY

NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY


SNO FUNCTION LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 HARMONY 12.5 0 87.5
2 IQC 100 0 0
3 KIWI 100 0 0
4 MASTERPACT 100 0 0
5 TESYS 0 54.5 45.5
6 RN2C & RM6 0 100 0
7 MAINTENANCE 0 100 0
8 METHODS 0 100 0
9 WAREHOUSE 100 0 0
10 LOGISTICS 100 0 0
11 CP TOOL 0 100 0
12 LINE LEADERS 0 12.5 87.5

81
NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY
SNO EXPERIENCE LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 >=5 0 100 0
2 >=4 52 33 15
3 >=3 53 22 25
4 >=2 46 18 36

82
• The required level here is competent level

• All the associates form RN2C, methods, maintenance,

the associate from CP tool and most of them from tesys

are at the basic level

• All the associates from IQC, kiwi, masterpact,

warehouse and logistics are at the novice level

83
• Associates with greater than 5 years of experience are

still at the basic level

• Some of the associates with greater than 4, 3 and 2

years of experience are at the competent level

• Overall, most of the associates are at the novice level,

when the required level is competent level

• The gap in competency here could be due to the

associates not giving much importance to the health and

safety rules or also due to not much emphasis given to

this during the orientation

OVERALL SUMMARY

84
NO OF PEOPLE AT EACH COMPETENCY
SNO COMPETENCIES LEVEL (IN %)
NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT
1 ACHIEVE RESULTS 11 68 21
2 FOCUS ON CUSTOMER 53 29 18
3 PC SOFTWARE LITERACY 69 31 0
MANUFACTURING
4 MANAGEMENT 38 54 8
MANUFACTURING
5 OPERATIONS 64 32 4
MANUFACTURING
6 PERFORMANCE 64 35 1
7 HEALTH AND SAFETY 50 27.5 22.5

• More number of associates are at the novice level,


followed by the basic level and the competent level

85
FINDINGS AND
SUGGESTIONS

FINDINGS

86
ACHIEVE RESULTS

• Most of the associates are at the basic level, but the

required level is the competent level

FOCUS ON CUSTOMER

• Most of the associates are at the novice level, but the

required level is the competent level

PC SOFTWARE LITERACY

• Most of the associates are at the novice level, but the

required level is the basic level

MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT

• Most of the associates are at the basic level, and here

the requirement is also the basic level

MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS

• Most of the associates are at the novice level, but here

the requirement is the basic level

MANUFACTURING PERFORMANCE

87
• Most of the associates are at the novice level, and here

the requirement is the basic level

HEALTH AND SAFETY

• Most of the associates are at the novice level, and here

the requirement is the basic level

SUGGESTIONS

88
ACHIEVE RESULTS

• Most of the associates are still at the basic level when

they have to be at the competent level.

• The associates at the basic level, i.e. the associates

from masterpact, kiwi, RN2C, IQC, logistics and CP tool

can be trained to reach the competent level.

• Here their educational qualification is not more

important as all the production associates do almost the

same kind of work.

• They would need more exposure.

• Competence should normally increase with the increase

in experience; but here the people with the maximum

years of experience are still at the basic level

• The reasons for this gap in the competency levels could

be lack of team work, lack of growth orientation, lack of

necessary grasping skills etc

• If all these reasons are eliminated, then the gap may

also be minimized

89
FOCUS ON CUSTOMER

• Here, the associates are not directly in touch with the

customers

• So in order to assemble the products as per the

requirements, they have to properly understand what

products they are assembling and how they have to

assemble it

• Details of the various products have to be clearly stated

and also it has to be ensures that the associates have

understood the requirements correctly

PC SOFTWARE LITERACY

• All the associates need not necessarily be at the

required level, i.e. at the basic level

• But those who do work like data entry have to be

competent

• This can be ensured while testing them on their

computer skills at the time of recruitment

MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT, MANUFACTURING

OPERATIONS AND MANUFACTURING PERFORANCE

90
• The competency levels for these three competencies are

set very high.

• Though the required level is the basic level, it would be

ideal even if the associates are at the novice level

• But in manufacturing management and operations there

are people who even exceed the required levels

HEALTH AND SAFETY

• Since safety is the top most priority at SEIL, it has to be

ensured that all the associates are at the required level;

but it is not so.

• There are more number of associates at the novice level,

followed by the basic level and then the competent

level.

• The importance of safety should be made known to the

associates during the time of induction or programs that

show the importance of safety (presentations, skits etc)

should be conducted at regular intervals

• This could be one of the objectives of the women’s forum

too

OTHER SUGGESTIONS

91
• Some of the supervisors in the warehouse do not speak

Telugu and as a result they are not able to connect with

the associates. This could be a reason for poor

performance and they have to be eliminated.

• When the associates are shifted from one functional line

to another as per the requirements, it has to be ensured

that they are totally aware of what work they are doing

under what role. There was a lot of confusion among the

warehouse associates as to what work they do under

different roles.

SN COMPETENCIES TRAINING PROGRAMS


O
Some behavioral training programs to improve upon
qualities like willingness to learn, take initiative,
1 ACHIEVE RESULTS dedication towards work, some exercises to improve
their concentration levels and mainly because their
nature of work is assembling, some psychometric
exercises to improve their hand-eye coordination should
also be included in the training program
The associates are not directly in touch with the
customer. So the production supervisors who set their
targets and the trainers who teach them how to do the
2 FOCUS ON work become their customers. Communication is an
CUSTOMER important aspect here. It has to be ensured that there is
no communication gap between the associates,
supervisors and the trainers. All the parties involved
have to understand the importance of effective
communication and communicate effectively
The softwares that the associates most often use are
3 PC SOFTWARE MS Office and SAP. At the time of recruitment that the
LITERACY associates who are required to do date entry and
related jobs know MS Office and after they join they
have to be effectively trained upon SAP

92
4 MANUFACTURING At the time of induction itself, the associates have to be
MANAGEMENT made known about the principles of the Schneider
Production System. It has to be ensured that they all
follow the zero wastage principle while doing the
assembling
5 MANUFACTURING This requires an understanding of the concepts of work
OPERATIONS standardization and continuous improvement. Most of
the associates are at the required level. It would be an
ideal situation even if the associates are at the novice
level.
6 MANUFACTURING This requires an understanding of key performance
PERFORMANCE indicators and six sigma methodologies. Most of the
associates are at the required level. It would be an ideal
situation even if the associates are at the novice level.
Safety being the first priority, rather than using formal
7 HEALTH AND training programs, it would be better to use role plays,
SAFTEY skits etc to emphasize the importance of safety. This
would have a far and wide spread reach.

CONCLUSION

Competency mapping gives a comprehensive view of where the

associates exactly stand. With the findings of this study, the HR and

the Methods department can sit together and devise training programs

as per the needs of the associates so as to improve their efficiency.

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BIBILIOGRAPH

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BOOKS REFERRED

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• Tom Boydell, Malcolm Leary, “Identifying Training

Needs”, Universities Press (India) Limited, Hyderabad,

1998

• Margaret Anne Reid, Harry Barrington, “Training

Interventions, Jaico Publishing House, Mumbai, 2007

WEBSITES REFERRED

• www.scribd.com

• www.citehr.com

• www.swebi.schneider-electric.com

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ANNEXURE

QUESTIONNAIRE

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INSTRUCTIONS

• Please fill up the necessary blanks

• Please tick in the appropriate box

NAME OF THE ASSOCIATE- ____________________________

FUNCTIONAL LINE- _________________________

COMPETENCY LEVELS
SNO QUESTIONS NOVICE BASIC COMPETENT

1 The associate achieves results to the extent


2 The associate focuses on customers to the extent
3 The associate knows to use the software to the extent
The associate is good at manufacturing management to
4 the extent
The associate is good at manufacturing operations to
5 the extent
The associate is good at manufacturing performance to
6 the extent
The associate follows health and safety rules to the
7 extent

COMPETENCY LEVELS

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A.ACHIEVE RESULTS

1.NOVICE

• Puts in some time and effort to accomplish goals. Pays limited attention to
others’ progress. Identifies and addresses routine obstacles that prevent work
from moving forward.

2.COMPETENT

3.EXPERT
• Puts in extra time and effort as requested to accomplish challenging goals.
Tracks others progress and key activities. Addresses obstacles in a timely
manner.

B.FOCUS ON CUSTOMER
1.NOVICE
• Develops basic understanding of customers’ requirements. Occasionally seeks
out customer feedback. Resolves customer problems with help of others

2.COMPETENT

3.EXPERT
• Develops a solid understanding of customers’ requirements. Listens to
customer feedback. Conveys the importance of resolving customer problems
to key individuals

C.PC SOFTWARE LITERACY


1.NOVICE
• Basic operating knowledge of general software/hardware products. Has
knowledgeable keyboarding skills

2.COMPETENT

3.EXPERT
• Basic operating knowledge of company standard software/hardware products.
Takes the initiative to learn new tools and technology. Utilizes the
internet/intranet for company purposes

D.MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS
1.NOVICE

99
• Understands the basic concepts of work standardization and continuous
improvement. Understands the 6 key measures of lean production (Customer
Satisfaction, Cost, Quality, Delivery, Health and Safety, Morale). Familiar with
the DMAIC process

2.COMPETENT

3.EXPERT
• Completes standardized work documentation with assistance and uses
Kaizen/barrier logs to identify improvement opportunities. Interprets value
stream maps. Understands the intent of ISO standards for quality and safety.
Knowledge of Total Preventive Maintenance (TPM)

E.MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT
1.NOVICE
• Familiar with resource allocation. Familiar with customer demand. Familiar
with safety principles. Awareness of the principles of SPS

2.COMPETENT

3.EXPERT
• Understands resource allocation requirements relative to customer demand.
Knowledge of product/process/material flow. Understands safety principles.
Understands SPS

F. MANUFACTURING PERFROMANCE
1.NOVICE
• Familiar with KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) /Process Metrics (examples –
dashboards, scorecards). Familiar with the Manufacturing Processes. Familiar
with calculating process capability (Cpk, Sigma level, % yield. Familiar with
Lean and Six Sigma methodology.

2.COMPETENT

3.EXPERT
• Calculates and reports KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) /Process Metrics.
Calculates and assesses process capabilities (Cpk, Sigma level, % yield.
Knowledge of (Yellow Belt level) Six Sigma

G.HEALTH & SAFETY


1.NOVICE

100
• Is aware of the health and safety regulations. Is aware of internal health and
safety critical principles. Understands Health and safety metrics and industry
benchmark

2. COMPETENT

3.EXPERT
• Knowledgeable on all the local health & safety regulations with some
knowledge on state/provincial and country regulations. Knowledgeable on
health and safety management system guidelines. Is able to explain why
Health and safety management is essential to employees complete physical
and mental well being. Deploys H&S programs / structures in support of the
corporate H&S vision

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