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CHAPTER-1

1.1. INTRODUCTION ON THE STUDY

Employee motivation is an important concept in an organization, when


workers are motivated in an organization their productivity rises and therefore the
organization realizes various advantages associated with the rise in labor
productivity. There exist various theories that explain employee motivation which
include theories by Sigmund Freud, Douglas McGregor and Abraham Maslow.

Sigmund Freud formulated a theory that stated that people were lazy at
work and that workers are very far from becoming optimistic, the workers have
no ambition and they always avoid taking any responsibility and that all the
workers want is security. Based on this assumption Freud stated that to get the
people to work there must a reward system, they must be coerced, punished and
intimidated. For this reason therefore the managers in any organization
according to this theory are viewed as taking the responsibility of policing
workers who refuse to work and that they cannot be trusted. However his theory
was based on some unrealistic assumptions.

Douglas McGregor also formulated a theory that explains employee


motivation, according to his theory people always want to learn, and that work is
viewed as natural and therefore the people will develop self development and
discipline, this theory also states that rewards to employees is not so much in
monetary form but the freedom to undertake difficult tasks and challenging tasks
all by themselves. Therefore the manager's job in this theory is only a way to lead
workers into self development and also achieve efficiency in the organization, the
managers work is viewed as soft and simple.
1.2. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

 To study the important factors which are needed to motivate the


employees.

 To study the effect of monetary and non-monetary benefits provided by the


Organization on the employee’s performance.

 To study the effect of job promotions on employees.

 To learn the employee’s satisfaction on the interpersonal relationship exists in


The organization.

 To provide the practical suggestion for the improvement of organization’s


Performance.

 To identify the various motivation factors and find suitable one

 To analyze how motivation created a job satisfaction among the employee

 To study motivation facilities provided by the concern

 To give suggestion to improve employee motivation in this organization


1.3. SCOPE OF THE STUDY

 The important of studying employee’s motivation is to understand the internal


Satisfaction in the minds of every employee.

 This study helps to know some employees satisfaction level.

 The finding of this study helps the company to implement the expectations
From the employees.

 The study helps the company to know whether the motivation undertaken are
Strongly accepted and also to know the lacking in the employee motivation
1.4 LIMITATIONS

 The study was limited to only one company.

 The study is based upon high population.

 The time duration of the study is less than the expected.

 The study only based on employee side. It is not covering the staffs.

 The project data can be valid up; hence there are chances of chances in
the Findings and result obtained.
1.5 STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

This motivational issue is not the fault of the employee. By providing


feedback and ensuring the feedback is consistent, you provide the means for
employees to motivate themselves to the desired behavior. For example,
inconsistent feedback would be for management to say it wants good safety
practices, and then frowns on workers who slow down by complying with
regulations. Or expressing that careful workmanship is needed, but reinforces
only volume of production.

Feedback must be provided on a continuous basis. If you only provide it


during an employee's performance rating period, then you are NOT doing your
job.

Also, ensure that there is not a difference in priorities. Employees with


several tasks and projects on their plates must be clearly communicated as to
what comes first when pressed for time. With the ever increasing notion to do
more with less, we must understand that not everything can get done at once.
Employees often choose the task that they enjoy the most, rather than the task
they dislike the most. And all too often that disliked task is what needs to get
performed first.

Looking at rewards, companies should be encouraged to understand that


people have different needs and many are surprised to learn that they are not
purely motivated by money. Many employees would welcome a salary sacrifice
whereby they exchange part of their salary for, say gym membership, childcare
support or extra holiday. Others may appreciate flexible working hours, whether
this is through completing core hours with flexible start and finish times, or
through a job share.
2. CHAPTER

2.1 REVIEW LITERATURE

A literature review is a body of text that aims to review the critical points of
current knowledge on a particular topic. Most often associated with science-
oriented literature, such as a thesis, the literature review usually precedes a
research proposal, methodology and results section. Its ultimate goal is to bring
the reader up to date with current literature on a topic and forms the basis for
another goal, such as the justification for future research in the area.

A Literature Review has been done to know about the various aspects of
job design in Order to identify those motivation factors that effect job
performance.

According to Rush, 1971 the main purpose of job design (or re-design) is to
increase both employee motivation and productivity. Job design can have a
significant effect on motivation. ). Increased productivity can manifest itself in
various forms. For example, the focus can be that of improving quality and
quantity of goods and services, reduce operation costs, and/or reduce turnover
and training costs.

On the other hand, increasing employees' motivation can be achieved


through increased job satisfaction. To this end, the Two-Hygiene Theory by
Herzberg (1971, as cited in Rush) describes two sets of factors, satisfying and
dissatisfying, that affect an employee's self-esteem and opportunity for self-
actualization in the workplace.
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Satisfaction and performance of the employees. Thus, for both


academicians and practitioners, job design takes on special importance in
today's human resource management. It is essential to design jobs so that stress
can be reduced, motivation can be enhanced, and satisfaction of employees and
their performance can be improved so that organizations can effectively compete
in the global marketplace.

Initially, the field of organizational behavior paid attention only to job


enrichment (JE) approaches to job design. Now, job design has taken a broader
perspective, with various dimensions such as job enrichment (JE), job
engineering (JEng), quality of work life (QWL), sociotechnical designs, the social
information processing approach (SIPA) and the job characteristics approach to
job design. The proposed model recognizes certain job characteristics that
contribute to certain psychological states, and that the strength of the employee's
need for growth has an important moderating effect.

The aim of this research is to identify the key issues of job design
research and practice, particularly in relation to higher-level jobs. To provide the
context for the account that follows, we first take a backward glance at job
design. We then briefly describe the approaches to job design with emphasis on
the job characteristics approach to job design in detail, followed by a literature
review of the job characteristics approach. Later we present the proposed model
of job design, and its future implications or outcomes.
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More attention is being paid to job design for three major reasons:

 Job design can influence performance in certain jobs, especially those


where employee motivation can make a substantial difference. Lower cost
through reduced turnover and absenteeism are also related to good job
design.
 Job design can affect job satisfaction. Because people are more satisfied
with certain job configurations than with others, it is important to be able to
identify what makes a “good” job.
 Job design can affect both physical and mental health. Example problems
such as backache or leg pain can sometimes be traced directly to job
design, as can stress and related high blood pressure and heart disease.

Herzberg (1966) made a critical distinction between these factors in that a


person does not move in a continuum from being dissatisfied to becoming
satisfied or vice versa. Rush (1971, p. 7) tries to explain Herzberg's point by
stating that, "the opposite of satisfaction is not dissatisfaction, but no satisfaction;
and that the opposite of dissatisfaction is not satisfaction but no dissatisfaction".
In a practical sense, this means that dissatisfying factors help support and
maintain the structure of the job, while the satisfying factors help the employee
reach self-actualization and can increase motivation to continue to do the job.

According to the Two Factor Theory of Frederick Herzberg (1959) people are
influenced by two factors. Satisfaction and psychological growth are a result
factor of motivation factors. Managers have the opportunity to influence the
motivation of employees through design of their jobs. Well-designed jobs help
accomplish two important goals: getting the necessary work done in a timely and
competent manner, and motivating and challenging employees. Both the
business and the employee benefit from successful job design. Poorly designed
jobs leave to chance whether the expected tasks will get done in a timely and
competent manner. Poorly designed jobs, moreover, are likely to be
discouraging, boring and frustrating to employees.

Job design serves to improve performance and motivation. Job-design


analysis starts by looking at a job with a broad perspective and swiftly moves
toward identifying the specific activities required to do the job. This is done for the
purpose of identifying and correcting any deficiencies that affect performance
and motivation.

Hence this literature review satisfy all the variables i.e. relationships (between
Job Design and employee performance/job design and motivation) of research
thesis Hypothesis.

Job design and its approaches are usually considered to have begun with
scientific management in the year 1900. Pioneering scientific managers such as
Taylor (1947), Gilbreth (1911), and Gilbreth and Gilbreth (1917) systematically
examined jobs with various techniques. They suggested that task design might
be the most prominent element in scientific management.

With respect to the design of individual jobs, the first major theory was that of
Herzberg and his colleagues (Herzberg et al. 1959). Their two-factor theory
distinguished between two types of factors, namely motivators, which are intrinsic
to the work itself (e.g. achievement, recognition, and responsibility), and hygiene
factors, which are extrinsic to the work (e.g. work conditions, pay, and
supervision). The proposition was that the hygiene factors are absolutely
necessary to maintain the human resources of an organization. According to
Hertzberg's theory, only a challenging job has the opportunity for achievement,
recognition, advancement and growth that will motivate personnel.

There was substantial interest from researchers and practitioners in job


design during the 1900s. Hickman et al. (1975) conducted a study and claimed
that people on enriched jobs are definitely more motivated and satisfied by their
jobs. Another study conducted by Griffin (1989) on 1,000 tellers from 38 banks of
a large holding company found from the job design intervention that employees
perceive meaningful changes and tend to recognize those changes over time.

In addition to this, a meta-analysis of the job characteristics model (Fried and


Ferris, 1987) found general support for the model and for its effects on motivation
and satisfaction and performance outcome.

Adler (1991) found that systems in which employees reported higher


perceptions of skill variety, task significance, autonomy, and feedback reported
higher levels of satisfaction and internal work motivation. Champoux (1991)
theorized the relationships that growth need strength moderates between the
core job characteristics and the critical psychological states and affective
responses. Moreover, Dodd and Ganster (1996) examined the interactive
relationship between feedback,

Autonomy and variety by manipulating the characteristics in lab. In their


study, Arce (2002) found that the reward from outside activities is affected by the
performance on inside activity. The study provides a rationale for the existence of
synergies between different activities. Loher et al. 1985) found the relation
between job characteristics and job satisfaction and also found that the relation
was stronger for employees high in growth need strength (GNS). Renn and
Vandenberg (1995) studied the strongest support for the job characteristic model
that allowed the core job dimensions to have direct and indirect effects on
personal and work outcomes. Another study conducted by Morrison et al. (2005)
found that job designs that provide for high levels of employee control also
provide increased opportunities for the development and exercise of skill. Also,
mediational influence of perceived skill utilization on job control job satisfaction
has been observed. Love and Edwards (2005) concluded that perceived work
demands, job control and social support through job design leads to high
productivity. Sokoya (2000) found in his study that the level of job satisfaction is
determined by a combination of jobs, work and personal characteristics. Rotating
managers to different jobs adds the benefit of task variety, resulting in increased
performance of employees.

Different variables of job design, employee motivation and job performance


are:
Discussed below:
Job content:
The activities required of the job or the task to be done on the job
Job Requirements:
The personal characteristics (education, experience, licenses, etc)
necessary to do the task
Job Context:
The environment within which the job is performed .Working Relationships
with other employees
Job rotation:
Job design technique in which employees are moved between two or
more jobs in a planned manner. The objective is to expose the employees to
different experiences and wider variety of skills to enhance job satisfaction and to
cross-train them.
Job enlargement:
Job Enlargement is the horizontal expansion of a job. It involves the
addition of tasks at the same level of skill and responsibility. It is done to keep
workers from getting bored. It is different than job enrichment (see sidebar).
Job enrichment:
Job Enrichment is the addition to a job of tasks that increase The amount
of employee control or responsibility. It is a vertical expansion of the job as
opposed to the horizontal expansion of a job, which is called job enlargement.
Rating scales:
A rating scale is a set of categories designed to elicit information about a
quantitative or a qualitative attribute. In the social sciences, common examples
are the Liker scale and 1-10 rating scales in which a person selects the number
which is considered to reflect the perceived quality of a product.

Management by objectives (MBO):


MBO aims to increase organizational performance by aligning goals and
subordinate objectives throughout the organization. Ideally, employees get strong
input to identifying their objectives, time lines for completion, etc. MBO includes
ongoing tracking and feedback in the process to reach objectives.
Peer or team evaluations:
Things to consider in making this evaluation include:
Competence:
The team member capable of completing his/her part of the project In
other words, did he/she learn anything in the course Quality of Work: Did the
team member strive to and do a good job in his/her assigned tasks.
Participation:
What was the level and extent of participation by the team member in all
phases of the project.
Promptness:
Did the team member meet the task completion deadlines set by your
group
Attendance:
How often did the team member miss a group meeting?
Employee Motivation
Organizations require a number of resources, strategies and techniques in
order to succeed. From capital, to a business site and to employees, all of these
are essential for a business to work. While these components are significant,
values, particularly motivation, is also recognized as a vital business element,
especially in enabling organizational transformation and enhancement.
Motivation permits the business owners and employees to be resourceful,
responsible and productive in performing daily business tasks, which in turn
helps in uniting the business with its consumers.

By means of motivating the employees, managers are able to encourage


them to work towards a common goal. This business principle also helps the
employees to become more productive, enabling enhancement and
transformation to place.

According to Creech (1995), motivation is typically defined by


psychologists as a stimulation that causes the creation of aroused, sustained and
directed behavior. This behavior in turn leads individuals to work and perform
towards goal achievement. Several authors had also studied on the principal
concept behind motivation.

Kreitner (1995) for instance, has defined motivation as the psychological


process that results to a directional and purposeful behavior. Motivation is also
defined as the tendency to behave in an appropriate manner to attain certain
needs (Buford, Bedeian & Lindner, 1995).

The introduction of several researches on employee motivation has also


introduced a number of theories explaining the factors that motivate employees.
These theories include the need-hierarchy theory and the two-factor theory. The
need-hierarchy theory of Maslow (1943) is among the first motivation theories
that had been introduced. In this theoretical model, Maslow noted five levels of
employee needs, which include the physiological, social, ego, safety and self-
actualising needs. From his work, Maslow is a challenging process and that
motivation basically works through a series of needs that are arranged in a
certain level. Hersberg on the other hand (Hersberg, Mausner & Snyderman,
1959) had classified motivation into two factors. These two factors are motivators
and hygienes. Intrinsic or motivator factors pertain to recognition, achievement
and attainment of job satisfaction. Alternatively, extrinsic or hygiene factors refer
to job security and payments.

Based from these theoretical perspectives, it is clear that employees


would have to receive something in return in order to encourage them to work
productively towards transformation and enhancement. There are many specific
ways on how the theories of motivation can be applied in actual work settings.
Granting due promotion is one example. Benham (1993) stated that promotion is
also synonymous to career success where employees are given higher
responsibilities or place on higher authority levels. Promotion is considered an
important element of human resource management as it encourages employees
to perform with quality. This also represents a significant aspect of the internal
selection system.

The organizational members’ affective reactions towards their job and to


the company are also influenced significantly based on their promotional
opportunities (Johnston et al., 1993). As explained by the theories of Maslow and
Hersberg, motivation can help in drawing out the best each employee can
provide; this can be achieved by promotion.

Another means of applying the theories of motivation is through the


employment of business coaches, a role which managers themselves can play.
Similar to sports, a business coach helps in making the business grow and
succeed. The business coach is one who serves as the mentor, counselor and
tutor of an organization. They are very much related to motivations theories as
they act as inspirations for the employees to improve and remain challenged
(Hale, 1999). According to Nyman and Thach (2002), business coaching can be
done through holistic coaching, performance coaching, content coaching or
through manager as coach. Furthermore, the process can be done in various
setting such as one-on-one coaching, focus group coaching or organizational
coaching.

Halle (1999) noted that business coaching has a number of significant


purposes in the organization, particularly in relation to transformation and
enhancement. For instance, this technique helps in motivating the employees,
especially when problems or issues arise. Through business coaches, the
essence of teamwork is emphasized.

Moreover, by providing polite criticisms to the employees, they are able to


realize their weak points, resulting to developed and more efficient workers.

The ability of business coaches to guide the employees also helps in


bringing about transformation in their working skills and performance; this
transformation occurs as business coaches stimulate the workers to search for
new skills and methods that would help them cope with various business
challenges.

Business coaches also help in identifying the strong points of the workers
and assist in enhancing them further. Business coaching is also related to the
enhancement factor as it utilizes the concept of constant evaluation. By
monitoring both the strengths and weaknesses of the employees, business
coaches are able to send in the right feedbacks to each employee, which would
allow for continuous enhancement in their skills and work attitudes (Halle, 1999).
2.2 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Definition

The research design for this study employed a descriptive survey method.
The target population of this study included employees at the Piketon Research
and Extension Center and Enterprise Center (centers). The sample size included
all 25 employees of the target population. Twenty-three of the 25 employees
participated in the survey for a participation rate of 92%. The centers are in
Piketon, Ohio.

Research is a systematic method of finding solutions to problems. It is


essentially an investigation, a recording and an analysis of evidence for the
purpose of gaining knowledge. According to Clifford woody, “research comprises
of defining and redefining problem, formulating hypothesis or suggested
solutions, collecting, organizing and evaluating data, reaching conclusions,
testing conclusions to determine whether they fit the formulated hypothesis”

SAMPLE DESIGN

A sample design is a finite plan for obtaining a sample from a given


population. Simple random sampling is used for this study.
Universe
The universe chooses for the research study is the employees of
Hyderabad Industries Ltd.
Sample Size
Number of the sampling units selected from the population is called the
size of the sample. Sample of 50 respondents were obtained from the population.
Sampling Procedure
The procedure adopted in the present study is probability sampling, which
is also known as chance sampling. Under this sampling design, every item of the
frame has an equal chance of inclusion in the sample.
Methods of Data Collection
The data’s were collected through Primary and secondary sources.
Primary Data
Primary data are in the form of “raw material” to which statistical methods
are applied for the purpose of analysis and interpretations. The primary sources
are discussion with employees, data’s collected through questionnaire.
Secondary Data
Secondary data’s are in the form of finished products as they have already
been treated statistically in some form or other.

The secondary data mainly consists of data and information collected from
records, company websites and also discussion with the management of the
organization. Secondary data was also collected from journals, magazines and
books.

Descriptive research, also known as statistical research, describes data


and characteristics about the population or phenomenon being studied.
Descriptive research answers the questions who, what, where, when and how.

Although the data description is factual, accurate and systematic, the


research cannot describe what caused a situation. Thus, descriptive research
cannot be used to create a causal relationship, where one variable affects
another. In other words, descriptive research can be said to have a low
requirement for internal validity.

Questionnaire

A well defined questionnaire that is used effectively can gather information


on both overall performance of the test system as well as information on specific
components of the system. A defeated questionnaire was carefully prepared and
specially numbered. The questions were arranged in proper order, in accordance
with the relevance.

Nature of Questions
The questionnaire consists of open ended, dichotomous, rating and
ranking questions.
Pre-testing
A pre-testing of questionnaire was conducted with 10 questionnaires,
which were distributed and all of them were collected back as completed
questionnaire. On the basis of doubts raised by the respondents the
questionnaire was redialed to its present form.
Sample

A finite subset of population, selected from it with the objective of


investigating its properties called a sample. A sample is a representative part of
the population. A sample of 50 respondents in total has been randomly selected.
The response to various elements under each questions were totaled for the
purpose of various statistical testing.

Descriptive research, also known as statistical research, describes data


and characteristics about the population or phenomenon being studied.
Descriptive research answers the questions who, what, where, when and how.

Although the data description is factual, accurate and systematic, the


research cannot describe what caused a situation. Thus, descriptive research
cannot be used to create a causal relationship, where one variable affects
another. In other words, descriptive research can be said to have a low
requirement for internal validity.

Variables of the Study


The direct variable of the study is the employee motivation Indirect
variables are the incentives, interpersonal relations, career development
Opportunities and performance appraisal system.

Tools to be used

 Correlation is used to test the hypothesis and draw inferences.


 ANOVA
 Chi-square
CHAPTER-3

3.1 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION


DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS

1. Response about the support from the HR department

TABLE-1

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Highly satisfied 18 36
2 Satisfied 29 58
3 Neutral 3 6
4 Dissatisfied 0 0
5 Highly satisfied 0 0
Total 50 100

CHART-1

Response about the support from the HR department

60 58

50
40 36
30
20 Series1
10 6
0 0
0
Highly Dissatisfi Highly
Satisfied Neutral
satisfied ed satisfied
Series1 36 58 6 0 0

INTERPRETATION
The table shows that 58% of the respondents are satisfied with the
support they are getting from the HR department.
TABLE-2

2. Management is interested in motivating the employees

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 27 54
2 Agree 20 40
3 Neutral 3 6
4 Disagree 0 0
5 Strongly Disagree 0 0
Total 50 100

CHART-2
Management is interested in motivating the employees

60 54
50
40
40
30
20 Series1
10 6
0 0
0
Strongly Strongly
Agree Neutral Disagree
Agree Disagree
Series1 54 40 6 0 0

INTERPRETATION

The table shows that 54% of the respondents are strongly agreeing that
the management is interested in motivating the employees.

TABLE-3

3. The Type of Incentives Motivates You More

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Financial Incentives 15 30
2 Non financial Incentives 9 18
3 Both 26 52
Total 50 100

CHART-3
T h e ty p e o f in c e n tiv es m o tiv a tes y o u m o re

30
F inanc ial Inc entives
Non financ ial Inc entives
52 B oth

18

INTERPRETATION

The table shows that 52% of the respondents are expressing that both
financial and non financial incentives will equally motivated them.

TABLE-4

4. Satisfaction with the present incentives scheme

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Highly satisfied 18 36
2 Satisfied 29 58
3 Neutral 3 6
4 Dissatisfied 0 0
5 Highly satisfied 0 0
Total 50 100
CHART-4

S a tis fa c tio n w ith th e p re s e n t in c e n tiv e s p ro v id e d b y th e o rg a n iz a tio n

58
60
50
40 36

30
20 S e rie s 1

10 6
0 0
0
H ig h ly H ig h ly
S a t is fie d N e u t ra l D is s a t is fie d
s a tis fie d s a t is fie d
S e rie s 1 36 58 6 0 0

INTERPRETATION
The table shows that 58% of the respondents are satisfied with the
present incentive scheme of the organization.

TABLE-5
5. The company is eagerness in recognizing and acknowledging
Employee’s work

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 18 36
2 Agree 29 58
3 Neutral 3 6
4 Disagree 0 0
5 Strongly Disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
CHART-5

Eagerness of the company in acknowledging the work


of employees

60 58

40 36

20 Series1
6
0 0
0
Strongly Strongly
Agree Neutral Disagree
Agree Disagree
Series1 36 58 6 0 0

INTERPRETATION

From the study, 58% of employees agreed that the company is eager in
recognizing and acknowledging their work, 36% strongly agreed and only 6%
showed neutral response.

TABLE-6

6. Periodical increase in salary

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 12 24
2 Agree 23 46
3 Neutral 3 6
4 Disagree 9 18
5 Strongly Disagree 3 6
Total 50 100
CHART-6

P erio d ical in crease in salary

50 46

40

30 24
20 18
S eries 1
10 6 6

0
S trongly S trongly
A gree Neutral Dis agree
A gree Dis agree
S eries 1 24 46 6 18 6

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 46% of employees agree that there is a periodical


increase in the salary.

TABLE-7

7. Job Security existing in the company

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 15 30
2 Agree 18 36
3 Neutral 11 22
4 Disagree 3 6
5 Strongly Disagree 3 6
Total 50 100
CHART-7

Job security exist in the company

40 36
30
30
22
20
Series 1
10 6 6

0
Strongly Strongly
Agree Neutral Disagree
Agree Disagree
Series1 30 36 22 6 6

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 35% of employees agree with good job security exist in
the company.

TABLE-8

8. Good relations with the co-workers.

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 15 30
2 Agree 27 54
3 Neutral 8 16
4 Disagree 0 0
5 Strongly Disagree 0 0
Total 50 100
CHART-8

G o o d re la tio n s w ith c o -w o rk e rs

60 54
50
40
30
30
20 16 S eries 1
10
0 0
0
S trongly S trongly
A gree Neutral Dis agree
A gree Dis agree
S eries 1 30 54 16 0 0

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 54% of the respondents agree that they have good
relations with co-worker.

TABLE-9

9. Effective performance appraisal system

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 10 20
2 Agree 23 46
3 Neutral 8 16
4 Disagree 6 12
5 Strongly Disagree 3 6
Total 50 100
CHART-9

Effective performance appraisal system

50 46

40

30
20
20 16
12 Series1
10 6

0
Strongly Strongly
Agree Neutral Disagree
Agree Disagree
Series1 20 46 16 12 6

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 46% of the respondents agree to effective performance


appraisal system existing in the company.

TABLE-10

10. Effective promotional opportunities in present job

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 9 18
2 Agree 26 52
3 Neutral 9 18
4 Disagree 3 6
5 Strongly Disagree 3 6
Total 50 100
CHART-10

Effective promotional opportunities in present job

60
52
50
40
30 Series1
20 18 18

10 6 6
0
Strongly Strongly
Agree Neutral Disagree
Agree Disagree
Series1 18 52 18 6 6

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 52% of the respondents agree with effective promotional
opportunities in their present job.

TABLE-11

11. Good safety measures existing in the organization.

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 15 30
2 Agree 23 46
3 Neutral 3 6
4 Disagree 6 12
5 Strongly Disagree 3 6
Total 50 100
CHART-11

Go od safety m easures existin g in the organiz ation

50 46
40
30
30

20
S eries 1
12
10 6 6
0
S trongly S trongly
A gree Neutral Dis agree
A gree Dis agree
S eries 1 30 46 6 12 6

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 46% of the respondents agree that there is a good safety
measure existing in the company.

TABLE-12

12. Performance appraisal activities are helpful to get motivated

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 9 18
2 Agree 23 46
3 Neutral 6 12
4 Disagree 3 3
5 Strongly Disagree 9 18
Total 50 100
CHART-12

P e rfo rm a n c e a p p ra is a l a c tiv itie s a re h e lp fu l to g e t m o tiv a te d

50 46

40

30

20 18 18
12 S e rie s 1
10
3
0
S t ron g ly S t ro n gly
A g re e N e u tra l D is a g re e
A gre e D is a gre e
S e rie s 1 18 46 12 3 18

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 46% of the respondents agree that the performance
appraisal activities are helpful to get motivated.

TABLE-13

13. Support from the co-worker is helpful to get motivated

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 12 20
2 Agree 29 46
3 Neutral 0 0
4 Disagree 6 12
5 Strongly Disagree 3 6
Total 50 100
CHART-13

Support from the co-w orker is helpful to get motivated

50 46

40

30
20
20
12 Series1
10 6
0
0
S trongly S trongly
A gree Neutral Disagree
Agree Disagree
S eries 1 20 46 0 12 6

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 58% of the respondents agree that the support from the
co-worker is helpful to get motivated.

TABLE-14

14. Career development opportunities are helpful to get motivated

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Strongly Agree 10 20
2 Agree 26 52
3 Neutral 02 04
4 Disagree 04 08
5 Strongly Disagree 08 16
Total 50 100
CHART-14

C areer developm ent opportunities are helpful to g et


m otivated

60
52

40

20
20 16 S eries1
8
4
0
S trongly S trongly
A gree Neutral Disagree
Agree Disagree
S eries1 20 52 4 8 16

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 52% of the respondents agree that the career
development opportunities are helpful to get motivated.

TABLE-15

15. Factors which motivates you the most

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Salary increase 21 42
2 Promotion 15 30
3 Level 03 06
4 Motivational talk 05 10
5 Recognition 06 12
Total 50 100
CHART-15

Factors which motivates you the most

12%
10% Salary increase
42% Promotion
Level
6%
Motivational talk
Recognition
30%

INTERPRETATION

The table shows that the 42% of the respondent is responding that
increase in salary will motivate them the most.

TABLE-16

16. Incentives and other benefits will influence your performance

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Influence 32 64
2 Does not influence 12 24
3 No opinion 06 12
Total 50 100

CHART-16
Incentives and other benefits will influence your
performance

12%

24% Influence
Does not influence
No opinion
64%

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 64% of the respondents responded that incentives and
other benefits will Influence their performance

TABLE-17
17. Management involves you in decision making which are connected to
your department

NUMBER OF
SL.NO PARTICULAR PERCENTAGE (%)
RESPONDENTS
1 Yes 47 94
2 No 00 00
3 Occasionally 03 06
Total 50 100

TABLE-17
Incentives and other benefits will influence your
performance

0% 6%

Yes
No
Occasionally

94%

INTERPRETATION

The table shows 94% of the respondents agree that they the Management
involve them in Decision making which are connected to your department.

4.2 INFERENTIAL STATISTICS

H0: There is no significant relationship between incentives and employee’s


performance.

Std.
Mean N
Deviation
Incentives 1.72 .573 50
Employee 1.50 .707 50

Correlations

Incentives Employee
Performance
Incentives Pearson 1 .655(**)
Correlation
Sig.(2-tailed) . .000
Sum of Squares
and Cross-
Products 16.080 13.000
Covariance
N .328 .265
Employee
Performance Pearson
Correlation .655(**) 1

Sig.(2-tailed) .000 .
Sum of Squares 13.000 24.500
and Cross-
Products
Covariance .265 .500
N 50 50

** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

Inference

Since the Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed) the null
hypothesis that is “There is no significant relationship between incentives
and employee’s performance” is rejected and an alternative hypothesis is
framed.

H1: There is significant relationship between incentives and employee’s


performance.

H0: There is no significant relationship between career development


opportunities and the extent of employee motivation.

Std.
Mean N
Deviation
Career
Development
3.70 1.035 50
Opportunities
Extent of
3.36 1.317 45
Motivation
Correlations

Career
Extent of
development
Motivation
opportunities
Career Pearson
Development Correlation 1 .909(**)
opportunities Sig.(2-tailed) . .000
Sum of Squares
and Cross- 52.500 52.111
Products
Covariance 1.071 1.184
N 50 45

Pearson
Correlation .909(**) 1
Extra of Sig.(2-tailed) .000 0
Motivation Sum of Squares
and Cross- 52.111 76.311
Products
Covariance 1.184 1.174
N 45 45

** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

Inference

Since the Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed) the null
hypothesis that is “There is no significant relationship between career
development opportunities and the extent of employee motivation” is rejected
and an alternative hypothesis is framed.

H1: There is significant relationship between career development opportunities


and the extent of employee motivation.
Ho: There is no significant relationship between performance appraisal system
and the extent of motivation.
Std.
Mean N
Deviation
Performance
appraisal system 2.40 1.143 50
Extent of
Motivation 2.60 1.355 50

Correlations

Career
Extent of
development
Motivation
opportunities
Performance Pearson
appraisal system Correlation 1 .962(**)
Sig.(2-tailed) . .000
Sum of Squares
and Cross- 64.000 73.000
Products
Covariance 1.306 1.490
Extent of N 50 50
Motivation
Pearson
Correlation .962(**) 1
Sig.(2-tailed) .000 .
Sum of Squares
and Cross- 73.000 90.000
Products
Covariance 1.490 1.837
N 50 50

** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).


Inference
Since the Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed) the null
hypothesis that is “There is no significant relationship between performance
appraisal system and the extent of motivation” is rejected and an alternative
hypothesis is framed.
H1: There is significant relationship between performance appraisal system and
the extent of motivation.
Ho: There is no significant relationship between interpersonal relationship in the
Organization and extent of motivation.

Std.
Mean N
Deviation
Employee
relations 1.86 .670 50
Extent of
Motivation 2.18 1.119 50

Correlations

Career
Extent of
development
Motivation
opportunities
Pearson
Correlation 1 .877(**)
Sig.(2-tailed) . .000
Sum of Squares
and Cross- 22.000 32.260
Products
Covariance .449 .658
N 50 50

Pearson
Correlation .877(**) 1
Sig.(2-tailed) .000 .
Sum of Squares
and Cross- 32.260 61.380
Products
Covariance .658 1.253
N 50 50
** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).

Inference

Since the Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed) the null
hypothesis that is “There is no significant relationship between interpersonal
relationship in the organization and extent of motivation.” is rejected and an
alternative hypothesis is framed.

H1: There is significant relationship between interpersonal relationship in the


organization and extent of motivation.

CHAPTER-4

4.1 FINDINGS
The findings of the study are follows:
 There is a harmonious relationship is exist in the organization between
Employees and management.
 The employees are really motivated by the management.
 The employees are satisfied with the present incentive plan of the
company Most of the workers agreed that the company is eager in
recognizing and acknowledging their work.
 The study reveals that there is a good relationship exists among
employees.
 Majority of the employees agreed that there job security to their present
job.
 The company is providing good safety measures for ensuring the
employees safety.
 From the study it is clear that most of employees agrees to the fact that
Performance appraisal activities and support from the coworkers in helpful
To get motivated.
 The study reveals that increase in the salary will motivates the employees
more.
 The incentives and other benefits will influence the performance of the
employees.

4.2 SUGGESTIONS

 Most of the employees agree that the performance appraisal activities are
helpful to get motivated, so the company should try to improve
performance appraisal system, so that they can improve their
performance.
 Non financial incentive plans should also be implemented; it can improve
the productivity level of the employees.
 Organization should give importance to communication between
employees and gain co-ordination through it.
 Skills of the employees should be appreciated.
 Better carrier development opportunities should be given to the employees
for their improvement.
 If the centralized system of management is changed to a decentralized
one, then there would be active and committed participation of staff for the
success of the organization.

4.3 CONCLUSION

The paper reviews the theories of employee motivation which include


theories by Sigmund Freud, Douglas McGregor and Abraham Maslow. Sigmund
theory of employee motivation was based on the assumption that workers must
be coerced to work, the theory by Douglas McGregor states that the workers are
ready to learn and therefore there must be organizational learning that will
motivate workers and finally Abraham Maslow introduced the hierarchy of need
that every organization should be aware of and which may be important in the
determination of the level of motivation in any organization.

CHAPTTER-5

5.1BIBLIOGRAPHY
 Maslow, A. H. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological
Review, July 1943. 370-396.
 Smith, G. P. (1994). Motivation. In W. Tracey (ed.), Human resources
management and development handbook (2nd ed.).
 Kovach, K. A. (1987). What motivates employees? Workers and
supervisors give different answers. Business Horizons, 30. 58-65.
 Skinner, B. F. (1953). Science and Human Behavior. New York: Free
Press.
 Vroom, V. H. (1964). Work and motivation. New York: Wiley.

Website:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/13317890/A-Project-on-Employee-Motivation-
by-Shahid-Kv-chavakkad

http://www.joe.org/joe/1998june/rb3.php

http://uir.unisa.ac.za/bitstream/handle/10500/3166/2008%20MBL
%203%20Research%20Report%20M
%20Perumal.pdf;jsessionid=8209E62FE4547C527C5D290377418489?
sequence=1

http://www.scribd.com/doc/48513110/Employee-Motivation

http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/Purna62-152009-employee-
motivation-product-training-manuals-ppt-powerpoint/