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Karen Kenney-Lassiter

Laura Fite

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Karen Kenney-Lassiter
Laura Fite

Structural Engineering

Whether you live in a large urban area or a rural area, structures such as buildings,

bridges, dams, towers, tunnels, stadiums, roller coasters, and monuments are probably parts of

your environment. It is a structural engineer who is responsible for the safety of these structures.

The Council of American Structural Engineers (CASE) defines a structural engineer as, “An

engineer with specialized knowledge, training, and experience in the sciences and mathematics

relating to analyzing and designing force-resisting systems for buildings and other structures” (as

cited in National Institute of Building Sciences, 2010). According to the Princeton Review

(2008), the main duty of a structural engineer is to design structures that meet their clients’ needs

while insuring public safety by adhering to all standards and building codes. Specifically, “a

structural engineer analyzes and designs the gravity support and lateral force resistance of

buildings, bridges and other structures” (Structural Engineers Association of Northern California,

2003). To become a structural engineer, one would have to have a bachelor’s degree in structural

engineering or civil engineering with an emphasis on structures, or architectural engineering.

Many have a master’s degree or a PhD. Structural Engineers must gain experience under a

mentor and then seek a professional license (Princeton Review, 2008).

One branch of structural engineering is earthquake engineering. Earthquake engineers

are concerned with “reducing earthquake or seismic risk to structures” (Scawthorn, 2007).

Buildings are normally designed so that if an earthquake occurs, it is assumed that there will be

damage to the building, but that the building will not collapse. Building collapse is not only the

primary cause of the loss of human life, but also causes loss of equipment, contents of the

building, loss of business due to interruption and damage to water, gas, power, and

communication lines (Scawthorn, 2007). The job of an earthquake engineer is to design in order

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to limit these losses. Although we cannot prevent earthquakes, we can try to limit the destruction.

Making sure that buildings do not collapse in an earthquake is one way to lessen the destruction.

Buildings should be built so that they do not sink or topple over and must be able to sway from

side to side (Rogers, p.26). There are several processes that earthquake engineers take part in to

limit the losses that could occur if a building collapses. According to Scawthorn (2007, para.1),

these processes include: “seismic hazard identification; structural analysis, design, and/or

retrofitting to prevent structural collapse and reduce property damage; and review of equipment

and operations to prevent disruption due to earthquakes.”

In more developed countries, existing buildings are at the greatest risk during

earthquakes, so the focus of earthquake engineers is on the identification analysis and reduction

of this risk. Newer construction is safer, but especially large or unusual structures are of most

interest to earthquake engineers. In underdeveloped countries, lack of building codes and

enforcement is a significant contributor for seismic risk (Scawthorn, 2007). Structural engineers,

especially those with expertise in earthquake engineering, are important to improving new

construction and existing structures in earthquake prone areas.

An understanding of earthquakes is important to designing structures that can better

withstand them. Earth has four layers: the inner core, the outer core, the mantle, and the crust.

“The crust and the top of the mantle make up a thin skin on the surface of our planet” (Wicker,

2010). This top layer is composed of plates. Simply put, earthquakes are a release of energy built

up by the stress of the earth’s plates moving past each other. The earth has about 20 plates that

are constantly moving. A fault is an area where these plates slide past one another. “The plates

are all moving in different directions and at different speeds. Sometimes the plates crash

together, pull apart or sideswipe each other” (Wicker, 2010). These plates are rigid, and while

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the plate is moving, a part of it is stuck on another plate remaining stationary. “When the plate

has moved far enough, the edges unstick on one of the faults and there is an earthquake”(USGS,

2009). The force of this friction causes the earthquake when it releases the stored up energy.

These seismic waves are released, resulting in everything shaking (USGS, 2009). On the surface

this is the epicenter, the point above ground where the hypocenter is located (the origin of the

earthquake). A seismograph is instrument that has a base set in the ground and a free hanging

weight and measures the magnitude of the earthquake (USGS, 2009). During an earthquake, the

instrument base moves, but the heavy weight does not. It records data scientist interpret into a

magnitude number for the earthquake using the Richter scale. The Richter scale assigns a

number between 0-9 measuring the earthquakes strength (Olien, 2002). A magnitude of three is

usually not newsworthy, but a magnitude of seven can cause serious damage (Walker, 2008).

Also to consider is the depth of the earthquake. If the earthquake is shallow there will be more

damage to structures. The main effects of earthquakes are shaking and ground rupture. Ground

rupture has been noted with the displacement of the earth along the fault: this causes risks for

engineering structures (Wikipedia, 2011). Disease, lack of life’s basic necessities, higher

insurance premiums, general property damage, road and bridge damage, collapse and

destabilization of buildings, not to mention the loss of human life, are some of the many

consequences of earthquakes (Wikipedia, 2011).

To help ensure future safety of human life during an earthquake, earthquake engineers

deal with the effects of earthquakes on structures. Part of this process is to assess the earthquake

risk in a region and to design structures to withstand future earthquakes (Wikipedia, 2011). This

process is not limited to designing structures to withstand moderate earthquakes, but also to

withstand strong ones without collapsing. Earthquake engineers contribute to the durability of

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structures taking into account “distribution of weight, variation in shape, variation in height, and

variation in foundation material” (Latham, n.d. para. 3). Construction codes in more developed

countries have taken this into account in their building guidelines, but most destruction in recent

years has been in poorly developed countries with nonexistent building codes. For example,

comparing the devastating earthquake in Haiti, 2010 resulted in thousands of more deaths than

the Chile earthquake several months later. “The reasons are simple. Chile is wealthier and

infinitely better prepared, with strict building codes, robust emergency response and a long

history of handling seismic catastrophes” (Bajak, 2010, para. 3). “In terms of energy released at

the epicenter, the Chilean earthquake was 501 times stronger” (Bajak, 2010, para. 3) The earth’s

surface materials also have to be taken into account. Chile has a more stable rock base, while

Haiti’s surface is more granular, causing soil liquefaction during an earthquake. According to

Professor Miranda, a Stanford University earthquake engineer, “Even though Haitians are very

poor, they can build much better structures with the same materials they’ve used before, if only

they do it with better information-learning, for instance, how to tie structural elements together

more effectively” (Orenstein, n.d., para. 6).

The deaths incurred during an earthquake are not a direct result of the natural

phenomenon, but occur during the collapse of structures. Structural engineers are vital in

lowering the lives lost during future earthquakes. Past experiences with building collapse can

improve the future of structural engineering in earthquake prone areas.

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Bajak, F. (2010, February 27). Chile-Haiti earthquake comparison: Chile was more prepared.

The Huffington Post. Retrieved January 13, 2011, from


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/27/chile-haiti-earthquake-co_n_479705.html

Earthquake. (2011, January 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved January 13,

2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake

Latham, T. (n.d.) Construction earthquake-proof buildings. Discovery Education Lesson


Plan Library. Retrieved January 9, 2011 from
http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/constructing -earthquake-
proof-buildings.cfm

Olien, B. (2002). The changing earth. Mankato, MN: Capstone Press.

Orenstein, D. (n.d.). Professor Miranda returns from Haiti and Chile resolved to improve
earthquake construction education. Retrieved January 9, 2011, from Stanford University,
The John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center Web site:
https://blume.stanford.edu/news/professor-miranda-returns-haiti-and-chile-resolved-
improve-

earthquake-construction-education.

Princeton Review, Inc. (2008). Structural engineer. Retrieved January 9, 2011, from
http://www.princetonreview.com/Careers.aspx?cid=322

Rogers, D. (1999). Earthquakes. New York, NY: Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers.

Scawthorn, C. (2008). Earthquake engineering. AccessScience. McGraw-Hill Companies.


Retrieved January 9, 2011, from
http://www.accessscience.com/popup.aspx?id=800400&name=print

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Schmidt, J. A. (2010, May). Structural engineering. Retrieved January 9, 2011 from National
Institute of Building Sciences Website: http://www.wbdg.org/design/dd_structeng.php

Structural Engineers Association of Northern California. (2003). What is structural engineering.


Retrieved January 9, 2011, from http://www.seaonc.org/public/what/what_is.asp

Wald, L. (2009, October 17). The science of earthquakes. U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved
January 8, 2011, from http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/kids/eqscience.php

Walker, S. M. (2008). Earthquakes. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications Company.

Wicker, C. (2010). Earthquakes. Retrieved January 9, 2011, from


http://www.weatherwizkids.com/weather-earthquake.httm

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What is odyssey?

All of life is a journey lined with experiences that impact our actions and our choices.

Sometimes during this adventure, our ride is smooth sailing with occasional bumps. Experiences,

challenges, and changes all lead to a different perspective, and at times, a completely different

outlook on life. Through this daily wandering we learn and grow along the way both personally

and professionally. By having diverse offerings we get to try new things and expand our outlook.

Having these opportunities is the odyssey of life. We can grow, improve and make a difference

based on our experiences.

How is the concept of odyssey depicted by your subtopic?

The concept of odyssey is depicted by structural engineering through two different

perspectives. In the past few years there have been devastating earthquakes taking many lives,

especially those in Haiti. To watch the news during this time, one feels helpless in knowing how

to help our neighbors. Structural engineers can improve this odyssey into the future for those

living in earthquake prone areas. By looking at the history of the damage of structures resulting

from these natural disasters and designing new construction that is built with building codes

enforced, structural engineers can improve structures and create a better future for these people.

At the same time, school children today are so pushed to be able to master the basics, we do not

always have time to share and expand into their interest areas. To be successful in their journey

of the future in our global society, students need to be able to recognize problems and identify

solutions in their daily life and the world around them. Taking these two real world issues and

combining them into the unit, students will look at the hardships faced by our neighbors and

understand the cause for such devastation and how looking at past experiences can improve the

future. They will conclude and build upon the knowledge that simple changes in the building

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structures could have saved many lives. Students will have experiences designing, constructing

and testing their ability to use their new knowledge to build a structure to withstand a simulated

earthquake on a shake table. They will be given the opportunity to reflect, refine and retest as

they bolster their problem solving skills.

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Unit title and description:

Shake and Quake….But, Will it Break?

Why don’t all the tall buildings fall during an earthquake? Earthquakes occur all over the world but their
effects are not always the same. Begin to understand the engineering challenges of building earthquake
resistant buildings as you enter the construction zone and become an earthquake engineer for a week.
Try your hand at building a virtual model and a concrete model that will withstand the shaking and
quaking of an earthquake. Will your model survive the shake table?

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Content Outline

Shake and quake……But will it break?

Karen Kenney-Lassiter & Laura Fite

I. Earthquakes
A. Earth’s Surface Layer
1. The crust is the outermost layer of the earth.
2. The crust is made up of tectonic plates.

B. Changes in Crust
1. Tectonic Plates
a. Plates are constantly moving.
b. Faults occur when the plates scrape, collide, spread or move past each
other
c. Parts of rigid plates may get stuck, remaining stationary.
2. Releasing Stored Energy
a. Over time, the force of friction causes energy release when the edges
unstuck.
b. Seismic waves are released.
i. Primary waves or P waves are the initial shock wave and fastest
moving.
ii. Secondary waves or S waves move the ground up and down or
back and forth
iii. Surface waves produce a rolling sensation and cause the most
damage.

C. Measuring Earthquakes
1. Seismograph measure magnitude
2. Richter scale assigns a number between 0 and 9 measuring strength.

D. Effects of Earthquakes
1. Structural Damage
a. Buildings
b. Bridges
c. Homes

2. Repercussion Effects
a. Aftershocks
b. Tsunamis
c. Landslides

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3. Human Losses
a. Life
b. Dwellings
c. Jobs
d. Food and Water
e. Communication

II. Engineering
A. Structural Engineering
1. Structural engineers are responsible for the safety of structures while meeting
client’s needs.
2. Structural engineers are specially trained to analyze and design force resistant
systems.
B. Earthquake Engineers
1. Earthquake engineering is a branch of structural engineering.
2. Earthquake engineering is the application of earthquake science and past
earthquake experiences to the design of new and existing buildings.
3. The main focus of an earthquake engineer is to reduce seismic risk to
structures.
4. Earthquake engineers use several processes to prevent building collapse.
i. Seismic hazard identification
ii. Structural analysis and design and or retrofitting
iii. Review of equipment and operations to prevent disruption due to
earthquakes.

III. Designing for Earthquakes

A. Causes of the Most Devastation


1. Poor building quality
a. Lack of building codes
b. High poverty
i. Haiti, an underdeveloped country lost 220,000 lives in the 2010
magnitude 7.8 earthquake
ii. Chili, a wealthy country lost around 400 lives in the 2010 8.7
magnitude earthquake.
c. Tsunami
i. March 11, 2011 a 23 foot tsunami occurred after an 8.9 magnitude
earthquake offshore near Japan.
ii. Recent Japan earthquake did not cause extreme devastation, but
14,133 lives were lost and 13,000 missing due to the tsunami that
resulted afterwards.

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2. Building Collapse
a. Building collapse is the primary cause of loss of human life.
b. Buildings should sway from side to side; not sink or topple.
c. Structures collapse when they are not designed for the earth’s surface
material.

B. Earthquake Engineers and Improving the Future


1. Earthquake engineers can incorporate features into modern structures to help
withstand earthquakes.
a. Distribution of weight
b. Variation in shape
c. Variation in height
d. Variation in materials
i. Use of flexible building materials
ii. Use of proper foundation materials
iii. Use of proper support systems
2. Engineers follow rules called codes.
a. Accessibility codes
b. Fire and safety codes
c. Hazard codes
3. Earthquake engineers use cost effective designs, especially in high
poverty areas.

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Shake and Quake… But will it Break? Technology Infused Paper

Our unit will focus on engineering as it relates to earthquakes. There have been many

devastating earthquakes in the world; ones that have destroyed cities and human lives. In places

with the most destruction, faulty construction and lack of building codes were the main causes of

building collapse. Earthquake engineers can improve the future by building new structures and

modifying existing structures to decrease the devastation. Students will learn the causes and

effects of earthquakes and discover how safer structures can be built by creating their own

models. The use of technology will be incorporated into our unit by using Smartboards, an on-

line earthquake simulator, an ITunesU video, PowerPoint, Flip cameras, Movie Maker, and

Skype.

Our week will begin with campers learning the causes and effects of earthquakes. A

PowerPoint of earthquake pictures from Chile and Haiti will be viewed as well as an ITunesU

video. Campers will view the video and other websites to become an “expert” on the 2010

earthquake in either Chile or Haiti. To demonstrate their knowledge, they will sort various

photographs of the earthquakes in Haiti and Chile. Using an online storyboarding template,

campers will begin to plan a public service announcement that will be sent to the Haiti Recovery

Group (www.haitirecoverygroup.com) at the conclusion of camp. After a short demonstration

on the use of Flip cameras, initial work on our public service announcement will begin by using

Flip cameras and sharing learned information about the devastation of earthquakes. Teachers will

then show students how to upload videos to prepare for the process of editing their public service

announcement on Movie Maker.

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After the campers have gained knowledge of earthquakes they will become familiar with

the process of earthquake engineering design. To become informed about the properties of

building materials and the role they play in real life seismic events, campers will experiment with

various materials with a partner to understand how cost and availability, flexibility, and strength

influence the choice of materials used in building construction. Each pair will have a different

type of material and directions to make a structure that will hold the weight of a tennis ball. The

following day, students will interact with an online earthquake simulator that can be found at

http://128.205.141.53:8080/app/EQ_13.html to solve problems and make informed decisions

about proper building supports.

Using the information acquired during the first few lessons, campers will design a model

of a building using different lengths of dowels and pegboards, a list of requirements, and a

budget. They will test their building on a shake table. Campers will continue to tape their daily

challenges on a Flip camera. They will use these videos for two purposes. First, campers will

construct a short video and a list of questions to share with a specialist to expand on their notion

of engineering design. We are currently searching for an expert who would be willing to view

and respond to campers each day. The second purpose for videotaping is our culminating

product of a public service announcement. This public service announcement will be our

campers’ technology product they will create using Movie Maker. They will share their public

service announcement with an organization in Haiti called the Haiti Relief Group to impart their

knowledge of the importance of building codes and safe structures in earthquake prone areas.

To conclude each session and give campers an opportunity to reflect, they will respond to

a question by posting their reflection or answer on the “Under Construction” board. These

responses will be shared with parents at Open House. We are hoping to provide campers with the

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opportunity to speak live via Skype to an earthquake engineer who has firsthand experience with

the destruction of earthquakes in low poverty areas.

Through the use of technology, campers will be engaged in more rigorous activities while

enjoying their odyssey of learning.

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SHAKE AND QUAKE…BUT WILL IT BREAK?

LESSON 1

WHY SO MUCH DAMAGE?

I. DEFINE THE CONTENT


LESSON OBJECTIVE:
AFTER WATCHING ITUNESU VIDEO, STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE THEIR UNDERSTANDING OF TERMINOLOGY BY CONSTRUCTING
DEFINITIONS AND SHARING AT LEAST THREE WITH THE CLASS.

USING INFORMATION FROM VIDEO AND WEBSITE RESOURCES, STUDENTS WILL ANSWER 6 QUESTIONS CORRECTLY ABOUT A SPECIFIC
EARTHQUAKE.

STUDENTS WILL DISCOVER PATTERNS IN TWO SIMILAR EARTHQUAKES AND UNDERSTAND THE CORRELATION BETWEEN POVERTY AND
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TO THE DEVASTATION IN EACH AREA AS DEMONSTRATED BY CORRECTLY SORTING 19 OUT OF 23 EARTHQUAKE
PICTURES.

STUDENTS WILL DRAW CONCLUSIONS ABOUT THE REASONS WHY SOME EARTHQUAKES ARE MORE DEVASTATING THAN OTHERS BY STATING
THREE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE 2010 EARTHQUAKES IN CHILE AND HAITI ON THEIR PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT.

STUDENTS WILL WORK AS A TEAM TO USE A STORYBOARDING TEMPLATE TO OUTLINE EACH DAY’S PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
REQUIREMENT.

LESSON POINT TO PONDER: (REMEMBER THIS IS A STATEMENT THAT SHOULD ELICIT CONVERSATION, THINKING AND DEBATE. THIS IS
NOT A QUESTION.)

EARTHQUAKES CAN BE PREDICTED.

A POWERFUL EARTHQUAKE WILL ALWAYS CAUSE MASSIVE DESTRUCTION AND LOSS OF LIFE.

II. PREPLANNING: BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND


A. WHAT 3 ITEMS ARE WORTH
KNOWING? AFTER THE LESSON,
(THINK ABOUT THE CONTENT YOU HAVE STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT AN EARTHQUAKE IS THE SHAKING, ROLLING, OR SUDDEN SHOCK OF
SELECTED. WHAT IS IMPORTANT FOR THE EARTH’S SURFACE RELEASING STRESS CAUSED BY FORCE FROM THE PLATES PUSHING
STUDENTS TO KNOW?) AGAINST EACH OTHER.

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STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT MOST INJURIES AND CASUALTIES DURING EARTHQUAKES ARE DUE
TO COLLAPSING STRUCTURES.

STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT THE AMOUNT OF DEVASTATION AND HUMAN LIFE DEPENDS UPON
THE SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AND THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS.

AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO REPRESENT THROUGH WORDS OR VISUAL DEPICTIONS THEIR
UNDERSTANDING OF GIVEN TERMINOLOGY BY CONTRIBUTING TO THE CLASS RESOURCE BOARD.
B. WHAT 3 ITEMS ARE IMPORTANT FOR
STUDENTS TO BE ABLE TO DO? STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO COMPILE INFORMATION WITH CLASSMATES AND DRAW THEIR
(DEFINE WHAT STUDENTS SHOULD BE OWN CONCLUSIONS ABOUT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AND
ABLE TO DO AS A RESULT OF YOUR STRUCTURE OF BUILDINGS AS IT RELATES TO DEVASTATION AND LOSS OF HUMAN LIFE.
LESSON.)

STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO CORRECTLY SORT PICTURES OF THE 2010 EARTHQUAKES IN


HAITI AND CHILE USING THEIR NEWLY ACQUIRED KNOWLEDGE OF THE SIMILARITIES AND
DIFFERENCES IN BOTH EARTHQUAKES AND THE REASONS BEHIND THOSE.

AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT THE EARTHQUAKES HAVING THE MOST DEVASTATION AND
LOSS OF HUMAN LIFE OCCURRED IN POVERTY STRICKEN AREAS WITH POOR BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION.

C. WHAT ARE THE ENDURING


UNDERSTANDINGS THAT STUDENTS STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT THROUGH THOUGHTFUL PLAN AND DESIGN IT IS POSSIBLE
SHOULD TAKE AWAY FROM THE TO CREATE STRUCTURES THAT ARE BETTER ABLE TO WITHSTAND EARTHQUAKES.
LESSON? (DEFINE THE BIG IDEAS.)

STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT THE STRUCTURE AND DESIGN OF BUILDINGS, THE CREATION
AND ENFORCEMENT OF BUILDING CODES, AS WELL AS THE MATERIALS USED CAN GREATLY
REDUCE THE AMOUNT OF EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE.

III. PLANNING
D. ESSENTIAL QUESTION: HOW CAN THE DEVASTATION OF THE PAST HELP US, AS A SOCIETY, PREPARE POPULATIONS IN
(ONE OVERARCHING LESSON QUESTION EARTHQUAKE PRONE AREAS FOR THEIR JOURNEY INTO A SAFER FUTURE?
)
E. ASSESSMENT: THE STUDENTS WILL PRESENT FACTUAL INFORMATION BY DISPLAYING VOCABULARY ON THE

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(PERFORMANCE TASK) WHAT WILL RESOURCE BOARD.


THE STUDENTS DO TO SHOW YOU THAT
THEY MASTERED THE CONTENT? STUDENTS WILL CONTRIBUTE TO CLASS DISCUSSION BY SHARING INFORMATION ON A SPECIFIC
EARTHQUAKE.

STUDENTS WILL SORT PICTURES OF THE HAITI AND CHILE EARTHQUAKES INTO TWO CATEGORIES
BASED ON THEIR KNOWLEDGE OF SPECIFIC DESTRUCTION IN EACH COUNTRY.

STUDENTS WILL REPORT CORRECT INFORMATION ABOUT THE DEVASTATION OF EARTHQUAKES


TO BEGIN THEIR PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT.

AN EARTHQUAKE IS THE SHAKING, ROLLING, OR SUDDEN SHOCK OF THE EARTH’S SURFACE.

EARTHQUAKES RELEASE STRESS CAUSED BY THE FORCE OF FRICTION WHEN THE EDGES UNSTICK
RELEASING SEISMIC WAVES.

PLATE TECTONICS IS A GEOLOGICAL MODEL IN WHICH THE EARTH’S CRUST AND THE UPPERMOST
MANTLE ARE DIVIDED INTO A NUMBER OF SEGMENTS (PLATES).

PLATES ARE ALWAYS MOVING AND SOMETIMES GET STUCK.

A FAULT IS AN AREA OF STRESS IN THE EARTH WHERE BROKEN ROCKS SLIDE PAST EACH OTHER
CAUSING A CRACK IN THE EARTH’S SURFACE.

AN EPICENTER IS THE POINT ON THE EARTH’S SURFACE DIRECTLY ABOVE THE FOCUS OF AN
F. CONTENT
EARTHQUAKE.
LIST THE CONTENT FOR THIS LESSON
ONLY.
AFTERSHOCKS, TSUNAMIS, AND LANDSLIDES ARE REPERCUSSION EFFECTS OF EARTHQUAKES.
(OUTLINE THE CONTENT YOU WILL
TEACH TODAY-THIS MAY COME FROM
A SEISMOGRAPH IS AN INSTRUMENT USED FOR RECORDING THE INTENSITY AND DURATION OF
YOUR CONTENT OUTLINE)
AN EARTHQUAKE.

THE RICHTER SCALE IS A MEASUREMENT OF THE EARTHQUAKE’S INTENSITY.

THERE ARE THREE TYPES OF SEISMIC WAVES RELEASED.

PRIMARY OR P WAVES ARE THE INITIAL SHOCK WAVES AND FASTEST MOVING.

SECONDARY OR S WAVES MOVE THE GROUND UP AND DOWN AND BACK AND FORTH.

SURFACE WAVES PRODUCE A ROLLING SENSATION AND CAUSE THE MOST DAMAGE.

THE AMOUNT OF DEVASTATION AND LOSS OF HUMAN LIFE CAN DEPEND UPON THE DESIGN AND
CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS AND THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONDITION OF THE AREA.

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MOST INJURIES AND CASUALTIES DURING EARTHQUAKES ARE DUE TO COLLAPSING STRUCTURES.

HAITI SUFFERED AN EARTHQUAKE ON JANUARY 12, 2010, IN THE CAPITAL CITY OF PORT AU
PRINCE CAUSING COMPLETE DEVASTATION AND 220,000 LIVES LOST. THIS DEVASTATION WAS
ESSENTIALLY CAUSED BY POOR CONSTRUCTION DESIGN AND BUILDING MATERIALS ALONG WITH
THE LACK OF BUILDING CODES DUE TO THE HIGH POVERTY IN THIS AREA.

CHILE SUFFERED AND EARTHQUAKE ON FEBRUARY 27, 2010. ALTHOUGH THIS EARTHQUAKE
WAS 8.8 MAGNITUDE AND OCCURRED IN A POPULATED AREA, ONLY ABOUT 800 LIVES WERE
LOST. THIS EARTHQUAKE OCCURRED IN AN AREA THAT WAS ECONOMICALLY PROSPEROUS AND
HAD VERY STRICT BUILDING CODES AND HIGH QUALITY BUILDING STRUCTURES.

ON MARCH 11, 2011 A 23 FOOT TSUNAMI OCCURRED AFTER AN 8.9 MAGNITUDE


EARTHQUAKE OFFSHORE NEAR JAPAN. RECENT JAPAN EARTHQUAKE DID NOT CAUSE EXTREME
DEVASTATION, BUT 14,133 LIVES WERE LOST AND 13,000 MISSING DUE TO THE TSUNAMI
THAT RESULTED AFTERWARDS.

AS STUDENTS ENTER THE ROOM, THEY WILL SEE A SIGN WELCOMING THEM TO THE
CONSTRUCTION ZONE. A POWERPOINT WILL BE PLAYING SHOWING BUILDINGS FROM THE HAITI
AND CHILE EARTHQUAKES. THEY WILL HAVE 10 MINUTES TO TRY THEIR HAND AT BEING A
G. HOOK:
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER. THEY WILL BE GIVEN THE TASK TO SEE WHO CAN BUILD A STRUCTURE
(DESCRIBE HOW YOU WILL GRAB
USING AS MANY CARDS FROM A DECK AS THEY WISH AND IN WHATEVER FORM THEY WANT
STUDENTS’ ATTENTION AT THE
USING ONLY THE CARDS.WE WILL INFORM STUDENTS THAT THE STRUCTURE MUST BE ABLE TO
BEGINNING OF THE LESSON. BE
WITHSTAND A TABLE SHAKE BY THE TEACHERS. STUDENTS WILL BE QUESTIONED ABOUT WHAT
CREATIVE.)
THEY COULD HAVE DONE TO MAKE THEIR STRUCTURE STRONGER TO STAND UP TO THE SHAKING
OF THE TABLE.

AS STUDENTS ENTER THE “CONSTRUCTION ZONE”, TEACHERS WILL GREET THEM, INTRODUCE
THEMSELVES AND ENCOURAGE THEM TO TRY THEIR HAND AT STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING BY
DIRECTING THEM TO A STATION WHERE A CONSTRUCTION PROJECT WILL BE SET UP. THERE WILL
BE A DECK OF CARDS PER STUDENTS. STUDENTS WILL BE INSTRUCTED TO BUILD A STRUCTURE
USING AS MANY CARDS AND IN WHATEVER FORM THEY CHOOSE. STUDENTS WILL BE INFORMED
THAT AFTER 5 MINUTES, THE TEACHERS WILL COME BY AND SHAKE THE TABLE. STUDENTS WILL
COMMENT ON THEIR OBSERVATION OF FACTORS THEY FELT CONTRIBUTED TO STRENGTH.
TEACHERS WILL THEN EXPLAIN TO STUDENTS THAT ENGINEERING IS A PROCESS THAT INVOLVES
H. INSTRUCTION: MODELING AND DEVELOPING SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS AND THAT WE WILL BE FOCUSING ON

(TELL, STEP-BY-STEP, WHAT YOU WILL THE PROCESS THAT ENGINEERS USE TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND SAFETY OF BUILDINGS

DO.) THROUGH DESIGN. WE WILL ALSO EXPLAIN THAT WE WILL BE LOOKING AT TWO SIMILAR
STRENGTH EARTHQUAKES TO DETERMINE THE FACTORS RELATING TO THE DEVASTATION AND
WHAT COULD BE DONE TO ENSURE LESS DEVASTATION IN THE FUTURE. WE WILL PRESENT THE
WORD ODYSSEY AS IT RELATES TO A JOURNEY INTO A SAFER FUTURE FOR PEOPLE LIVING IN
EARTHQUAKE PRONE AREAS.

TEACHERS WILL TELL STUDENTS THAT FIRST WE NEED AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE CAUSES OF
EARTHQUAKES AND THE TERMINOLOGY THAT IS PERTINENT. STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN THREE
NOTE CARDS WITH A VOCABULARY WORD ON EACH AS WELL AS A RECORDING SHEET WITH

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QUESTIONS RELEVANT TO A SPECIFIC EARTHQUAKE. AN ITUNESU (CU UNIVERSITY EPISODE


#13 EARTHQUAKES—LINK PROVIDED ON DVD). VIDEO ON EARTHQUAKES WILL BE PLAYED
AND USING THEIR NOTE CARDS AND RECORDING SHEETS, STUDENTS WILL HAVE TO PROCESS,
REFINE, EXTRAPOLATE, AND INTERPRET WHICH INFORMATION IN THE VIDEO IS NECESSARY TO
COMPLETE THEIR RESEARCH.

FOLLOWING THE VIDEO, STUDENTS WILL SHARE THEIR VOCABULARY TERM WITH THE CLASS AND
PLACE IT ON THE RESOURCE BOARD. DURING CLASS DISCUSSION, TEACHERS WILL CHECK FOR
UNDERSTANDING AND GIVE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION THROUGH LECTURE AND VISUAL
MODELS.

AFTER DISCUSSION OF THE EARTHQUAKE FACTS AND TERMINOLOGY, STUDENTS WILL DISPERSE
INTO GROUPS BASED ON THEIR SPECIFIC EARTHQUAKE THEY RECORDED INFORMATION ABOUT.
THEY WILL DISCUSS ANSWERS TO THE QUESTIONS THEY WERE GIVEN AND WILL BE PROVIDED
WITH A LIST OF WEBSITES TO FURTHER INVESTIGATE IF THEY HAVE UNANSWERED QUESTIONS.
WHEN FINISHED, THEY WILL BE GIVEN MATERIALS TO MAKE A VISUAL DISPLAY TO SHARE
INFORMATION WITH THE OTHER GROUP.

TEACHERS WILL DISTRIBUTE PICTURES OF EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE TO BUILDINGS IN BOTH CHILE


AND HAITI AND STUDENTS WILL USE THEIR ACQUIRED KNOWLEDGE TO SORT PICTURES. CLASS
DISCUSSION WILL FOLLOW.

TO CONCLUDE, STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN A TASK OF COMPLETING A PUBLIC SERVICE


ANNOUNCEMENT ABOUT IMPROVING THE SAFETY OF BUILDINGS IN HIGH POVERTY AREAS. WE
WILL OUTLINE THE WEEK’S LESSONS AND COMPLETE A DIGITAL STORYBOARDING TEMPLATE FOR
EACH DAY USING SMARTBOARD. STUDENTS WILL DECIDE HOW TO COMPLETE THIS PROCESS.
TODAY STUDENTS WILL BEGIN THIS PROJECT BY REPORTING CORRECT INFORMATION ABOUT THE
DEVASTATION OF EARTHQUAKES USING A FLIP CAM. THEY WILL DISCUSS THE DIFFERENCES IN
HIGH POVERTY AREAS COMPARED TO AREAS WITH HIGHER SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS.

FINALLY, STUDENTS WILL BE ASKED TO WRITE THEIR THOUGHTS ON A POST-IT NOTE ABOUT
HOW A STRUCTURAL ENGINEER CAN CHANGE THE FUTURE FOR THE PEOPLE IN HIGH POVERTY,
EARTHQUAKE PRONE AREAS. AS THEY LEAVE THEY WILL PLACE THEIR NOTE ON THE “UNDER
CONSTRUCTION” BOARD. THIS BOARD WILL BE USED FOR IDEAS THAT ARE UNDER
CONSTRUCTION OR STILL FORMING.

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I’m an Expert Recording Sheet


Earthquake to research: Haiti, January 12, 2010

What was the specific location of your earthquake?

What was the magnitude?

Describe the people in terms of population and socio-economic status:

Describe the type of buildings:

Describe how communities and the people were affected:

How many human lives were lost?

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Websites for Information on Haiti Earthquake

http://articles.cnn.com/2010-01-
13/world/haiti.construction_1_building-code-haiti-
earthquake?_s=PM:WORLD

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8460042.stm

http://hubpages.com/hub/Haiti-Earthquake-Facts

http://www.dec.org.uk/item/425http://theweek.com/article/index/10
5201/haiti-disaster-the-essential-facts

http://theweek.com/article/index/105201/haiti-disaster-the-essential-
facts

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Global-News/2010/0302/Chile-
earthquake-facts-Chile-vs.-Haiti-in-
numbershttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/28/chile-haiti-
earthquake-2010-comparison_n_480153.html

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Haiti Answers/I’m an Expert


Earthquake to research: Haiti, January 12, 2010

Please research the following information and log your answers in your
notebook. Be ready to share your findings.

Specific location of your earthquake: Epicenter 16 miles from Port Au


Prince

What was the magnitude? 7.0

Describe the people in terms of population and socio-economic status.

Port au Prince population 2,000,000, Poorest country in western


hemisphere, lowest life expectancy, 80% of people living below poverty
line, only ½ of people had access to tapwater,86% living in slum
conditions, 70% living on less than $2 a day, ½ cannot read or write

Describe the type of buildings. Urban, multi-level buildings, shoddy


construction, many made with homemade brick or construction blocks

Describe how communities were affected. No water, power, not


enough doctors, 19 million cubic meters of debris, looters, landmarks
destroyed, home and businesses destroyed

Number of deaths: 220,000

Describe the effects on the people living there, 2 million homeless, 3


million in need of emergency aid, ½ million living in camps, 5,000
schools damaged or destroyed

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I’m an Expert Recording Sheet


Earthquake to research: Chile, February 27, 2010

What was the specific location of your earthquake?

What was the magnitude?

Describe the people in terms of population and socio-economic status:

Describe the type of buildings:

Describe how communities and people were affected:

How many human lives were lost?

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Websites for Information Chile Earthquake

http://mceer.buffalo.edu/infoservice/disasters/Chile-Earthquake-
2010.asp#1

http://www.about-knowledge.com/chile-earthquake-facts/

http://geography.about.com/od/chilemaps/a/concepcionchile.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concepci%C3%B3n,_Chilehtm

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/world/americas/28chile.html?
_r=1

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Global-News/2010/0302/Chile-
earthquake-facts-Chile-vs.-Haiti-in-
numbershttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/28/chile-haiti-
earthquake-2010-comparison_n_480153.html

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Chile Answers/I’m an Expert


Earthquake to research: Chile, February 27, 2010

Specific location of your earthquake: Epicenter 70 miles from


Concepcion

What was the magnitude? 8.8

Describe the people in terms of population and socio-economic status:

Concepcion is 2nd largest urban area, population of region is 889,725,


population of city alone is 212,000, one of the richest counties in the
hemisphere, 18.2 % below poverty line, annual income is $14,700,
educational center, and economy based on manufacturing and has
several trading centers

Describe the type of buildings: urban, multi-level buildings

Describe how communities were affected: Homes damaged, crumbling


wall allowed prisoners to escape, transportation slowed or halted
tsunami caused further damage

Number of deaths: 700+

Describe the effects on the people living there: 1.5 million displaced,
telephone and power wires down, widespread lawlessness (looting)

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Digital Storyboarding Template:

http://users.altec.org/~scherrer/digi_dif/storyboard.htm

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Day 1 Vocabulary Cards

mantle fault primary secondary


waves waves
(P waves) (S waves)

magnitude seismograph Richter scale aftershock

ground tectonic
tsunami epicenter rupture plates

Earth’s crust inner core outer core

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Earthquake
The shaking, rolling, or sudden shock of
the earth’s surface.

Plate Tectonics
A geological model in which the Earth’s crust and
the uppermost mantle are divided into a number
of segments (plates).

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Plates
Always moving and sometimes get
stuck.

Epicenter
The point on the Earth’s surface directly
above the focus of an earthquake.

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Fault
An area of stress in the Earth where broken rocks slide
past each other causing a crack in the Earth’s surface.

Seismograph
An instrument used for recording the
intensity and duration of an earthquake.

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Richter Scale
A measurement of the earthquakes
intensity.

Primary waves
P waves are the initial shock waves and
fastest moving.

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Secondary Waves
S Waves move the ground up and down
and back and forth.

Surface Waves
Produce a rolling sensation and cause
the most damage.

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Images Provided by:


• http://www.arthursclipart.org/nature/nature/page_
01.htm
• http://stjschools.org/ndavis/sciencelink2.html
• http://www.zrobtosam.com/PulsPol/Puls3/index.php
?sekcja=4&arty_id=6431
• http://www.internationalrivers.org/en/sichuan-
earthquake-epicenter
• http://classroomclipart.com/cgi-
bin/kids/imageFolio.cgi?direct=Science/Earth_Scienc
e/Earthquakes

•http://www.arthursclipart.org/machines/machines/p
age_02.htm
•http://www.setileague.org/iaaseti/smiscale.htm

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/kids/eqscience.php

•http://www.scarborough.k12.me.us/wis/teachers/dt
ewhey/webquest/nature/images/Earthquake_surface
_waves.gif

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SHAKE AND QUAKE … BUT WILL IT BREAK?

LESSON 2

MAKING IT SAFE!!

I. DEFINE THE CONTENT


LESSON OBJECTIVE:
THROUGH EXPLORATION OF MATERIALS, STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THE TRADE OFFS OF AVAILABILITY AND COST ALONG
WITH PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS AND HOW THEY IMPACT CHOICES OF DESIGN BY CORRECTLY MAKING THREE STATEMENTS
IN THEIR PSA AS TO THE BEST CHOICES OF MATERIALS.

AFTER PRESENTATION BY BUILDING INSPECTOR, STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF BUILDING CODES BY
LISTING TWO REASONS IN THEIR PSA AS TO THE NEED FOR BUILDING CODES IN HIGH POVERTY AREAS.

THROUGH USE OF COMMON OBJECTS STUDENTS WILL GRASP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS AS
DEMONSTRATED BY CORRECTLY MATCHING DEFINITIONS AND TERMS.

LESSON POINT TO PONDER: (REMEMBER THIS IS A STATEMENT THAT SHOULD ELICIT CONVERSATION, THINKING AND DEBATE. THIS IS
NOT A QUESTION.)

IT IS TOO EXPENSIVE TO DESIGN A BUILDING THAT WILL SURVIVE ANY EARTHQUAKE.

II. PREPLANNING: BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND

AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT DIFFERENT MATERIALS HAVE DIFFERENT PROPERTIES.
A. WHAT 3 ITEMS ARE WORTH
KNOWING?
STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS CAN VARY MATERIALS TO IMPROVE THE
(THINK ABOUT THE CONTENT YOU
CHANCES OF WITHSTANDING AN EARTHQUAKE.
HAVE SELECTED. WHAT IS IMPORTANT
FOR STUDENTS TO KNOW?)
STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT ENGINEERS MUST FOLLOW A SET OF RULES CALLED BUILDING
CODES.

B. WHAT 3 ITEMS ARE IMPORTANT


FOR STUDENTS TO BE ABLE TO DO? AFTER THE LESSON,
(DEFINE WHAT STUDENTS SHOULD BE STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO STATE THE PURPOSES OF BUILDING CODES.

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ABLE TO DO AS A RESULT OF YOUR


LESSON.) STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO BUILD A STRUCTURE AND REVISE TO IMPROVE IT.

STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO JUSTIFY THE PROBLEMS AND BENEFITS OF DIFFERENT MATERIALS.

AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS USE CERTAIN MATERIALS FOR THE
REASONS OF COST AND AVAILABILITY, FLEXIBILITY, STRENGTH AND RIGIDITY.
C. WHAT ARE THE ENDURING
UNDERSTANDINGS THAT STUDENTS
STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT THE IDEAL MATERIALS MAY BE EXPENSIVE AND NOT READILY
SHOULD TAKE AWAY FROM THE
AVAILABLE.
LESSON? (DEFINE THE BIG IDEAS.)

STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT MATERIALS NEED TO BE ABLE TO HOLD WEIGHT BUT NOT BE
SO RIGID AS TO BE UNABLE TO MOVE WITH SOME GROUND MOVEMENT.

III. PLANNING

D. ESSENTIAL QUESTION: WHAT ARE THE REASONS EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS USE CERTAIN BUILDING MATERIALS OVER
OTHERS?
(ONE OVERARCHING LESSON
QUESTION )

TEACHER OBSERVATION WILL BE USED DURING THE BUILDING AND TESTING OF THEIR
STRUCTURES FOR STRUCTURAL IMPROVEMENT.

E. ASSESSMENT:
STUDENTS WILL BE ASSESSED DURING GROUP DISCUSSION AND PSA PERFORMANCE ON THEIR
(PERFORMANCE TASK) WHAT WILL REASONING AS TO WHY SOME MATERIALS WERE BETTER THAN OTHERS.
THE STUDENTS DO TO SHOW YOU THAT
THEY MASTERED THE CONTENT?

REFLECTIONS ON THE “UNDER CONSTRUCTION” BOARD WILL BE CHECKED FOR UNDERSTANDING


AT THE CONCLUSION OF CLASS.

EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS CAN INCORPORATE FEATURES INTO MODERN STRUCTURES TO


HELP WITHSTAND EARTHQUAKES.
F. CONTENT
LIST THE CONTENT FOR THIS LESSON
THE FEATURES ARE DISTRIBUTION OF WEIGHT, VARIATION IN SHAPE, VARIATION IN
ONLY.
HEIGHT, AND VARIATION IN MATERIALS.
(OUTLINE THE CONTENT YOU WILL
TEACH TODAY-THIS MAY COME FROM
BUILDING MATERIALS MUST HAVE SOME FLEXIBILITY.
YOUR CONTENT OUTLINE)

RIGIDITY IS A STRUCTURE’S ABILITY TO MAINTAIN FORM.

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MATERIALS MUST BE STRONG UNDER PRESSURE AND WEIGHT.

EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS USE COST EFFECTIVE MATERIALS IN HIGH POVERTY AREAS.

ENGINEERS FOLLOW RULES CALLED BUILDING CODES INCLUDING ACCESSIBILITY CODES, FIRE AND
SAFETY CODES, AND HAZARD CODES.

AS STUDENTS ENTER THE ROOM THEY WILL BE ENCOURAGED TO GO TO A TABLE WHERE THEY
G. HOOK: WILL USE GUMDROPS AND TOOTHPICKS TO BUILD A STRUCTURE THAT WILL HOLD ONE OR MORE

(DESCRIBE HOW YOU WILL GRAB TEXTBOOKS FOR 15 SECONDS. STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN 10 MINUTES TO BUILD THEIR

STUDENTS’ ATTENTION AT THE STRUCTURE BEFORE STRUCTURES WILL BE TESTED AND FOLLOWED BY DISCUSSION OF WHY ONE

BEGINNING OF THE LESSON. BE WAS STRONGER THAN THE OTHER.

CREATIVE.)

HOOK- AS STUDENTS ENTER THE ROOM THEY WILL BE ENCOURAGED TO GO TO A TABLE WHERE
THEY WILL USE GUMDROPS AND TOOTHPICKS TO BUILD A STRUCTURE THAT WILL HOLD ONE OR
MORE TEXTBOOKS FOR 15 SECONDS. STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN 10 MINUTES TO BUILD THEIR
STRUCTURE BEFORE STRUCTURES WILL BE TESTED AND FOLLOWED BY DISCUSSION OF WHY ONE
WAS STRONGER THAN THE OTHER.

STUDENTS WILL BE INTRODUCED TO THE CHIEF BUILDING INSPECTOR, LES EVERETT FROM THE
CITY OF GREENVILLE, WHO WILL TALK TO STUDENTS ABOUT LOCAL BUILDING CODES,
ACCESSIBILITY CODES, FIRE CODES, AND HAZARD CODES AND HOW CODES MAY VARY IN
DIFFERENT PLACES.

H. INSTRUCTION:
(TELL, STEP-BY-STEP, WHAT YOU WILL AS A DEMONSTRATION, SET UP FOUR DOMINOES AS SUPPORT CORNERS TO HOLD A PIECE OF
DO.) PAPER AND A BOOK AND FOUR MARSHMALLOWS TO HOLD A PIECE OF PAPER AND A BOOK.
PLACE A PIECE OF PAPER ON EACH TO DEMONSTRATE THAT EITHER MATERIAL WILL SUPPORT THE
PIECE OF PAPER. PLACE A BOOK ON EACH AND DISCUSS THE IMPACT OF THE BOOK ON THE
DOMINOES AND MARSHMALLOWS. DISCUSS WHAT TERM MIGHT BE USED TO DEFINE A
MATERIAL’S ABILITY TO HOLD A WEIGHT (STRENGTH). REPEAT ACTIVITY BUT THIS TIME, SHAKE
THE TABLE. THE DOMINOES WILL FALL OVER WHILE THE MARSHMALLOWS WILL KEEP THE
STRUCTURE SOUND. GIVE STUDENTS THE OPPORTUNITY TO DISCUSS WHY THEY THINK THIS
HAPPENED AND WHAT TERM MIGHT BE USED TO DEFINE A MATERIAL’S ABILITY TO ABSORB
ENERGY (FLEXIBILITY OR ABSORBENCY).

STUDENTS WILL NOW CREATE THEIR OWN STRUCTURES TO EXPLORE DIFFERENT MATERIALS.
STUDENTS WILL WORK WITH A PARTNER. DEPENDING ON THE NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN THE
CLASS, NOTE CARDS WITH THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND DEFINITIONS WILL BE HANDED OUT:
STRENGTH; FLEXIBILITY; RIGIDITY; COST EFFECTIVE. STUDENTS WILL FIND THEIR PARTNER BY

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FINDING THE PERSON THAT HAS THE TERM OR DEFINITION MATCHING THEIRS. HAND OUT
MATERIALS, AGAIN DEPENDING ON NUMBER OF PARTNERS. ONE GROUP WILL BE GIVEN PLASTIC
STRAWS. ONE GROUP WILL BE GIVEN CHENILLE STEMS. ONE GROUP WILL BE GIVEN WOOD
STICKS AND SILLY PUTTY. ONE GROUP WILL BE GIVEN RUBBER TUBING. ONE GROUP WILL BE
GIVEN ALL MATERIALS. STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN A TASK TO COMPLETE WHICH WILL BE ON A
TASK CARD. STUDENTS’ TASK IS TO BUILD A STRUCTURE AT LEAST 50CM IN HEIGHT THAT WILL
HOLD THE WEIGHT OF A TENNIS BALL ON TOP. THEY WILL HAVE 15 MINUTES TO BUILD AND FIVE
MINUTES TO ALLOW FOR THREE TESTS OF THEIR STRUCTURE. THE TENNIS BALL CAN BE PLACED
ON THE STRUCTURE TWICE TO MAKE FINAL REVISIONS BEFORE THE FINAL TEST. AFTER 20
MINUTES, STUDENTS WILL COME TOGETHER. THE STUDENTS THAT HAD ONLY ONE OR TWO
MATERIALS WILL DISCUSS THE PROPERTIES OF THEIR MATERIALS AND THE PROBLEMS THEY HAD.
THEN, THE STUDENTS THAT HAD ALL THE MATERIALS WILL DISCUSS THE PROBLEMS AND THE
BENEFITS OF THEIR MATERIALS AND WHAT COMBINATIONS OF MATERIALS WORKED BEST. NEXT,
RELATE THIS EXPERIMENT TO THE BUILDING OF REAL STRUCTURES.

EXPLORE REASONS WHY EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS WOULD USE CERTAIN MATERIALS OVER
OTHERS SUCH AS STEEL, WOOD, OR CONCRETE. DISCUSS FLEXIBILITY, STRENGTH, AND RIGIDITY.
CHECK TO SEE IF PARTNERS WERE PAIRED CORRECTLY BY REVIEWING TERMS AND DEFINITIONS.
DISCUSS HOW COST AND AVAILABILITY OF MATERIALS AFFECT BUILDING AND THAT YOU MAY
NOT ALWAYS BE ABLE TO USE THE IDEAL MATERIALS.

POSE THE QUESTION: HOW DO COST AND AVAILABILITY, FLEXIBILITY, STRENGTH, AND RIGIDITY
OF MATERIAL RELATE TO EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND DESIGN? DISCUSS ANSWERS.

STUDENTS WILL POST VIDEO OF TODAY’S EXPERIMENT ON A BLOG ON WORDPRESS.COM FOR


FEEDBACK FROM VIEWERS.

USING STORYBOARDING TEMPLATE STUDENTS WILL PREPARE A TALK ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE
OF BUILDING CODES AND THE BEST KIND OF MATERIALS TO USE IN EARTHQUAKE PRONE AREAS.
ONE STUDENT WILL VIDEO WHILE THE OTHER SPEAKS AS THEY ADD TO THEIR PUBLIC SERVICE
ANNOUNCEMENT THAT THEY BEGAN EARLIER.

TO CONCLUDE, STUDENTS WILL REFLECT ON THE QUESTION: IF YOU COULD USE ANY OF THE
MATERIALS FROM THIS ACTIVITY, WHICH WOULD YOU HAVE USED AND WHY? THEY WILL POST
THEIR REFLECTIONS ON THE “UNDER CONSTRUCTION” BOARD.

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Checklist of student participation and understanding for lesson 2:

Name:_______________________________________________

observed
Student demonstrate an understanding that building materials need to have some
flexibility.
Student demonstrates an understanding that materials must hold up under pressure
and weight.
After building their structures, student can justify their use of materials .
Student is an active participant in designing the group PSA.
Students have demonstrated their reasoning behind their use of certain materials
keeping in mind properties of materials and cost effectiveness.
Yes or check if observed.

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Constructing Gumdrop Structure


Using the toothpicks and gumdrops at an
empty station, construct a building that will
hold the most textbooks for 15 seconds
without collapsing. You have 15 minutes to
complete your design. You may work
individually, with a partner, or in a group.

GOOD LUCK!!

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Strength Flexibility

Cost
Rigidity effective
Producing Structures
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optimum ability to
results for maintain
the form.
expenditure.
A material’s A material’s
ability to ability to
hold up absorb
under energy.
pressure
and weight.
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Day 2/Properties of Building Materials

1. Using only your material(s), build a structure.


2. Your structure must be 50 cm high and hold the weight of a tennis ball.
3. You will have 15 minutes to build before testing.
4. After 15 minutes you will have 5 minutes to allow for 3 tests.
5. The tennis ball can be placed on your structure twice to make revisions.
6. Your third trial will be the final test.

Day 2/Properties of Building Materials

1. Using only your material(s), build a structure.


2. Your structure must be 50 cm high and hold the weight of a tennis ball.
3. You will have 15 minutes to build before testing.
4. After 15 minutes you will have 5 minutes to allow for 3 tests.
5. The tennis ball can be placed on your structure twice to make revisions.
6. Your third trial will be the final test.

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7. SHAKE AND QUAKE…BUT WILL IT BREAK?


8. LESSON 3
9. LET’S GET BUILDING!!

DEFINE THE CONTENT


LESSON OBJECTIVE:
THROUGH SIMULATIONS OF EARTHQUAKES THAT HAVE HAPPENED IN THE PAST, STUDENTS WILL DISCOVER THE IMPORTANCE OF SUPPORT
PLACEMENTS NOTED THROUGH AN IMPROVED SCORE OF AT LEAST 25% ON THE SIMULATOR.

STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF BUILDING DESIGN USING TECHNOLOGY THROUGH AN EARTHQUAKE SIMULATOR
PROGRAM BY CONSTRUCTING A VIRTUAL MODEL TO WITHSTAND THE FORCE EXERTED IN ONE OF THREE PROVIDED EARTHQUAKES BY
INCREASING THEIR SCORE BY AT LEAST 25% ON THE SECOND TRIAL.

AFTER CREATING VIRTUAL AND CONCRETE MODELS, STUDENTS WILL STATE THREE FACTORS OF BUILDING SUPPORT USE IN THEIR PSA.

STUDENTS WILL EMPLOY KNOWLEDGE FROM PREVIOUS LESSONS TO DESIGN A 3-D MODEL AND TEST ON A SHAKE TABLE.

LESSON POINT TO PONDER: (REMEMBER THIS IS A STATEMENT THAT SHOULD ELICIT CONVERSATION, THINKING AND DEBATE. THIS IS
NOT A QUESTION.)

AN ENGINEER’S JOB IS TO MAKE THE MOST OUT OF THE LEAST.

II. PREPLANNING: BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND

AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS USE SEVERAL PROCESSES TO PREVENT
A. WHAT 3 ITEMS ARE WORTH
BUILDING COLLAPSE.
KNOWING?
(THINK ABOUT THE CONTENT YOU HAVE
STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT FOUNDATION, DAMPERS, AND ISOLATORS ARE AN INTEGRAL
SELECTED. WHAT IS IMPORTANT FOR
PART IN PROPER SUPPORT SYSTEMS.
STUDENTS TO KNOW?)

STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT ENGINEERS ARE SPECIALLY TRAINED TO ANALYZE AND DESIGN
FORCE RESISTANT SYSTEMS.

B. WHAT 3 ITEMS ARE IMPORTANT FOR AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS TO BE ABLE TO DO? STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO INCREASE THEIR SCORE USING THE ONLINE SIMULATOR.
(DEFINE WHAT STUDENTS SHOULD BE
ABLE TO DO AS A RESULT OF YOUR STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO EXPLAIN THEIR REASONING FOR THE PLACEMENTS OF
LESSON.) SUPPORTS IN THEIR BUILDING.

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STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO CONSTRUCT A MODEL USING THE DESIGN PROCESS THAT AN
ENGINEER USES.

AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT BUDGET CONSTRAINTS HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED DURING
THE DESIGN PROCESS.

C. WHAT ARE THE ENDURING


UNDERSTANDINGS THAT STUDENTS STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT VARYING THE SUPPORT PLACEMENT SYSTEM WILL
SHOULD TAKE AWAY FROM THE LESSON? DETERMINE THE DURABILITY OF THE STRUCTURE.
(DEFINE THE BIG IDEAS.)
STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS CANNOT DESIGN A BUILDING TO
COMPLETELY WITHSTAND AN EARTHQUAKE, BUT CAN LIMIT STRUCTURAL DAMAGE THROUGH
THE USE OF APPROPRIATE SUPPORT SYSTEMS.

III. PLANNING
D. ESSENTIAL QUESTION: HOW ARE SUPPORT SYSTEMS UTILIZED TO IMPROVE NEW CONSTRUCTION AND LIMIT THE
(ONE OVERARCHING LESSON QUESTION ) AMOUNT OF BUILDING DAMAGE OR COLLAPSE DURING AN EARTHQUAKE?

ASSESSMENT OF CREATIVITY, DURABILITY AND STAYING WITHIN THE BUDGET CONSTRAINTS


WILL BE COMPLETED DURING THE SHAKE TABLE TEST.

E. ASSESSMENT: THROUGH COMPLETION OF DATA LOG AND IMPROVING SCORE IN ONLINE SIMULATOR,
(PERFORMANCE TASK) WHAT WILL THE UNDERSTANDING WILL BE EVALUATED.

STUDENTS DO TO SHOW YOU THAT THEY


MASTERED THE CONTENT? STUDENTS WILL BE OBSERVED DURING CLASS DISCUSSION FOR CORRECTLY DEFENDING THEIR
CHOICE OF MATERIALS OR CORRECTLY STATING THEIR REASONS FOR CHANGE.

EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS INCORPORATE FEATURES INTO MODERN STRUCTURES TO HELP


WITHSTAND EARTHQUAKES.
F. CONTENT
LIST THE CONTENT FOR THIS LESSON EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS VARY FOUNDATION MATERIALS AND SUPPORT SYSTEMS TO HELP
ONLY.
STRUCTURES WITHSTAND EARTHQUAKES.
(OUTLINE THE CONTENT YOU WILL TEACH
TODAY-THIS MAY COME FROM YOUR
BUDGET CONSTRAINTS HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED WHEN DESIGNING A BUILDING.
CONTENT OUTLINE)
EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS VARY FOUNDATION MATERIALS AND SUPPORT SYSTEMS.

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DAMPERS ARE DEVICES USED TO DISSIPATE ENERGY FROM VIBRATIONS.

THE FOUNDATION IS THE BASIS OR GROUNDWORK ON WHICH A STRUCTURE SITS.

A BASE ISOLATOR IS A BEARING PAD WHICH IS PLACED BETWEEN A BUILDING AND ITS
FOUNDATION.

A COLUMN IS AN UPRIGHT SUPPORT COMPOSED OF RELATIVELY FEW PIECES.


G. HOOK: POSE A QUESTION, IF YOU WERE SENT TO AN EARTHQUAKE PRONE AREA TO ASSESS THEIR
(DESCRIBE HOW YOU WILL GRAB STRUCTURES AND YOU COULD ONLY HAVE THREE FACTS TO WORK WITH, WHAT WOULD YOU
STUDENTS’ ATTENTION AT THE WANT TO KNOW? POST YOUR ANSWERS ON THE “UNDER CONSTRUCTION” BOARD.
BEGINNING OF THE LESSON. BE
CREATIVE.)

AS STUDENTS ENTER THE CLASSROOM THE FOLLOWING QUESTION WILL BE POSED FOR THE
STUDENTS TO ANSWER. IF YOU WERE SENT TO AN EARTHQUAKE PRONE AREA TO ASSESS THEIR
STRUCTURES AND YOU COULD ONLY HAVE THREE FACTS TO WORK WITH, WHAT WOULD YOU
WANT TO KNOW? POST YOUR ANSWERS ON THE “UNDER CONSTRUCTION” BOARD.

AFTER VIEWING GROUP FEEDBACK ON WORDPRESS.COM BLOG, STUDENTS WILL PARTICIPATE


IN CLASS DISCUSSION ON THEIR REFLECTIONS PREVIOUSLY PLACED ON THE “UNDER
CONSTRUCTION” BOARD AND DEFEND THEIR CHOICE OR STATE REASONS FOR NEW CHOICES
AND MATERIALS.

TEACHERS WILL PROVIDE EXPLANATION AND EXAMPLES OF FOUNDATION, DAMPERS, BASE


ISOLATORS, AND COLUMNS. THE USAGE OF THESE WILL ALSO BE EXPLAINED. STUDENTS WILL
H. INSTRUCTION: UNDERSTAND FURTHER WHEN THEY ARE USING THE ONLINE SIMULATOR AS IT EXPLAINS IN
(TELL, STEP-BY-STEP, WHAT YOU WILL MORE DETAIL THE SPECIFIC USES OF THESE DEVICES.
DO.)

USING THE SMARTBOARD, TEACHERS WILL DEMONSTRATE THE BASICS OF THE SHAKE AND
QUAKE EARTHQUAKE SIMULATOR BY WALKING STUDENTS THROUGH THE PROCESS OF USING
EACH SECTION. EARTHQUAKE SIMULATOR CAN BE ACCESSED BY THE PROVIDED HYPERLINK OR
BY TYPING IN THE ADDRESS:

HTTP://128.205.141.53:8080/APP/EQ_13.HTML

STUDENTS WILL BE DIRECTED TO CHOOSE A PARTNER, FIND A LAPTOP, AND FOLLOW THE
POSTED STEPS TO OPEN THE ONLINE SIMULATOR. EACH SET OF STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN A
DIFFERENT SEISMIC EVENT TO DESIGN A STRUCTURE WITH SUPPORTS THAT WOULD
WITHSTAND THEIR EVENT. STUDENTS WILL TEST THEIR INITIAL STRUCTURE. AFTER
COMPLETION, THE CLASS WILL DISCUSS THEIR EARTHQUAKE, WHAT SUPPORTS THEY USED AND
HOW THEIR BUILDING WITHSTOOD THE EARTHQUAKE. EACH GROUP WILL THEN TRY TO

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IMPROVE THEIR MODEL WITH THE SAME EARTHQUAKE. DATA LOGS WILL BE FILLED OUT
WRITING A DESCRIPTION OF THEIR BUILDING, WHICH SPECIFIC EARTHQUAKE THEY HAD AND
THE RESULTS. STUDENTS WILL CALCULATE THEIR EXPENSES TO SEE IF THEY STAYED WITHIN THE
BUDGET. DISCUSSION WILL FOLLOW.

STUDENTS WILL BE INFORMED THAT NOW THEY ARE GOING TO CREATE AN ACTUAL MODEL.
STUDENTS WILL PULL A PICTURE CARD OUT OF A CONSTRUCTION HAT TO GROUP THEMSELVES
INTO TWO GROUPS. THE STUDENTS WILL GROUP THEMSELVES BY DECIDING WHAT SHAPED
BUILDING THEY HAVE. THE TWO GROUPS OF STUDENTS WILL BE PROVIDED MATERIALS AND A
BUDGET TO DESIGN A 5 STORY BUILDING THAT WILL WITHSTAND AN EARTHQUAKE AS
SIMULATED ON THE SHAKE TABLE. THE MATERIALS THEY WILL USE ARE DOWEL RODS FOR THE
COLUMNS AND PEGBOARDS FOR THE FLOOR AND CEILING. EACH GROUP OF STUDENTS WILL BE
PROVIDED WITH A FLIP CAMERA TO VIDEOTAPE THEIR PROCESS. A DISCUSSION TO EXPLAIN
THAT THE SCALE IS 1 INCH=1FOOT. THE BUILDING SPECIFICATIONS ARE THAT THE HEIGHT OF
THE FIRST FLOOR SHOULD BE 12 FEET AND THE HEIGHT OF FLOORS TWO THROUGH FIVE MUST
BE 10 FEET. AN EXPENSE SHEET WILL BE PROVIDED SHOWING THE COST OF SUPPORTS, FLOOR
AND ROOF. EACH GROUP WILL BE GIVEN A BUDGET OF $10,000,000. A TASK CARD WITH
THIS INFORMATION WILL ALSO BE PROVIDED. THE BUILDING THEY DESIGN MUST BE ABLE TO
SURVIVE THE SHAKE TABLE WITHOUT COLLAPSING AND HAVING AS LITTLE DAMAGE AS
POSSIBLE.STUDENTS WILL BE GIVEN TIME TO DESIGN AND CONSTRUCT THEIR BUILDINGS.
BUILDINGS WILL BE TESTED ON THE SHAKE TABLE. WEIGHTS OF UP TO 30 LBS. WILL BE ADDED
TO REPRESENT A LIVE LOAD. EACH STRUCTURE WILL BE SHAKEN FOR 20 SECONDS. BUILDINGS
WILL BE EXAMINED TO SEE STRUCTURAL DAMAGE AND ASSESSED TO SEE IF THEY ACTUALLY
SURVIVED THE TASK.

VIDEO OF BOTH GROUPS’ PROCESS WILL BE UPLOADED TO WORDPRESS.COM FOR FEEDBACK


AND SUGGESTIONS FROM VIEWERS.

USING THEIR STORYBOARD TEMPLATE, STUDENTS WILL SUMMARIZE ALL THE IMPORTANT
FACTORS THAT EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS CONSIDER WHEN BUILDING SAFER BUILDINGS. THEY
WILL USE THIS INFORMATION TO VIDEO THEIR PSA.

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Column
an upright support composed of relatively few
pieces

Base Isolators
A bearing pad that is placed between a
building and it’s foundation

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How Base Isolators Work

Damper
Devices used to dissipate energy from
vibrations.

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Foundation
The basis or groundwork on which a
building sits.

Task cards, building data log, and shake table directions can be found under on line simulator
from the lesson. (http://mceer.buffalo.edu)

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Building Shape Pictures for Group Pairing

Styrofoam House

pinktentacle.com

Eco Friendly House Petronas Twin Towers

youlivewhere.com Malaysia

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wikipedia.org

Orpheum Theater Center, Sioux Falls, SD

www.siouxfalls.org

The Gold Dome, Oklahoma City, OK

wikipedia.org

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Arquitectonica Trinity Place National Centre for Performing Arts (The Egg Building)

San Francisco, CA Beiijing, China

arcspace.coom nationalgeographic.com

The Millennium Dome, Greenwich Peninsula, London, UK

wikidpedia.org

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Petroleum Building, Tulsa OK

tulsapreservationcommission.org

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Freedom Tower

1 World Trade Center NYC


Wikipedia.org

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Day 3/Building a Model

Materials:

 dowels: 3/16”dowel - 12 inch, 30 inch, 48 inch


 pegboards (for each floor and the ceiling)
 building data log

1. You will build a five story building using your materials.


2. The height of the first floor must be 12 ft.
3. The height of the second through fifth floors must be 10 feet.
4. The scale we will use is 1 inch= 1 foot.
5. You will have a budget of $10,000,000
Prices are as follows: each floor = $500,000
Roof=$1,000,000
1 story support=$300,000
3 story support=$475,000
5 story support=$700,000
6. 30 pounds of weight will be placed on your building.
7. Buildings must be able to survive (without collapsing) and earthquake
simulated on the shake table for 20 seconds.
8. You must keep track of your budget on the Building Data Log.
9. You will have 45 minutes.
Good Luck!!

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SHAKE AND QUAKE….BUT WILL IT BREAK?

LESSON 4

BUILDING FOR THE BIG ONE!

I. DEFINE THE CONTENT


LESSON OBJECTIVE:

STUDENTS WILL USE MOVIE MAKER TO EDIT AND FINALIZE THEIR PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT WITH TWO OR MORE FACTS
REPRESENTING EACH DAILY COMPONENT TO BE SHARED WITH PARENTS, TEACHERS, AND THE HAITI RECOVERY GROUP VIA THE INTERNET.

USING FEEDBACK FROM EXPERT, STUDENTS WILL MAKE IMPROVEMENTS TO THEIR 5 STORY 3-D MODEL THAT WILL SHOW IMPROVEMENT IN
HOLDING AS MUCH OR MORE WEIGHT WHILE INCREASING TIME ON SHAKE TABLE.

STUDENTS WILL PREPARE AT LEAST TWO INFORMED QUESTIONS TO POSE TO EARTHQUAKE EXPERT WHO HAS VISITED HAITI REPRESENTING
AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESS STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS GO THROUGH, AS WELL AS AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE DEVASTATION IN
HAITI.

LESSON POINT TO PONDER: (REMEMBER THIS IS A STATEMENT THAT SHOULD ELICIT CONVERSATION, THINKING AND DEBATE. THIS IS
NOT A QUESTION.)

THERE IS ONE FACTOR THAT IS MOST IMPORTANT IN EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING DESIGN.

II. PREPLANNING: BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND

AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT THERE ARE MANY FACTORS THAT EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS USE
A. WHAT 3 ITEMS ARE WORTH WHEN DESIGNING BUILDINGS.
KNOWING?

(THINK ABOUT THE CONTENT YOU


STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS LOOK AT INFORMATION FROM
HAVE SELECTED. WHAT IS
EARTHQUAKES IN THE PAST TO DESIGN IN THE FUTURE.
IMPORTANT FOR STUDENTS TO
KNOW?)
STUDENTS WILL KNOW THAT PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE USED TO INFORM AND
SWAY AN AUDIENCE.

B. WHAT 3 ITEMS ARE IMPORTANT

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FOR STUDENTS TO BE ABLE TO DO? AFTER THE LESSON,


(DEFINE WHAT STUDENTS SHOULD BE STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO COMPILE A VIDEO USING MOVIE MAKER.
ABLE TO DO AS A RESULT OF YOUR
LESSON.) STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO ASK INFORMED QUESTIONS TO THE EARTHQUAKE EXPERT VIA
SKYPE.

STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO MAKE A REASONABLE PREDICTION AS TO HOW HAITI WOULD


REACT TO A FUTURE EARTHQUAKE AFTER REBUILDING FROM PRESENT DEVASTATION.

AFTER THE LESSON,


STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT A PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT CAN SWAY THEIR
AUDIENCE.
C. WHAT ARE THE ENDURING
UNDERSTANDINGS THAT STUDENTS
STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING CAN HELP SOLVE REAL WORLD
SHOULD TAKE AWAY FROM THE
PROBLEMS.
LESSON? (DEFINE THE BIG IDEAS.)

STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND THAT LESSONS FROM THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE CAN BE USED TO
MAKE CHANGES IN DESIGN IN THE FUTURE FOR THAT POVERTY STRICKEN AREA.

III. PLANNING
D. ESSENTIAL QUESTION: HOW CAN WE USE OUR NEWLY ACQUIRED KNOWLEDGE TO HELP INFORM PEOPLE IN POVERTY
(ONE OVERARCHING LESSON STRICKEN AREAS?
QUESTION )
STUDENTS’ PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT WILL BE ASSESSED USING A RUBRIC AS AN
E. ASSESSMENT:
ASSESSMENT.
(PERFORMANCE TASK) WHAT WILL
THE STUDENTS DO TO SHOW YOU
STUDENTS WILL CONSTRUCT REFLECTIVE QUESTIONS TO DISCUSS WITH THE STRUCTURAL
THAT THEY MASTERED THE CONTENT?
ENGINEER AS NOTED BY THEIR POSING QUESTIONS DURING THE SKYPE INTERVIEW.

EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS USE BUILDING CODES, PROPER MATERIALS AND SUPPORT SYSTEMS IN
THE MOST COST EFFECTIVE WAY TO MINIMIZE DAMAGE IN AN EARTHQUAKE.
F. CONTENT
LIST THE CONTENT FOR THIS LESSON
THE PURPOSE OF A PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT IS TO RAISE AWARENESS, TO INFORM AND
ONLY.
EDUCATE THE PUBLIC.
(OUTLINE THE CONTENT YOU WILL
TEACH TODAY-THIS MAY COME FROM
EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERS USE PAST EXPERIENCES TO CREATE A BETTER FUTURE.
YOUR CONTENT OUTLINE)

MOVIE MAKER IS A COMPUTER PROGRAM WHERE YOU CAN EDIT AND SHARE YOUR FINISHED

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MOVIES VIA THE INTERNET.

AS THE STUDENTS ENTER CLASS FOR THE LAST DAY, THERE WILL BE A GRAPH POSTED FOR THEM TO
G. HOOK:
MAKE AN INFORMED PREDICTION ON ABOUT HOW PORT AU PRINCE, HAITI WILL WITHSTAND A
(DESCRIBE HOW YOU WILL GRAB
7.7 MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE IN THE YEAR 2030. THERE WILL BE CHOICES PROVIDED AND THE
STUDENTS’ ATTENTION AT THE
STUDENTS WILL PLACE THEIR NAME IN THE COLUMN OF THE GRAPH THAT REPRESENTS THEIR
BEGINNING OF THE LESSON. BE
CLOSEST PREDICTION.
CREATIVE.)

AS THE STUDENTS ENTER CLASS FOR THE LAST DAY, THERE WILL BE A GRAPH POSTED FOR THEM TO
MAKE AN INFORMED PREDICTION ON ABOUT HOW PORT AU PRINCE, HAITI WILL WITHSTAND A
7.7 MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE IN THE YEAR 2030. THERE WILL BE CHOICES PROVIDED AND THE
STUDENTS WILL PLACE THEIR NAME IN THE COLUMN OF THE GRAPH THAT REPRESENTS THEIR
CLOSEST PREDICTION.

USING THEIR STORYBOARD AS THEIR PLANNER AND THE DAILY VIDEO SEGMENTS DEMONSTRATING
INFORMATION FOR THEIR PSA, STUDENTS WILL USE MOVIE MAKER TO EDIT AND FINALIZE THEIR
SECTION. AFTER A BRIEF DEMONSTRATION ON HOW TO USE MOVIE MAKER, STUDENTS WILL
WORK WITH THEIR PARTNER. THIS VIDEO WILL BE COMPLIED INTO ONE PUBLIC SERVICE
ANNOUNCEMENT TO BE SHARED WITH PARENTS AS WELL AS THE HAITI RECOVERY GROUP
(WWW.HAITIRECOVERYGROUP.COM) AND OUR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEER.

THE FEEDBACK FROM THE WORDPRESS.COM BLOG ABOUT THEIR STRUCTURES AND THEIR
H. INSTRUCTION: PERFORMANCE ON THE SHAKE TABLE WILL BE SHARED WITH THE STUDENTS. AS A CLASS, WE WILL
(TELL, STEP-BY-STEP, WHAT YOU WILL EXAMINE THIS FEEDBACK AND ALSO USE IT TO ENHANCE OUR STRUCTURES. THESE STRUCTURES
DO.) SHOULD BE READY TO SHARE WITH PARENTS ON THE SHAKE TABLE.

STUDENTS WILL TAKE SOME REFLECTION TIME TO LIST QUESTIONS THEY WOULD LIKE TO ASK AN
EARTHQUAKE EXPERT ON STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING OR THE DEVASTATION IN HAITI. AFTER
DISCUSSION IN CLASS, STUDENTS WILL SKYPE WITH OUR EARTHQUAKE EXPERT WHO HAS VISITED
HAITI TO HAVE THEIR QUESTIONS ANSWERED.

STUDENTS WILL PRACTICE INFORMATION THAT THEY WISH TO SHARE WITH VISITORS.

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Day 4/Labels for Graph (Hook)

An earthquake has just


hit the city of Port Au
Prince, Haiti. It is the
year 2030. What are
the results of this
quake?

Port Au Prince looks much the


same as it did after the 2010
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earthquake with a similar


number of lives lost.
Port Au Prince has many
damaged buildings but less
building collapse and much less
loss of life.

Port Au Prince has minimal


building damage and no loss of
life.

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Rubric for Public Service Announcement (PSA)


Beginning Developing Accomplishing Exemplary
Storyboard Did not use Demonstrates Demonstrates good Demonstrates
storyboard as some planning, planning using outstanding
planner. using storyboard. planning using
storyboard. storyboard.
Emotional Demonstrates Demonstrates Demonstrates good Demonstrates
Appeal very little or no some emotional level of emotional an outstanding
emotional appeal. appeal. level of
appeal. emotional
appeal.
Collaboration Rarely listens Often listens to, Usually listens to, Almost always
with Peers to, shares with, shares with, and shares with, and listens to,
and supports supports the supports the efforts shares with,
the efforts of efforts of others of others in the and supports
others in the in the group, but group. Does not the efforts of
group. Often is sometimes is not cause problems in others in the
not a good a good team the group. group. Tries to
team member. member. keep people
working well
together.
Flow/Technical Lacks flow. The PSA has The PSA has good The PSA has
Production Rarely conveys some flow, but flow, with little outstanding
emotions or has some rough errors. The recording flow and is very
enthusiasm. spots. Shows is clear and audible. professional.
Difficulty time little enthusiasm Emotion and
hearing the and emotion. enthusiasm are
message. Can understand evident.
and hear most of
the recordings.

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Website for directions using Windows Movie Maker to pull up on whiteboard:


http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/printouts/Movie_Maker.pdf

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