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V5R3 LPAR and HMC

V5R3 Announcements Technical Overview August 2004

IBM Virtualization Engine and eServer i5 systems


Delivered first on eServer i5 systems

IBM Virtualization Engine

This presentation contains information about IBMs plans and directions. Such plans are subject to change without notice.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 2

Notes: IBM Virtualization Engine and eServer i5 systems


We begin this LPAR partitioning and HMC presentation with a slide depicting where POWER5-based Logical Partitioning - dynamic logical partitioning (Dynamic LPAR) fits with IBMs Virtualization Engine architecture (system technologies) and system provisioning. Building on its strong 35-year heritage of virtualization with IBM systems, IBM Virtualization Engine enriches IBM eServer. systems and TotalStorage subsystems with leading-edge services and technologies that simplify the management of a heterogeneous IT infrastructure. These innovative offerings provide a key component on the on demand operating environment, addressing a wide range of user needs, ranging from provisioning to workload management (IBM Enterprise Workload Manager) and system management (IBM Director Multiplatform). We will discuss these two products in more detail later. IBM Virtualization Engine is a suite of systems services and technologies that can help your business improve the effectiveness of IT as it treats resources as a single pool, accessing and managing resources across the organization more efficiently, by effect and need rather than physical location. Virtualization is a key component of the on demand operating environment which can help you align your IT environment with the needs of your business. IBM Virtualization Engine will include two main components: Virtualization Engine Systems Services for managing your infrastructure using software technologies such as IBM Director Multiplatform, IBM Enterprise Workload Manager, Systems Provisioning and IBM Grid Toolbox Virtualization Engine Systems Technologies for sharing the resources within your infrastructure with technologies such as Dynamic logical partitions, Virtual I/O, Capacity on Demand, and Virtual Ethernet enabled through a common POWER Hypervisor that is optimized for eServer i5. A single Virtualization Engine console will provide health-monitoring capabilities across system resources, as well as the capability to integrate with other management systems. The reach of the Virtualization Engine also extends to other resources in your enterprise, including networks, servers, and storage devices.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 3

Notes: IBM Virtualization Engine and eServer i5 systems - 2


IBM Virtualization Engine Systems Technologies builds on the Partition Licensed Internal Code on the iSeries, and the pSeries Hypervisor, offering a common POWER Hypervisor that will be managed through the Hardware Management Console (HMC) and enables pooling of resources through virtualization such as CPU, memory, I/O and LAN. iSeries users, in particular, will benefit from not having to create a Primary Partition as a managing partition along with increase in the number of partitions and the capability to deploy AIX 5L for UNIX workloads. IBM Virtualization Engine Systems Services is a product preview, with software offerings planned for 3Q 2004 availability. These offerings will complement the already rich systems management capabilities provided by Management Central and iSeries Navigator, and enables the integration and automation of common management tasks across multiple operating environments.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 4

Agenda
System architecture eServer i5 IBM eServer i5 LPAR Changes Hardware Management Console Overview
Hardware overview Connection options Features and functions

LPAR Creation Operations Console options on i5

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 5

System Architecture for LPAR on eServer i5


eServer i5 partitions HMC
AIX 5L Linux i5/OS

POWER Hypervisor

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 6

New LPAR System Layout


Hardware Management Console

I5/OS
Service Partition

AIX

LINUX

I5/OS

SLIC
Firmware Private Network OR OR Public Network

SLIC

POWER5 HYPERVISOR
Permanent / Temporary Resources

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 7

New LPAR System Layout


This slide gives a high level view of a new POWER5 eServer i5 system capable of running partitions with i5/OS, POWER Linux distributions and IBMs AIX 5L, releases 5.2 or 5.3. Key items, which the subsequent slides expanded on, include: The iSeries-based SLIC microcode with a new low level interface to the firmware which makes the system run as an i5 system The new POWER5 Hypervisor which is independent of the operating system(s) running above it. The POWER5 Hypervisor functions include managing the active partitions and permanent and temporary processor and memory resources. The Hardware Management Console device that is required for all LPAR and capacity on demand configuration and management functions. This console uses LAN connections to the POWER5 systems Service Processor port. The LAN network used to connect the HMC to the system can be private or a secured a public network. The HMC is required for configuring multiple partitions or managing capacity on demand. The Service partition can be any i5/OS partition that you set up to provide service functions, such as requesting and receiving fixes. You can configure your eServer i5 system so that these functions can be provided through the HMC itself. Though not required, setting up an i5/OS partition and an HMC to provide service functions is recommended as backups for each other.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 8

Components of Power 5 Hardware


CEC Contains processors, memory, service processor Power System/RIO Link links to connect enclosures Expansion Towers DASD, Buses Hypervisor Firmware to virtualize all hardware for each partition Operating Systems i5/OS, AIX, Linux HMC Hardware Management Console

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 9

What is a Hypervisor?
LOW level hardware virtualization software Runs on CEC (main system) CPU and resides in CEC Memory Loaded into the CEC by the FSP on base system IPL Provides various RAS functions to partitions Virtualizes all system hardware into multiple, independent, logical partitions (memory, CPUs, buses, etc) Provides Virtual and/or Dedicated processor resources The Virtual Service Processor (VSP) is part of the Hypervisor Virtual TTY, Virtual Serial, Virtual Ethernet Squadrons Hypervisor is referred to as the 'Converged Hypervisor' because it runs heterogeneous OS'es (i5/OS, AIX, Linux)

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 10

Note: What is a Hypervisor?


The LPAR Hypervisor is now shipped as a firmware part of all eServer POWER5 models.

It is stored in the non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) of the Service Processor. Previously, it was a part of the System Licensed Internal Code (SLIC) shipped with OS/400. As the Hypervisor is now independent from the operating systems, there is no more a primary partition concept for LPAR. Memory is the only resource used by the Hypervisor.
An Hardware Management Console (HMC) device is required to perform LPAR and CUoD configuration and Management. This device is an IBM customized Linux appliance featuring an IBM NetVista specific workstation. It is pre-loaded with the HMC software and cannot be used for any other purpose. A DVD-RAM drive is included for backup and recovery. The HMC is connected via the first Ethernet port of the eServer. A single HMC can manage several eServers known as Managed Systems. A second HMC may be connected for redundancy. A virtual terminal function is provided to open an operating system console session on each managed system from the HMC. This is an additional choice to the current OS/400 Twinax, Operations Console and LAN console options: the HMC type console. The HMC is shipped with an integrated modem to be used as focal point for the IBM Service Agent function that can report problems to IBM Support. I/O error reporting requires an additional Ethernet link between the HMC and the eServer. The HMC can be ordered as a required priced feature of any LPAR or CUoD configuration for new orders or upgrades (MES), or shipped as a mandatory part of all high-end models. Partitions are now created as Partition Profiles. A partition profile is used to allocate resources such as processor units, memory and I/O cards to a partition. Several partition profiles may be created for the same partition, because no resource availability checking is performed when a partition profile is created. The only way to validate that partition profiles have no resource conflict is to create a System Profile which is a collection of partition profiles. A partition profile cannot be added to a system profile if the partition resources are already committed by another partition profile being part of that system profile. Several system profiles may be created to materialize different validated partition profiles to be activated concurrently.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 11

What is a Service Processor?


Service processors have been around for a long time. In older, nonpartitionable hardware, the service processor was a separate, embedded computer that supported the main OS. On partitioned hardware, all partitions have a Virtual Service Processor (VSP), provided by the Hypervisor. VSP functions include:
PL the partition's OS (RPA or i5/OS are the two types) Manage OS debugging (Mainstore dumps, Virtual I/O) Provides access to various system settings Provide a virtual control panel for a partition Provide various HMC interfaces for partition control

rpa : RS/6000 platform architecture

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 12

Legacy iSeries LPAR vs Power 5 LPAR


Legacy LPAR Primary Viable, and usable Primary MSD, Secondary MSD Only support i5/os and Linux CSP style Service Processor Green screen LPAR configuration Separate lines of expansion hardware for i vs p series Power 4 (and previous) Converged LPAR Primary Partition (Phyp) hidden If Phyp MSDs, partitions do not AIX and Linux Partitioning FSP style Service Processor HMC LPAR configuration i and p series expansion hardware is the same Power 5

pHyp : power 5 hypervisor msd : main store dump csp: converged service processor

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 13

i5/OS V5R3 Logical Partitioning


Interface on pre-POWER5 systems remains (Service Tools, iSeries Navigator) POWER5: IBM Virtualization Engine systems technologies include POWER Hypervisor
Supports i5/OS, AIX 5L and Linux and up to 254* partitions

Improve server utilization rates across multiple workloads


Automatic processor balancing with uncapped partitions

Improve fault tolerance and lower partition management costs


Primary partition replaced by Hardware Management Console (HMC)
* Up

to 160 with 570 16-way and product preview is 254 . Max 64 i5/OS partitions per system. This presentation contains information about IBMs plans and directions. Such plans are subject to change without notice.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 14

Notes: i5/OS V5R3 Logical Partitioning - 1


eServer i5 servers, combined with the POWER Hypervisor feature exceptional dynamic logical partitioning (Dynamic LPAR) with automatic movement of processor with the introduction of uncapped partitions. In addition, other I/O resources such as memory, tape devices and I/O adapters may also bee pooled between partitions. plus the ability to create partitions of less than one processor unit. The previous limit of 32 partitions has also been increased with the eServer i5 which can support up to 254 partitions, each with a minimum of 10 processing units, and the capability to define AIX 5L partitions. Since the introduction of LPAR, nearly 70% of i870 and i890 customers have exploited this mainframe-class technology, with close to 20,000 active partitions worldwide. LPAR usage has also increased significantly on uni-processor servers. The exceptional granularity of being able to move 100th of a processing unit between partitions is another example of how the iSeries continues to exploit the concept of resource virtualization - for memory, disk storage, or processors. The introduction of POWER Hypervisor and Hardware Management Console (HMC) eliminates the requirement to have a Primary Partition defined for partitioning management. This enables customers to improve fault tolerance whereby partitions can be started or restarted individually without affecting the entire system, and enables new partitions to be created dynamically without requiring a system restart. POWER Hypervisor also features the capability to create uncapped partitions, in addition to dedicated partitions and capped partitions already used on iSeries servers. Uncapped partitions enable customers to maximize server utilization rates by automatically moving any unused processing resources to the uncapped partitions based on partition priorities.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 15

Notes: i5/OS V5R3 Logical Partitioning - 2


For example, if you have 4 partitions defined where one partition has a dedicated CPU. 2nd has 75 processing units defined as capped, the 3rd has 50 processing units defined as uncapped and 4th and has 75 processing units defined as uncapped. Assume that 4th partition also has the highest priority set for consuming any unused processor capacity. When this partition reaches 100% utilization of its allocated CPU, it will look for more resources in partition 2, and 3. If there are any unused processing units available, it will automatically move them into partition 4. The main difference between capped and uncapped partitions is associated to the number of licenses you would need to purchase. For example, if you wanted to run an application in a shared pool which contains 4 processors, and the maximum that application would ever need is one processor, then you will most likely want to create a capped partitions which gives you the granularity to allocate as little as 10th of a processor or as high as an entire processor. Any unused capacity will be used by the shared pool and other partitions. In an uncapped partition, the upper limit is defined by the number of processors available in the shared pool. Hence, in our example, you need to purchase licenses for 4 processors for that application. Additional capped and uncapped partition information is provided later in this presentation. The most complete information on this is in the Performance presentation.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 16

IBM eServer i5 LPAR Changes

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 17

IBM eServer i5 LPAR Changes


Logically partitioned servers do not require a Primary Partition All LPAR i5 servers must have HMC All OS/400 partitions must be at i5/OS V5R3 Uncapped partitions Operating systems: i5/OS, AIX 5L 5.2/5.3, POWER5 Linux distributions Simple migration process or reconfigure with wizards

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 18

Multiple Operating Systems more details And underneath the operating systems ...
Applications, .... I5/OS Applications, .... AIX 5L Applications, .... POWER5 Linux

TIMI i5 SLIC SF / RTAS SF / RTAS

POWER5 Hypervisor POWER5 64-bit RISC Hardware

TIMI = Technology Independent Machine Interface SLIC = System Licensed Internal Code SF = System Firmware RTAS = Run-Time Abstraction Services

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 19

Notes: Multiple Operating Systems more details - 1


iSeries servers are atypical in that they are defined by software, not by hardware. When a program presents instructions to the machine interface for execution, it thinks that the interface is the system hardware, but it is not. This interface is known as Technology Independent Machine Interface (TMI). The instructions presented to TIMI pass through a layer of microcode before they are understood by the hardware itself. This comprehensive design insulates application programs and their users from changing hardware characteristics. When a different hardware technology is deployed, IBM rewrites sections of the microcode to absorb the fluctuations in hardware characteristics. As a result, the interface presented to the customer remains the same. The microcode layer is known as the System Licensed Internal Code. Many of the frequently-executed routines run in SLIC. Supervisory resource management functions in SLIC include validity and authorization checks. On most of todays systems, these routines reside in the operating system. On the iSeries, because SLIC is closer to the silicon, routines performed there are faster than routines placed higher in the machine. IBM eServer i5 servers work with a different structure when compared to the previous technologies used with the iSeries servers. Above the POWER5 technology-based hardware is a new code layer called the POWER Hypervisor. This code is part of the firmware shipped with the IBM eServer i5 hardware. The POWER Hypervisor resides in flash memory on the Service Processor. This firmware performs the initialization and configuration of the IBM eServer i5 hardware, as well as the virtualization support required implement capacity on demand and run up to 254 partitions concurrently (product preview) on the eServer i5 servers.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 20

Notes: Multiple Operating Systems more details - 2


The layers above the POWER Hypervisor are different for each supported operating system. For i5/OS, TIMI and the layers above the POWER Hypervisor are still in place. SLIC, however, is changed and enabled for interfacing with the POWER Hypervisor. The POWER Hypervisor code is based on the iSeries PLIC code that is enhanced for use with the IBM eServer i5 hardware. The Partition Licensed Internal Code (PLIC) is now part of the POWER Hypervisor. For the AIX-5L and Linux operating systems, the layers above the POWER Hypervisor are similar, but their content is characteristic for each operating system. The layers of code supporting Linux and AIX-5L consist of System Firmware and Run-Time Abstraction Services (RTAS): System Firmware is composed of Low Level Firmware and Open Firmware. Low Level Firmware is code that performs server unique input/output (I/O) configurations such as high-speed link (HSL)-2/RIO-G loops and PCI-X bridges. Open Firmware contains the boot time drivers (for example, SCSI, SSA, Token Ring, and Ethernet), the boot manager, and the device drivers required to initialize the PCI adapters and attached devices. The Run-Time Abstraction Services consist of code that supplies platform dependent accesses and can be called from the operating system. The intent of this code is to minimize the need for an operating system to understand hardware unique details. These calls are passed to the POWER Hypervisor that handles all I/O interrupts. The IBM eServer i5 layered code structure makes the IBM eServer i5 platform even more flexible. It also enables easy accommodation of different operating systems. In summary, the POWER Hypervisor allows for multiple operating systems to run on the new hardware. i5/OS, Linux, and AIX 5L are supported. New releases of POWER technology-based Linux and AIX 5L are required and are planned to be during 3Q 2004. No additional investment is required to bring existing applications running on the iSeries today, with an earlier supported OS/400 release, to i5/OS or to the new IBM eServer i5 hardware.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 21

LPAR Basic Definitions


Dynamic LPAR: Ability to move resources between partitions without shutting down a partition Micro-Partitioning: Ability to assign partial processors to a partition, for example, 2.6 processors (smallest unit is .1 processor) Dedicated Partition: Whole processors only, assigned to a partition Authorized operator can manually move processor from a dedicated partition to another partition (no automatic re-assignment to another partition) Capped, Shared Processor Pool Partition: Whole or partial processors in a shared processor pool assigned to the partition Automatic reassignment of processors from one partition to another or manual reassignment Specified maximum number of processors assigned to a partition cannot be exceeded The Processing Units value defines the maximum amount of equivalent processor power that the partition can use. This Processing Units value is used to calculate the number of operating system license entitlements required. Virtual Processors value defines the number of physical processors that the system can access to provide the processing power Uncapped, Shared Processor Pool Partition: Whole or partial processors in a shared processor pool assigned to the partition Automatic reassignment of processors from one partition to another or manual reassignment. See the earlier slides describing uncapped partition support. Specified maximum number of processors assigned to a partition can be exceeded The Processing Units value defines the basic or start up number of processors that the partition will use. The sum of all such processor units in a shared pool cannot exceed the number of permanent processors in the shared pool. Virtual Processors value defines the number of physical processors that the partition can automatically reassign to itself, provided idle processor power is available. This can be set to the number of processors in the shared pool, but can be less. This Virtual Processors value is used to calculate the number of operating system license entitlements required.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 22

LPAR Basic Definitions 2


Shared processor pool: a group of processors defined as a pool that can be automatically and temporarily reassigned to a partition using the pool as the workload resource utilization fluctuates within a partition. Resources can be shared between partitions in increments of .01 processors by either a capped or uncapped partition.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 23

LPAR 8xx compared to eServer i5 at V5R3


Function
Interface

V5R3 on 8xx
DST / SST iSeries Navigator LPAR API

V5R3 on eServer i5
HMC LPAR DST/SST function not available HMC User Roles Super admin Operator Viewer Product engineer Service rep 64 per HMC,2 per system 128 and will be 254 No Primary Partition profile System profile New Profile available immediately

Authority

Service Tools ID

Max. Partitions

32 max Depends on model Primary Secondary Shell New Partition available after IPL

Partition type

Creation

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 24

LPAR 8xx compared to eServer i5 at V5R3 - 2


Function
i5/OS support + I/O BUS

V5R3 on 8xx
Linux IOP level switching Bus Ownership

V5R3 on eServer i5
Linux (New kernel required) AIX Slot level switching No Bus Ownership Dynamic, may be changed without restart partition May be shared among multiple partitions Shared mode of capped and uncapped processing Powered off dedicated will have processors available for share Dynamic may be changed without restart of partition Memory assigned in increments if 16 MB Memory Affinity (only dedicated processors)

Processors

Dynamic, may be changed without restart partition May be shared among multiple partitions

Memory

Dynamic may be changed without restart of partition Memory assigned in increments if 1 MB

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 25

LPAR 8xx compared to eServer i5 at V5R3 - 3


Function V5R3 on 8xx V5R3 on eServer i5
Virtual Server partition is a logical partition providing virtual resource to other partitions Virtual Client is the logical partition that uses the resources Logical Partition have Virtual slots OS/400 partitions can have 432,767 virtual IO slots Virtual IO slots support Virtual SCSI, virtual serial and virtual Ethernet (VLAN) Up to 4094 networks Same + HMC Service Processor + HMC

Virtual I/O

Hosting partition shares resources with Guest Partition Hosted partition gets its resources from OS/400 Virtual IO resources are devices owed by the host partition and can be provided to guest partition

Virtual LAN Partition Console Configuration

Up to 16 networks LAN Console, Direct attach,Twinax Load Source

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 26

LPAR and HMC on eServer i5 V5R3 at a glance


Hardware Management Console required for LPAR Partition Profile, System Profile Create and Manage Partition Profiles Capped, uncapped partitions

eServer i5 partitions HMC


AIX 5L Linux i5/OS

POWER Hypervisor

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 27

HMC Functions
Configuration Management
Server and partition configuration Virtual I/O configuration Capacity on Demand management HMC setup and configuration GUI or command line, local or remote Virtual operating system consoles Server and partition controls Dynamic LPAR resource movement Scheduled operations

Problem Management
Hardware error event collection, analysis, and correlation Gathering of extended debug data Transmission of problems to IBM

Operations Management

Service Management
Guided concurrent repair procedures Hardware inventory collection Service utilities

Change Management
Add/remove server hardware Check and update Licensed Internal Code on servers, and on HMC itself

eServer i5 partitions HMC


AIX 5L Linux i5/OS

POWER Hypervisor

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 28

HMC Profile-based Partition Management


Partition Profiles
Users can create multiple, named profiles for each partition
Provides the ability to predefine multiple partition configurations Useful, for example, for predefining on demand server images for different workloads

Users activate a partition by selecting a profile For POWER5 systems, profiles define:
Partition type (AIX/Linux or OS/400) Processor allocation type (dedicated or shared) Resource requirements (processors, memory, physical I/O, virtual I/O) Resource max/min boundaries Boot mode Workload Management partition groups Partition policies (service authority, monitoring, etc.)

System Profiles
User can create multiple, named system profiles System profiles list one or more LPAR profiles to activate Validation tools are available to make sure the profiles dont conflict

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 29

Notes: LPAR and HMC - 1


A POWER5 Managed Systems is the complete physical system being managed by an HMC. A partition profile defines the configuration of a partition or managed system. The Hardware Management Console allows the user to create multiple profiles for each partition or managed system. A partition profile can be used to start a partition or managed system in a particular configuration. To configure and manage logical partition profiles on your IBM eServer hardware, at least one Hardware Management Console must be connected to the eServer i5. The HMC is not required for running the logical partitions on the eServer i5. i5/OS, Linux, and AIX 5L are supported operating systems that can be installed on IBM eServer i5 Models. These operating systems will operate as independent logical servers. However, partitions share a few system attributes, such as the system serial number, system model, and processor feature code. All other system attributes may vary among partitions. These attributes are stored in the partition profile. A logical partition does not own any resources until it is activated. The resource information that a partition profile stores includes the required number of processors, memory, and hardware resources assigned to that profile. A system profile is an ordered list of partition profiles. When you activate a system profile, the managed system will attempt to activate the partition profiles in list order. A system profile helps with activating or changing the managed system from one complete set of logical partition configurations to another. It is possible for the user to create a system profile that has a partition profile that has overcommitted resources. The Hardware Management Console has a tool to validate the system profile against the currently available system resources and against the total system resources. Validating the system profile ensures that the I/O devices and processing resources are not overcommitted, and it increases the chances that the system profile can be activated. (For overcommitted resources, see next notes page.)

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 30

Notes: LPAR and HMC - 2


A full system partition profile has all of the managed systems resources. Because all of the hardware (both required and desired) are assigned to this partition, no other partitions can be started when the full system partition profile is running. Likewise, the full system partition profile cannot be started while other partitions are running. Each logical partition has at least one, but can have multiple partition profiles. The user can create additional partition profiles with different resource specifications for every logical partition. If multiple partition profiles are created, any partition profile can be the default profile for that particular partition. The Hardware Management Console (HMC) will activate the default profile if a specific partition profile is not selected to be activated. Only one partition profile can be active at a time. To activate another partition profile for the same logical partition, the user has to shut down the logical partition before other profile can be activated. A partition profile is identified by a partition ID. Partition IDs are whole numbers used to identify the logical partition that is created. The HMC shows you all of the resources available on your system. The HMC does not verify if another partition profile is currently using a portion of these resources. Therefore, it is possible to over commit resources. When a partition profile is activated, the system will attempt to allocate the resources assigned to that partition profile. If there are overcommitted resources, the partition profile will not be activated. For example, there are four processors on a managed system. The first partition (ID 1) profile (A) has three processors, and the second partition (ID 2) profile (B) has two processors. If an attempt is made to activate both of these partition profiles at the same time, partition 2 profile B will fail to activate because the processor resources are then overcommitted.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 31

Notes: LPAR and HMC - 3


When setting up a partition profile, you must specify the desired, minimum, and maximum values you want for the profile. For processor resources: If the minimum processing value is not met for a partition profile, the profile will not be activated. If there is a processor failure, the system will attempt to accommodate the minimum processor sizes for all partitions. If all minimums are satisfied, the partitions will restart with all available resources distributed proportionately to their allocation. The desired processing value is the amount of processing resources that the partition will get if processing power is not overcommitted. If the desired amount of processing units is available, the profile will start with the amount processing units indicated. However, if when processors are overcommitted , the partition will get a value that is between the minimum and desired amount. The maximum processing value is the maximum amount of processing resources that the partition will get, even if there are manual attempts to assign the partition more processing power. The above processor specifications are essentially the same for pre-POWER5 and POWER5 systems. The maximum processing resource as discussed above, when applied to pre-POWER5 systems should be considered as a capped partition when referring to the following POWER5 capped and uncapped partition descriptions.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 32

Uncapped Partition support


Automate processing power distribution with uncapped partitions Use resources out of a shared processor pool Uncapped weight value Defined in the Partition Profiles
Minimum, desired, maximum processors
Processor resources

Use what is available example:


Partition starts with 3 processors Partition gets 2 processors when its CPU utilization requires it

Uncapped Partition usage


Performance ranges from best to better than best
WORKLOAD Partition ID Weight Value P2
WEIGHT 100

P3
WEIGHT 100

P4
WEIGHT 200

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 33

Notes: Capped and Uncapped processor support - 1


Here we give a brief explanation of uncapped processor support on a POWER5 system with sufficient resources POWER5 partitions in the shared processing pool can have a sharing mode of capped or uncapped. A capped partition indicates that the logical partition will never exceed its assigned processing capacity. The capped mode could be used if the user knows a software application would never require more than a certain amount of processing power. Any unused processing resources will only be used by the uncapped partitions in the same shared processing pool. We strongly recommend you initially operate your LPAR environment with all active capped partitions until you fully understand the resource utilization of each active partition as compared to the availability of processor and memory) resources system-wide. An uncapped partition means that the partitions assigned current processing capacity may be exceeded, up to the partitions maximum virtual processors settings, when the shared processing pool has any unused processing power. As an example, assume partitions 2, 3, and 4 all had uncapped mode selected. Partition 2 has 3.00 processing units assigned to it, but only 1.00 processing unit was in use. Partition 3 is active with 1.00 processor processing unit, but over time has a workload demand that requires additional processor resources that is overall CPU utilization exceeds 100%. Because partition 3 is uncapped, the server allows the unused 2.00 processing units in partition 2 to be used in partition 3. This situation increases the processing power for partition 3 to 3.00 processing units, and the workload demand needed at that particular time finishes.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 34

Notes: Capped and Uncapped processor support - 2


The uncapped sharing mode is unique in that if the workload requires, that partition using uncapped mode can acquire and use additional processor capacity. This additional capacity can be drawn from capped or uncapped processors not being fully used, any unassigned processors and any processors assigned to a shut down dedicated partition. If a partition using shared processors needs to use all of its defined capacity the uncapped partition using it will give back whatever it took. If a shut down dedicated partition is brought up, it will regain its processors. A partition using uncapped mode may have varying performance but it will always be able to use at least its assigned capacity. Using the same example, assuming that both partitions 3 and 4 both need additional resources at the same time to complete a job, the server can distribute the unused processing resources to both partitions. This distribution process is determined by the uncapped weight of each of the partitions. Uncapped weight is a number in the range of 0 through 255 that you set for each uncapped partition in the shared processing pool. By setting the uncapped weight (255 being the highest weight), any available unused capacity is distributed to contending logical partitions in proportion to the established weight value of the uncapped partitions. The default uncapped weight value is 128. Again using the same example, if partition 3 had an uncapped weight of 100 and partition 4 had an uncapped weight of 200, partition 4 would get twice the unused processing resources that partition 3 received. Finally, when the eServer i5 has partition(s) configured that are using a profile with dedicated processors and these partition(s) are in a power off status, the processors that then are unused in the server, become available for the uncapped partition processor pool. Note: The LPAR class, created by the Rochester eServer Technology Enablement Center (ETEC), includes demonstrations of uncapped processor activity.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 35

LPAR Licensing Entitlement Example


3 dedicate processor partitions, 3 shared pool capped partitions, 2 shared pool uncapped partitions All 5 partitions use a shared pool of 9 processors
Capped i5/OS VirProc=1 ProcUnit=1.0
I5/OS AIX Linux ProcU= ProcU= ProcU=1 1 1 1 2 3
Dedicated Processor Partitions

Capped AIX VirProc=4 ProcUnit=2.0

Capped Linux VirProc=4 ProcUnit=2.0

Uncapped i5/OS VirProc=7 ProcUnit=3.0

Uncapped i5/OS VirProc=3 ProcUnit=1.0

Shared Processor Pool


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Number of license entitlement required: I5/OS: 10 AIX: 3 Linux: Contact Linux distributor

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 36

Notes: LPAR Licensing Entitlement Example


Using the previous definitions of capped and uncapped partitions, shared pools and: For capped partitions: The Processing Units value is used to calculate the number of operating system license entitlements required. For uncapped partitions: This Virtual Processors value is used to calculate the number of operating system license entitlements required. We show this operating system licensing entitlements example: 3 capped partitions, 2 uncapped partitions All 5 partitions use a shared pool of 9 processors Licensing requirements: i5/OS: 10 license entitlements (1 for the dedicated partition plus 9 for the shared pool). Note that the calculation for capped and uncapped i5/OS partitions is 11. This is 1 (ProcU=1) for the dedicated partition plus 10 (VirProc=7 + VirProc=3) for the uncapped partitions. However, we do not require more entitlements for a product than the number of processors in the shared pool. AIX 5L: 3 license entitlements. This is 1 (ProcUnit=1.0) for the dedicated plus 2 (ProcUnit=2.0) for the capped partition Linux: Licensing terms of Linux on the eServer i5 systems are established by the Linux distributors. You must validate the licensing entitlement rules with the Linux distributors. For more information: http://www.ibm.com/eserver/iseries/lpar

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 37

eServer i5 Multiple Operating Systems July 2004 Announcements


i5/OS V5R3
Available: 6/11 V5R3 supported on IBM eServer i5, iSeries 270, 7xx & 8xx LPAR: 254* Partitions, un-capped partitions iSeries Navigator Storage Mgt enhancements, 1 TB storage spaces

AIX 5L 5.2.H
Available: August 2004 pSeries announces AIX 5L 5.2.H packaging, price, GA date Dedicated processors, Static Partitioning, Direct I/O

AIX 5L 5.3.H
Available: September 2004 pSeries announces AIX 5L 5.3.H packaging, price, GA date Micro-partitioning, virtual Ethernet, and virtual storage on the IBM eServer i5 iSeries and pSeries models

eServer i5.Linux on POWER5


Available: September 2004 SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES 3 This version has been tested by IBM Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS 3 This version has been tested by IBM. SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 8 IBM is currently testing this version. Runs only on Integrated xSeries servers attached through IXA

Linux on iSeries Integrated IXS/IXA

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 38

Notes: eServer i5 Multiple Operating Systems July 2004 Status


This slide represents a nice summary of the operating systems supported on eServer i5 systems through the date shown in the slide title. Some additional notes regarding some eServer p5 logical partitioning support functions as they relate to an eServer i5 system: On eServer p5 systems, the Advanced POWER Virtualization function provides micro partitioning, virtual storage and virtual Ethernet support (AIX 5L 5.3 or later required). On eServer i5 systems the Advanced Partitioning Feature that includes the Virtual I/O server is not supported. This is an eServer p5 offering only. On an eServer i5 systems, the virtual I/O support for Linux and AIX partitions requires an active i5/OS partitions. On an eServer p5 system if you want to use Virtual Ethernet with an i5/OS partition (Product Preview only as of August 2004), you will need the eServer p5 Virtual I/O server product.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 39

Notes: eServer i5 Multiple Operating Systems July 2004 Status - 2


Statements of direction Within the next twelve months, IBM intends to announce sub-capacity licensing terms and conditions for additional middleware products, such as WebSphere Application Server and DB2 Enterprise Server Edition, on other platforms such as AIX 5L, i5/OS, OS/400 , and Linux on POWER. IBM also plans to deliver license management tools to assist clients in tracking and reporting their software assets to take advantage of these flexible pricing models. Contact an IBM sales representative for details. IBM plans to extend the capabilities of the IBM eServer p5 product line by introducing support for the i5/OS operating system. This support is planned for selected eServer p5 570 and future high-end eServer p5 models. i5/OS support will provide additional flexibility for large-scale server consolidation where AIX 5L and/or Linux is the primary operating system. i5/OS support will be limited to one processor on selected p5 570 models and up to two on selected high-end models. This capability is planned to be available in the first half 2005.

Note: All statements regarding IBMs future direction and intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice, and represent goals and objectives only. References to list prices refer to IBM list prices only. Reseller prices may vary.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 40

OS Support for Virtualization on eServer i5


i5/OS 5.3
Micro-Partitioning Uncapped Partitions Dynamic LPAR Processor Memory I/O Virtual I/O Hosting Virtual I/O Client Storage Ethernet CD/DVD Tape No Yes No No Yes Yes No No No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No Yes No Yes No No No No No Yes Yes

AIX 5L 5.3
Yes Yes

AIX 5L 5.2
No No

Linux SLES 9
Yes Yes

Linux RHEL 3 U3
Yes Yes

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 41

LPAR Maximums and Shared Processor Considerations


Model/Processor/Server Feature: n processors Maximum Partitions Dedicated full processor Processors activations AIX 5L, 5.2 2 4 4 10 10 20 40 20 40 80 (64 max i5/OS) 120 (64 max i5/OS) 160 (64 max i5/OS) 160 (64 max i5/OS) No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Shared processors/uncapped partition Linux*, AIX 5L 5.3 Yes/No Yes/No Yes/No Yes/Yes Yes/Yes Yes/Yes Yes/Yes Yes/Yes Yes/Yes Yes/Yes Yes/Yes Yes/Yes Yes/Yes

520 8950/0900/0930: 1 Way 520 8951/0901/0921: 1 Way 520 8952/0902: 1 Way 520 8953/0903: 1 Way 520 8954/0904: 1 Way 520 8955/0905: 2 Way 550 8958/0915: 1-4 Way 570 - 8961/0919, 8971/0930: 1-2 Way 570 - 8961/0920, 8971(2x)/0921: 2-4 Way 570 - 8971(4x)/0922: 5-8 Way 570 - 8971(6x)/0924: 9-12 Way 570 - 8971(8x)/0926: 13-16 Way 570 - 8971(8x)/0928: 2-16 Way

* POWER5 Distributor Releases: SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3. The releases are available September 2004.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 42

Notes: LPAR Maximums and Shared Processor Considerations


This slide provides a summary of LPAR maximums and shared processor considerations per operating system running on an eServer i5 system.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 43

Key POWER5 LPAR, Service and Support web sites


I5/OS, AIX 5L, Linux partitioning on POWER5 systems:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2s/en_US/index.htm

I5/OS, AIX 5L, Linux service and support on POWER5 systems:


http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2s/en_US/index.htm

AIX on eServer i5 systems


http://www.ibm.com/eserver/iseries/aix

iSeries console management considerations: mixed POWER5 and nonPOWER5 systems:


http://www-1.ibm.com/servers/eserver/iseries/literature/index.html

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 44

POWER5 Partitioning: eServer Information Center: OS/400


http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2s/en_US/index.htm

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 45

Hardware Management Console description and functions

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 46

Why a Hardware Management Console (HMC)?


Servers are becoming more virtualized Operating systems will continue to have less direct visibility and control over real server hardware A place for hosting advanced platform management applications, outside of the operating systems, to do: Server configuration prior to operating system deployment Service when operating systems are unavailable Coordination of platform-related operations across multiple operating system images, in an independent security model Presentation of virtual operating system consoles These functions should have common user and programming interfaces, independent of any one operating system Supporting both local and remote operation A common delivery vehicle, which enables IBM to deliver more function, more quickly

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 47

Hardware Management Console (HMC)


7316-TF3 display

7310-CR21
(rack)

7310-C03
(desktop)

HMC is dedicated to console function Required on POWER5 servers to create/change partitions or to use Capacity on Demand Not required to operate the partition Saves the cost of typical primary partition

July announcements: Max 64 partitions per HMC across up to 16 servers Max two HMCs per server
1

As shown, with a #7316-TF3 (additional cost), separate 1 EIA unit keyboard and display

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 48

Notes: Hardware Management Console (HMC)


The addition of the IBM eServer i5 models and the Hardware Management Console (HMC) make it more challenging to determine what to use to control your iSeries or i5/OS partition when there is a mixture of POWER5 and non-POWER5 systems in a network that you want to manage LPAR and COD on. Note, in the eServer Information Center (discussed in this presentation) there are topics and PDFs that describe how a customer should make a decision on what to use for their i5/OS console if there is a network of pre POWER5 and POWER5 systems that need to be managed. Because of the variety of ways that iSeries servers can be used, what is best for one customer may not be best for another customer. A White Paper will be available that describes some of the key differences between the console choices, and what the pros and cons are for each. Various scenarios are described, and a console recommendation will be made for each. In some cases, multiple physical consoles will be required in order to get all needed function. The word Console is used generally at some times to also include control panel function. This document is only meant as an overview and for decision making. Details on how to configure and use these console types are available in InfoCenter and in a new redbook on planned for LPAR on POWER5, number SG24-8000. The redbook draft is available at http://www.ibm.com/redbooks The White Paper can be found at: http://www-1.ibm.com/servers/eserver/iseries/literature/index.html

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 49

Notes: Hardware Management Console (HMC) - 2


Notes: HMC connects to the POWER5 service processor which has two dedicated HMC ports. The ports are Ethernet ports. (Different from the two generic 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet LANs.) High availability suggestion: buy a spare Ability to attach more than one HMC to the same server/partition Ensure you order with on-site maintenance option for the HMC (no shipping to repair site) Each HMC must have access to a graphics display, a keyboard, and a mouse. In addition to the displays offered as features of this HMC, the IBM 7316-TF2 Flat Panel Console Mounting kit and 7316-TF3 Flat Panel rack-mounted display, keyboard and mouse and associated VGA switch are supported as well as existing IBM T541H, P76, P77, P260, and P275 graphics displays. The 7316configuraton is recommended for users who are in a space constrained environment. The following PDFs describe the manuals: 7316-TF2 Flat Panel Console Mounting kit, SA38-0631 7316-TF3 Flat Panel rack-mounted display, keyboard and mouse, SA38-0643 Consider customer requirements before ordering a rack-mount HMC. If the customer intends to place the keyboard, display and mouse In the rack, they may frequently need to stand in front of the rack (especially if using the 5250 console capability). The higher price of the rack-mount version is due to the packaging requirements (just like a laptop PC is more expensive than a desktop PC). A machine type 7316-TF3 is recommended if you desire placing the HMC monitor/display in a rack. It provides a 1U high (1.75 inches) device that includes a 17 inch flat panel display and room for a keyboard. The design features a pull-out approach that allows the display to pop up in front of the rack, while exposing the keyboard. Price includes the display. The special keyboard (which includes both trackpoint and touch-pad mouse capabilities) is additional cost. If not using the 7316-TF3 a USB keyboard and mouse and cables must be ordered (or otherwise supplied) separately.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 50

Hardware Management Console (HMC)


Single console for POWER5 server
Pre-installed Linux-based workstation Ethernet, desktop or rack mount Supports local consoles, including 5250 console Web-based System Manager enables local or remote management for HMC control and status

Required on POWER5 servers to create/change partitions (LPAR) or to use Capacity on Demand


Replaces primary partition and improves system resiliency Can be used with 5250 twinax, Operations Console direct attach, Operations Console for the LAN Not required to operate the partition

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 51

HMC More Details


Based on xSeries server technology Minimum HMC configuration includes: 1 GB memory, 40 GB disk, DVD-RAM, 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet port, diskette drive Select options for HMCs display, keyboard, etc HMC connects to POWER5 service processor which has two dedicated HMC ports. The ports are Ethernet ports. (Different from the two generic 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet LANs.) Standard HMC maintenance support is CRU. Suggest upgrading support to IBM On-Site Repair to be more consistent with POWER5 servers support agreement. High availability suggestion: buy a spare HMC. Maximum of 2 HMCs per system. HMC not used on earlier iSeries servers. Additional non-HMC i5/OS consoles running Ops Navigator.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 52

Notes: More on the HMC


The addition of the IBM eServer i5 models and the Hardware Management Console (HMC) make it more challenging to determine what to use to control your iSeries or i5/OS partition when there is a mixture of POWER5 and non-POWER5 systems in a network that you want to manage LPAR and COD on. Note, in the eServer Information Center (discussed in this presentation) there are topics and PDFs that describe how a customer should make a decision on what to use for their i5/OS console if there is a network of pre POWER5 and POWER5 systems that need to be managed. Because of the variety of ways that iSeries servers can be used, what is best for one customer may not be best for another customer. A White Paper will be available that describes some of the key differences between the console choices, and what the pros and cons are for each. Various scenarios are described, and a console recommendation will be made for each. In some cases, multiple physical consoles will be required in order to get all needed function. The word Console is used generally at some times to also include control panel function. This document is only meant as an overview and for decision making. Details on how to configure and use these console types are available in InfoCenter and in a new redbook on planned for LPAR on POWER5, number SG24-8000. The redbook is planned for 3Q 2004. The White Paper should be found from the main iSeries web site late 2004. Notes: HMC connects to the POWER5 service processor which has two dedicated HMC ports. The ports are Ethernet ports. (Different from the two generic 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet LANs.) High availability suggestion: buy a spare. Ability to attach more than one HMC to the same server/partition. Ensure you order with on-site maintenance option for the HMC (no shipping to repair site)

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 53

HMC GUI top-level navigation


Manage HMC configuration, users, services, ... Guide setup wizard and online documents Update your Licensed Internal Code Manage your servers and partitions Service tools to analyze and repair Set up security for remote GUI access

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 54

HMC: Manual Dynamic Processor Movement example

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 55

Notes: HMC: Manual Dynamic Processor Movement example


In this slide we give an example of using the HMC to move .25 processing units (micro partitioning) from a selected partition to, in this example a Linux (Linux(3)) partition. You see the projected results of the processor movement for the from partition and the to partition (After move text). You also see information on virtual processors and uncapped weights for uncapped partition support.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 56

HMC User Interfaces and Access


Local GUI
Starts automatically whenever the HMC is started Requires user login prior to access

Remote GUI
Uses an installable standalone remote client application (WebSM Client)
Windows (NT,XP) or Linux Downloadable as an installable application directly from the HMC, using a web browser

Also supported from one HMC to another, or from AIX 5L Can be SSL secured through public/private key files
Generate on the HMC, and transfer to client systems

Local Command Line


Launched from a right-click menu option on the HMC desktop Restricted to a set of supported HMC commands

Remote Command Line


Accessed through encryption-protected Secure Shell (SSH) Key files can be set up and exchanged to avoid password prompts
Very useful for automation and scripting without human intervention

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 57

Advanced System Management User Interface


Service Processor Menus
Accessed by web browser Secure (HTTPS) access Password authentication Basic server operations
No partition functions

Remotely manage systems without an HMC Many of these functions are also on the HMC
A few less common ones only in ASMI Browser interface can be launched on the HMC

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 58

Web-based System Manager Remote Client


Two remote clients available:
Web-based System Manager Remote Client Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start Either client works the same after installation

You can access your HMC remotely by installing this remote client on your PC workstation. The remote client provides flexibility by allowing you to manage your system from virtually anywhere you have a PC. Up to 5 remote clients can be logged in simultaneously Uses SSL security Some tasks not performed using the remote client
These tasks include determining the level of HMC code, restarting the HMC interface, and configuring System Manager Security for certificate authority or viewing overview and status information.

For more information: eServer Information Center


http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/pubs/html/as400/infocenter.html

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 59

Web-based System Manager Remote Client comparisons


Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start
Available for Linux and Windows platforms Checks for updates every time it launches and if updates are available, downloads them automatically Launches from the Java Web Start console Slow performance for automatic downloads if you are using a cable modem or DSL connection Requires a browser Remote client security is included in the installation process. It is not a separate step

Web-based System Manager Remote Client


Available for Linux and Windows platforms Updates require that you uninstall the previous version and install the current version Installs via an InstallShield wizard You can select the installation location

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 60

Hardware Management Console setup and networking capabilities

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 61

HMC Guided Setup Wizard

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 62

HMC Service Functions


Guided setup
Leads users through all the tasks needed to set up an HMC

Service Focal Point


Collection of hardware and LIC serviceable events

Licensed Internal Code updates from the HMC


For initial release, requires system to be shut down Concurrent firmware update capability is in plan

System dump captures to the HMC


Hardware scan dump, or hypervisor dump sent to HMC Automatic capture for remote support

Guided Hardware Service Procedures


More concurrent maintenance functions are in plan

Service Utilities
LED controls, monitoring policies, partition operations

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 63

HMC Security
Restricted Shell
Provides access to supported HMC command line functions Accessible remotely through SSH Also accessible as a command prompt window on the HMC itself

Granular User Access Controls


Define Task and Resource Roles that define accessible lists of user tasks and resources (systems, partitions, etc) Assign roles to users to define their access rights For example, access could be limited to a single partition

Network Security Firewall Controls


Define which HMC network services should be accessible on which physical network interfaces For example, limit remote WebSM or SSH access to a single interface, or none

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 64

HMC Communications
Service processor
HMC SSL communication Power control Error event handling Licensed Internal Code updates System configuration data Partitioning control Virtual I/O definition Capacity on Demand Concurrent Service Gather hardware error events Gather hardware inventory Ethernet Shutdown/reboot (AIX/Linux) Dynamic LPAR (AIX/Linux) Use of i5 OS VPN connections Part#1 i5 OS

M = Memory P = Processor A = PCI Adapter

Part#2 i5 OS
PPP PP MMMM
AAAAA

Part#3 Linux

Part#4 AIX 5L
PPP MM
AAAA

Hypervisor (pass-through)

PPPP PPP MMMMM


AAAAAAA

P M
AAA

SLIC

SLIC

Linux Kernel

AIX Kernel

Hypervisor
Service Processor
HMC Ethernet

Operating Systems

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 65

HMC network possibilities


Local HMC:
Any physical HMC that is directly connected to the system it manages via a private network. Usually the first or only local HMC in your private network is a DHCP server in your private network and a DHCP client in your open network.

Remote HMC:
Any HMC used to remotely access another HMC or managed system. Remote HMCs are usually present in an open network Remote HMCs can also be local HMCs.

Web-based System Manager Remote Client:


Usually a PC installed with Web-based System Manager software. Use this PC to access other HMCs remotely Web-based System Manager Remote Clients can be present in private and open networks. You can perform most management tasks using the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 66

HMC Network Topology for i5 Systems


IBM

Admin LAN
Network (Opt.)
Internal PCI modem

LAN to Partitions

Network (Opt) Ethernet Service Network

IBM
Rack mount HMC option

Private Network
Ethernet connections to service processors, HMC provides DHCP services

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 67

Private and Open Network Options


IBM

HMC

HMC automatically assigns IP address and connects to systems DHCP Server


SSL -En cryp ted

Manual setup of Service Processor IP parameters

Private
Network

Other network devices

Open
Service Processors request IP addresses from HMC

Remote HTTPS connection from web browser

Manually enter IP address or range on HMC, HMC finds and connects to systems

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 68

HMC Electronic Connections to IBM


1. Local Modem
This option enables you to send problem information and system data to your service provider using the modem on your HMC. You may want to select this option if the following are true:
Your HMC does not have access to a high-speed Internet connection. You do not have any I5/OS logical partitions with high-speed Internet connections

2. Internet VPN
This option enables you to send problem information to your service provider using a high-speed Internet connection on your HMC This is the fastest connection option available on the HMC, but some environments restrict this type of connectivity for security reasons. Before you select this option, be sure your company's security policy permits this type of connection

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 69

HMC Electronic connections to IBM (contd)


3. Connecting through other systems or logical partitions
This option enables you to send problem information to your service provider through a pass-through system. This pass-through system can be another HMC or a logical partition on your server that supports the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP). Currently, only logical partitions with the V5R3 level of I5/OS can support L2TP, so are the only logical partitions that can be used as pass-through systems You may want to select this option if the following are true:
Your HMC does not have access to a high-speed Internet connection You have an I5/OS logical partition with high-speed Internet connections, running V5R3

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 70

Electronic connections to IBM


LIC Fix Strategy The HMC connection type that you select here also dictates how you will install your server LIC fixes.
For example, if you choose to connect to your service provider through your HMC, you will install server LIC fixes through your HMC

For I5/OS logical partitions, use the normal I5/OS PTF install functions on your service partition for installing fixes, rather than using the HMC

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 71

LPAR, HMC, Service Partition


Existing iSeries LPAR environments (non-POWER5) already have procedures for handling service and support functions among partitions
Reporting all hardware and software problems Receiving fixes (PTFs), distributing and applying fixes to the affected partitions Other services

On POWER5 HMC is used for primary hardware service and support Service tools run in each logical partition and work with the (HMC) as part of the total service environment iSeries Consideration:
One (any) active logical partition on your IBM eServer i5 system be designated as a service partition Consider the partition running applications or a small configuration partition only active for operating service functions Provides traditional service functions such as reporting software problems, receiving operating system-based fixes, .... or backup your HMC. Can complement HMC service and support functions

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 72

Service/Problem Flows

Service information and problems flow from each logical partition to the service provider using a VPN connection, as follows:
Linux logical partition > HMC > OS/400 service partition > Service and support AIX logical partition > HMC > OS/400 service partition > Service and support OS/400 logical partition > HMC (for service information) > OS/400 service partition > Service and support OS/400 logical partition > OS/400 service partition (for problems) > Service and support OS/400 service partition > Service and support

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 73

LPAR Service and Support Configuration Examples

Basic set up

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2s/en_US/index.htm

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 74

Notes: LPAR Service and Support Configuration Examples - 1


In this slide we show three of the possible service and support configurations when using an HMC device in a POWER5 system LPAR environment. For more details than shown here, review the referenced documentation (such as shown in the Service and Support manual PDF cover) . This documentation is available in the eServer Information Center that we discussed earlier in this presentation. In the graphic on the left we show an eServer i5 LPAR configuration with one OS/400, one Linux and one AIX partition and all service and support functions running through the HMC. This requires appropriate configuration parameters on the HMC and minimal set up in partition. Each logical partition communicates with the HMC. The HMC Electronic Service Agent and Service Focal Point support is configured to connect to your service or support organization. The IBM eServer hardware can be configured to automatically handle these tasks for you. If the applications are enabled, your server can report a problem to the service or support organization without your intervention. If a service person is needed, you can arrange to have the service performed and to recover from a problem as quickly as possible. In the graphic in the middle we show the multiple operating system LPAR partitions using the HMC device for managing service information and problems. We add showing an OS/400 partition (could be any active partition) designated as an OS/400 service partition. In this scenario we want all partitions to use the HMC communications connection to the IBM service and support site. You set up the HMC and its communications hardware to connect to the service provider. You set up each partition to report through the modem and its Point to Point (PPP) set up, in our example, on the HMC.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 75

Notes: LPAR Service and Support Configuration Examples - 2


The PDF manual shown describes how to set this up using the HMC wizards. You need to refer to the operating system unique service and support documentation and wizards to route its service and support data to the HMC. The POWER5 OS/400 Partitioning manual contains this information. In the lower right graphic we show a modification to the middle configuration by continuing to have Linux and AIX 5L service information and problems reporting to the HMC and the i5/OS partition reporting service information to the HMC. One of the i5/OS partitions is designated as a service partition and you can see OS/400 problems in the other OS/400 partition are reported directly to the i5/OS partition. This is because we know all connections to service and support are going through the communications configuration of the partition designated as the service partition. The i5/OS partition has the connection for all service information and problems to the service and support provider. In this scenario you still set up the HMC to connect to the service provider, which can be used. However, in this scenario we are also configuring the HMC to route the service and support and problem information routed to it to the i5/Os partition with the communications connection to the service and support provider. This connection could be a modem for PPP connections or, as shown, a VPN connection through the internet to the service and support site. To do this routing, using the appropriate HMC wizard, you would specify connecting through other systems or logical partitions. On the i5/OS service partition, you set up your PPP (modem) or VPN connection using the enhanced i5/0S Universal Connection wizards. Note, the Communications presentation in the Technical Overview set of presentations discusses the V5R3 Universal Connection support.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 76

Using operating system or HMC for fixes


Using operating system Partition (In-Band)

I5/OS
Service Partition

AIX

LINUX

I5/OS

Using HMC (Out-Band)

SLIC
Firmware

SLIC

Firmware
Perm | Temp

WebSM client

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 77

Notes: Using operating system or HMC for fixes


When an HMC is being used to manage partitions, capacity on demand, or other POWER5-based detail hardware level functions, there are two ways to request and receive fixes: Using the operating system (i5/OS, in our case): In some cases this technique has been referred to as In-Band, so we include that term here. This is the normal way iSeries customers have requested fixes prior to the availability of the HMC functions. Using the HMC itself: In some cases this technique has been referred to as Out-Band, so we include that term here. These fixes include firmware, as well as microcode, i5/OS, or licensed programs fixes.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 78

I5/OS Using operating system (In-Band)


Getting fixes through the operating system without an HMC Virtually the same as current OS/400 implementation New service objects MHxxxx PTF
Using operating system Partition (In-Band)

I5/OS
Service Partition

These are the firmware update code fixes Update of firmware occurs during full system IPL

SLIC
Firmware

Firmware

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 79

Using the HMC (Out-Band)


Getting fixes with an HMC or using an HMC All partitions get service from HMC
I5/OS Linux AIX

Firmware update can be driven by any partition Other partitions unaware of update Firmware update by OS should not affect other partitions
Using HMC (Out-Band)

Firmware

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 80

VSP panel functions


Service processors have traditionally interacted with users via the 'Panel Function' interface This is simply a numbered function that is input by the user on the panel of the machine.
Function 3 Re-IPL partition (hard shutoff/poweron) Function 8 Emergency partition Poweroff Function 21 Make DST available Function 22 Force Partition Dump Function 34 Retry MSD IPL Function 42 Force PHYP kernel dump Function 43 Force FSP Reset/Reload Function 65 Deactivate Remote DST Function 66 Activate Remote DST Function 67 ReIPL SP IOP Function 68 Power off SP IOP and IOA slots Function 69 Power on SP IOP and IOA slots Function 70 Force SP MFIOP Dump

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 81

Notes: VSP panel functions


As described at the beginning of this presentation, we discussed the Service Processor and the Virtual Service Processor (VSP) required internally be each partition, regardless of operating system for that partition. This slide is a summary of the VSP control panel functions for an i5/OS partition.

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 82

LPAR Creation example

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 83

LPAR Setup with HMC

I5/OS
Partition 1

Linux
Partition 2
POWER5 Hypervisor

Unassigned Resources

Status Command/Response Virtual Consoles

HMC

Non-Volatile RAM

Processors

Mem Regions Allocation I/O Slots Tables

LPAR

Service Processor

Ethernet

Server

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 84

LPAR Creation Wizard Default Type

Partition type default is now based on system type (iSeries or pSeries)

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 85

LPAR Creation Wizard Virtual Processors

HMC automatically establishes appropriate defaults for virtual processor amounts, but these can be modified through advanced settings

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 86

LPAR Creation Wizard Memory Information


The memory panel for profile creation now shows both the installed memory, and the amount of memory available for use by partitions

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 87

LPAR Creation Wizard I/O Information


I/O Configuration panels provide additional detailed information on each adapter slot, accessed through a Properties button

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 88

LPAR Creation Wizard Required I/O


I/O Devices marked as Required will be reserved for the exclusive use of this partition, and cannot be accidentally moved through dynamic LPAR

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 89

System Profile Verification


System Profile Validation can be used to ensure that there are sufficient resources and no resource conflicts, when activating a set of partitions

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 90

System and Partition State Names

State names have been changed. A running system is now shown as Operating state, and inactive partitions are now shown as Not Activated state

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 91

System Properties I/O View

Overall list of I/O resources and their partition ownerships can be seen by selecting the Properties task on a managed system

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 92

Consoles on i5 eServer

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 93

i5/OS Console Choices


Starting in V5R3, the types of consoles that can be used to control i5/OS are:
1. Twinax terminal 2. Operations Console direct-connect 3. Operations Console LAN-connect 4. Hardware Management Console (HMC) 5. ASMI (Advanced System Management Interface)

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 94

Console Function Comparison Summary


Functions Local 5250 access Remote 5250 access One PC can manage multiple partitions/systems LPAR, CUoD managed with this Perform graphical disk management Remote control panel functions Requires IOP, dedicated IOA Supported via LAN Customer installed software on PC OS/400 equivalent languages EZSetup functions available Can be used for remote service Twinax Yes No No No No No Yes No No Yes No No Operations Console (pre i5 and i5 models unless noted) Yes Yes Yes (LAN only) Yes (pre-i5 models only Yes Yes (but no i5 remote power on/off) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes HMC i5 models only Yes Yes (via pass through) Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No No (limited languages) No Yes new Service Focal Point function

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 95

i5/OS Consoles
Ops Console LAN Uses slot C3 for #9771, #9793, and #9794 Can use slots C2 and C5 if a #2849 or #2744 installed Cannot use the embedded Ethernet port Cannot us dual Ethernet adapter Ops Console direct Model 520 uses slot C3 for #9771, #9793, and #9794 Model 570 uses slot C3 for #9771, #9793, and #9794 Twinax console Model 520 Uses slot C3 for #9771, #9793, and #9794 Slots C2 and C5 if a #4746 installed Model 570 Uses slot C3 for #9771, #9793, and #9794 Slots C4 and C6 if a #4746 installed

2004 IBM Corporation PAGE 96

LPAR Migration

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Migrating you existing iSeries LPAR configurations

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Notes: Migrating you existing iSeries LPAR configurations


When you have an existing LPAR configuration on a non POWER5 system and want to duplicate those partition on a new POWER5 system you can recreate the partitions new on the target POWER5 or, optionally used a migration/export function of your existing LPAR partitions and import that export media to the target POWR5 system. This slide gives a high level overview of the export/import technique is available to you.

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Upgrade 810 to 520


In this scenario the primary becomes P3 The disk units in CEC become P3 Will have to clean up P0 on Upgrade Must attach old hardware before new No reduction of disk drives required

P1

P2

P3 (P0)

P0

P1

P2

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Upgrade LPAR 825 to 570


Primary has too many drives Reduce drives to >= 8 Remember RAID sets Install old tower first Loop connections HSL-2 Power up to standby Power down Swap out HSL-2 for HSL-G Power up to standby Power down and add new IO Power up completely

P1

P2

Existing IO

P3 (P0)

New IO P0 P1 P2 Add to P1 and P3

Displaced Drives

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Alternate upgrade LPAR 825 to 570


Ignore CEC/Primary IO 825 powered down Load LPAR config on HMC No LPAR in new CEC Attach old IO Power to standy Fix LPAR config Add other old IO Power up fully

Existing IO

P1

P2

P0

P1

P2

Removed Drives and cards

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Publications and Education

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LPAR on PowerPC Redbook SG24-8000

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HMC Education
1. 2. 3. 4. Go to http://www.ibm.com/servers/resourcelink On the Home page select "Register for a user ID and password On the Register for Access page, select the type of userid requested On the Self-registration page, fill in your email address and a preferred ID, then click Submit

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HMC Education

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HMC Education

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Information Centers
The eServer Hardware Info Center contains information on the POWER5 models...everything from planning for the hardware, installing the hardware (and the consoles), setting up partitioning and CoD, to servicing the hardware
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2s/en_US/index.htm http://www.ibm.com/eserver/iseries/infocenter. Select eServer Information Center in the left navigation bar.

iSeries pre POWER5 and OS/400 V5R3 (i5/OS)


http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r3/ic2924/index.htm

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IBM

i5 Hardware Planning Site

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2s/en_US/index.htm

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IBM

i5 Hardware Planning Site

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2s/en_US/index.htm

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LPAR and HMC Summary

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LPAR on eServer i5 at a glance


Partition Profile, System Profile Create and Manage Partition Profiles Capped, uncapped partitions HMC required for a partitioned eServer i5
Required for setup Can run without HMC Used to move resources between POWER5 partitions Movement can be scheduled within HMC or through generated scripts to run from the Web-based System Management Remote Client (connected to HMC at run time) Starting a partition can be specified at system IPL eServer i5 partitions or requires manual start from HMC HMC Used for service functions
AIX 5L Linux i5/OS

POWER Hypervisor

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Trademarks and Disclaimers


8 IBM Corporation 1994-2004. All rights reserved. References in this document to IBM products or services do not imply that IBM intends to make them available in every country. The following terms are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both:
AIX AIX/L AIX 5L AIX 5L (logo) AS/400 AS/400e DB2 DB2 Universal DB2 OLAP Server DataPropagator Domino e business(logo) e(logo)business e(logo)server eServer Enterprise Storage Server Hipersockets IBM IBM Virtualization Engine IBM(logo) iSeries Lotus MQSeries Notes OS/400 POWER POWER4 POWER5 Power Architecture Power Everywhere POWER Hypervisor POWER6 pSeries Quickplace Rational RS/6000 S/390 ThinkPad Tivoli TotalStorage WebSphere xSeries z/OS zSeries 400 i5/OS

Rational is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation and Rational Software Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. Intel, Intel Inside (logos), MMX and Pentium are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both. Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries. SET and the SET Logo are trademarks owned by SET Secure Electronic Transaction LLC. Java and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both. Other company, product or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. Information is provided "AS IS" without warranty of any kind. All customer examples described are presented as illustrations of how those customers have used IBM products and the results they may have achieved. Actual environmental costs and performance characteristics may vary by customer. Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from a supplier of these products, published announcement material, or other publicly available sources and does not constitute an endorsement of such products by IBM. Sources for non-IBM list prices and performance numbers are taken from publicly available information, including vendor announcements and vendor worldwide homepages. IBM has not tested these products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance, capability, or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the capability of non-IBM products should be addressed to the supplier of those products. All statements regarding IBM future direction and intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice, and represent goals and objectives only. Contact your local IBM office or IBM authorized reseller for the full text of the specific Statement of Direction. Some information addresses anticipated future capabilities. Such information is not intended as a definitive statement of a commitment to specific levels of performance, function or delivery schedules with respect to any future products. Such commitments are only made in IBM product announcements. The information is presented here to communicate IBM's current investment and development activities as a good faith effort to help with our customers' future planning. Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBM benchmarks in a controlled environment. The actual throughput or performance that any user will experience will vary depending upon considerations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user's job stream, the I/O configuration, the storage configuration, and the workload processed. Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual user will achieve throughput or performance improvements equivalent to the ratios stated here. Photographs shown are of engineering prototypes. Changes may be incorporated in production models.

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