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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill,

2002)

This map was prepared by an experienced editor at HBS Publishing, not by a teaching professor. Faculty at Harvard Business School were not involved in analyzing the textbook or selecting the cases and articles. Every case map provides only a partial list of relevant items from HBS Publishing. To explore alternatives, or for more information on the cases listed below, visit: www.hbsp.harvard.edu/educators
Case Title Institution, HBSP Product Number, Length, Teaching Note Geographical and Industry Setting, Company Size, Time Frame Abstract, Key Subjects

Chapter 1: Foundations of Information Systems in Business Information HBS N/A Technology 31p Management 301147 from 1960-2000 (HBS background note) Richard L. Nolan Chapter 2: Competing with Information Technology Note on the HBS N/A Structural 19p Analysis of 376054 Industries Michael E. Porter

Covers the history of IT management from 1960 to the present. Applies the Stages Theory as a basis to trace the evolution of the three dominant IT designs (mainframes, microcomputers, networks) and how companies used and managed IT in each era. Subjects: Information age; Information technology; Internet; Management philosophy

Online Market Makers (HBS background note) Thomas Eisenmann ; Christopher J. Hackett

HBS 28p 801308

N/A

Provides a framework for the analysis of industry structure. Identifies the major structural features that influence the profit potential in industries and some illustrative implications of these for strategy formulation. Can be used as a reference note for business policy courses and/or as the background for a lecture on industry analysis. Subjects: Business policy; Industry analysis; Industry structure; Strategy formulation Describes the business model for online market makers, firms that use the Internet to organize a marketplace, providing participants with a virtual "place" to trade, rules to govern their exchanges, and infrastructure to support trading. First it proposes a definition of market making and presents different ways to categorize online market makers. Next it describes how online market makers create value for market participants. Then it examines the economics of market making, focusing on revenue and cost drivers, using both online and offline examples. Building on that analysis, the final section examines

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
the risks and potential payoffs to online market makers from pursuing aggressive growth strategies. Teaching Purpose: To help students understand the online market maker business model, and to provide a framework to help them analyze the strategic decisions made by these companies. Explores the value proposition offered by these companies and the economic imperatives they face. Finally, seeks to provide a framework for evaluating whether the adoption of aggressive growth strategies is prudent for online market makers. Subjects: Entrepreneurship; Internet; Market analysis; Market definition; New economy; Online information services; Strategy formulation; World Wide Web A start-up intellect exchange initially offered a public expertise exchange, connecting experts with clients. Now management wonders whether a new, more focused strategy will succeed. Subjects: Consulting; Electronic commerce; Knowledge management

Intellect Exchange, Inc. James I. Cash Jr.; Janis L. Gogan

15p 802113

A Note on Knowledge Management David A. Garvin Artemis March

HBS 20p 398031

Boston, MA Industry Setting: consulting Company Size: start-up Number of Employees: 15 Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001 N/A

Provides an overview of knowledge management, including descriptions of knowledge management strategies, processes, organization, infrastructure, systems, and challenges. Describes the approaches at two leading consulting firms, Arthur Andersen and Ernst & Young, who have been pioneers in applying the approach to their own internal operations. Teaching Purpose: To expose students to the elements of knowledge management and contrast the approaches that two leading firms have taken. Subjects: Consulting; Information systems; Knowledge management

Chapter 3: The Internetworked E-Business Enterprise Akamai HBS Global Industry Technologies 25p Setting: Internet Thomas 802132 Gross Revenue: Eisenmann $175 million revenues Number of Employees: 800 Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End:

As the leading content delivery network, Akamai helps Internet companies deliver web site content to end users with fewer delays and lower costs. This case describes strategic management challenges facing Akamai in late 2001, as the three-year old firm's growth slows due to the failure of many dotcom customers. Akamai has launched a new product, EdgeSuite, which promises significant cost savings for large enterprise customers--a new market for

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
2001 Akamai. Describes several decisions facing management as they accelerate efforts to penetrate enterprise customers. Teaching Purpose: To explain how the Internet's network of networks architecture can lead to data delivery delays and solutions to improve performance; and to illustrate the challenges confronting a network infrastructure company as it shifts its target customer focus to include enterprise customers, in particular, sales and channel management priorities. Subjects: Business policy; Entrepreneurship; Information technology; Internet; Networks; New economy; Strategy formulation; Telecommunications Cisco is the world's largest manufacturer and distributor of routers and switches. In order to achieve this position, it has adopted an aggressive growth strategy, acquiring companies, their employees, and new employees at a rate of 250 to 300 employees per month. The Cisco Employee Connection (CEC), a corporate intranet, is the primary means by which new employees are absorbed and acculturated. The CEC is also the principal means of interaction for the multifunctional work team approach Cisco employs. This case critically assesses this approach to scaling an organization and the extent to which it can be maintained and transferred. Subjects: Computer industry; Corporate culture; Electronics; Employee training; Intranets; Teams Sun Microsystems is a pioneer in networking computing. Sun's servers maintain a large market share and are considered highly scaleable. The case describes the n-tier architecture for building and managing large networks in which thousands of workers and customers are connected to enterprise servers. Teaching Purpose: To analyze and assess network architectures in structure and cost for building enterprise-wide intranets. Subjects: Computer industry; Computer systems; Implementation; Information technology; Intranets; Networks; Silicon Valley; Technological change Describes how Information Technology Services Director Mohamed Muhsin planned to restructure the bank's information technology in response to President Jim Wolfensohn's call to build a knowledge bank. Several reorganization efforts taken by the bank in the 1980s led to a decentralized system, which hindered the access to and sharing of information within the bank. By the early 1990s the

Cisco Systems, Inc.: Managing Corporate Growth Using an Intranet Michael Parent ; Debra Rankin

Ivey School/UWO 13p 97E018 TN available

United States Industry Setting: electronics Company Size: large Case Time Frame Start: 1997 Case Time Frame End: 1997

Sun Microsystems and the N-tier Architecture Richard L. Nolan Kelley Porter

HBS 20p 399037

Silicon Valley, CA Industry Setting: hi-tech Gross Revenue: $9.8 billion revenues Number of Employees: 22,500 Case Time Frame Start: 1998 Case Time Frame End: 1998 United States Industry Setting: development banking Case Time Frame Start: 1996 Case Time Frame End: 1997

Information at the World Bank: In Search of a Technology Solution (A) W. Earl Sasser Jr.; Carin-Isabel Knoop ; Josep

HBS 21p 898053 B case available

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
Valor organization's values had shifted, calling for more collaboration among all bank sectors. The creation and implementation of a standardized, user friendly information technology system was needed. Describes how Muhsin planned to restructure and the challenges he would face. Teaching Purpose: Students are asked to decide how a decentralized institution like the World Bank can build a centralized information system and how, in turn, to teach and encourage the sharing of information. Subjects: Banking; Centralization; Decentralization; Information systems; Knowledge management; Organizational change; Organizational structure In 1998, chief information officers (CIOs) in the highly competitive international gases and chemicals business came face-to-face with the reality that electronic commerce capability was a strategic necessity. Computer-supported collaborative work, electronic commerce, and Internet systems were cited by the CIOs as critical technologies in 1998. The increasing strategic importance of electronic commerce commanded the attention of the senior executives of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., an international corporation with headquarters in Trexlertown, PA. With sales of $4.6 billion in 1997, Air Products held the number two position in the gases industry in the United States, behind Praxair, and was the fourth largest provider in the worldwide market. Air Products Management Information Systems (MIS) Vice President Joe McMakin and his colleagues recognized the opportunity: they could improve service to customers by automating the buying, selling, and distribution of products, while simultaneously improving productivity and realizing cost savings. Teaching Purpose: Reveals the issues and processes involved in corporate implementation of electronic commerce initiatives. A rewritten version of an earlier case. Subjects: Chemicals; Computer networks; Computer systems; Electronic commerce; Information systems; Information technology; Internet Introduces students to the concepts and issues related to Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) technology. Begins with a stylized example of ERP in action. Following this introduction, a brief history of the ERP industry is provided with reference to major events and players. Additional case examples of successful and unsuccessful implementations are

Electronic Commerce at Air Products F. Warren McFarlan ; Melissa Dailey

HBS 17p 399035

Pennsylvania Industry Setting: chemicals Gross Revenue: $4.6 billion revenues Number of Employees: 16,000 Case Time Frame Start: 1998 Case Time Frame End: 1998

Chapter 4: Electronic Business Systems Enterprise HBS N/A Resource 8p Planning, 699020 (technology note) Robert D. Austin Cedric X. Escalle Mark Cotteleer

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
offered to enhance students' understanding of the impact ERP can have on the organization and to illuminate ERP issues. Teaching Purpose: Introduces students to the definitions, concepts, and issues surrounding ERP technologies. Subjects: Enterprise systems; ERP; Information systems; Information technology; Operations management; Software Reviews Tektronix's implementation of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution in all three of its global business divisions. This case tells the story of three implementations, each with its own character and requirements. Tektronix managers needed to synchronize the requirements of each division with the company's overall need to standardize business practices and its desire to adhere to a common business model across the enterprise. Details the difficulty of major business change in a mature business and technical environment. Subjects: Electronics; Enterprise systems; ERP; Implementation; Information technology; Reengineering Moore Medical is a medium-sized distributor of medical supplies to practitioners such as podiatrists and emergency medical technicians. It has relied on traditional customer channels to communicate product offerings, promotions, and availability, and to take orders. It is now attempting to transition into a "bricks and clicks" distributor. It has already made substantial investments in an eCommerce web site and in "back office" ERP software to improve the fulfillment performance of its four distribution centers. The ERP software has not lived up to expectations in all areas, and the company must decide whether to invest in more modules. It must also decide whether to make a significant additional investment in CRM software. Teaching Purpose: Examines the factors underpinning IT investment decisions. The decision is complicated by the fact that the company has recently made substantial IT investments that have impacted financial performance and caused organizational disruption. In addition, it is not clear that all of Moore's known issues related to customer retention and satisfaction will be addressed by the Customer Relationship Management (CRM) under consideration. Students preparing the case must understand this environment and formulate an IT investment program that makes sense within it. Subjects: Electronic commerce;

Tektronix, Inc.: Global ERP Implementation Robert D. Austin Richard L. Nolan George Westerman Mark Cotteleer

HBS 22p 699043

Teaching Note available

Pacific Northwest Industry Setting: electronics Gross Revenue: $2 billion revenues Case Time Frame Start: 1993 Case Time Frame End: 1998

Moore Medical Corp. Andrew McAfee Gregory Bounds

HBS 18p 601142

Connecticut Industry Setting: medical supplies Gross Revenue: $124 million revenues Number of Employees: 303 Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
ERP; Information technology; Internet; Medical supplies; Operations management; Order processing; Resource allocation; Supply chain Grey Worldwide Hong Kong and China (Grey WWHK/China) is repositioning itself through defined emarketing and CRM strategies for the Asian market. The case examines how integral its customer relationship group is in building a CRM strategy to deliver client value proposition. Grey WWHK/China has strong umbrella brand equity, but the brand capital has to be invigorated through a renewed e-marketing focus. Constrained by changing market conditions, particularly industry pressure on commission margins, Grey WW-HK/China needs to differentiate itself and is assessing CRM's value in developing loyal and lifetime customers. However, in a growing Asian market, Grey WW-HK/China is in heated competition with other players. Grey WWHK/China's CRM team is developing an Asiaspecific CRM blueprint for its internal management, something that is transferable to Grey's clients. Grey WW-HK/China is considering merging technology with traditional marketing philosophy, and the team is expected to deliver a proposal that outlines the CRM tools that Grey WW-HK/China should use to reposition its brand and build customer loyalty. Subjects: Brand equity; China; Communications industry; Customer relations; Implementation; Knowledge management; Market positioning Describes a dramatic decrease in service levels (ontime shipments) from the warehouse network of a large electronics distributor. Students need to analyze the root cause of the problem and propose actions. Teaching Purpose: To reinforce basic tools of operations analysis in a warehouse setting (process flow, cycle time, bottlenecks, throughput times, manpower loading, etc.) and teach students the need for root cause analysis. A rewritten version of an earlier case. Subjects: Distribution; Electronics; Information systems; Operations management Syncra Systems makes Internet-based software that allows supply chain partners to compare disparate forecasts and production plans, to uncover any discrepancies among them, and to address these issues. However, many potential Syncra customers perceive that they will pay for the software others will benefit from, making Syncra's products a questionable investment. Syncra must find effective

Grey Worldwide: Strategic Repositioning Through CRM Julie Yu ; Ali F. Farhoomand ; Shamza Khan ; Marissa McCauley

U. of Hong Kong 18p HKU164 TN available

Hong Kong

Delivery Problems at Arrow Electronics, Inc. (A) Andrew McAfee Frances X. Frei Kerry Herman

HBS 17p 601131 B case available

Long Island, NY Industry Setting: electronics Gross Revenue: $1 billion revenues Case Time Frame Start: 1993 Case Time Frame End: 1993

Syncra Systems Andrew McAfee Mona Ashiya

HBS 18p 601035 TN available

Waltham, MA Industry Setting: Internet-based software Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
ways to address this concern and must decide how to best position its products for the marketplace. Teaching Purpose: 1) Highlights the information intensity of multi-partner collaborations involving supply chain planning; 2) addresses the circumstances under which IT investments that benefit many partners are good ones for a single firm to make; and 3) considers whether Internet-based collaborative activities are best executed in a pointto-point manner between trading partners, or centrally in an e-marketplace. Subjects: Business to business; Forecasting; Information technology; Internet; Production planning; Software; Supply chain Bush Boake Allen, a flavor and fragrance firm, is considering strategic options that would integrate customers into its flavor development process via a new Internet-based design platform. As this approach could result in dramatic changes to the firm's business model and relationship with customers worldwide, Julian Boyden, president, CEO, and chairman, faces serious opposition from senior managers. Teaching Purpose: Developed to show: 1) how Internet-based design platforms are changing the relationship and roles between product development, marketing, and customers; 2) new opportunities for customer "lock-in" in increasingly competitive markets with diminishing loyalty; and 3) to what extent customers can be empowered to design their own products in markets with heterogeneous needs. Subjects: Business marketing; Customer retention; Electronic commerce; Internet; Management of change; Product development; Research & development; Supply chain.

Bush Boake Allen Stefan Thomke Ashok Nimgade

HBS 24p 601061

chemical/consumer Gross Revenue: $500 million revenues Number of Employees: 2,000 Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

Chapter 5: Electronic Commerce Systems Amazon.com: HBS Seattle, WA Exploiting the 40p Industry Setting: Value of Digital 800330 online retail Business Supplement Company Size: Infrastructure available large Gross Lynda M. TN available Revenue: $1.6 Applegate ; billion revenues Meredith Collura Number of Employees: 7,600 Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End:

Enables a thorough analysis of Amazon.com and the company's value proposition, in terms of its business concept, digital business capabilities, and community and shareholder value. Examines the company's complex set of business models and web of business relationships, as well as Amazon's plan to monetize (generate revenues and earnings through) its assets. Teaching Purpose: To enable students and executives to analyze firm performance and value in a highly uncertain, rapidly growing business environment. Subjects: Business models; Electronic commerce; Retailing

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
2000 United States Industry Setting: book industry/electronic commerce Gross Revenue: $2 billion revenues Number of Employees: 20,000 Case Time Frame Start: 1996 Case Time Frame End: 1997 San Jose, CA Industry Setting: ecommerce Gross Revenue: $47.3 million revenues Number of Employees: 300 Case Time Frame Start: 1999 Case Time Frame End: 1999 Hong Kong, Global Industry Setting: trading Gross Revenue: $4 billion revenues Number of Employees: 3,500 Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

Leadership Online: Barnes & Noble vs. Amazon.com (A) Pankaj Ghemawat ; Bret Baird

HBS 21p 798063 B case available

Describes the attempt of a traditional retailer, Barnes & Noble, to counter the challenges posed by an Internet-based start-up, Amazon.com. Subjects: Competition; Electronic commerce; Internet; Publishing industry; Retailing

eBay, Inc. Stephen P. Bradley ; Kelley Porte

HBS 32p 700007

Li & Fung: Internet Issues (A) F. Warren McFarlan ; Fred Young

HBS 19p 301009 B case available

Nasdaq Japan: EMerging Markets Lynda M. Applegate ; Kristin Kohler

HBS 30p 802056 TN available

Japan Industry Setting: financial services Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2001

H.E. Butt Grocery Co.: The

HBS 6p

Texas Industry Setting: grocery

eBay was the world's largest and most popular person-to-person trading community on the Internet. In early 1999, the company was doing very well and seemed to have solved many of its early problems. However, on March 30, 1999, Amazon.com announced that it was entering the online auction arena. This powerful firm could prove to be eBay's strongest competitor to date. Teaching Purpose: What should eBay do in light of the entry of its most recent and serious competitor to date. Subjects: Auctions; Electronic commerce; High technology; Internet Focuses on the issues facing a Hong Kong-based trading company, which links hundreds of factories in India and Asia with major customers like the GAP and Limited in Europe and in the United States. The company has recently launched a dot-com operation to allow its extraordinary network of factories in Asia to target much smaller retail chains in Asia and Europe than they were able to do before. Teaching Purpose: To gain new insight on the possibilities of global logistics. Subjects: Asia; Business to business; Electronic commerce; Globalization; Information technology; Logistics; Supply chain Describes the design and launch of Nasdaq Japan. Addresses issues concerning the design of electronic markets, the impact of information technology on market structures and relationships, the launch of new ventures by established firms, and the cultural issues that arise when starting new ventures in global markets. Subjects: Electronic commerce; Entrepreneurship; Information technology; Japan Shows how the company's IT priorities have moved from primary supply chain restructuring to e-

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
New Digital Strategy (A) F. Warren McFarlan ; Melissa Dailey 300106 B case available Gross Revenue: $7 billion revenues Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000 commerce. Shows the new organization structure created by the company. Students must decide whether this new structure will work. Teaching Purpose: To highlight the challenges and options of transformation in the world of e-commerce. Subjects: Electronic commerce; Information technology; Internet; Organizational change; Organizational structure; Supermarkets

Chapter 6: E-Business Decision Support Tristan & Ivey Quebec, Canada America School/UWO Industry Setting: Michael R. 18p apparel and Pearce ; Shunyin 97A008 accessory stores Lam TN available Company Size: mid-size Case Time Frame Start: 1997 Case Time Frame End: 1997

American Airlines: Object Oriented Flight Dispatching Systems F. Warren McFarlan ; Espen Andersen

HBS 14p 195046

Texas Industry Setting: airlines Company Size: large Gross Revenue: $13 billion revenues Number of Employees: 104,000 Case Time Frame Start: 1990 Case Time Frame End: 1994

In April 1997, Tristan & America, an apparel retail company based in Montreal, was considering the purchase of StaffWorks, an automated laborscheduling system marketed by Campbell Software. Michel Desaulniers, MIS director of Tristan & America, was concerned about whether StaffWorks fit his company's need, how the software related to other information systems currently used by the company, and what constituted a good scheduling package. This case illustrates the use of decision support systems (particularly the scheduling system) and store-traffic data in retail management. Also describes the considerations in scheduling retail store staff and the complexities of organizational buying in the retail context. Subjects: Canada; Information systems; Retailing; Sales management; Scheduling Describes the organization and development of American Airlines Systems Operation Control (SOC) center, located in Dallas, from which the day-to-day running of the airline takes place. Specifically, the decision support system used by the flight dispatchers, and the object-oriented tools and techniques used to develop it, are detailed. Teaching Purpose: Shows the value and experience of an iterative approach to systems development and the use of graphical user interfaces in a highly complex, real-time environment. It also outlines some areas in which the computer, at present, is unlikely to be of much help. Subjects: Airlines; Artificial intelligence; Information systems; Operations management; Systems design; Transportation

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)

LockheedGeorgia Co.: Executive Information Systems Lynda M. Applegate

HBS 28p 187135

Marietta, GA Industry Setting: aerospace Company Size: Fortune 500 Gross Revenue: $2.6 billion sales Case Time Frame Start: 1978 Case Time Frame End: 1987

Firefly Network (A) Erik Brynjolfsson ; Jean-Claude Charlet

Stanford GSB 16p OIT22A Supplement available

Cambridge, MA Industry Setting: Internet software Number of Employees: 80 Case Time Frame Start: 1997 Case Time Frame End: 1998

BroadVision Erik Brynjolfsson ; Jean-Claude Charlet

Stanford GSB 17p OIT21

Los Altos, CA Industry Setting: Internet software Gross Revenue: $30 million revenues Number of Employees: 200 Case Time Frame Start: 1997 Case Time Frame End: 1998

Describes the implementation and use of an executive information system at Lockheed-Georgia Corp. First introduced eight years ago, the system, with very favorable evaluations, is now widely used by executives. The objectives of the case are: 1) to introduce the concept of executive information systems, 2) to identify factors that contribute to the potential successful implementation of these systems in organizations, and 3) to discuss the influence of executive information systems on information flow within organizations. Subjects: Aerospace industry; Executives; Implementation; Information systems Firefly Network develops software that allows Internet-based businesses to gather information about their online customers and deliver personalized information to them in return. Firefly was founded in March 1995 by a group of researchers of the MIT Media Lab working on applications of intelligent software agents. This case discusses the role of personalization software in building online communities and enhancing electronic commerce, with a particular focus on online book selling. It compares the different technologies available, including "rules-based systems," and analyzes the related issues of trust and privacy. Finally, it questions revenue models for Web-based businesses, as well as the strategy of a young Internet software company trying to create an industry standard. Subjects: Artificial intelligence; Consumer marketing; Electronic commerce; Entrepreneurship; Growth strategy; Information technology; Internet; Marketing strategy; Software; Virtual communities BroadVision develops software that allows Internetbased businesses to gather information about their online customers and deliver customized information to them in return. The firm was founded in May 1993 by a successful entrepreneur with a track record of two previous successful startups. The case discusses the role of "rules-based systems" in delivering personalized information directly to the consumer and allowing one-to-one marketing to happen on the Internet. Trust and privacy issues related to the use of this "mass-customization" technology are discussed. Related personalization technologies, such as "collaborative filtering" are analyzed as well. Finally, the case deals with the growth strategy and business model of BroadVision, as a young Internet

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
software company competing with software giants such as Microsoft, Netscape, and Oracle. Subjects: Artificial intelligence; Business models; Consumer marketing; Electronic commerce; Entrepreneurship; Growth strategy; Information technology; Internet; Marketing strategy; Silicon Valley; Software; Virtual communities Chapter 7: Developing E-Business Strategies Cisco Systems 23p San Jose, CA Architecture: 301099 Industry Setting: ERP and WebTN available information enabled IT technology Case Richard L. Nolan Time Frame Start: Kelley Porter 2000 Case Time Christina Akers Frame End: 2001

TradeCard: Building a Global Trading Electronic Payment System Ali F. Farhoomand ; Marissa McCauley

U. of Hong Kong 21p HKU105

global Industry Setting: electronic commerce Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

Describes the seven-year process of Cisco building its strategic I-Net. First Cisco completely replaced its back-office legacy systems beginning in 1994. At that time, the company standardized on Internet protocols. In addition, the company shifted strategic focus from IT back-office applications to front-office applications. After ERP, the company spent the next two years electronically connecting with customers. Teaching Purpose: To understand the process of building a strategic I-Net in the network era. A rewritten version of two earlier cases. A consolidated version of the Cisco Systems ERP and Cisco Systems Web-enablement cases. Designed to be taught in one class session (if two class sessions are available, it is recommended that Cisco ERP Systems be used for one session followed by Cisco Systems Web-enablement). Subjects: ERP; Information technology; Silicon Valley; Technological change; World Wide Web In an attempt to provide an online payment mechanism for large-dollar cross-border transactions, TradeCard, Inc. developed TradeCard, considered to be the world's first and only "Credit card" for international trade that contains all three "C's" of global trade transactions: credit, connectivity, and compliance. The case provides a study on how to build a viable international electronic payment system for business-to-business e-commerce. Looks into this new alternative online payment mechanism and how it is changing the international trade payment environment. Focuses on how TradeCard, Inc. built TradeCard: its technical architecture capable of providing a seamless online settlement transaction and a secure electronic solution involving synchronization of huge databases in an international transaction. Also revolves around the marketing issue that TradeCard, Inc. is facing: how to build the network of players in international trading and aggregating the disparate services necessary onto the TradeCard system. Subjects: Business to business;

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
Electronic commerce; Financial services; Globalization; International business Focuses on the strategic issues of an emerging dotcom in a rapidly emerging Internet nation--China (#2 in the world by 2003). Alibaba is a Hangzhou, China-based bulletin board company, trying to carve out a niche in the B-to-B e-commerce world. Shows the speed and complexity of strategy evolution and shows the fascinating set of problems that a player in this new space must confront. Whether the company will ultimately survive or not is very much an issue. Teaching Purpose: To show the universality of a dotcom management issue in a global context. The case sensitizes the student to the complex survival issues of an emerging B-to-B e-commerce company and focuses attention on what management must do. These issues are surprisingly similar to those which confront companies in Western Europe and the United States. Subjects: Business models; Business to business; China; Electronic commerce; Global Research Group Describes a leading pharmaceutical company's approach to developing e-business capabilities throughout the organization. Highlights the company's decision to approach e-business on a more centralized manner. Subjects: Electronic commerce; Global Research Group; Organizational change; Pharmaceuticals; Restructuring; Strategy implementation; Switzerland; Technology

Alibaba.com F. Warren McFarlan ; Carin-Isabel Knoop ; David Lane

HBS 19p 301047 B case available

Hangzhou, China Industry Setting: ecommerce Company Size: small Gross Revenue: $1 million revenues Number of Employees: 250 Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

eBusiness@ Novartis Andrew McAfee Carin-Isabel Knoop Cate Reavis

HBS 21p 601057

Basel, Switzerland Industry Setting: pharmaceuticals Gross Revenue: $19 billion revenues Number of Employees: 36,000 Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001

Chapter 8: Developing E-Business Solutions ACTonline: U. of Hong Australia Industry ACTDirect's Kong Setting: banking Electronic 13p Case Time Frame Banking System HKU040 Start: 1998 Case Ali F. TN available Time Frame End: Farhoomand ; 1998 Vanessa N. Clark

In the 1980s, Australian Capital Territory Banking Corp. Ltd. (later known as "ACTDirect") identified the need to develop information systems to enhance the provision and delivery of its products and services. "ACTonline," an electronic banking system, was the Bank's solution to meeting the challenges of continual technological change. By the latter part of the 1990s, however, fast and complex advances in technology changed the banking landscape. The new electronic marketplace presented a challenge to management--how best to market ACTonline in the electronic commerce environment? Teaching Purpose: 1) Examine the strategic implications of using an information system (IS) to create and sustain competitive advantage; 2)

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Harvard Business School Publishing Case Map for OBrien: Management Information Systems, 5th Edition (McGraw Hill, 2002)
Compare and contrast traditional and emerging approaches to marketing banking-related products and services in the EC environment, and to raise and discuss the implications for managers; 3) Draw attention to issues related to IT investment; 4) Raise issues relating to the management of complex technical issues, such as the potential threat of obsolescence of ACTonline's operating system, hardware and software, and issues related to interconnectivity and interoperability. Subjects: Australia; Banking; Electronic commerce; Information systems; Marketing management; Strategic market planning; Technological change SalesDriver.com (SalesDriver) was a Boston-based e-commerce application service provider that provided a turnkey solution for sales managers to manage their sales contests online. It had just achieved its 1,000th user mark and had the opportunity to snag software giant Lorimer Development Corp. (Lorimer) as a new client. The solution Lorimer had requested would alter SalesDriver's current product by including functionality that other users might not need. The general manager had to evaluate the economies of scale by keeping one product for all users and the economies of scope by tailoring the product for individual customers. Developing the added function as a one-off would take significantly less development time than adding the function to the site and making it available to all customers. He had to decide which approach was best in the long run. Subjects: Action planning; Capacity analysis; Electronic commerce; Implementation; Software; Systems design Global Financial, a subsidiary of a major heavy equipment manufacturer, makes loans to customers for purchases of the parent company equipment. Global Financial's loan application process is the major subject of this case. Customers are unhappy with the slowness of the process, and a major competitor promises to process loans much faster. The details of the processing system, including historical data, are included. This allows examination of bottlenecks in the system, and suggestions for possible system design changes. Subjects: Capacity planning; Financial services; Process analysis; Reengineering; Simulation; Systems analysis

SalesDriver: The Lorimer Request Scott Schneberger ; Ken Mark

Ivey School/UWO 11p 901E02 TN available

Boston, MA Industry Setting: business services Company Size: small Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

Global Financial Corp. Charles A. Holloway ; Charles P. Bonini

Stanford GSB 9p OIT20 TN available

California Industry Setting: financial Case Time Frame Start: 1996 Case Time Frame End: 1996

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Cisco Systems, Inc.: Implementing ERP Robert D. Austin Richard L. Nolan Mark Cotteleer

HBS 19p 699022 TN available

Silicon Valley, CA Industry Setting: information technology Gross Revenue: $8 billion revenues Number of Employees: 2,500 Case Time Frame Start: 1993 Case Time Frame End: 1995

Reviews Cisco System's approach to implementing Oracle's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software product. This case chronologically reviews the diverse, critical success factors and obstacles facing Cisco during its implementation. Cisco faced the need for information systems replacement based on its significant growth potential and its reliance on failing legacy systems. Case discussion focuses on where management was particularly savvy in contrast to where it was the beneficiary of good fortune. Teaching Purpose: To foster discussion of the complexities of implementing large-scale information systems. To illuminate some of the positive and negative steps taken by a leading company in its own implementation. Subjects: California Research Center; Enterprise systems; ERP; Expert systems; Implementation; Information age; Information technology; Silicon Valley; Software

Chapter 9: Security and Ethical Challenges Web and IT HBS N/A Hosting 11p Facilities, 601134 Technology Note Robert D. Austin

CaseTrust: Building ThirdParty e-Tailing Trust Ali F. Farhoomand ; Pauline Ng ; Shamza Khan

U. of Hong Kong 18p HKU122 TN available

Singapore Industry Setting: retailing Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

Introduces students to the data centers where IT infrastructure is increasingly physically housed. These centralized hosting facilities represent in the information age the equivalent of power utilities in the industrial age. Students are introduced to issues of physical and Internet security, infrastructure management, and service provider partner selection. Teaching Purpose: To introduce students to a fundamental component of Internet infrastructure, the web hosting data center. Subjects: Computer services; Electronic commerce; Information management; Information technology; Internet; Operations management; Technology In March 2000, CaseTrust, an accreditation scheme designed to promote consumer confidence in Webbased retailers, was in the third year of implementation in Singapore. The plan was to extend CaseTrust's success to other countries. However, this raised a number of issues with regards to the legal framework required, CaseTrust's marketing and branding strategy, technical issues relating to security, and cultural factors. This case seeks to draw out the learning experience in Singapore as to what builds trust in the B2C marketspace and to apply these to CaseTrust's strategy for other countries. Subjects: Electronic commerce; Globalization; Retailing; Southeast Asia

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Microsoft Security Response Center (A) Mike Wade ; Jeffrey Clayman

Ivey School/UWO 11p 901E19 Supplements available

United States Industry Setting: business services Company Size: large Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

DoubleClick, Inc.: Gathering Customer Intelligence Scott Schneberger ; Ken Mark

Ivey School/UWO 16p 901E05 TN available

United States Industry Setting: business services Company Size: mid-size Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

eBay: Private Ordering for an Online Community David P. Baron ; David Hoyt

Stanford GSB 21p P37 TN available

United States Industry Setting: Internet marketmaker Gross Revenue: $431 million revenues

Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) is a key component of the security infrastructure for Microsoft--the large, internationally known software manufacturer. A hacker has informed the program manager of the center of potentially damaging security vulnerability in a piece of Microsoft's Internet server software. Neither the hacker nor MSRC knows for sure whether systems using the software have been compromised, but they do know that the vulnerability has been discussed in hacker news groups. The program manager must determine who should be told, what needs to be done, and when. Subjects: Internet; Public relations; Risk assessment; Security; Software; Strategic planning DoubleClick, Inc., with global headquarters in New York City and over 30 offices around the world, was a leading provider of comprehensive Internet advertising solutions for marketers and web publishers. It combined technology, media, and data expertise to centralize planning, execution, control, tracking, and reporting for online media companies. DoubleClick was able to track Internet users' surfing habits (but not the surfers' identities), allowing it to personalize ads for specific market groups. When DoubleClick announced it was merging with Abacus Direct, a direct marketing company with a database of consumer names, addresses, and retail purchasing habits of 90% of American households, it raised many privacy-related questions and concerns. Several Internet privacy activists had filed a formal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission after being informed by media sources that DoubleClick had the ability to divulge a person's identity by merging the databases of the two companies and matching the information in "cookies" with a surfer's profile. The president was confident that its internal practices were sound, but he wondered whether they would placate advertising clients afraid of consumer backlash, the concerns of Internet surfers, and the company's investors. Subjects: Advertising; Direct marketing; Electronic commerce; High technology products; Internet; Risk management eBay hosts the world's largest online trading community. Members of this community buy and sell in auctions conducted on the eBay web site. The success of this marketplace depends on the ability of buyers and sellers to feel secure in conducting transactions. As the community has grown, the issues

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Number of Employees: 1,900 Case Time Frame Start: 1996 Case Time Frame End: 2000 involved in providing a safe marketplace have become more and more complicated. Activity conducted on the eBay site are subject to public law, but the company has supplemented public law with its own policies, rules, and regulations intended to provide a safe online environment for its members. This case discusses the private ordering of eBay's community, and describes several situations that might require new or revised policies, including privacy of member information, off-site transactions, sale of controversial items, and sale of banned or regulated items. Subjects: Auctions; Community development; Electronic commerce; Internet marketing; World Wide Web The vice president of the Security Products Division of Sophis Networks along with the Government Affairs Group had spent the last two and a half years working closely with Congress and the Clinton administration to relax U.S. export restrictions on encryption products (because export restrictions meant lost sales for U.S. companies such as Sophis and customers outside the United States demanded products with the highest level of encryption available). However, President Clinton pledged to veto a bill called the Security and Freedom Through Encryption Act (SAFE), which hoped to relax U.S. export restrictions. The vice president and the Government Affairs Group at Sophis needed to develop a "nonmarket" strategy and implementation plan to relax encryption export controls. Teaching Purpose: To teach students how to think through "nonmarket" problems that companies, especially high-technology companies, face; how to develop strategy and action plans to remedy nonmarket problems; and how to evaluate the strategy and actions of a prominent high-technology company when faced with a business-threatening nonmarket issue. Subjects: Exports; High technology; High technology products; International business; Legislation; Regulation; Regulatory agencies; Right of privacy; Software industry; Trade policy

Sophis Networks and Encryption Export Controls (A) David P. Baron ; Victoria Chang

Stanford GSB 16p P34A B case available

United States Industry Setting: technology Case Time Frame Start: 1999 Case Time Frame End: 1999

Chapter 10: Enterprise and Global Management Of E-Business Technology Microsoft Latin HBS Latin America America 15p Industry Setting: Robert S. Kaplan 100040 software Case

Mauricio Santillan, regional vice president for the Latin American division of Microsoft, has introduced a new performance measurement system to help his

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Alberto Ballve Antonio Davila TN available Time Frame Start: 1998 Case Time Frame End: 1998 country managers formulate and control strategy. Microsoft Latin America's priorities are rolling out of an entirely new corporate database software package and devising a strategy to combat software piracy. Santillan uses the measurement system to motivate country managers to establish locallyrelevant strategies that will be aligned with the region's global priorities. This case shows how a Balanced Scorecard system can be useful to help managers in emerging markets learn about the importance of strategy and become better general managers. Also illustrates that a strategic measurement system can be implemented even in an environment where reliable data may be difficult to acquire. Subjects: Balanced scorecard; Central America; Developing countries; Emerging markets; Management accounting; Performance measurement; Software National Logistics Management (NLM), a thirdparty logistics company, is a successful, profitable business that provides a more cost-effective and efficient means to expedite premium freight. With the logistics landscape changing, NLM's market niche is threatened. Can NLM survive in the newer, faster e-business logistics world? What are NLM's options for growth? Teaching Purpose: To identify business strategies within a changing e-business environment. Subjects: Business models; Business services; Electronic commerce; Internet; Logistics; Technology Details the evolution of an e-business strategy and capabilities over a 16-year period. What began in 1984 as an effort to automate the port of Singapore to achieve productivity savings, by 2000 had evolved into a global e-business called Portnet.com. Closes as senior managers contemplate the progress they have made and the challenges still ahead. Subjects: Government policy; Information services; Information systems; Information technology; Southeast Asia; Strategic planning Follows the protagonist, Sonia Sharpe, as she and her American Express Interactive Team attempt to develop and market an interactive, on-line, corporate travel service in a highly competitive environment. Looks at the possible resources and partnerships a company needs to succeed in the fast-paced world of computer software and information technology. Ends

National Logistics Management Lynda M. Applegate ; Mary Teichert Rotelli ; Kristin Kohler

HBS 32p 801110 Supplement available TN available

Detroit, MI Industry Setting: third-party logistics Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

PSA: The World's Port of Call Lynda M. Applegate ; Nancy Bartlett ; Dolly ChangLeow ; Neo Boon Siong American Express Interactive Lynda M. Applegate

HBS 34p 802003 TN available

Singapore Case Time Frame Start: 1980 Case Time Frame End: 2001

HBS 22p 802022 TN available

New York, NY and Redmond, CA Industry Setting: travel and information technology Case Time Frame Start:

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1996 Case Time Frame End: 1998 with Sharpe questioning whether (and how) to pursue international expansion and the integration of the Interactive Travel Service with other American Express services (for example, their corporate credit card service). A rewritten version of an earlier case. Subjects: Information technology; Services; Software; Travel Staples.com, the online unit of the U.S. office supplies retailing chain, faces a range of strategic and organizational issues as it accelerates its growth. Should it pursue only existing Staples customers, or consumers who do not shop in Staples stores? How quickly should it add services (e.g. legal, payroll, accounting) to its product offering? Which operating functions should be shared between the online units and the core business? Should Staples.com be spun off as a tracking stock? Teaching Purpose: To illustrate the strategic and organizational challenges facing an established company pursuing a "bricksand-clicks" strategy. Subjects: Business policy; Electronic commerce; Entrepreneurship; Internet; Office equipment; Retailing Describes CIO Girard Liberty's successful transformation of the Welch Foods information systems organization from 1992 to 1998. Teaching Purpose: Highlights the challenges and role of a CIO in a mid-sized company in the 1990s. Subjects: Food; Information systems; Information technology

Staples.com Joanna Jacobson Thomas Eisenmann Gillian Morris

HBS 10p 800305 TN available

Framingham, MA Industry Setting: office supplies retailing Company Size: large Gross Revenue: $9 billion revenues Number of Employees: 46,000 Case Time Frame Start: 1999 Case Time Frame End: 2000

Welch Foods, Inc. Charles Osborn ; Donna B. Stoddard

Babson 19p BAB018

New England Industry Setting: food Gross Revenue: $570 million revenues Case Time Frame Start: 1992 Case Time Frame End: 1998

Chapter 11: Computer Hardware National 33p Innovation 601049 Systems and Comparative Industry Evolution (HBS note) Henry W. Chesbrough ; Gillian Morris Sun HBS Microsystems 20p and the N-tier 399037 Architecture Richard L. Nolan Kelley Porter

N/A

Silicon Valley, CA Industry Setting: hi-tech Gross Revenue: $9.8 billion revenues Number of

Discusses U.S. and Japanese innovation systems. Illustrates these with comparative studies of computer and pharmaceutical industries. Probes effects of labor, capital, and customer market institutions on these sectors in the United States and Japan. Teaching Purpose: To motivate students to consider innovation effects outside the United States. Subjects: Computer industry; Innovation; Japan; National competitiveness; Pharmaceuticals industry; Technology Sun Microsystems is a pioneer in networking computing. Sun's servers maintain a large market share and are considered highly scaleable. The case describes the n-tier architecture for building and managing large networks in which thousands of workers and customers are connected to enterprise

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Employees: 22,500 Case Time Frame Start: 1998 Case Time Frame End: 1998 servers. Teaching Purpose: To analyze and assess network architectures in structure and cost for building enterprise-wide intranets.Subjects: California Research Center; Computer industry; Computer systems; Implementation; Information technology; Intranets; Networks; Silicon Valley; Technological change Reviews the challenges facing the Intel Corp. as it moves beyond its successes in semiconductors. Subjects: Computer systems; Corporate strategy; Semiconductors

Intel Corp.: The Evolution of an Adaptive Organization Robert A. Burgelman ; Dennis L. Carter Raymond S. Bamford

Stanford GSB 67p SM65

Global Industry Setting: semiconductors Case Time Frame Start: 1999 Case Time Frame End: 1999

Chapter 12: Computer Software Microsoft in HBS 2002 23p Michael G. 702411 Rukstad ; David TN available B. Yoffie ; Carl Johnston ; Tyrrell Levine

Microsoft: An Inside Look Robert A. Burgelman

Stanford GSB13p SM32

Global Industry Setting: software Gross Revenue: $30 billion revenues Number of Employees: 30,000 Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001 Competitive strategy Geographic Setting: Seattle, WA Industry Setting: computer software Case Time Frame Start: 1993 Case Time Frame End: 1996

Examines Microsoft's strategy and competitive position as it prepares to launch Windows XP. The discussion explores how Microsoft builds and sustains its competitive edge. Subjects: Competitive advantage; Software; Technology

Documentum, Inc. Rajiv Lal ; Sean Lanagan

HBS 26p 502026

Silicon Valley, CA Industry Setting: enterprise software Company Size: start-up Gross

Discusses how Microsoft came to dominate the computer software industry by 1996. Microsoft's domination was not inevitable or guaranteed. Discusses the battle between Windows and IBM's OS/2 in the early 1990s, while offering a glimpse at the personal battles between Microsoft's Bill Gates and IBM's James Cannavino. Also discusses Microsoft's response, in 1995 and 1996, to the threats and opportunities posed by the Internet. Provides the context for discussing Microsoft's ability to recognize strategic threats and opportunities, and to assess and respond effectively to their strategic options. Subjects: Competition; Corporate strategy; Operating systems; Software; Strategy formulation; Technological change Describes Jeff Miller's attempt to implement Geoffrey Moore's crossing the chasm ideas at enterprise software vendor, Documentum. Teaching Purpose: Illustrates marketing strategy tradeoffs and a market selection process.

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Revenue: $2 million revenues Number of Employees: 20 Case Time Frame Start: 1993 Case Time Frame End: 1993 Cambridge, MA Industry Setting: software Gross Revenue: $1 million revenues Number of Employees: 25 Case Time Frame Start: 1999 Case Time Frame End: 2000 United States and Scandinavia Industry Setting: forestry Gross Revenue: $627 million revenues Number of Employees: 1,600 Case Time Frame Start: 1995 Case Time Frame End: 1995 Subjects: Entrepreneurial management; Growth strategy; Information technology; Market selection; Marketing strategy; New product marketing; Sales strategy; Silicon Valley; Software

Measurement and Management at CitySoft V.G. Narayanan ; Sanjay T. Pothen

HBS 21p 100056 TN available

CitySoft is a very small software developer that is grappling with issues of cost measurement and management. Students must decide what reports should be generated and how to use these reports. Teaching Purpose: Introductory case for a course in cost and performance measurement. Subjects: Cost accounting; Growth management; Information systems; Performance measurement; Profitability analysis; Small business; Software Academic Discipline: Accounting & control Focuses on the selection of packaged software to serve multiple sites within the context of a multinational company. Describes the creation of an RFP and the selection of a software vendor. Centers around two competing proposals with the decision point being which one to choose. With the growth of enterprise-wide software solutions, the case provides a realistic, current, and detailed view of software procurement in an international business environment. Teaching Purpose: To give students the opportunity to critique a company's software selection process including RFP creation and proposal evaluation. Subjects: Computer systems; Data processing; Forest products; Information systems; Information technology; International operations; Materials management; Multinational corporations; Software

Timberjack Parts: Packaged Software Selection Project F. Warren McFarlan ; Darryl S. Romanow ; Mark Keil

HBS 21p 398085 Case Video available

Chapter 13: Data Resource Management DoubleClick, Ivey United States Inc.: Gathering School/UWO Industry Setting: Customer 16p business services Intelligence 901E05 Company Size: Scott TN available mid-size Case Schneberger ; Time Frame Start: Ken Mark 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

DoubleClick, Inc., with global headquarters in New York City and over 30 offices around the world, was a leading provider of comprehensive Internet advertising solutions for marketers and web publishers. It combined technology, media, and data expertise to centralize planning, execution, control, tracking, and reporting for online media companies. DoubleClick was able to track Internet users' surfing habits (but not the surfers' identities), allowing it to personalize ads for specific market groups. When DoubleClick announced it was merging with Abacus

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Direct, a direct marketing company with a database of consumer names, addresses, and retail purchasing habits of 90% of American households, it raised many privacy-related questions and concerns. Several Internet privacy activists had filed a formal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission after being informed by media sources that DoubleClick had the ability to divulge a person's identity by merging the databases of the two companies and matching the information in "cookies" with a surfer's profile. The president was confident that its internal practices were sound, but he wondered whether they would placate advertising clients afraid of consumer backlash, the concerns of Internet surfers, and the company's investors. Subjects: Advertising; Direct marketing; Electronic commerce; High technology products; Internet; Risk management Alibris is an Internet-era company providing search and fulfillment services for hard-to-find (rare, used, and out-of-print) books. At the time of the case, the company previously made decisions to change its revenue model, to become involved in the fulfillment process for each book it sells by establishing a crossdock facility, and to purchase Oracle's Internet commerce software. However, the implementation of this software has been very difficult, delaying the launch of the new fulfillment business and costing large amounts of money at a time when cash is scarce. The company's leaders, who are not IT professionals, must decide whether to continue with Oracle or begin anew with another product. Teaching Purpose: Used to discuss the elements of a viable Internet-era business. Alibris has made a number of decisions that move it far from the business of its predecessor, Interloc. Interloc was a profitable business, and it is not immediately clear why Alibris has decided to take on substantial additional cost, risk, and complexity. Can be used to surface the reasons for this change and their legitimacy. Examines how a company that bought off-the-shelf software from a leading vendor to accomplish tasks that seemed straightforward could find itself in the extremely difficult circumstances outlined. Involves issues of the functionality that Alibris required and the dynamics of commercial software development and release. Subjects: Customer service; Data bases; Information technology; Internet; Publishing industry; Supply chain

Alibris (A) Andrew McAfee Kerry Herman

HBS 11p 601111 B case available

Emeryville, CA Industry Setting: used books Number of Employees: 14 Case Time Frame Start: 1998 Case Time Frame End: 1998

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eBay and Database Protection David P. Baron

Stanford GSB 11p P33

United States Industry Setting: media, Internet & online content providers Gross Revenue: $431 million revenues Number of Employees: 1,927 Case Time Frame Start: 2000 Case Time Frame End: 2000

In 2000, eBay was faced with the challenge of protecting important strategic assets--its database and the community it had developed--while allowing information to flow freely on the Internet. eBay's information assets were invaluable to the company for the design of auctions and for identifying service enhancements and other business opportunities, including partnering with other service providers. The popularity of online auctions pioneered by eBay, Inc., however, had led to numerous rival Internet auction sites as well as a group of "auction aggregators," whose use of eBay's information threatened the value of the company's strategic assets. Companies such as Bidder's Edge, AuctionRover.com, and ultimatebid.com searched Internet auction sites, extracted data, and provided it to their users. Bidder's Edge, for example, provided information on auctions in a variety of categories corresponding to those on eBay's front page. A person searching for an ancient coin on Bidder's Edge received information on coins available on eBay, Yahoo!, and Amazon.com. Although this provided comparative information and convenience to users, it was based on information developed by eBay and extracted from its site. This case describes eBay, auction aggregators, database protection, intellectual property law and databases, proposed legislation and the coalitions supporting the Collections of Information Antipiracy Act and the Consumer and Investor Access to Information Act as well as legislation in the European Union. Subjects: Auctions; Copyright; Data bases; Information industry; Intellectual property; Internet; Legislation

Chapter 14: Telecommunications and Networks Netonomy HBS United States and Roger Hallowell 26p Europe Industry Helen Clement 801462 Setting: TN available telecommunication s software Company Size: start-up Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001

A new software product enables wireless telcos to offer a self-service customer service solution, lowering costs and improving service levels. What is good self-service? How should the company prioritize its growth opportunities, and what should its capabilities be? How will these decisions affect its shareholders? Teaching Purpose: To illustrate the importance of the service component of self-service. To facilitate a discussion of a global growth strategy for a service firm/software developer and the tradeoffs it must make between growth and profitability.

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Subjects: Globalization; Information technology; Internet; Service management; Software; Telecommunications Describes the efforts of a well-financed, young company attempting to transform how IT services are delivered during a period of high-tech pessimism. Jamcracker is attempting to popularize an "application service provider" (ASP) model of service delivery that will, if successful, take the industry to a new level of vertically disintegrated maturity. But it is a bold concept that they are selling to a cautious group of prospective buyers. Poses questions about how to operationalize and sell the company's new service concept. Teaching Purpose: Introduces students to a new service delivery model and to the complexities involved in operationalzing the new model. Subjects: Information management; Information technology; Operations management; Outsourcing; Service management; Telecommunications As the leading content delivery network, Akamai helps Internet companies deliver web site content to end users with fewer delays and lower costs. This case describes strategic management challenges facing Akamai in late 2001, as the three-year old firm's growth slows due to the failure of many dotcom customers. Akamai has launched a new product, EdgeSuite, which promises significant cost savings for large enterprise customers--a new market for Akamai. Describes several decisions facing management as they accelerate efforts to penetrate enterprise customers. For example: Should they employ a separate sales force for enterprise accounts (which require more consultative selling than Akamia's earlier products)? Should sales efforts be organized by vertical market? To what extent should Akamai rely on resellers versus direct sales reps? Teaching Purpose: (1) To explain how the Internet's architecture can lead to data delivery delays and solutions to improve performance and (2) to illustrate the challenges confronting a network infrastructure company as it shifts its target customer focus to include enterprise customers, in particular, sales and channel management priorities. Subjects: Business policy; Entrepreneurship; Information technology; Internet; Networks; New economy; Strategy formulation; Telecommunications

Jamcracker Robert D. Austin

HBS 19p 602007 TN available

Cupertino, CA Industry Setting: information technology Number of Employees: 250 Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001

Akamai Technologies Thomas Eisenmann

25p 802132

Global Industry Setting: Internet Gross Revenue: $175 million revenues Number of Employees: 800 Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001

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WWWW--Who Will Win Wireless? Roger Hallowell Sherry Whitley Rosina Giuliante Jennifer Jacobs

HBS 32p 802012

United States Industry Setting: wireless communications

Atheros Communications Thomas Eisenmann ; Nicole Tempest

HBS 26p 802073

San Jose, CA Industry Setting: semiconductors Company Size: start-up Gross Revenue: $20 million revenues Number of Employees: 140 Case Time Frame Start: 2001 Case Time Frame End: 2001

Networked Utility Providers (HBS background note) Thomas Eisenmann ; Alastair Brown

HBS 13p 801309

N/A

The wireless Internet may offer opportunities for managers and investors. This case discusses different players in the wireless Internet industry and asks readers to evaluate the likelihood that they will create and capture value. Teaching Purpose: Explores the potential of the wireless Internet, focusing participants on a rigorous examination of which players are likely to create and capture value and why. Subjects: Internet; Service management; Telecommunications Atheros Communications is a Silicon Valley start-up that has designed a chipset for wireless local area network (WLAN) products that conform to the 802.11a standard. This offers significant performance advantages over rapidly proliferating 802.11b (WiFi) products, including a 5-fold increase in data transmission rate with fewer interference problems. Atheros has a 6- to 12-month lead over competitors developing similar chipsets. This case examines strategic challenges confronting Atheros: How can it best exploit its lead? How can it promote customer adoption of products that provide performance breakthroughs but lack backward compatibility? As a start-up with limited credibility and resources, how can it influence standards-setting processes dominated by large companies? Given short product life cycles, how should it focus future R&D efforts? Teaching Purpose: To explore barriers to customer adoption for a new product with strong network effects, to analyze competitive dynamics in an industry where standards are important, and to explore strategic challenges facing a start-up under these circumstances. Subjects: Business policy; Entrepreneurship; Internet; Networks; New economy; Semiconductors; Silicon Valley; Standardization; Strategy formulation Defines and describes ways to categorize networked utilities, software "applets" such as RealNetwork's RealPlayer, Macromedia's Shockwave, and AOL's ICQ that are downloaded via the Internet. Networked utilities extend basic web browser capability to allow users to complete specialized tasks, such as accessing "rich" media files (audio, video, animations) or chatting in real time with other users. Discusses the economic model for networked utility providers, focusing on their revenue and cost drivers. Examines some of the challenges they encounter in

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establishing a technical standard, and describes tactics that they can employ to improve their odds of success. Building on that analysis, the final section examines the payoff to networked utility providers from aggressive growth strategies. Teaching Purpose: To help students understand the Networked Utility Providers business model and the strategic issues that confront companies pursuing this model-most notably, the challenge of establishing a dominant technical standard. Examines tactics employed to win a standards battle and provides a framework for assessing the payoff from aggressive growth strategies. Subjects: Entrepreneurship; Growth strategy; Internet; Standardization; Strategy formulation; Telecommunications; Telecommunications industry; World Wide Web This is a distillation of the book The E-Commerce Arsenal, published by AMACOM. Unrelenting advances in technology ensure that online shopping will continue to get faster and cheaper. The key is to use the correct technology to focus on the three main objectives of any retail establishment, be it online or off-line: attracting customers, making shopping easier, and offering superior customer service. The 12 "must-have" technologies introduced in these pages will help you achieve all three of these goals. For example, you'll learn about: viral affiliates programs with web partners who link your site to theirs, enabling their customers to pay you a visit with a click of the mouse; listfeed programs that get your products into the inventory of buying clubs, product review sites, and price comparison engines; and WAP-enabling that allows WAP (wireless application protocol) surfers to find your site--a key technology as more and more web customers will be logging on via wireless devices. Subjects: Communications equipment; Consumer marketing; Customer relations; Customer service; Electronic commerce; Information age; Information systems; Internet; Networks; Partnerships; Technological planning; Technology

The ECommerce Arsenal (Book Summary) Alexis D. Gutzman

Soundview Book Summary 8p SV2318

N/A

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