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City of Gardena 2008-2014 Housing Element

Adopted August 9, 2011 Resolution No. 6023 City of Gardena Department of Community Development 1700 West 162nd Street Gardena, CA 90247

TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. INTRODUCTION....................................................................................1
A. B. C. D. E. Community Context ............................................................................................. 1 Role and Organization of the Housing Element ............................................... 3 Data Sources and Methods .................................................................................. 4 Relationship to Other General Plan Elements ................................................... 5 Public Participation ............................................................................................... 5

II.

HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT .....................................................8


A. B. C. D. E. F. G. Population Profile ................................................................................................. 9 Employment Characteristics .............................................................................. 12 Household Characteristics ................................................................................. 16 Housing Characteristics ..................................................................................... 19 Special Needs ....................................................................................................... 23 Share of Regions Housing Need ...................................................................... 34 Assisted Housing at Risk of Conversion.......................................................... 39

III.

HOUSING CONSTRAINTS ...............................................................44


A. B. C. Market Constraints ............................................................................................. 44 Governmental Constraints ................................................................................. 45 Environmental and Infrastructure Constraints ............................................... 60

IV.

HOUSING RESOURCES .....................................................................65


A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. Development Credit ........................................................................................... 65 Vacant Land ......................................................................................................... 65 Recycling .............................................................................................................. 69 Potential Density Increase .................................................................................. 70 Commercial Corridors and Lot Consolidation ............................................... 74 Potential Housing Growth ................................................................................. 77 Actions to Make Available Adequate Sites to Accommodate the Regional Housing Need ...................................................................................................... 78 Provision for a Variety of Housing Types ....................................................... 82 Zoning to Accommodate Affordable Housing ............................................... 86 Financial Resources ............................................................................................. 89 Opportunities for Energy Conservation .......................................................... 95

V.

HOUSING PLAN ...................................................................................98


A. B. C. D. Housing Element Goals and Policies................................................................ 98 Evaluation of Accomplishments Under 2000-2005 Housing Element.. ..... 100 Housing Programs ............................................................................................ 104 Summary of Quantified Housing Unit Objectives ....................................... 131

Appendix A: Appendix B: Appendix C: Appendix D:

Community Meeting Potential Recycling and Density Increase Potential Lot Consolidation Under Existing Zoning Potential Lot Consolidation After Proposed Zone Amendment

List of Tables Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8 Table 9 Table 10 Table 11 Table 12 Table 13 Table 14 Table 15 Table 16 Table 17 Table 18 Table 19 Table 20 Table 21 Table 22 Table 23 Table 24 Table 25 Table 26 Table 27 Table 28 Table 29 Table 30 Table 31 Table 32 Table 33 Table 34 Table 35 Table 36 Population Trends 1990 to 2007 .............................................................................. 9 Gardenas Forecast Growth 2007-2025................................................................. 10 Population Age Composition 2007....................................................................... 11 Lakewood Labor Force 1960-2006 .......................................................................... 9 Civilian Employed Population Age 16+ by Occupation 2007 ........................... 13 Occupation Distribution of Gardena Residents 1990-2007 ............................... 14 Percent of Employment by Major Industry Group 2000 ................................... 15 Household Growth 1990-2012............................................................................... 16 Household Tenure 1990-2007 ................................................................................ 17 Household Characteristics 1990-2007 .................................................................. 17 Percent of Household by Income 2007................................................................. 18 Gardena Housing Growth 1960-2007 ................................................................... 19 Housing Type 2007 ................................................................................................. 20 Age Distribution of Existing Housing Stock ....................................................... 21 Housing Condition by Medium and High Residential Density Land Use.................................................................................................... 21 Median Rents 2007 .................................................................................................. 22 Special needs Populations 2000 ............................................................................ 23 Licensed community Care Facilities 2007 ........................................................... 24 Elderly householders by Tenure 2000 .................................................................. 25 Elderly Householders by Income and Tenure 2000 ........................................... 25 Persons with Disability by Employment Status 2000 ........................................ 28 Persons with Disability by Disability Type 2000 ................................................ 29 Female Headed Households 2000 ........................................................................ 30 Household Size by Tenure 2000............................................................................ 31 Household Income Distribution by Tenure 2006 ............................................... 35 Households Overpaying for Housing 2006......................................................... 36 Severe Overpayment 2000 ..................................................................................... 36 Household with Overcrowded Conditions 2006 ................................................ 37 Sever Overcrowding 2007 ...................................................................................... 38 Regional Housing Needs: Construction Allocation 2006- 2014 ........................ 38 Assisted Housing Inventory.................................................................................. 40 Required Rent Subsidies ........................................................................................ 42 Residential Land Use Categories .......................................................................... 46 Gardena Specific Plans ........................................................................................... 48 Residential Development Standards .................................................................... 51 Typical Planning and Zoning Fees ....................................................................... 53

Table 37 Table 38 Table 39 Table 40 Table 41 Table 42 Table 43 Table 44 Table 45 Table 46 Table 47 Table 48 Table 49 Table 50 Table 51 Table 52

Right-Of-Way Standards ....................................................................................... 55 Residential Project Approval Processing Time................................................... 55 Development Credit Effect on RHNA ................................................................. 65 Vacant Residential Sites Inventory ....................................................................... 67 Potential Recycled Units ........................................................................................ 70 Potential Density Increase by Zone ...................................................................... 73 Prime Opportunity Sites ........................................................................................ 75 Potential Housing Growth .................................................................................... 77 Net Effect of Adequate Sites Programs ................................................................ 80 Meeting the Lower-Income 50-percent Requirement ........................................ 82 Housing Types by Zone Category ........................................................................ 82 Affordable Rents 2008 ............................................................................................ 86 Financial Resources Available for Housing Activity ......................................... 92 Review of Accomplishment Under 2000 Housing Element ........................... 101 Housing Program Summary ............................................................................... 125 Quantified Objectives 2008-2014......................................................................... 131

List of Figures Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Regional Location ..................................................................................................... 2 Gardena General Plan and Land Use ..................................................................... 7 Race and Ethnicity .................................................................................................. 12 Seismic Hazard Zones ............................................................................................ 62 Vacant Land ............................................................................................................. 68 Potential Recycle and Density Increase: Northern Gardena ............................. 71 Potential Recycle and Density Increase: Southern Gardena ............................. 72 Potential Locations for Emergency Shelters ...................................................... 115

I.

INTRODUCTION
A. Community Context
Located in the South Bay region of Los Angeles County, 13 miles south of downtown Los Angeles, Gardena is a dense urban community encompassing 5.7 square miles. Nicknamed the Freeway city, Gardena is situated near four major freeways: the Harbor (110), San Diego (405), Century (105), and Artesia (91). Surrounding communities include Hawthorne and Los Angeles County to the north and west, Torrance to the south and west, and Los Angeles to the east Figure 1 show the location of the City of Gardena in relation to the region. Incorporated in 1930, Gardena experienced a large amount of growth during the 1950s, when the population more than doubled and the number of housing units grew by more than 150 percent. Growth in the City slowed during the 1960s and 1970s, but the city has seen its population increase by more than 30 percent over the past 20 years. Housing in Gardena originally consisted almost entirely of single-family homes. However, as the City grew and vacant land became more limited, higher density housing was necessary to accommodate the population. The housing stock now consists of a balance between single-family homes and multi-family units. During the 1980s, a majority of the housing growth was attributable to the replacement of single-family dwellings with multi-family units. In the last ten years, new housing construction in the City has occurred through the implementation of specific plans. Since 1999 seven specific plans have been adopted within the City. Six of the seven specific plans have been developed with 440 new units. The recently adopted Artesia Corridor Specific Plan envisions a mixed-use development on 44 acres of land along Artesia Boulevard between Normandie Avenue and Western Avenue. Once developed, the Artesia Corridor Specific Plan site will accommodate approximately 300 units and over 400,000 square feet of commercial uses. However, due to the lack of resources both funds and land the City must look at creative methods to provide decent affordable housing for all economic segments of the population of today and tomorrow. Today the population of the City has become ethnically diverse. Hispanics are now the largest ethnic group in the City, comprising nearly one-third of the population, while Blacks and Asians each account for more than one-fourth of the population.

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City of Gardena 2008-2014 Housing Element

Figure 1 Regional Perspective

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The 2008-2014 Housing Element continues the Citys focus on maintenance of the housing stock and establishes new programs designed to increase homeownership in the community, as well as to provide incentives for the development of affordable housing. The City will also continue other programs aimed at meeting the needs of lower-income households and special needs populations.

B.

Role and Organization of the Housing Element

The Housing Element is a seven-year program extending from 2008 through 2014, unlike other General Plan elements that typically cover a ten-year planning period. Housing Element law, first enacted in 1969, mandates that local governments adequately plan to meet the existing and projected housing needs of all economic segments of the community. The law recognizes that in order for the private market to adequately address housing needs and demand, local governments must adopt land use plans and regulatory systems that provide opportunities for, and do not unduly constrain, housing production. Housing Element statutes also require the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) to review local housing elements for compliance with State law and to report their findings to the local government. Californias Housing Element law requires that each city and county develop local housing programs to meet its fair share of existing and future housing needs for all income groups. The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) is responsible for assigning these regional needs, in the form of a Regional Housing Need Assessment or RHNA, to Southern California jurisdictions. The SCAG 2007 RHNA indicates that between 2006 and 2014, the City of Gardena needs to plan for the construction of 1,105 units to accommodate the Citys share of the regional housing needs. The Gardena Housing Element identifies strategies and programs that focus on: 1) conserving and improving existing affordable housing; 2) providing adequate sites for residential development; 3) assisting in the provision of affordable housing; 4) removing governmental and other constraints on housing development; and 5) promoting equal housing opportunities. The Housing Element is organized into the following main sections: Housing Needs Assessment Includes a city profile and assessment of the Citys population, housing characteristics, employment trend and special housing needs. The Needs Assessment also includes the Citys share of the regional housing needs. (Chapter II) Housing Constraints Includes an analysis of actual and potential governmental and non-governmental constraints upon the development,

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improvement or maintenance of housing, including construction cost, government regulations, financial costs, permit fees, regional constraints, etc. (Chapter III) Housing Resources Identifies land suitable for residential development, opportunities for recycling, redevelopment, as well as financial resources for the development of housing. (Chapter IV) Review of Existing Housing Programs Includes a progress report and a discussion of the overall effectiveness of the Housing Element, and the established goals and programs. (Chapter V) 2008-2014 Housing Plan Includes the Citys goals, policies and programs to be undertaken during the 2008-2014 period of the Housing Element to address housing needs in the community. (Chapter VI)

C.

Data Sources and Methods

In preparing the Housing Element, various sources of information are consulted. The 2000 Census provides the basis for population and household characteristics. Although dated, the Census remains the most comprehensive and widely accepted source of information on demographic characteristics, and provides consistency with other regional, State and Federal housing plans. However, several sources are used to provide reliable updates of the 2000 Census: Data from the State Department of Finance (DOF) and the State Employment Development Department (EDD) is used to update population and demographic data. Housing market information, such as home sales, rents, vacancies, and land costs are updated by property tax assessors files, internet sources listing sales and rent data, interviews with the local real estate community, and through rental data collected by the City. House program information is derived from the 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan for the City of Gardena and the Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Reports. Local and County service agencies are consulted for information on special needs populations, the services available to them, and the gaps in the system. Housing conditions and land use survey conducted by GRC Associates, Inc. in March and April 2008 and revisited in February 2011.

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D.

Relationship to Other General Plan Elements

The Gardena General Plan was adopted in 2006. The General Plan consolidated the seven mandated topics into three elements: 1) Community Development Element (Land Use Plan, Economic Development Plan, Community Design Plan, Housing Plan and Circulation Plan); 2) Community Resources Element (Open Space Plan and Conservation Plan); and 3) Community Safety Element (Safety Plan and Noise Plan). This Housing Element builds upon the other Plans, and is consistent with the policies and programs set forth in the General Plan. Examples of consistencies include residential development capacities and standards established in the Land Use Plan, which are incorporated within this Housing Element. The distribution of the Citys desired development patterns is presented in the Land Use Policy Map which is shown in Figure 2. This policy map identifies a land use designation for each parcel within the City. Other General Plan Elements and Plans provide economic and community design opportunities, as well as infrastructure and environmental constraints on housing development. Whenever any element or plan of the General Plan is amended, the Housing Element will be reviewed and modified, if necessary, to ensure the continued consistency between the elements.

E.

Public Participation

As required by State law, all economic segments of the community must be provided an opportunity to review and comment on the Housing Element. In compliance with this requirement, the City held a community workshop on the Draft Housing Element at the Nakaoka Community Center Auditorium at 1670 W. 162nd Street, Gardena on April 10, 2008. The purpose of the public community workshop meeting was to discuss and receive input on the Draft Housing Element and the communitys concerns regarding housing issues in the City. Notifications of the public hearing and community meeting were published in display ads in the Gardena Valley News. A copy of the published notices, the notice flyer and the signup sheet are included as Appendix A. In addition, the notice of the community workshop was posted at City Hall, Gardena Nakaoka Community Center and the library. A copy of the notice was also sent to Gardenas City Council and Planning and Environmental Quality Commission members. The community workshop was announced on the Citys official Web site www.ci.gardena.ca.us. Copies of the Draft Housing Element were available for review at City Hall and at the Citys public library, and will also be available for download on the Citys Web site. The April 10, 2008 community meeting was attended by 18 people. One of the key issues expressed at the meeting was the desire to incorporate universal design in future housing developments in the City. In response to this public input, the Housing Element now includes Housing Policy 5.2 -- Support accessible

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residential design that facilitates use of housing units by all persons regardless of age or disability status. In addition, the Housing Element encourages housing developers to incorporate universal design in the housing project to accommodate person with disabilities. Another opportunity for public participation on the Housing Element was at the April 15, 2008 regular meeting of the Planning and Environmental Quality Commission. At this meeting a workshop was conducted to introduce the Planning Commission members and the public in attendance to the purpose and adoption process of the Housing Element. No members of the public spoke at the Planning Commission workshop, however numerous people were at attendance. The Housing Element was again presented to the Planning Commission on May 20, 2008. In addition to the materials described above, Appendix A includes the Media Advisory on the Planning Commissions consideration of the Housing Element, which was published in the Gardena Valley News on May 15, 2008. The Planning Commission recommended the Housing Element to the City Council, and the City Council approved the Housing Element for submittal to HCD on May 27, 2008. In an effort to involve more members of the community, the City will conduct community meetings prior to the approval of the final Housing Element by the Gardena Planning and Environmental Quality Commission and the City Council. Notices for all public hearings will be published in the Gardena Valley News at least 10 days prior to the hearing dates. Agendas and staff reports are available in advance, and the meetings are held in City Hall, which is accessible to persons with disabilities.

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City of Gardena 2008-2014 Housing Element

Figure 2 General Plan Land Use

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II. HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT


Assuring the availability of adequate and affordable housing for current and future residents is an important goal for the City of Gardena. Gardenas housing production needs stem from both local and regional conditions. These conditions include the following: New housing is needed as regional employment and population growth generate a demand for new housing throughout Southern California. New housing is needed as Gardenas current population increases and ages. New construction housing is needed to replace some of Gardenas older housing stock that is too severely deteriorated to rehabilitate. New housing is needed when vacancy rates are low to ensure reasonable levels of choice and mobility in the marketplace.

A strategy to determine the housing needs of a community must be based on an understanding of its socioeconomic and housing characteristics. This entails a review of the human environment of the City. Demographic and socio-economic trends of a community such as population growth, household income or changing age distribution among residents affect the types and quantities of housing needed. The characteristics of a citys current housing stock, defined as the collection of all housing units located within the city jurisdiction, serve as a baseline for future conditions and goals. The Housing Needs Assessment presents a demographic profile and housing stock analysis of the City of Gardena pursuant to Government Code Sections 65583 (a)(1) and 65583(a)(2) to help guide this Housing Element to address all future housing goals for the planning period of 2008 to 2014. The Housing Needs Assessment is comprised of the following components:

A. Population Profile B. Employment Characteristics C. Household Characteristics D. Housing Characteristics E. Special Needs F. Share of Regions Housing Needs

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A.

Population Profile

This section includes demographic and socio-economic characteristics for Gardena residents, divided into the following subsections: Population growth, age composition, and racial/ethnic characteristics. The information provides a database upon which decisions concerning policies and programs for the provision of adequate housing can be based.

Population Growth
Incorporated in 1930, Gardena experienced a large amount of growth during the 1950s, when the population more than doubled and the housing units grew by more than 150 percent. Growth in the City slowed during the 1960s and 1970s, but the City has seen its population increase by more than 30 percent since 1970. Population data from the 2000s indicates a slowdown in this second wave of growth as the supply of developable land continues to decrease. Table 1 presents population growth trends from 1990 to 2007 for Gardena and surrounding cities. According to the United States Census Bureau, the total population of the City increased from 49,841 in 1990 to 57,746 in 2000. This represents an increase of 7,905 residents and a growth rate of 15.9 percent for the ten-year period. This rate is significantly higher than that of Los Angeles County for the same period, with a growth rate of 7.5 percent. Gardenas growth rate for this time frame was comparable with the surrounding cities of Lawndale and Hawthorne, at 16.0 percent and 17.9 percent, respectively.
Table 1 Population Trends 1990-2007 Jurisdiction City of Gardena % Growth City of Carson % Growth City of Hawthorne % Growth City of Lawndale % Growth City of Los Angeles %Growth City of Torrance % Growth LA County % Growth 1990 49,841 83,995 71,349 27,331 3,485,398 133,107 8,863,052 2000 57,746 89,730 84,112 31,711 3,694,820 137,946 9,528,330 2007 61,947 98,178 89,080 33,572 4,018,080 148,558 10,331,939 Growth 1990-2000 7,905 15.9% 5735 6.8% 12763 17.9% 4380 16.0% 209,422 6.0% 4839 3.6% 665,278 7.5% Growth 2000-2007 4,201 7.3% 8448 9.4% 4968 5.9% 1861 5.9% 323,260 8.7% 10612 7.7% 803,609 8.4%

Source: U.S. Census 1990 and 2000; California Department of Finance E-5 Estimates 2007

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According to the most recent California Department of Finance (DOF) estimate, the 2007 population of Gardena totaled 61,947, an increase of 4,201 residents over the 2000 count. Gardenas 7.3 percent growth rate from 2000 to 2007 is lower than the 8.4 percent increase of Los Angeles County for the same time period, and is within the range of the cities in the vicinity. The Southern California Association of Governments forecasts growth at the regional, county, subregional and city levels. The 2004 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) Growth Forecast was adopted by the SCAG Regional Council in 2004. The city totals are the sum of small area data and are recommended for advisory use only. The SCAG forecasts for the City of Gardena are shown in Table 2. Total population within the City is forecast to increase from 61,947 in 2007 to 74,375 in 2025, an increase of 12,428 or 20.0 percent. Total households within the City are forecast to increase from 21,058 in 2007 to 25,426 in 2025, which represents an increase of 4,368 households or 20.7 percent.

Table 2 Gardenas Forecast Growth 2007 -- 2025 Growth 2007-2025 12,428 4,368 Percent Growth 20.0% 20.7%

Forecast Population Households

2007 61,947 21,058

2025 74,375 25,426

Source: SCAG 2004 RTP Growth Forecast; DOF 2007 Estimates

Age Composition
Different lifestyles, family types and sizes, income levels and housing preferences are associated with specific age groups. For instance, young adults tend to reside alone or in small households of unrelated persons, and prefer condominiums and other small housing units. The need for detached single-family housing is prevalent among middle age households, and increased household sizes necessitate larger housing units. Additional stipulations such as proximity to schools and recreational facilities, job centers, and entertainment venues are important factors in accessing the needs of adult households, especially in households with children. As individuals and couples age there is a tendency to relocate to smaller housing units and senior housing.

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Table 3 Population Age Composition 2007 Gardena Age Groups Preschool 0-4 years School Age 5-17 College Age 18-24 Young Adults 25-34 Adults 35-44 45-54 55-64 Seniors 65 and over Total Population Median Age
Source: Claritas

Los Angeles County Total 782,128 2,026,093 1,031,128 1,468,169 1,589,052 1,407,210 972,235 1,056,957 10,331,939 34.0 Percent 7.6% 19.6% 10.0% 14.2% 15.4% 13.6% 9.4% 10.2% 100.0

Total 4,584 11,671 5,228 8,109 9,812 8,276 6,325 7,973 61,947 36.4

Percent 7.4% 18.8% 8.4% 13.1% 15.8% 13.4% 10.2% 12.9% 100.0%

Table 3 shows the age distribution of Gardena residents and Los Angeles County residents in 2007. Working adults (ages 25 to 64 years) represent 52.5 percent of the total population, while students (ages 5 to 24 years) represent 27.2 percent. Seniors (ages 65) and over make up 12.9 percent of the total population, and youth age 4 and under represents 7.3 percent. In comparison with Los Angeles County, Gardena population is represented by fewer students but more seniors. As a result, the median age of Gardena residents is older than that of Los Angeles County residents by two years.

Race and Ethnicity


Gardena prides itself on being a racially, ethnically and culturally diverse community. Figure 3 illustrates the racial and ethnic breakdown of Gardena residents. In 2007, the Hispanic or Latino ethnic group represented the largest portion of the Citys ethnic population at 36.0 percent. The Hispanic share of the total population was lower than the representation of Los Angeles County which was 47.3 percent. The second largest ethnic/racial group is the African-American or Black population at 27.6 percent, followed by the Asian and other population at 26.9 percent. The most noticeable shifts have occurred with the Non-Hispanic White population, which represented almost one-third (31.4%) of the total population in 1980 and has now decreased to less than ten percent.

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Figure 3 Race and Ethnicity

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50%


Asian/Other
Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic White

40%
30% 20% 10%

0% 1980
Source: Claritas

2007

B.

Employment Characteristics

Employment trends for the City of Gardena and Los Angeles County are shown in Table 4. According to SCAG, total estimated employment in the City increased from 33,095 in 1990 to 34,313 in 2000, an increase of 1,218 jobs or 3.7 percent during the ten-year period. This growth rate was considerably higher than that of Los Angeles County, which experienced employment decline of approximately 159,300 jobs or 3.5 percent during the 1990-2000 period.
Table 4 Employment Trends 1990 2000 Area City of Gardena Los Angeles Co. 1990 33,095 4,612,800 2000 34,313 4,453,500 Growth 1990-2000 1,218 -159,300 % Growth 3.7% -3.5%

Source: Southern California Association of Governments

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Table 5 Civilian Employed Population Age 16+ by Occupation 2007 Occupation Mgt. Business and Finance Operations Professional and Related Occupations Service Sales and Office Farming, Fishing and Forestry Construct., Extraction and Maintenance Prod., Trans. and Material Moving
Source: Claritas

Gardena 11.1% 16.8% 16.0% 29.7% 0.2% 7.3% 18.9%

LA County 13.4% 20.8% 14.7% 27.6% 0.2% 7.8% 15.6%

Table 5 shows the 2007 estimated civilian employment population age 16 and over by occupation for the City of Gardena and Los Angeles County. A total of seven occupational categories are presented in the table. Gardena residents tend to be employed to a lesser extent than County residents in highly skilled fields. The occupational categories that usually require the highest training and skill levels are: 1) management, business and financial operations and 2) professional and related occupations. The City of Gardena had 27.9 percent of its employed population within these two occupational categories in 2007. This share was lower than that of Los Angeles County at 34.2 percent. The occupational category that relates most closely to manufacturing and warehousing a prominent industry in Gardena is production, transportation and material moving. Approximately one-fifth (18.9%) of the employed population in Gardena is within this occupational classification. This is slightly higher than the countywide figure. Although Gardena residents are employed in highly skilled fields to a lesser extent than countywide averages, there has been growth in these categories over time. Table 6 depicts changing occupational trends for the ten-year period from 1990 to 2000 as reported by the Census Bureau. The categories of Management Business and Finance Operations and Professional and Related Occupations are consolidated under the Management/Professional occupation category. The highly skilled fields of Management/Professional and Service Occupations has steadily increased in the share of total employment of Gardena residents, from 34.0 percent in 1990 to 43.8 percent in 2000 to nearly one-half (48.9%) in 2007. This trend clearly demonstrates the growing percentage of white-collared occupations in relation to the work force as a whole.

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Table 6 Occupation Distribution of Gardena Residents 1990 - 2007 1990 Occupation Management/Professional Service Sales and office Farming, fishing, and forestry Construction, extraction, and maintenance Production, transportation, and material moving Total Number 5,694 3,024 9,599 281 3,234 3,777 25,609 Percent 22.2% 11.8% 37.5% 1.1% 12.6% 14.7% 100.0% 2000 Number 6,665 3,795 7,132 58 1,755 4,494 23,899 Percent 27.9% 15.9% 29.8% 0.2% 7.3% 18.8% 100.0% 2007 Number 7,018 4,020 7,462 59 1,829 4,744 25,132 Percent 27.9% 16.0% 29.7% 0.2% 7.3% 18.9% 100.0%

Source: US Census Bureau, Census 1990 and 2000; Claritas

Employment by major industry group within the City of Gardena is presented in Table 7. The employment data in this table is based on the SCAG ES 202 employment file, which includes self-employment figures. These employment data represent year 2000 for the City and 2001 for Los Angeles County. The three leading employment sectors within the City were manufacturing (34.5%), services (22.2%) and retail trade (16.2%). There were an estimated 9,390 manufacturing jobs in 2000 (not including self employment). The top three manufacturing sectors in 2000 included: Transportation equipment; Fabricated metal products; and Primary metal products.

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Table 7 Percent of Employment by Major Industry Group 2000

SIC Code
00-09 10-19 20-39 40-49 50-51 52-59 60-69 70-89 90-99
1 2

Sector
Agricultural Etc. Mining, Construction Manufacturing TCU Wholesale Trade Retail Trade FIRE Services Government
2

City of Gardena
0.8% 7.2% 34.5% 8.2% 7.8% 16.2% 2.7% 22.2% 0.4%

Los Angeles Co.


0.0% 3.4% 14.8% 6.1% 6.5% 15.7% 5.7% 33.3% 14.6%

Source: Southern California Association of Governments ES 202 Data File Los Angeles county data is the annual average for 2001 and is for non-farming employment The ES 202 data has poor government employment coverage.

As presented in the above tables, Gardena has a diversified economy. The City has a variety of businesses and agencies that provide employment opportunities. Major employers in the City include:1 Hustler Casino (500+ employees) Normandie Casino (500+ employees) C.R. Laurence Manufacturing (500+ employees) Charles E. Thomas Petroleum Products (100+ employees) Martin/Brattrud Inc. Furniture Manufacturing (100+ employees)

City of Gardena, 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan. Employment figures current as of May 2005.

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C.

Household Characteristics

The Census defines a household as one or more persons who occupy a housing unit. This includes persons living alone, families related through marriage or blood, or unrelated persons sharing a dwelling. People living in retirement or convalescent homes, school dormitories or other group living situations are not considered households, but are considered part of the group quarters population. Household characteristics are an important indicator of housing need in a community. The household characteristics section is divided into the following components: household growth, household type, household tenure, household composition and size, household income, and special needs groups and households.

Household Growth
Household trends for the City and County are shown in Table 8. The total number of households (as indicated by occupied housing units) in the City increased from 19,409 in 1990 to 20,324 in 2000, an increase of 915 households or 4.7 percent during the ten-year period. This growth rate is almost identical to the 4.8 percent experienced in Los Angeles County. Growth rates for the two areas diverged in recent years, as Gardenas 3.6 percent growth from 2000 to 2007 is considerably less than that of Los Angeles County at 5.8 percent for the same period.
Table 8 Household Growth 1990 2012 Growth 1990-2000 915 4.7% 2,989,542 3,133,774 3,314,263 144,232 4.8% Growth 2000-2007 734 3.6% 180,489 5.8%

Jurisdiction Gardena % Growth LA County % Growth

1990 19,409

2000 20,324

2007 21,058

Source: U.S. Census, DOF 2007 estimates

Household Tenure
The California Department of Finance estimated 21,058 households in Gardena in 2007. As shown in Table 9, of the total households in Gardena, 53.1 percent were renters and 46.7 percent were owners. Household tenure as a percentage of total occupied housing units has remained almost constant over this time period.

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Table 9 Household Tenure 1990 2007 Tenure Renter % of Total Owner % of Total Total 1990 9,675 53.4% 8,451 46.6% 18,126 2000 10,707 52.7% 9,617 47.3% 20,324 2007 11,173 53.1% 9,885 46.9% 21,058

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Claritas

Household Composition and Size


Table 10 summarizes household type distributions from 1990 to 2007. The total number of households increased during this time period from 18,126 to 21,058. Overall the distribution of different household types remained relatively constant over time, with family households comprising slightly less than 70 percent. Historical trends indicate that average household size (persons per household) has been increasing in Southern California for several decades. Since 1990, the average household size in Gardena has increased from 2.70 to 2.85 in 2007. The County has also experienced a similar pattern of household size increase. Countywide, the household size has increased from 2.91 in 1990 to 3.13 in 2007. Overall, the average number of persons per household is significantly higher for the County than it is for Gardena.

Table 10 Household Characteristics 1990 - 2007 1990 Household Type Total Households Families Singles Other Average HH Size Number 18,126 12,337 4,698 1,091 2.70 Percent of Total 100.0% 68.1% 25.9% 5.8% Number 20,324 14,031 5,191 1,102 2.80 2000 Percent of Total 100.0% 69.3% 25.5% 5.4% Number 21,058 14,571 5278 1,209 2.85 2007 Percent of Total 100.0% 69.2% 25.1% 5.7%

Source: US Census Bureau, Census 1990 and 2000; Claritas

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Household Income
Household income in Gardena is typically slightly below that of Los Angeles County as a whole, with a greater percentage of households falling into lower income classes. Table 11 presents the 2007 household income distribution for residents of Gardena and Los Angeles County. A total of 15.8 percent of the households in the City had an annual income of under $15,000 in 2007. This is slightly higher than the proportion recorded across Los Angeles County (14.4%). An estimated 55.4 percent of all households in Gardena had incomes under $50,000 annually, while 50.7 percent of Los Angeles County households fell into this group. The same relationships are valid at the upper end of the household income spectrum. An estimated 13.2 percent of all households in Gardena had incomes over $100,000 in 2007, which is considerably lower than the 20.5 percent observed at the County level. The 2007 median household income in the City of Gardena was $44,819 as compared to Los Angeles Countys $49,246, a difference of $4,427.

Table 11 Percent of Households by Income 2007 Income Less than $15,000 $15,000 - $24,999 $25,000 - $34,999 $35,000 - $49,999 $50,000 - $74,999 $75,000 - $99,999 $100,000 - $149,999 $150,000 - $249,999 $250,000 - $499,999 $500,000 and more Median HH Income
Source: Claritas

Gardena 15.8% 11.6% 12.2% 15.8% 19.6% 11.7% 10.2% 2.5% 0.4% 0.1% $44,819

LA County 14.4% 11.0% 10.8% 14.5% 17.5% 11.2% 11.8% 5.7% 1.9% 1.1% $49,246

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D.

Housing Characteristics

Housing Growth
As Table 12 shows, Gardenas housing supply has increased over the decades from approximately 11,500 in 1960 to nearly 21,500 units in 2007. Since Gardena is in a highly developed area, much of the increase was the result of annexation of unincorporated County land to the City. Some of the increase in the last ten years has been through development of residential specific plans. For example, in 1999, the implementation of the Emerald Square Specific Plan resulted in the development of 150 single-family units, and in 2004 the Carnellian Specific Plan resulted in the new construction of 101 single-family units. However, with very limited vacant land available for residential development, most of the future housing growth is anticipated to come from the recycling of developed land to higher density residential uses.
Table 12 Gardena Housing Growth 1960 - 2007 Year 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007
Source: U.S. Census and DOF

Number of Units 11,526 14,694 17,540 19,037 21,037 21,492

Percent Change

27.5% 19.4% 8.5% 10.5% 2.2%

Housing Type
Gardena is primarily a residential community with almost 45 percent of the total land area designated for residential use in the General Plan. According to the DOF estimates, there were 21,492 housing units in Gardena in 2007. Table 13 shows that approximately one half (51.3%) of the total units in Gardena were single-family units (attached and detached) and 43.6 percent were multiple-family units. Mobile homes accounted for the remaining 5.1 percent of Gardenas housing stock. In comparison, the 2007 countywide housing total of approximately 3.38 million units was distributed to 55.7 percent single-family units, 42.7 percent multiple-family units and 1.7 percent mobile homes.

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Table 13 Housing Type 2007 Single Detached Gardena Percent Los Angeles County Percent 9,310 43.3% 1,638,521 48.4% Attached 1,711 8.0% 243,978 7.2% 2 to 4 units 2,710 12.6% 291,406 8.6% Multiple 5+ units 6,658 31.0% 1,151,750 34.1% Mobile Homes 1,103 5.1% 56,701 1.7% Total 21,492 100.0% 3,382,356 100.0%

Source: DOF 2007 estimates

Gardenas housing type distribution has changed very little since the adoption of the previous Housing Element. In 2000, single-family homes accounted for approximately 51 percent of the Citys housing stock, with about 44 percent accounted for by multi-family units. Mobile homes and other housing types made up just over five percent. There was a slight shift, however, toward singlefamily homes and away from multi-family and mobile home units during the 1990s. At the time of the 1990 Census, single-family dwellings accounted for about 45 percent of the total dwelling units in Gardena, with multi-family units representing 47 percent and mobile homes at eight percent.

Housing Stock Age and Condition


The majority of the Citys housing stock is in good condition. However, homes built more than 30 years ago are likely to require structural renovation and maintenance. According to Table 14, almost two-thirds of the existing housing stock in Gardena were built prior to 1970. In general, older buildings require greater maintenance, which results in higher costs. Thus, maintenance is often deferred, leading to the further physical deterioration of the Citys housing units. In addition, older, deteriorated structures often violate building code standards and lack safety features such as fire suppression, home security devices and seismic safety retrofits. In fact, stringent seismic safety codes were not developed until after the 1971 Sylmar earthquake. After that event, many building codes were revised to ensure structures could withstand seismic activity of similar magnitude. Therefore, the current age of Gardenas housing stock strongly suggests there will be an increased need for structural improvements during the next decade. As part of the development of the 2008-2014 Housing Element, a survey of housing conditions was conducted in areas designated for Medium Density (R-2 and R-3 zones) and High Density Residential (R-4 zone) land uses. These two land use designations were selected because they have the potential for higher

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density recycling. The survey identified residential parcels by the following housing conditions as they appeared from the public right-of-way: 1) good; 2) needs maintenance; and 3) deteriorated and candidate for recycling. Parcels identified as deteriorated had housing that were structurally unsound and posed potential health and safety issues. These conditions would generally fall under the physical blight criteria of the California Community Redevelopment Law.
Table 14 Age Distribution of Existing Housing Stock Year of Construction 1999-2007 1995-1998 1990-1994 1980-1989 1970-1979 1960-1969 1950-1959 1940-1949 Prior to 1939
Source: U.S. Census and Claritas

Units Constructed 1,297 167 873 2,408 3,226 3,845 6,384 2,551 795

Percent of Total 6.0% 0.8% 4.1% 11.2% 15.0% 17.9% 29.6% 11.8% 3.7%

The results of the survey are presented in Table 15. It shows that 2,584 parcels zoned R-2, R-3 and R-4 had existing residential units. Of these surveyed parcels, 2,283 parcels (88.4%) had housing that was in good condition, 295 parcels (11.4%) exhibited signs of deferred maintenance, and six parcels (0.2%) were deteriorated.
Table 15 Housing Condition by Medium and High Residential Density Land Use R-2 Good Condition Percent Needs Maintenance Percent Deteriorated Percent Total Percent
Source: GRC Associates, Inc.

R-3 1,057 84.9% 184 14.8% 4 0.3% 1,245 100.0%

R-4 989 94.0% 62 5.9% 1 0.1% 1,052 100.0%

Total 2,283 88.4% 295 11.4% 6 0.2% 2,584 100.0%

237 82.6% 49 17.1% 1 0.3% 287 100.0%

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Housing Costs
The 2007 median sales price of single-family and condominium homes in Gardena were $490,000, which was 7.6 percent lower than the Los Angeles County median price of $530,000. These figures were derived from information provided by Dataquick Information Services. Sales data for the first few months of 2008 indicate that prices are dropping significantly. In February 2008, the median sales prices in Gardena had dropped to $450,000, which is a reflection of the overall real estate market. This price decline is likely to continue through the remainder of 2008. Additionally, the 2007 median asking rental rate in Gardena was $930 per month as compared to Los Angeles County rents of $1,669 per month. Gardenas median rents were approximately $739 lower than the County. Table 16 presents a summary of rental rates by unit type for both Gardena and the County.
Table 16 Median Rents 2007 Los Angeles County $1,209 $1,508 $1,416 $1,943 $2,038 $1,563

Gardena Studio 1 Bed-1 Bath 2 Bed 1 Bath 2 Bed 2 Bath 3 Bed 2 Bath Median Rent
Source: Realfacts, Feb. 2008

Difference $609 $683 $491 $848 ($12) $633

$600 $825 $925 $1,095 $2,050 $930

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E.

Special Needs

Certain segments of the population experience conditions that make it difficult for them to access affordable housing. Physical/medical conditions need for particular space or supportive service requirements, incomes, or other factors may impede a households ability to obtain descent and affordable housing. Government Code Section 65583(a)(7) requires the housing element to analyze characteristics and conditions of the following population groups: elderly, disabled, female-headed households, large households, farmworkers, and the homeless. Table 17 summarizes the special needs populations in Gardena as of 2000. Each population group, as well as its specific circumstances and housing needs, is described in the following sections. Population statistics as of 2007 are given where available within the individual sections.
Table 17 Special Needs Populations 2000 Special Needs Groups Seniors With a Disability Senior Households Renter Owner Disabled Persons Female-Headed Households With Related Children (<18) Large Households Renter Owner Farmworkers
2 3

Persons 7,146 2,913

Households

Percent

12.4% (40.8%) 4,282 1,374 2,908 21.1% (32.1%) (67.9%) 20.7% 6,246 1,835 3,031 1,615 1,416 30.6% (29.4%) 14.9% (53.3%) (46.7%) < 0.1% < 0.1% 20,404

11,925

58 150 57,746

Homeless Persons

Total Persons/Households
Source: U.S. Census 2000
1

Numbers in parentheses reflect the percentage of the special needs group, and not the percentage of the total City population or households.
2 3

Persons employed in farming, forestry or fishing occupations. Estimate

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According to California Department of Social Services records, 34 State-licensed community care facilities are located in Gardena. Table 18 summarizes the facilities by type and capacity. These facilities have a total capacity of 605 persons. Gardena currently contains five types of facilities:
1.

Adult Day Care Serves seniors and developmentally disabled adults who are able to live at home, but require a certain level of care during the day. Some adult day care facilities provide health care services, while others provide non-medical care in the form of personal hygiene and meals. Adult Residential Facilities Facilities of any capacity that provide 24hour non-medical care for adults ages 18 through 59 who are unable to provide for their own daily needs. Adults may be physically handicapped, developmentally disabled, and/or mentally disabled. Group Homes Facilities of any capacity that provide specialized 24-hour non-medical treatment for persons under age 18. Residents are referred by the Department of Children and Family Services and the Probation Department. Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Provide care and supervision for persons age 60 and above and assistance with activities of daily living, such as bathing and grooming. They may also provide incidental medical services under special care plans. Small Family Home Provide 24-hour-a-day care in the licensee's family residence for six or fewer children who are mentally disabled, developmentally disabled, or physically handicapped, and who require special care and supervision as a result of such disabilities.
Table 18 Licensed Community Care Facilities 2007 Facility Type Adult Day Care Adult Residential Group Home Residential Elderly Small Family Home Total Facilities 5 20 2 5 2 34 Capacity 232 121 12 232 8 605

2.

3.

4.

5.

Source: Department of Social Services, Community Care Licensing Division

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Elderly
Elderly persons comprise the population of persons age 65 and older. Elderly persons have special needs stemming from three different sources: relatively low fixed incomes, high health care costs, and physical disabilities. Being on a low fixed income makes it difficult for many of the elderly to obtain adequate housing. This is further compounded by rising health care costs, which are a product of health problems associated with aging. If an elderly person is disabled, health care costs may be even higher, and housing may be more difficult to find due to accessibility issues. Other special needs relevant to this demographic include transportation and other services. As previously stated the City of Gardena has a total of 7,973 residents age 65 and older as of 2007, an 11.6 percent increase from the 2000 senior population of 7,146. The 2007 figure represents 13.0 percent of the total current population of the City. Tables 19 and 20 summarize elderly households by tenure and income.
Table 19 Elderly Householders by Tenure 2000 Age 65-74 years 75 plus years
Source: U.S. Census 2000

Owner 1,551 1,357

Renter 918 456

Total 2,469 1,813

Table 20 Elderly Householders by Income and Tenure 2000 Owner Households 190 165 385 740 Renter Households 380 54 113 547

Income Level Below 50% AMI 51% to 80% AMI 81% to 120 AMI Total
Source: CHAS Data

Total 570 219 498 1,287

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In order to help meet the needs of elderly residents, the City promotes affordable housing conservation through the following rehabilitation assistance programs: Residential Rebate Program -- Designed to cover expenses for major household repairs. It is available for low/moderate income homes and mobilehome owners. The refund is a 50 percent cash rebate up to a maximum of $3,000. Handy-worker Fix-Up program -- Designed to provide qualified low and moderate-income households with free home improvement assistance. Housing units must be owner-occupied single-family or mobile homes. This program offers free Handy-worker crew labor and materials up to $600 for qualifying improvements, including health and safety corrections and ADA improvements. Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation Program -- Offers up to $50,000 in City housing rehabilitation zero-interest loan assistance to low-income, owneroccupants residing within the City of Gardena. Mobile Home Rehabilitation Program -- Offers up to $20,000 in City housing rehabilitation loan assistance to low-income mobile home owneroccupants residing within the City of Gardena.

The Gardena Zoning Ordinance also allows for a potential source of affordable housing for seniors in the form of granny units. Municipal Code Section 18.12.030 allows granny units in R-1 zones occupied by single-family residences, subject to conditional use permits. There are five residential Licensed Community Care Facilities within the City that serve the elderly, with a combined capacity of 232 beds. In addition, the Gardena Senior Citizens Day Care Center is an adult day care facility with a capacity of 77 persons. The Center, located at 14517 South Crenshaw Boulevard, provides lunch and transportation to elderly Gardena residents, as well as support counseling for family members. Staff members speak English, Chinese, Japanese, Spanish, and Tagalog.2 Additional assistance to elderly residents of Gardena is provided by the Senior Citizens Bureau, a division of the Citys Recreation and Human Services Department. The office of the Senior Citizens Bureau is located at 1670 West 162nd Street in the Kiyoto Ken Nakaoka Community Center. The Senior Citizens Bureau provides support to senior citizens through information and referral services, case management, in-home support; daily nutritional meals at seven community sites (including the Senior Citizens Day Care Center, the Japanese

City of Gardena, 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan

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Cultural Institute, Rowley Park, Thornburg Park and the Lawndale Senior Center) and home-delivered meals; outreach; health clinics; escort and shopping services; specialized care for people suffering from Alzheimer's Disease, including daily socialization and recreation programs, exercise, lunch, art and music therapy, counseling, health screening, transportation, special events; and programs for the chronically mentally ill who live in board and care and family group homes, including daily social, recreational and educational programs.3 The City owns and operates the Gardena Municipal Bus Lines (GMBL) system. GMBL routes transverse the southwest region of Los Angeles County and extend into downtown Los Angeles. To address the specific transportation needs of the elderly and disabled, GMBL also operates the Gardena Special Transit system. Gardena Special Transit is a demand-response service for elderly and handicapped persons, operating seven days a week at a nominal cost to patrons.4

Disabled Persons
The 2000 Census identifies three types of disabilities: work disabilities, mobility limitations, and self care limitations. Disabilities are defined as mental, physical, or health conditions that last more than six months. The types of disabilities are described below: Work Disability: A condition lasting more than six months that restricts a persons choice of work and prevents them from working full-time. Mobility Limitation: A physical or mental condition lasting more than six months which limits a persons ability to go outside of his or her home alone. Self-Care Limitation: A physical or mental condition lasting more than six months which makes it difficult for a person to take care of his or her own personal needs.

As required under Government Code Sections 65583(a)(4) and 65583(c)(3) all housing elements adopted after January 1, 2002 must analyze potential and actual constraints upon the development, maintenance and improvement of housing for persons of disabilities and include programs for the removal of such constraints or provide reasonable accommodation for housing designed for persons with disabilities.

3 4

www.ci.gardena.ca.us City of Gardena 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan

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The 2000 Census numbers the adult population of the City of Gardena (civilian non-institutionalized population ages 16 and above) at 43,702. As shown in Table 21, 11,925 persons have one or more disability, representing 27.3 percent of the Citys total adult population. Disability status does not necessarily indicate a need for special need/supportive housing, and data on the total number of disabled persons needing supportive housing in the City is not available. Using the national standard of 1-3 percent of the disabled population needing supportive housing, it can be estimated that the City has approximately 119 to 358 disabled individuals in need of supportive housing.
Table 21 Persons with Disability by Employment Status 2000 Number Age 16-64, Employed Persons with a Disability Age 16-64, Not Employed Persons with a Disability Persons Age 65 Plus with a Disability Total Persons with a Disability
Source: Census Bureau (2000 Census SF 3: P42)

Percent 15.6% 8.8% 42.7% 100.0%

5,765 3,247 2,913 11,925

Table 22 gives a breakdown of the disabled persons population by type of disability. Self-care disabilities represent a significant portion of disabilities reported by persons in both the 15-64 and senior age groups. While Go-outsidehome disabilities only represent 8.1 percent of total disabilities tallied citywide, 1,490 out of 5,399 disabled seniors are affected by this form of disability, representing 27.6 percent of their demographic. Furthermore, 1,598 disabled seniors have some form of physical disability, representing 29.6 percent of the same demographic. To assist disabled individuals in providing adequate housing to meet their needs, Title 24of the Uniform Building Code was adopted by the State of California in 1984. Title 24 provides regulations for adaptability and accessibility of apartments units to prove for the safety and welfare of physically handicapped inhabitants and visitor. An adaptable apartment is one that has accessible floor entry and circulation, and that can at any future point be adapted to meet the specific needs of a handicapped person. These improvements would include the installation of wider doors, grab bars, lower cabinets, and lower light switches, as well as sidewalk-to-front-door ramps.

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Table 22 Persons with Disabilities by Disability Type 2000 Number Total Disabilities Total Disabilities for Ages 5-64 Sensory Disability Physical disability Mental disability Self-care disability Go-outside-home disability Employment disability Total Disabilities for Ages 65 and Over Sensory Disability Physical disability Mental disability Self-care disability Go-outside-home disability
Source: Census Bureau (2000 Census SF 3: P41)

Percent 100.0% 70.6% 4.8% 10.5% 6.5% 3.4% 17.8% 27.9% 29.4% 5.5% 8.7% 3.5% 3.6% 8.1%

18,378 12,979 840 1,931 1,193 620 3,264 5,131 5,399 1,019 1,598 637 655 1,490

The City offers home improvement programs that provide for handicapped access improvements. Additionally the City will examine and consider additional programs that will provide additional housing for disabled persons within Gardena. Furthermore, the City contracts with the Fair Housing Foundation to provide fair housing and landlord/tenant services, which benefit many disabled people that are denied a reasonable accommodation. The Gardena Socialization Center for Mentally Ill Adults is a daily social, recreation, and educational program for chronically mentally ill adults who reside in private homes and board and care homes in the City. The program enhances a participants independence and ability to live in the least restrictive environment possible. The Center is funded in part by Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, and staffed by the Gardena Community Adult School. The Socialization Program is offered at Recreation Park, located at 15800 South Brighton Avenue, and Freeman Park, located at 2100 West 154th Place.

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Female Heads of Household


Female-headed households, especially single parent households, are typified as having lower incomes and a greater need for affordable housing. In addition these households can have needs such as accessible day care and health care, as well as other supportive services. The relatively low incomes earned by femaleheaded households, combined with the increased need for supportive services, severely limit the housing options available to them. As shown in Table 23, female-headed households number 6,246 as of 2000, representing 30.6 percent of total households in the City. There were 2,801 single female householders living alone, and 3,445 were 2-or-more person households with female householders. The latter category includes 1,835 households with children under 18 years of age and 1,610 without. Of the 6,246 total female headed households in the City, 844 are composed of families living below the federal poverty line of approximately $11,250 for a two person household. This figure represents 13.5 percent of total female-headed households and 48.3 percent of the 1,746 total families living below the poverty line.
Table 23 Female Headed Households 2000 Householder Type Total Households Total Female Heads-of-Household Female Heads with Children under 18 Female Heads without Children under 18 Total Families Under the Poverty Level Female Headed Households Under the Poverty Level
Source: Census Bureau (2000 Census SF 3: P10 and P90)

Number 20,404 6,246 1,835 1,610 1,746 844

Percent 100.0% 30.6%

100.0% 48.3%

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Assistance for female-headed households includes the Gardena Family Child Care Program (GFCC), which was established in 1976 to provide quality childcare and child-development services to school-age children whose parents live or work in the City. The GFCC Program is provided at low or no cost, depending on family income, and is available to low-income and high-risk families with children 12 years of age or younger. Child Care services are provided out of licensed Family Child Care Homes within the City.

Large Households
Large households, defined as households with five or more members, have special needs due to the limited availability of adequately sized affordable housing units. Larger units can be very expensive, which often results in large households residing in smaller, less expensive units or doubling up to save on housing costs, both of which lead to overcrowded conditions. As seen in Table 24, the 2000 Census identifies 3,031 large households in Gardena, representing almost 15 percent of all households. Among the Citys large households, 51 percent were renters, while 49 percent owned their own home. In comparison, only 41 percent of large households were homeowners in 1990. Homeownership increased among large households over the ten-year period partially as a result of the development of several new single-family subdivisions and the annexation of the Rosecrans unincorporated area.5

Table 24 Household Size by Tenure 2000 1-4 persons Number Owner Renter Total 8,206 9,099 17,305 Percent 85.3% 84.9% 85.1% 5+ Persons Number 1,416 1,615 3,031 Percent 14.7% 15.1% 14.9% Number 9,622 10,714 20,336 Total Percent 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

Source: Census Bureau (2000 Census SF 3: H17)

City of Gardena, 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan

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In order to alleviate overcrowding among large households, the City partners with the Housing Authority of the County of Los Angeles (HACoLA). Through the Countys Section 8 program, low-income large households can receive a rental subsidy to reduce their housing costs, thereby increasing their access to affordable housing of sufficient size.

Farmworkers
Farmworkers are identified as persons whose primary source of income is seasonal agricultural labor. Their housing needs stem from their relatively low income and job instability. According to the 2000 Census, 58 residents were employed in the farming, fishing, and forestry category, comprising 0.2 percent of the total employed population. This figure translates to less than two onehundredths of a percent of the total population of the City. Gardena is located in a highly urbanized area of Los Angeles County and any major agricultural uses in the immediate vicinity ceased decades ago. There is no evidence of a sizeable community of migrant farm workers residing within city limits, as the great distance between the City and agricultural areas makes the commuting cost prohibitive. Given that so few residents are employed in this industry, the housing needs of farm workers can be addressed by the overall programs for affordable housing, such as rent subsidies, and affordable new incentives for construction.

Homeless
A homeless individual or family is defined by federal regulations as a person or family that lacks a fixed and regular nighttime residence. Homelessness is an acute housing problem that has broadened in dimension in recent years. However, the lack of data documenting the extent of this problem in Gardena, compounded by the mobile nature of the homeless, makes establishing an accurate estimate of the total number difficult. In its 2004 Continuum of Care Gaps Analysis for Service Planning Area 8 (SPA 8), which includes Gardena, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) estimated 9,903 homeless persons to be living in the South Bay area. Approximately 80 percent of the homeless were individuals and 20 percent were families. LAHSA estimates that 43 percent of the homeless suffered domestic violence and 82 percent suffer from substance abuse. An additional 29 percent were estimated to be mentally ill and nearly 6 percent were inflicted with HIV or AIDS. Homeless individuals and families have differing housing needs. Both groups are in crisis and need emergency food, clothing and shelter. Long-term transitional shelter, however, would have different emphases for individuals and families. An individual would do well in transitional housing such as cooperative or

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single-room occupancy facilities. Families require more housing amenities to accommodate their size and age range; thus, lower income re-entry housing such as single or multi-family units would be most appropriate. Both groups require supportive housing and social services. The needs of homeless families are more complicated than those of homeless individuals, in that childcare, pediatric care, and education must interact with basic health, mental health, employment, and other supportive social and housing issues.6 According to the City Managers Office, there are approximately 150 homeless persons in the City over the course of a year.7 The Gardena Police Department estimates there are approximately 20 homeless persons within the City at any one time. The Gardena Human Services Division responds to homeless individuals and families, as well as lower income persons threatened with homelessness, through the Emergency Services Program. Through this program, the City gives referrals and transportation vouchers to shelters, and also provides food vouchers and clothing. The Human Services Division assists approximately 100 persons identified as homeless annually through the Emergency Services Program. The Human Services Division and Emergency Services Program refer homeless families and individuals to the following facilities for assistance and daytime shelter: Harbor Gateway Clubhouse and Soup Kitchen (Los Angeles) Homeless Women's Drop-In Center (Wilmington) His House/Salvation Army (20830 South Vermont Avenue, Torrance) The Job Center (Torrance)

Additionally, the Human Services Division refers homeless families, women, children, and abused persons to the appropriate location for overnight shelter: 1736 Family Crisis Center (21707 Hawthorne Boulevard, Torrance) Family Shelter for the Homeless (Long Beach) House of Yahweh (4046 Marine Avenue, Lawndale) Harbor Interfaith Shelter (670 West Ninth Street, San Pedro)

Single homeless men are referred to the Beacon Light Mission located at 525 Broad Avenue in the Wilmington. Mentally ill persons, both homeless and other mentally-disabled persons in need of emergency assistance are referred to Harbor View House located at 921 South Beacon Street, San Pedro.

6 7

City of Gardena 2005-2010 Consolidated Plan City of Gardena Action Plan Fiscal Year 2006/07

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In addition to the Emergency Services Program, the City operates the following programs to address the supportive service needs of the homeless and those threatened with homelessness: employment and training programs; a child care program; senior meals; case management and counseling for youth and families; socialization centers for the mentally ill; recreation opportunities for the developmentally disabled; and low cost bus services for elderly, disabled, and other residents.

F.

Share of Regions Housing Need

State Housing Law requires SCAG to identify the jurisdictions fair share of the existing and future regional housing needs for all income groups. This fair share is determined to ensure that each jurisdiction accepts responsibility for the housing needs of current and future residents, particularly lower income groups. The SCAG 2007 RHNA identifies how the current housing supply falls short in meeting the needs of the Citys residents, and quantifies the improvements that must occur in order to ensure that those needs are being satisfied.

Household Income and Tenure


Table 25 presents the household income distribution by owner and renter occupancy and by income categories (Extremely Low, Very Low, Low, and Moderate and Above). The information was based on the SCAG Existing Housing Needs 2006 report, which shows that of the 20,337 households, 14.1 percent were Extremely Low Income, 11.1 percent were Very Low Income, and 20.0 percent were Low Income households. The information also shows that over one-half (54.4%) of the renters were in the Extremely Low, Very Low and Low Income category as opposed to less than one-third (29.6%) of owners in the same income categories. Extremely Low Income households are much more likely to rent than to own their housing units, with renters accounting for 76.8 percent of the total. They are also more likely than other households to have a housing problem of one kind or another, with 72.3 percent falling into this category, compared to only 48.9 percent of all households. The same is true of overpayment (43.9% compared to 25.9%) and overcrowding (25.1% compared to 21.8%). Clearly, Gardenas lowestincome households are burdened with housing problems to a greater extent than other groups, and it is particularly important for the Citys housing programs to reach them.

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Table 25 Household Income Distribution by Tenure 2006 Extremely Low <30% of median 665 6.9% 2,205 20.6% 2,870 14.1%

Very Low 30-50% of median 775 8.0% 1,475 13.8% 2,250 11.1%

Low 50-80% of median 1,415 14.7% 2,140 20.0% 3,555 17.5%

Moderate and Above 80-95% of median 575 6.0% 845 7.9% 1,420 7.0% >95% of median 6,205 64.4% 4,035 37.7% 10,241 50.4%

Tenure Owners Percent Renters Percent Total Percent

Total 9,635 100.0% 10,700 100.0% 20,337 100.0%

Source: SCAG Draft Existing Housing Needs, downloaded from the HUD User Web, September 19, 2006

Households Overpaying for Housing


Overpayment is defined as spending over 30 percent of household income on housing, while severe overpayment is defined as paying more than 50 percent. The SCAG 2007 RHNA estimated that 5,260 households, or 25.9 percent of the 20,335 households in 2006, were overpaying for housing. Table 26 shows that of these households, 2,405 (45.7%) were in the very low income category, 1,410 (26.8%) were in the low income category, 355 (6.7%) were in the moderate income category, and 1090 (20.7%) were in the above moderate income category. The SCAG RHNA also indicated that of the 5,260 households experiencing a cost burden (paying over 30% of their income towards housing,) more than half were renters. Among very low (30-50%) and extremely low income households, renters were more likely to overpay than owners. Among low (50-80%) and moderateand-above (80% and up) income households, this problem affected more owners, indicating that families in these groups are overextending themselves to pay mortgages as they aspire to homeownership. These trends would seem to indicate a need for both rental and for-sale units affordable to lower income families, as households tend to favor housing (especially ownership housing) that is technically out of their income range even when more affordable choices are available.

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Table 26 Households Overpaying for Housing 2006 Very Low <30% median Renters Owners Total
SCAG 2007 RHNA

Low 50-80% median 925 485 1,410

Moderate and Above 80-95% median 150 205 355 >95% median 100 990 1,090 Total 2,880 2,380 5,260

30-50% median 795 350 1,145

910 350 1,260

Severe Overpayment The most recent year for which data are available on severe overpayment is 2000, in which just under one-sixth of all Gardena households and just under one-fifth of renters paid more than half their income for housing, as shown in Table 27. This problem was most acute for extremely low income (30% median or less) households, more than half of whom severely overpaid. The data show a similar pattern to that of overall overpayment, with owners accounting for a greater share of severely overpaying households as income rises.
Table 27 Severe Overpayment 2000

Total Renters Household Income <30% of median With cost burden >50% (%of income group) Household Income 30-50% of median With cost burden >50% (%of income group) Household Income 50-80% of median With cost burden >50% (%of income group) Household Income >80% of median With cost burden >50% (%of income group) Total Households With cost burden >50% (%of total) 107 (5%) 4,886 0 (0%) 10,682 2,072 (19.4%) 2,197 1,283 (58.4%) 1,465 678 (46.3%) 2,134

Total Owners 655 329 (50.2 %) 759 259 (34.1%) 1,412 385 (27.3%) 6,769 271 (4%) 9,595 1,238 (12.9%)

Total Households 2,852 1,612 (56.5%) 2,224 937 (42.2%) 3,546 492 (13.8%) 11,655 271 (2.3%) 20,277 3,310 (16.3%)

Source: State of the Cities Data Systems: Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) Data based on U.S. Census 2000

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Households in Overcrowded Conditions


A persistent problem affecting housing conditions is overcrowding. The U.S. Census defines overcrowding as more than 1.01 persons per room excluding kitchen, bathrooms, and hallways. Severe overcrowding is defined as more than 1.5 persons per room. Overcrowding is often an indicator of households that may be financially unable to obtain adequate space for their needs, or households that are required to house extended family members. It is not necessarily a reflection of inadequate physical conditions of the housing units themselves. As presented in Table 28, 4,430 households experienced overcrowding, representing just more than one-fifth of total households. Of these households, 1,385 (31.3%) were in the very low income category, 950 (21.4%) were in the low income category, 385 (8.7%) were in the moderate income category, and 1710 (38.6%) were in the above moderate income category. Renters were much more likely to experience overcrowding, as roughly half of Gardena households rent their units, yet the number of overcrowded renter households was about twoand-a-half times as large as the number of overcrowded owner households. This may indicate a need for more three-bedroom rental units to accommodate larger renter households. Families that own homes generally are able to take advantage of the ample stock of single-family houses in Gardena, most of which have three or more bedrooms; thus, severe overcrowding is not as much of a problem for owners as it is for renters, and the latter group would benefit more than the former from large units.
Table 28 Households with Overcrowded Conditions 2006 Very Low <30% median Renters Owners Total
SCAG 2007 RHNA

Low 50-80% median 760 190 950

Moderate and Above 80-95% median 270 115 385 >95% median 1,010 700 1,710 Total 3,200 1,230 4,430

30-50% median 510 155 665

650 70 720

Severe Overcrowding The 2007 American Community Survey, released by the U.S. Census Bureau, provides data on severe overcrowding by tenure, presented in Table 29. No data are available on severe overcrowding by income level. Only three percent of all Gardena households had more than 1.5 persons per room, and

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as with the overall level of overcrowding, this was a problem that affected renters to a greater degree than owners. The proportion of renters experiencing severe overcrowding was more than four times that of owners.
Table 29 Severe Overcrowding 2007 Total households Renters Owners Total 10,230 10,033 20.263 Severely overcrowded 496 112 608 % of tenure group 4.8% 1.1% 3.0%

Source: U.S. Census American Community Survey 2007

Future Need
The SCAG 2007 RHNA is a minimum projection of additional housing units needed to accommodate projected household growth at various income levels by 2014. The RHNA projects future housing needs for Gardena over a period of seven years, adjusted for vacancy and the local income distribution. The RHNA numbers serve as planning goals in the preparation of future strategies and programs. The City is not required to actually construct the housing; rather, it must demonstrate that sufficient development capacity exists for the addition of at least 1,105 units between 2006 and 2014. Table 30 presents the Citys projected housing needs from 2006-2014 according to five income categories. Approximately 40 percent of future housing need is allocated to the lower income groups (0 to 80% of area median income), while moderate and above-moderate income households received 60 percent of the allocation (80% and over of AMI). Gardena is 99 percent built out, and the City believes that housing needs will not change significantly.
Table 30 Regional Housing Needs: Construction Allocation 2006 2014 Extremely Low Income Units % of Total 135 12.2% Above Moderate Income 476 43.1%

Very Low Income 135 12.2%

Low Income 171 15.5%

Moderate Income 188 17.0%

Total 1,105 100.0%

Source: SCAG 2007 RHNA

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The projected housing construction allocation for Extremely Low-Income and Very Low-Income categories was assumed the same proportions. Therefore, the 135 units are needed for Extremely Low-Income households and 135 units for Very Low-Income households during the 2006-2014 planning period.

Of the total 1,105 units in Gardenas RHNA allocation, 135 or 12.2 percent are in the Extremely Low Income category. As stated previously, households in this income group are particularly prone to housing problems such as overpayment and overcrowding, and thus require special attention to make sure their needs are adequately served. The City is prepared to address these needs on a variety of levels, including its density bonus and second unit policies, preservation of Section 8 and other assisted units, mixed-use zoning, and, depending on availability, making use of state and federal funds to finance affordable residential development.
The City is credited with any additional units constructed since 2006. In 2006 and 2007, the Citys housing stock increased by 125 homes, all of which were singlefamily units and above moderate income.

G.

Assisted Housing at Risk of Conversion

State law requires an analysis of existing assisted rental units that are at risk of conversion to market rate. This includes conversion through termination of a subsidy contract, mortgage prepayment, or expiring use restrictions. The following at risk analysis covers the period of 2008 through 2014.

Assisted Housing Inventory


Currently three assisted rental housing developments are located in the City. This includes all multi-family rental units assisted under federal, state or local programs. Table 31 details the assisted units in the City. According to the inventory, there are three projects containing 279 assisted rental units in Gardena. All three projects were financed under the HUD Section 202 program, and maintain Section 8 contracts. All of the units are housing for the Elderly, and are owned and operated by non-profit corporations. While the longterm affordability of the projects is fairly secure based on their non-profit status, due to the required annual renewals for Section 8 funding, the projects are technically considered at risk of conversion.

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Table 31 Assisted Housing Inventory Project Owner Cooperative Services Gardena South Park Senior Housing Gardena Senior Housing Funding Sources HUD Section 202 Section 8 HUD Section 202 Section 8 HUD Section 202 Section 8 Units Subject to Conversion 80 Earliest Date of Conversion 03/29/2038 Annual Renewals 03/01/2026 Annual Renewals 02/01/2031 Annual Renewals

Project Name Gardena Towers

Tenant Type Elderly

Gardena South Park Manor

Elderly

126

Meadowlark Manor

Elderly

73

Source: 2008 HUD Database

Section 8 Projects
All three assisted projects maintain Section 8 contracts with HUD. In the short run, these units are likely to remain affordable. However, due to the uncertainty surrounding the future of Section 8 funding, the long-term affordability is suspect. Typically, Section 8 projects that receive more than fair market rent are not considered at-risk. These projects are eligible to participate in the Mark to Market Program. Under this program, owners are given favorable tax treatment provided that they preserve the units at rents that are affordable to low-income households. Eligible projects include FHA insured projects receiving Section 8 project based assistance, where rents exceed HUD established fair market rents. According to HUD, two projects are eligible for the Mark to Market Program: Gardena South Park Senior Housing, and Meadowlark Manor. Gardena Marine Avenue Senior Housing is not eligible to participate, as current rents are below market levels. Gardena Towers: Gardena Towers is an 80-unit project built for seniors, with all units assisted. The project was finance under the HUD Section 202 program, which provides capital advances to non-profit sponsors to finance the development of rental housing with support services for the elderly. The advance is interest free and does not have to be repaid as long as the units remain affordable for at least 40 years. The affordability controls under Section 202 extend until 2038, but are contingent upon the

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continued availability of Section 8 funding. As previously stated, the project is not eligible to participate in the Mark to Market program. Gardena South Park Manor: Gardena South Park Manor is a 126 unit senior housing project. This project was also financed under the HUD Section 202 program. Affordability controls extend until 2005, but are also contingent on the continued availability of Section 8 funding. Meadowlark Manor: Meadowlark Manor is a 73-unit project restricted to seniors. Similar to the other two projects, Gardena Senior Housing was financed under the HUD Section 202 program. The affordability controls extend until 2011, but are contingent upon the continued renewal of Section 8 funding.

Preservation and Replacement Options


Preservation or replacement of at-risk projects can be achieved in several ways: 1) transfer of ownership to non-profit organizations; 2) provision of rental assistance to tenants using other funding sources; 3) replacement or development of new assisted multi-family housing units; 4) purchase of affordability covenants; and/or 5) refinance of mortgage revenue bonds on bond funded units. These options are described below, along with a general cost estimate for each.

Transfer of Ownership
Non-profit corporations currently own all three of the at-risk projects in Gardena. With this being the case, transfer of ownership is not needed.

Rental Assistance
The future availability of Section 8 funding is uncertain. In the event that Section 8 funding is no longer available, rent subsidies can be used to maintain affordability, by using local, state, or other funding sources. The subsidies can be structured in to mirror the Section 8 program, whereby tenants receive the difference between the Fair Market Rent (determined by HUD and the local housing authority) and the maximum affordable rent of the tenant (30% of household income). The feasibility of this alternative depends on the property owners willingness to accept rental vouchers. In this case, the owners are likely to accept vouchers given that non-profit corporations own all three projects, and the projects currently maintain renal subsidies.

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Given the bedroom mix of the 279 at-risk rental units, the total cost of subsidizing the rent for the units is $26,559 per month, as shown in Table 32. This translates into approximately $318,708 annually or $6.4 million over a 20 year period.
Table 32 Required Rent Subsidies Fair Market Rents $600 $825 LA Co. Very Low-Inc. $26,550 $30,300 Afford. Cost (30% of HH Inc.) $663 $758

Unit Size Studio 1-Bdrm Total

Total Units 52 227 279

HH Size 1 2

Utility Per Unit Allowance Subsidy $50.00 $50.00 -$117

Monthly Subsidy -$26,559 $26,559

Source: GRC Associates

Construction of Replacement Units


The construction of new low-income housing units is a means of replacing at-risk units that are converted to market rate. The cost of developing housing depends upon a variety of factors, including density, the size of the units, location, land costs, and the type of construction. The average cost for developing a onebedroom unit is $93,750, assuming an average development cost of $125 per square foot, and a unit size of 750 square feet. Given the average total development cost of $93,750 per unit, the cost of replacing the 278 at-risk units would be over $26 million, which is much higher than the $6.4 million for rental subsidies over a 20-year period.

Purchase of Affordability Covenants


Another option that will preserve the affordability of at-risk projects is providing an incentive package to owners to induce them to maintain the units as lowincome housing. Incentives could include an interest rate write-down on the remaining loan balance, or supplementing the Section 8 subsidy to achieve market rents. The feasibility of this option depends on both the physical and financial condition of the complex. If the complex requires rehabilitation or is too highly leveraged, the cost of affordability covenants goes up. However, by providing lump sum financial incentives, on-going subsidies of rents, or reduced mortgage interest rates, the City can ensure that at-risk units remain affordable.

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Cost Comparisons
Rental assistance provides the most feasible alternative for preserving Gardenas three at-risk projects, given the willingness of the non-profit owners to accept alternate subsidies if Section 8 contracts are not renewed, compared to the high cost of constructing new affordable units. Transfer of ownership is unnecessary since non-profit corporations own all three assisted projects. The purchase of affordability covenants would also be a viable option, and could be used in conjunction with rent subsidies, lump sum financial assistance or mortgage interest rate subsidies. Fortunately, none of Gardenas assisted rental projects are considered at high risk of conversion to market rate due to their non-profit ownership and likely continued renewal of Section 8 certificates.

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III. HOUSING CONSTRAINTS


There are many factors that contribute to the cost, supply and distribution of housing. A review of these factors provides an understanding of the private market forces impacting the sales price and rent distribution of both existing and new housing supply in Gardena. Gardenas proximity to major employment centers in southern Los Angeles County, as well as to Los Angeles International Airport and downtown Los Angeles, its accessibility to major transportation corridors such as I-110, I-405, I-105, and the Artesia freeway (SR 91), and its mild climate and air quality can encourage or constrain the development, maintenance, and improvement of the housing stock. These factors include market mechanisms, governmental regulations, and physical and environmental constraints.

A.

Market Constraints

Construction costs, land costs, and the availability of financing all contribute to the cost of housing production, which can hinder the development of affordable housing. To a large degree, the City has little control over these constraints, as the market dictates the costs. Through programs such as home ownership assistance, and the use of flexible design standards, the City can take steps to lessen these constraints.

Construction Costs
Construction costs can be a major impediment to the ability of a community to augment its housing stock, and influence rents and sale prices when new units are placed on the market. A major component of these costs are the price of building materials, which has seen a significant increase so far this decade but is showing signs of leveling off. Analyses of the construction market published in the Construction Industry Market Report2007 First Quarter and Second Quarter by Davis Langdon stated that nationally, material costs had increased at a rate of six percent per annum over the preceding yearand even experienced a dip at the end of 2006following a period from 2004 to 2006 in which they rose meteorically, hitting peak rates of approximately 15 percent. However, the reports say, prices remain at a high level, and the uncertainty of material prices is currently having a far greater impact on the construction market than actual cost increases.

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In general, the industry standards for construction costs by type of residential product range are as follows: Townhome/garden apartment housing with at-grade parking: $100 to $150 per square foot Attached housing with parking garage: $150 to $250 per square foot. Attached housing with underground parking: $200 to $250 per square foot.

Availability of Mortgage and Rehabilitation Financing


A major impediment to assisting new and existing housing is financing. The City does not have a redevelopment agency due to voter disapproval twice in the 1970s and more recently in 2004. With no redevelopment housing funds set aside for affordable housing, the City has severely limited financial resources. To date, the City has relied upon CDBG for housing rehabilitation, HOME funds, HUD 202 for senior housing and a mobile home conversion/bond-financing project.

B.

Governmental Constraints

Housing affordability is affected by factors in both the public and private sectors. Actions by the City can have an impact on the price and availability of housing in the City. Land use controls, building codes, fees, and other local programs intended to improve the overall quality of housing may also serve as a constraint to housing development.

Land Use Controls


The Land Use Element of the Gardena General Plan sets forth the policies for guiding local development. These policies, together with existing zoning regulations, establish the amount and distribution of land to be allocated for different uses within the City. Housing supply and costs are affected by the amount of land designated for residential use and the density at which development is permitted. Over 50 percent of the acreage in Gardena is designated for residential use. The Zoning Ordinance allows for a wide range of residential uses, with densities ranging from a maximum of 9 units per acre in lower density residential areas, up to 27 units per acre in the higher density multi-family zones. Table 33 summarizes the residential land use categories and their corresponding zone designations.

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Table 33 Residential Land Use Categories General Plan Land Use Category Low Density Residential Medium Density Residential Zoning Designation R-1 R-2, R-3 Max. Density DUs/Acre (du/ac) 9 du/ac 17 du/ac Residential Types Single Family Residences Low Density Multiple-Family Residential (R-2) and Medium Density Multiple-Family Residential (R-3) High Density Multiple-Family Residential Commercial Residential (C-R) and Home Business (H-B) Multi-family dwellings, Singlefamily attached and live-work units.

High Density Residential Mix Use Mix Use Overlay

R-4 C-R, H-B

27 du/ac 20 du/ac 20 du/ac

Source: Land Use Element, Gardena General Plan 2006

Each residential designation is defined as follows: Low Density Residential - The single-family areas within Gardena are recognized as the backbone of the community and serve as one of its most important assets. The Low Density Residential designation is implemented by the Single-Family Residential (R-1) zone, which provides for the development of conventional single-family detached houses. The Low Density Residential designation is the largest land use category in the City. It occupies over onequarter (27.0%) of all the land in the City and represents almost two-thirds (60.4%) of all residentially designated land in the General Plan. Medium Density Residential - The Medium Density Residential designation is intended to provide a quality multiple-family living environment. This category is implemented by the Low Density Multiple-Family Residential (R-2) and Medium Density Multiple-Family Residential (R-3) zones. It typically includes lower density multi-unit residential development and higher density singlefamily residential development such as those in the specific plan areas. Fourteen percent of all land in the City is designated for Medium Density Residential which represents approximately one-third (32.2%) of all residentially designated land in the City. High Density Residential - The High Density Residential designation provides for a high quality, compact, multiple-family living environment. This category is

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implemented by the High Density Multiple-Family Residential (R-4) zone and consists of two to three story multi-unit buildings. The High Density Residential land use designation accounts for slightly over two percent of all the land in the City, and five percent of all residential land in the City. Mixed Use - The Mixed-Use designation is intended to provide for the coexistence of residential and commercial, office or industrial uses in the same building or on the same lot. It is implemented by the Commercial Residential (CR) and Home Business (H-B) zones. This land use designation can be found in two areas of the City southern Gardena between 178th Street and 182nd Street and the downtown area along Gardena Boulevard. Mixed Use Overlay - The Mixed-Use Overlay permits residential development with a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) on selected areas designated for Commercial and Industrial land uses. The CUP requirements are the same for all zones in the City (Municipal Code section 18.46.040), and are detailed in this section's discussion of permit and processing procedures. The purpose of this land use designation is to allow greater flexibility of development alternatives, especially attractive higher density residential development in appropriate areas that are experiencing both physical and economic blight. To prevent a patchwork of incompatible land uses, residential development in the Mixed-Use Overlay would be allowable on a project site with a minimum of 1.5 acres.

Specific Plans
Specific plans are either advisory or regulatory documents that provide more focused guidance and regulation for particular areas. Specific plans are a useful tool to implement planning and development goals within selected areas by adopting unique standards and requirements. Generally, specific plans include land use, circulation and infrastructure plans, development standards, design guidelines, as well as phasing, financing, and implementation plans. There are seven specific plans within the City of Gardena. The land use for six of the specific plans is residential and the recently adopted Artesia Corridor Specific Plan includes mixed-use (residential and commercial). Each specific plan is summarized in the following Table 34. The General Plan also identifies Specific Plan Areas. These are areas that provide an opportunity for a mix of commercial and residential development. These areas have been designated in the General Plan Land Use Element and included as Land Use Policy 3.3: Consider the adoption of specific plans for the four corners at the Van Ness-Rosecrans, Western-Rosecrans, Rosecrans-Normandie centers and the Artesia corridor to promote and direct revitalization efforts, and to further study and evaluate whether a mix of commercial and residential development is appropriate in these areas.

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Table 34 Gardena Specific Plans Specific Plans Emerald Square Adoption Year 1999 Location 177 Street between Budlong Avenue and Vermont Avenue Redondo Beach Boulevard west of Van Ness Avenue
th

Land Use Plan Description 159 single-family homes within a 21.5-acre gated community Two gated residential communities consisting of 65 detached condominium units within a 5-acre gated community 59 detached condominium units within a 5.7-acre gated community 35 detached condominium units within a 2.9-acre gated community 21 detached condominium units within a 1.5-acre gated community 101 single-family detached homes within an 11.4-acre gated community 44-acre Specific Plan provides for up to 300 residential units, 375,000 square feet of commercial space, and 40,000 square feet of restaurant space

Redondo Village

1999

Gardena Village

1999

North side of Artesia Boulevard between Denker Street and Western Avenue Budlong Avenue Between th th 144 Street and 146 Street Southeast corner of Normandie Avenue and th 168 Street Vermont Avenue between st th 141 Street and 135 Street South side of Artesia Boulevard between Normandie Avenue and Western Avenue

Cottage Place

2003

Normandie Estates Carnellian

2004

2004

Artesia Corridor

2006

Source: Gardena General Plan 2006

All four identified Specific Plan Areas are designated either Neighborhood Commercial or General Commercial in the General Plan and would potentially provide a significant number of additional housing units. For example, the 44acre Artesia Corridor Specific Plan, designated General Commercial in the General Plan, could provide up to 300 units, including 70 live/work units, on approximately 44 acres of underutilized and vacant land. The Artesia Corridor Specific Plan encourages high-density development by permitting both multifamily dwellings and single-family attached dwellings. The Specific Plan also allows no more than 15 dwelling units per acre and a maximum of ratio of office square footage to residential square footage of 0.4:1. This ensures that live/work space does not transition to a predominantly office use. The City considers this allowed density to be insufficient to fully realize the potential of the Specific Plan for housing development, and thus the zoning ordinance will be revised to increase the maximum residential density of the Artesia Corridor Specific Plan from 15 to 20 units per acre.

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Lack of Redevelopment
One of the key tools available to local jurisdictions in eliminating blight, promoting economic development and providing affordable housing is redevelopment and the use of tax increment funds that it affords. Twenty percent of the gross tax increment must be allocated to the Housing Fund and spent solely on projects to increase, improve and preserve the communitys supply of lowand moderate-income housing. These units that are assisted by Housing Funds must remain affordable for at least 55 years. Several years ago, the City recognized that conditions of physical and economic blight exist within Gardena, and that the City lacked sufficient revenues to support its existing and projected services. Therefore, in 2004, the City initiated an effort to establish a redevelopment agency and eventually form a project area to receive tax increment funds. These funds would be used to revitalize the Citys commercial and industrial economy and improve the housing stock. However, in a 2004 referendum, Gardena residents rejected the idea of a redevelopment agency. As a result, the City does not have redevelopment as a tool to assemble property or the financial resources from tax increment to purchase property and to rehabilitate and increase the supply of affordable housing.

Residential Development Standards


The City regulates the type, location, density, and scale of residential development primarily through the Zoning Ordinance. Zoning regulations are designed to protect and promote the health, safety and welfare of local residents, as well as implement the policies of the General Plan. The Zoning Ordinance also serves to preserve the character and integrity of existing neighborhoods. The Ordinance sets forth the city residential development standards, including density, lot area, lot coverage, and parking. Site Requirements: Maximum height and lot coverage rules limit the number of units constructed on a given lot. Lot size is the same for all residential zones, with a minimum size of 5,000 square feet required. Width and depth for all zones are also identical. The minimum width and depth are 50 and 80 feet respectively, with a minimum width of 55 feet required for corner lots. All residential zones require a front yard of 20 feet, and the R-2, R-3 and R-4 zones require that 50 percent of the yard be permanently landscaped. Maximum lot coverage is 50 percent in the R-1 zone and 65 percent in all other zones. Corner lots in the R-1 zone can have lot coverage of 70 percent. Height limits are 25 feet for the R-1 zone, 30 feet for the R-2 zone and 35 feet for the R-3 zone.

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Parking Requirements: Each residential unit requires two parking spaces; the R1 zone requires a two-car garage, and all other zones require that at least one parking space be covered. Unit Sizes: The Zoning Ordinance requires a single-family unit to have a size of at least 800 square feet. For multi-family units, the minimum sizes are 450 square feet for a studio, 750 square feet for a one-bedroom unit, 900 square feet for a twobedroom unit, and 1,200 square feet for a three-bedroom unit. The standards are described in detail below and summarized in Table 35. Cumulative Impact of Development Standards: Gardenas R-2, R-3 and R-4 zones contain development standards relating to density, height, setbacks, parking and usable open space. These standards generally do not prohibit the construction of the maximum number of units allowed under the density for these zones. In both the R-2 and R-3 zones, the minimum lot size is 5,000 square feet, while the minimum lot width is 50 feet. Assuming a hypothetical lot of the minimum size meets these standards, the depth of this lot would be 100 feet. At 17 units per acre (the density for these zones), the lot should accommodate two dwelling units. The front (20 feet), side (five feet) and rear (10 feet) yard setbacks create a building envelope of 60 by 70 feet, or 4,200 square feet. Subtracting 1,400 square feet for four parking spaces (350 square feet per space) leaves an envelope of 2,800 square feet. The two units will require a total of 1,200 square feet of usable open space (600 square feet per unit). The rear yard, at 10 feet by 50 feet, can provide 500 square feet of this requirement. Subtracting the remaining 700 square feet from the building envelope leaves 2,100 square feet for the two dwelling units, or 1,050 square feet per unit. This is more than enough room to accommodate two (2), two-bedroom units (minimum of 900 square feet each) in a single story building. Three-bedroom units, however, require at least 1,200 square feet. A developer wishing to construct these larger units may have to build them in two stories, perhaps with carports tucked under the upper floor. The major constraint on the supply of housing in these two zones is the R-2 zones maximum of two units on any single lot; however, this impediment could be avoided by subdividing larger R-2 parcels or obtaining a specific plan designation. On larger R-3 parcels, this density would be even easier to achieve, as the setbacks would account for a smaller percentage of the lot and thus allow for a larger building envelope in which the structure and parking facilities could be configured more flexibly.

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Table 35 Residential Development Standards Standards Min. Lot Size Min. Width Min. Depth Max. Density R-1 5,000 SF 50 ft. 55 ft. for corner lot 80 ft 1 du/lot R-2 5,000 SF 50 ft 55 ft for corner lot 80 ft 17 du/acre R-3 5,000 SF 50 Ft 55 F for corner lot 80 ft. 17 du/acre R-4 5,000 SF 50 ft 55 ft for corner lot 80 ft. 27 du/acre C-R 7,500 SF 50 ft 80 ft. 20 du/acre H-B 5,000 SF 50 ft N/A 1 du/lot 35 ft. (25 for single-family homes) 20 ft.

Max. Building Height Min. Front Yard

25 ft. 20 ft. 5 ft. 10 ft. for corner lot

30 ft. 20 ft. 5 ft. for 2 stories 7 ft. for > 2 stories 10 ft. for corner lots 5 ft. for 2 stories 10 ft. for > 2 stories

35 ft. 20 ft. 5 ft. for 2 stories 7 ft. for 2 stories 10 ft. for >2 stories 10 ft. for corner lots 5 ft. for 2 stories 7 ft. for 2 stories 10 ft. for >2 stories 10 ft. for corner lots 600 SF 50% front yard

35 ft. 20 ft. 5 ft. for 2 stories 7 ft. for 2 stories 10 ft. for >2 stories 10 ft. for corner lots 5 ft. for 2 stories 7 ft. for 2 stories 10 ft. for >2 stories 10 ft. for corner lots 600 SF 50% front yard

45 ft. 20 ft. 5 ft. for 2 stories 7 ft. for 2 stories 10 ft. for >2 stories 10 ft. for corner lots 5 ft. for 2 stories 7 ft. for 2 stories 10 ft. for >2 stories 10 ft. for corner lots 600 SF N/A

Min. Side Yard

5 ft. for structures on front half of lot

Min. Rear Yard

5 F ft. for 1 story 10 ft. for > 1 story

N/A

Min. Usable Open Space Min. Landscaping

50 % lot size 25% lot size for corner lot 50% front yard

600 SF 50% front yard

N/A N/A

Source: City of Gardena Municipal Code

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The R-4 zone, which contains identical development standards to those described above but allows for 27 units per acre, presents some additional complications. Subtracting an additional 600 square feet of open space and 700 square feet of parking space from the 2100 square foot envelope described above would leave only 800 square feet for three units. In this case, the project could take advantage of the ordinances provision for 150 square feet of the open space to be attached to each unit as a balcony. This would increase the building envelope to 1,250 square feet. If two-thirds of the parking space (1,400 square feet) could be tucked into the ground floor as a carport, this would yield a building envelope of 2,650 square feet. This would likely be enough to accommodate three 900-square foot twobedroom units in a two-story configuration, plus the balconies and parking. These units, if split between the upper and lower stories, could take up 1,250 square feet of ground floor space, with the remainder situated on the upper floor. If a developer wished to build three-bedroom units, there would need to be at least 2,800 square feet of second-floor space to accommodate both the units and their balconies. Since the building envelope would come up just short of this space, it might be necessary to provide subterranean parking for three-bedroom units on the smallest conforming R-4 sites. On larger lots, this would not be a problem, as the larger building envelope per unit would provide more flexibility.

Development Fees
The City assesses various development fees in order to cover the costs of permit processing, as well as the costs of providing public services to the developments. Table 36 presents a summary of total development fees for a single-family unit and a multiple-family unit. Planning fees and entitlement fees are calculated for the entire project, while building fees are calculated on a per unit basis. Planning fees and entitlement fees are similar for both single-family and multi-family development.

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Table 36 Typical Planning and Zoning Fees


Service Planning Department Fees Site Plan Review Environmental Assessment Review Public Notice Mailing Fee Building Department Fees Building Permit Fees Plan Check Fees Other Fees (SMIP, JOB, SCAN, DOCS) Entitlement Fees Planning Commission Determination Conditional Use Permits General Plan Amendment Land Division Parcel Map/Tract Map Lot-Line Adjustment/Parcel Map Merger Specific Plan $2,290.75 $2,424.50 $2,416 $2,424.50* $331.75 Actual Cost, deposit of $2,290.75 $2,424.50 $2,416 $2,290.75 $2,424.50 $2,416 $2,424.50* $331.75 Actual Cost, deposit of $2,290.75 $2,424.50 $2,416 $1,459based on housing type(a)* $1,292 based on housing type(a)* $453 based on housing type(a)* $2,099 based on housing type(b)* $1,868 based on housing type(b)* $669based on housing type(b)* $2,424.50* $187.75* $350.00 deposit* $2,424.50* $187.75* $350.00 deposit* Single-Family Unit Multi-Family Unit

Variance Zone Change Impact Fees (per unit) Sewer Usage Fee Parkland In-lieu Fee Multi-family Impact Fee School District Fee (LAUSD) Total fees for a project with zoning/General Plan entitlements in place and requiring a new subdivision Source: City of Gardena CDD

$140* $7,710 * $5,418(d)* $21,858.75


(c)

$140* $7,710(c)* $1,000* $4,644(d)* $23,516.75

(a) Fees based on a single-family detached dwelling of: 1,400 sq. ft. of living area, 400 sq. ft. garage, 3 bedrooms and 2 baths, building valuation $200,000, and land valuation of $20 per square foot (b) Fees based on a multiple-family unit of: 1,200 sq. ft. of living area, 400 sq. ft. garage, 2 bedrooms and 1.5 baths, unit valuation of $120,000, and land valuation of $20 per square foot (c) Calculated thusly per Gardena Municipal Code: (.003 acre/resident)x(No. of units in subdivision)x(Avg. 2.95 persons/unit)x(fair market value per acre of unimproved site); applies only to new subdivisions (d) Calculated from rate of $3.87/square foot * Used in total fee calculations

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The City exacts from all new-construction multi-family residential development projects a multi-family development impact fee at the rate of $1,000 per unit. Non-profit multi-family developments for senior citizens currently are exempted from the fee. The stated rationale of the City in charging the fee, as articulated in the Municipal Code, is that additional multifamily development creates a burden on public service provision, and that additional revenue is needed to offset the cost of these increased services [Gardena MC Section 15.48.010]. Revenue collected from the fee is placed in a development impact fund, to be applied to the increased public service costs. The multi-family development impact fee imposes an additional cost on the construction of each individual unit, and may have an impact on the financial feasibility of larger-scale development. It accounts for much of the difference in total fees between the hypothetical single-family and multi-family units analyzed above. For this reason, the fee could be considered a constraint on affordable housing production. To remove this constraint, the Housing Element contains a new program to waive the fee for projects that contain one or more units that will be kept affordable to lower-income households (i.e., those whose income is less than or equal to 80 percent of AMI).

On/Off Site Improvements


According to service providers and utility companies, the Citys present infrastructure is adequate to accommodate planned growth levels, and since the City is fully developed, streets, sidewalks and curbs are already in place. If the City determines that a street dedication or improvement is required, the street shall be in accordance with the width, standards and right of way lines of the Citys General Plan Circulation Element which is presented in Table 37. According to the Citys Public Works Department, a residential street costs approximately $6.70 per square foot to construct and $1.80 per square foot to maintain. These costs are not directly imposed on the housing developed in the neighborhood where the street is located. The General Plan Circulation Elements roadway classification and right-of-way standards are presented in Table 37.

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Table 37 Right-of-Way Standards Right-of-Way Width (Feet) 100 100 80 60 60 54 Roadway Width\ (Feet) 84 80 72 42 40 36

Street Classification Arterial 6 Lane Arterial 4 Lane Major Collector Commercial-Industrial Collector Residential Collector Local

Source: Gardena 2006 General Plan Circulation Element

Permit and Processing Procedures


Development processing time is relatively short and expeditious due to a onestop counter, streamlined procedures, and concurrent processing. The Citys development approval process and time frame for both single-family and multifamily developments are very similar, with the exception that single-family homes do not require site plan review. Of course, larger developments may require additional time. The following Table 38 presents the general processing time by level of approval required for a typical residential development project:
Table 38 Residential Project Approval Processing Time Process Site Plan Review
(1)

Required Time Period 30-60 days 4-5 Weeks

Review and Approval Community Development Dept. (CDD) CDD, Public Works (PW), Building and Safety (BS), Fire Department (FD) CDD, Planning Commission (PC) CDD, Planning Commission (PC) CDD, PC, LA County CDD, PC, City Council (CC) CDD, PC, CC

Plan Check/Building Permit

Conditional Use Permit Variance Subdivision Zone Change w/EIR and Public Hearing General Plan Amendment w/ EIR and Public Hearing
Source: City of Gardena CDD 1 Not required for single-family homes

3-4 Months 5-9 Weeks 3-4 Months 6-12 Months 6-12 Months

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The City requires site plan review for any development that requires a zone change, a conditional use permit, a variance, a parcel map or a tract map, as well as for multi-family developments of four units or more. In addition, the City maintains discretion to extend this requirement to other types of development. Site plan review is administrative in nature, and requires the community development director to determine that the proposed development will not adversely affect the surrounding area before the plans can be approved. The director is required to take into account the relevant zoning and development standards, as well as a number of other factors, including the dimensions of the lot; the size, placement and materials of the structures; pedestrian and vehicular access and parking; and exterior elements such as landscaping, lighting, signage and fencing. Each applicant must fill out a form, submit 25 copies of the site plan and pay a filing fee. The director has discretion over whether to call for a public hearing and has 30 days from the date of the filing to render a decision on the application, or 60 days if a public hearing is held. A decision can take the form of approval, conditional approval or denial. Any person is entitled to appeal this initial decision to the Planning and Environmental Quality Commission and, if necessary, to the City Council, as long as the appeal is filed within ten days after the date of the decision. The City Council has the final say on all decisions concerning site plan reviews in Gardena. Conditional Use Permit Requirement for Mixed-Use Overlay Development: Within the MUO zone, residential uses are permitted by right; however, residential/commercial live-work uses are permitted subject to a conditional use permit (CUP). In addition, any use that may result in exterior or interior noise levels in excess of city residential noise standards are also subject to a CUP. Further, vehicle parking design and requirements may be modified and circulation and access requirements to alleyways may be waived as part of the MUO CUP process. As part of the CUP process, the applicant/developer must first file and pay an application fee for site plan review of $2,424.50. This is followed by a public hearing of the Planning Commission, which requires noticing in a newspaper and mailing to owner and occupants within a 300-foot radius of the site. The CUP process is governed by Municipal Code Section 18.46.040, which lays out the Commissions criteria for approval or denial as follows: In determining whether to issue or deny a CUP, the Commission shall consider the following factors: The nature of the proposed use; The compatibility of the use with surrounding area and uses; The distance between the proposed use and residential areas, schools, house of worship, and parks;

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The number of similar uses in the surrounding area and the distances between such uses; The input of person residing in the community regarding the proposed use and community opposition; The cumulative effect of the proposed use in the community; Whether, under the circumstances of the particular application, the establishment and maintenance or operation of the use will be detrimental to the health, safety, peace, moral, comfort or general welfare of persons residing or working in the neighborhood of such proposed use or be detrimental in injurious to property and improvement in the neighborhood or the city; Other factors as the Commission deems relevant; and Failure to satisfy any of the criteria set forth in this section.

Once the CUP has been approved, the property must be developed within 12 months. After that time period, the CUP automatically becomes null and void. However, the developer may request an extension of up to six months from the Commission. The Commission, after due consideration, may deny or approve the extension. Only one extension is permitted. Because of the added time, reduced certainty of approval, and expense involved in the conditional use permit process, the CUP requirement for MUO projects could be acting as a constraint to the production of housing in this zone. For this reason, the CUP requirement will be eliminated as part of the MUO zone amendment program. All MUO projects will now be permitted by right, without having to acquire a CUP or undergoing any other type of discretionary review.

Building Codes and Enforcement


In addition to land use controls, the local building codes also affect the cost of housing. The City has adopted the Uniform Building Code (UBC) which establishes the minimum standards for new construction. While the City can impose more stringent standards, the minimum standards must be the standards of the UBC. The City has no adopted standard above and beyond the UBC. In March 2004, the responsibility of code enforcement, other than permit approvals, was transferred to the Gardena Police Department. The Police Department is responsible for all land use-related City and State regulations and policies. The Police Departments specialized Code Enforcement Detail works within the Patrol Bureau and interactively with the Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving (COPPS) Team. The Police Department focuses on healthand-safety and public nuisance violations that negatively affect quality of life in the community. For example, violations include:

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A building or structure that constitutes a health or fire hazard or a danger to human life A property that causes erosion or water runoff that may be harmful to people or adjacent property Deferred maintenance or deterioration that harms property values in the area or interferes with the peaceful use of nearby land and structures Abandonment of property in a way that leaves it vulnerable to unauthorized occupation

The code enforcement program places high priority on voluntary compliance and neighborhood empowerment, but includes citation, prosecution, and abatement activities when necessary to achieve its goals. In addition, code violators are encouraged by the Police Department to participate in the Citys Owner Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program.

Constraints to Housing for Persons with Disabilities


Housing that accommodates individuals with disabilities can require the incorporation of special features, such as front door ramps, special bath facilities, grab bars, and lower cabinets and light switches. Generally speaking, the uncommon nature of these features makes them potentially expensive and difficult to implement, especially if they have to be retrofitted into an existing structure. Additionally, some disabled people may require residential care in a facility where they receive assistance in performing routine tasks. As stated previously in Chapter II, it is estimated that Gardena has anywhere from 119 to 358 residents who fall into this category. The City of Gardena has adopted and currently enforces the 1991 Uniform Building Code. Gardena has not added any standards or restrictions that substantially differ from those used throughout the State, meaning that all regulations specified in Title 24 regarding the accessibility and adaptability of housing units for persons with disabilities currently are applied to all residential development in the City. The Citys zoning ordinance explicitly permits residential care facilities serving six or fewer residents by right in the R-3 and R-4 zones. While this use is not permitted explicitly in the R-1 zone, the State Health and Safety Code requires the City to treat care facilities of this size as a by-right single family use, and this mandate is carried out during the development review and approval process. Additionally, the ordinance places no special siting or separation requirements on such facilities. Licensed care facilities for the disabled with more than six residents must obtain a conditional use permit, a requirement that is consistent with State law. Also, residential care facilities are not explicitly given any exceptions to off-street parking requirements for their respective zones.

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The Gardena Municipal Code (Sec. 18.04.125) defines Community Care Facility as any residential facility which is maintained and operated to provide twenty-four hour nonmedical residential care for not more than six children, adults or children and adults, including, but not limited to, the developmentally disabled, physically handicapped, mentally disordered, or incompetent persons, in need of personal services, protection, supervision, assistance, guidance or training essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the protection of the individual. To comply with State law regarding persons with disabilities, the City will amend the zone ordinance to allow such residential care housing facilities to be considered as a normal residential use. It will be the policy of the City to apply the general development standards of the residential zone. In regards to residential housing for persons with disabilities with more than six residents, the City will allow such housing with a CUP. All visitors to the Community Development Department are informed that they are entitled to request a reasonable accommodation with respect to zoning, permit processing and building code standards if they feel that they qualify for such an accommodation under Fair Housing Laws, and that their requests will be reviewed by City staff. The request will be approved or denied once determinations have been made as to the following: the qualifying status of the individual; the necessity of the accommodation; and the financial or administrative burden on the City.

In the City Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program, housing rehabilitation standards promote renovations that create accessibility for persons with disabilities. This Program is a no-interest loan program for low-moderate income persons. The Program provides loans for the mobile home and single family residential home owners. Applicants are not required to make any payments for 30 years or until the sale of the property, transfer of title or when they no longer reside in the house, whichever occurs first. The City provides information on its website in both Spanish and English. Additionally, the Citys Parks and Recreation Department distributes flyers and information material regarding the availability of loan funds to make accessibility improvements. Another rehabilitation program is the Citys Handy Worker Program operated by the Public Works Department. The Handy Worker Program provides free repairs to low income qualified applicants for improvements related to ADA accessibility. Eligible items include health and safety conditions, disability modifications, grip bars, wheelchair ramps, etc.

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In addition, the Citys Youth and Family Services Bureau works with the at risk population which includes the disabled. The Bureau has trained counselors who survey and utilize all of the Los Angeles County Services to locate housing for the handicapped, and other members of the at risk population. The City is also authorized to purchase from the County one time only assistance for senior citizens and persons with disabilities. These services include locating housing, paying rent, buying food, and helping persons with disabilities to locate service providers to accommodate special needs A potential constraint on person with disability is the code definition of family. The Gardena Municipal Code (Sec. 10-3.231) defines family as an individual or two or more persons related by blood, marriage, or adoption or a group of not more than five persons, excluding servants, who are not related by blood or marriage, living together as a single housekeeping unit in a dwelling unit. The City realizes that this section is invalid under State law, which established that city ordinances may not define family based on relation or number of people. Since the time of this ruling, the City has been complying with the state standard articulated by the court and has not been applying a distinction based on relation or number to define family. To remove any confusion over this Code section, the Housing Element includes a program to amend the Municipal Code to reflect the state standard for defining a family. The amendment will be executed within one year of the adoption of the Housing Element. Finally, in response to comments received from the community meeting, the City shall seek to accommodate persons with disabilities by encouraging housing developers to incorporate universal design in the housing development. As an incentive for developers to incorporate universal design, the City shall offer a stream-lined permit process.

C.

Environmental and Infrastructure Constraints

Environmental Constraints
Seismic Conditions. Southern California is a region of high seismic activity. The City, which is located in the southwestern portion of the region, is also subject to risks and hazards associated with potentially destructive earthquakes. Faults that could affect the City include the regional San Andreas and San Jacinto faults and the local Newport-Inglewood, Charnock, Whittier-Elsinore, Sierra MadreCucamonga, San Fernando and Raymond Hill fault systems. These regional and local fault systems have the potential to generate the highest site acceleration when considering the maximum expected earthquake for each fault. According to the California Department of Conservation, an Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zone is located at the northeast portion of the City in the vicinity of El Segundo Boulevard and Vermont Avenue. This is a known active fault zone delineated by

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the State Geologist and is considered part of the Newport-Inglewood fault system. The potential impacts related to fault rupture within the City are significant, as this fault is potentially active. Figure 4 illustrates the location of the local and regional fault zones in the vicinity of the City. Each of these faults is capable of an earthquake large enough to cause significant damage in the City and its vicinity. The probability of an earthquake affecting the City is dependent on the distance to the fault and the type and intensity of seismic activity along these faults. Liquefaction. The area located along Artesia Boulevard and the Dominguez Flood Control Channel in the southern portion of the City is located within a liquefaction zone identified in the Seismic Hazard Zones Map prepared by the California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology (Inglewood Quadrangle 1999 and Torrance Quadrangle 1999). Figure 4 illustrates the area subject to potential liquefaction. Liquefaction zones are defined as areas where historic occurrence of liquefaction, or local geological, geotechnical and groundwater conditions indicate a potential for permanent ground displacements such that mitigation as defined in Public Resources Code Section 2693(c) would be required. Liquefaction is caused by a shock or strain from an earthquake, and involves the sudden loss of soil strength and cohesion and the temporary transformation of soil into a fluid mass. Therefore, older structures within the City are vulnerable to loss by liquefaction as they may not have been constructed or reinforced to meet seismic standards. Gardena is subject to seismic shaking due to the numerous fault systems located near the region. The source for most severe ground shaking would likely be the Newport-Inglewood fault, which is the fault in closest proximity to the City. Hazardous Sites. The Gardena Sumps located at the southwest corner of Normandie Avenue and Artesia Boulevard is listed on the CERCLIS list as a site of hazardous substances. Currently this contaminated site is in the process of remediation by British Petroleum. There are 53 properties identified by the Regional Water Quality Control Boards (RWQCB) Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) database as potential contaminated sites. The contamination of the sites could affect not only the soil but also the underlying groundwater resources. The Brownfield Program is the result of a grant from the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to conduct environmental site assessments of existing industrial and commercial facilities that cannot redevelop or expand as a result of real or perceived environmental contamination. There are currently 18 sites within the City that are part of the Brownfield Program.

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City of Gardena 2008-2014 Housing Element

Figure 4 Seismic Hazard Zones

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At sites currently or formerly occupied by commercial or industrial uses, there may be some environmental obstacles to development. The site where such problems are most likely to occur is underutilized Site 3 (See Appendix C), which includes land where a gas station once stood and two existing commercial vehicle maintenance facilities. The gas station has had its underground tank removed and has completed/is going through soil remediation, while the two maintenance facilities may require toxic substance issues to be mitigated before, during or after demolition. Site 22 also includes a former gas station that is still standing and may or may not have its underground tank removed. The potential for toxic substance problems exists as well at all sites with current or former industrial uses, including the following underutilized sites: 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 31. Stormwater Quality/Quantity. The Los Angeles County Municipal National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit (NPDES), to which the City of Gardena is a party, requires the inclusion of stormwater quality and quantity considerations in the conservation, housing, land use, and open space elements of the General Plan. The Housing Element takes into account, as a planning tool, the need to: Minimize impacts from storm water and urban runoff on the biological integrity of Natural Drainage Systems and water bodies in accordance with requirements under CEQA (Cal. Pub. Resources Code 21100), CWC 13369, CWA 319, CWA 402(p), CWA 404, CZARA 6217(g), ESA 7, and local government ordinances Maximize the percentage of pervious surfaces to allow percolation of storm water into the ground Minimize the quantity of storm water directed to impervious surfaces and the municipal storm drain system Minimize pollution emanating from parking lots through the use of appropriate Treatment Control BMPs and good housekeeping practices Properly design and maintain treatment control BMPs in a manner that does not promote the breeding of vectors; and Provide for appropriate permanent measures to reduce storm water pollutant loads in storm water from the development site

Effectively, the above objectives have been met and will continue to be met through the implementation of the development planning program of the NPDES permit, which calls for the implementation of post-construction runoff pollution mitigation controls. The NPDES permit requires such controls for housing developments that involve the construction of 10 or more unit homes, including single family homes,

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multifamily homes, condominiums and apartments. For housing developments in already built-out areas such as Gardena, the most cost effective and efficient way to mitigate runoff pollution is to create as much landscaped area as possible and to infiltrate runoff from roof tops and other hardscaped areas to landscaped areas. If this is not possible because of space limitations, sub-surface infiltration controls should be required (e.g., storm water chambers, dry wells, french drains). The NPDES permit also requires such controls for any project that discharges adjacent to or discharges directly to an environmentally sensitive area (ESA) where the development will: Discharge storm water and urban runoff that is likely to impact a sensitive biological species or habitat; and Create 2,500 square feet or more of impervious surface area.

The City has one ESA: the Gardena Willows Wetlands Preserve. Runoff from adjacent projects has the potential to adversely impact biota and wildlife that exist in the wetlands. Any such project shall be subject to a rigorous CEQA evaluation, including, at a minimum, a mitigated negative declaration, that shall prescribe appropriate pollution reduction controls as mitigation measures during and following construction.

Infrastructure Constraints
The infrastructure of critical importance to the maintenance and development of new housing includes water facilities, sewerage facilities, streets and sidewalks. The provision and maintenance of these facilities in a community enhances not only the character of the neighborhoods but also serves as an incentive to homeowners to routinely maintain the condition of their homes. In the alternative, when public improvements are left to deteriorate or are overextended in use, the neighborhoods in which they are located become neglected and show early signs of deterioration. As an entirely urbanized community, Gardena already has in place all the necessary infrastructure to support future development. All vacant and underutilized sites on residentially zoned land are environmentally sound and are adequately served by water, wastewater, stormwater, energy and communications infrastructure. There should be no significant problems with connecting potential developments on these sites to the Citys utility grid.

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IV. HOUSING RESOURCES


This section describes and analyses the resources available for development, rehabilitation, and preservation of housing in Gardena. This includes the availability of land resources and the ability to satisfy the Citys share of the regional housing need, and financial resources available to support the provision of affordable housing. Energy conservation techniques are also discussed as ways to reduce utility costs.

A.

Development Credit

Gardena has one pending affordable multi-family project currently in the process of being developed. The project site is located at 2010 El Segundo Boulevard and extends 0.6 acres. Although the property remains vacant, it is in the process of being developed under the O zone with a 37-unit project that will be restricted to lower-income senior households. The zone change from C-3 to O was approved by the City Council in 2010, and construction is expected to commence in the fall of 2011. This project is deducted from the Citys RHNA allocation according to Table 39 below.
Table 39 Development Credit Effect on RHNA Source RHNA Allocation (2006-2014) Less development credit Remaining RHNA Lower Income Units 441 37 404 Mod/above Income Units 664 0 664 Total Units 1,105 37 1,068

B.

Vacant Land

Within Gardena, there are seven vacant sites that are suitable for residential development that total approximately 4.2 acres. Four sites are located within established residential neighborhoods, while the others are located on commercial corridors and are designated for mixed-use development. One of these is a Mixed Use Overlay site on Western Avenue, another lies in the C-R zone on Gardena Boulevard and the third site includes two vacant parcels (zoned GC and HDR). Table 40 summarizes the development potential of these sites and Figure 5 shows the location of the vacant sites.

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The four exclusively residential sites (Sites A, B, C, and D) are located in mediumdensity residential areas and are expected to be developed according to the allowed densities of their respective zones. Site A at 139th Street is a single parcel zoned R-2, which permits a maximum density of 17 units per acre. If feasible, this parcel could be consolidated with adjoining properties, which contain older single family homes with large unused areas in the interior of the block. If the lots are consolidated, the City could adopt a Specific Plan to more effectively maximize the development potential of the site. For now, this analysis assumes the vacant lot will be developed in isolation, and calculates a gain of 24 units from the site. Site B, on 146th Street, consists of two parcels under common ownership and zoned R-3. This site will yield a gain of seven units while staying within all the development standards of the zone. Sites C and D, on Halldale and Dalton Avenues, respectively, are isolated R-3 parcels of about 0.2 acres and each have capacity for three multi-family units. The vacant Mixed Use Overlay site (Site E) sits at the end of a block and fronts Western Avenue. The six parcels making up this site are all under common ownership. This one-acre site is expected to be developed to the maximum density of 20 units per acre, resulting in a gain of 20 units. Site F is zoned C-R and is assumed to have a residential density of 20 units per acre. This would result in the development of five units. In total, development of vacant residential sites could potentially result in 62 new units for moderate and above income households. While the above information roughly describes the development potential of vacant residential sites in particular, the City will take measures designed to promote the consolidation of vacant sites, wherever possible, with adjacent underutilized properties. Such properties consist mainly of vacant or blighted commercial buildings on mixed-use corridors, but also include older single-family homes on large lots zoned for multi-family housing.

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Table 40 Vacant Residential Sites Inventory Site No. APN General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR Zone Acres Maximum Density 17 17 17 17 Potential Units Affordability Level Moderate Moderate

A B C D

6115-010-008 6103-019-015 6103-019-016 6105-013-012 6106-031-061 6103-003-013 6103-003-014 6103-003-015 6103-003-016 6103-003-017 6103-003-018 6113-017-018 6113-017-029

R-2 R-3 R-3 R-3

1.43 0.44 0.18 0.21

24 7 3 3

Moderate Moderate Moderate

GC

C3-MUO

1.0

20

20

MU

C-R

0.25

20

Moderate

TOTAL
Source: GRC Associates, March/April 2008

3.51

62

Moderate

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City of Gardena 2008-2014 Housing Element

Figure 5 Vacant Land

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C.

Recycling

Recycling is the development of land occupied by deteriorated and/or dilapidated buildings in an effort to create a healthy, viable mix of housing for different income groups and household sizes. It can involve the construction of new dwelling units in addition to those that are replaced, since parcels with blighted structures, for a variety of reasons, frequently have not been developed to their maximum potential density. Recycling, then, can have the dual benefit of both augmenting the Citys housing supply and improving the quality of dwelling units and neighborhoods. A housing survey was conducted in March/April 2008 of areas of the City of Gardena where land use controls permit the development of multi-family housing. The results of the survey indicate that six residential parcels were candidates for recycling. A property was included if it met the current definition of physical blight under California Redevelopment Law [Health and Safety Section 33031(a)]. This definition includes: Buildings in which it is unsafe or unhealthy for persons to live or work, due to serious building code violations, dilapidation and deterioration caused by long-term neglect, construction that is vulnerable to serious damage from seismic or geologic hazards, and faulty or inadequate water or sewer utilities; Conditions that prevent or substantially hinder the viable use or capacity of buildings or lots. These conditions may be caused by building of substandard, defective, or obsolete design or construction given the present general plan, zoning or other development standards. Adjacent or nearby incompatible land uses that prevent the development of those parcels or other portions of the project areas. The existence of subdivided lots that are in multiple ownership and whose physical development has been impaired by their irregular shapes and inadequate sizes, given present general plan and zoning standards and present market conditions.

As presented in Table 41, there are 70 existing units that are candidates for recycling on 3.7 acres within the multi-family zones. Potential buildout of all multi-family zoned parcels considered candidates for recycling would yield a net increase of 15 units, with none of these being suitable for lower-income households. Appendix B provides a complete listing of these parcels, while Figures 6 and 7 show their locations.

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Table 41 Potential Recycled Units Area Size (Acres) 0.21 3.18 0.29 3.68 Existing Potential Net Recyclable Units Recycled Units 1 68 1 70 2 7 6 15

Study Area R-2 R-3 R-4 Total

Source: GRC Associates, March/April 2008

D.

Potential Density Increase

In addition to the vacant sites identified above, future housing units can also be accommodated on underutilized lots that have not been developed to their full potential under the existing land use designation and corresponding zoning. All the identified sites are currently improved and infrastructure needs could be met by the existing facilities. These areas include school and church sites, sites occupied by parking lots, commercial and other non-residential uses, and underutilized residential sites that are designated for moderate and high density residential uses. Since these properties are all in reasonably good condition, interspersed throughout the City and often isolated from one another, they are considered to be resources for incremental, long-term housing growth and are not included in this Housing Element's adequate sites inventory. Within each of the multi-family zones there are parcels containing a lower number of units than the maximum, regardless of the condition of the units. Although these parcels may or may not be developed within the decade, they nonetheless have the potential for additional units on the property. Table 42 shows that there are 1,286 existing units on parcels that have additional capacity for higher density multi-family development (excluding those parcels that qualify for potential recycling), based on densities of 15 to 22 units per acre, depending on the zone. Realistic buildout of these properties would yield a total of 3,834 units, for a net increase of 2,548 units. The locations of underutilized parcels are presented in Figures 6 and 7.

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City of Gardena 2008-2014 Housing Element

Figure 6 Potential Recycle and Density Increase: Northern Gardena

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City of Gardena 2008-2014 Housing Element

Figure 7 Potential Recycle and Density Increase: Southern Gardena

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Table 42 Potential Density Increase by Zone Existing Units on Underutilized Parcels 1 461 598 226 1,286 Potential Units on Underutilized Parcels* 281 1,137 1,728 688 3,834

Zone SP R-2 R-3 R-4 Total

Net Gain 280 676 1,130 462 2,548

*Under existing zoning and densities Source: Gardenia Municipal Code, GRC Associates

The current uses on the vast majority of the sites identified on the analysis are single-family and multi-family residences, with commercial and residential uses in the C-R zone along Gardena Boulevard. These uses generally fall short of the full development potential of the sites, with many parcels containing less than the maximum permitted number of units under the applicable zoning. The general trend in residential development in Gardena has shifted toward moderate to higher density specific plan projects in recent decades, as demand for housing has risen due to continued population and employment growth in the Los Angeles basin, as well as the Citys favorable location near coastal communities and employment hubs. Thus, multi-family development that maximizes the number of units on a given parcel has become increasingly viable, even where existing uses occupy the site. In the long term, then, the existing housing on the sites identified in the analysis will not prohibitively constrain the recycling of the sites to higher densities. This is because the cost of removal can be readily absorbed into the development budget of a market-rate project or an affordable project with adequate gap financing. In the short term, however, the recent financial upheaval has created unfavorable conditions nationwide for new housing construction, and Gardena is no exception to this trend. As a consequence, there is likely to be decreased development activity until home prices begin to rise again. Once the market improves and more projects become viable, there should be few impediments to the development of underutilized sites with new housing. To aid the development of these sites to their full potential, a number of incentives are available. One of these is an expedited approval process, whereby affordable housing projects would be assured of a faster processing time. Additionally, encouraging the development of second units on R-1 zones and adopting a Density Bonus Ordinance in compliance with State law would further increase the housing supply within the City. The City will also partner with forprofit and non-profit developers to pursue new affordable housing opportunities,

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as well as supporting community housing development organizations to facilitate the development of new affordable housing on both vacant and non-vacant sites. This support may include land write-downs, land acquisition and holding, and other forms of assistance. These incentives are discussed in greater detail in the Financial Resources section and the Housing Plan. The Housing Element also contains a program to incentivize mixed-use residential development in the C-R zone along Gardena Boulevard. Possible incentives being considered include increased maximum height and density, reduced development fees and reduced residential parking requirements. As part of the program, the City intends to conduct meetings with property owners to discuss opportunities for residential mixed-use development in the area.

E.

Commercial Corridors and Lot Consolidation

The most promising opportunities for adding to Gardena's housing stock through lot consolidation lie along underutilized stretches of the City's commercial corridors that are zoned for either Mixed Use Overlay or Specific Plan Overlay development. These sites are candidates for consolidation and redevelopment with mixed-use projects. Additional opportunities lie on underutilized sites in the R-2, R-3, R-4 and C-R zones, as well as one site with Specific Plan zoning. A total of 26 underutilized sites are suitable for consolidation, occupying approximately 86 acres of land. These sites, when developed to their full potential, will yield a net gain of 1,046 units. In most cases, these sites consist of multiple parcels that are either developed with small or obsolete buildings exhibiting signs of blight or are vacant but cannot be developed individually due to regulatory obstacles. The City will help consolidate these parcels through a variety of means, including making use of the Specific Plan process and using federal CDBG and HOME funds to help assemble property. In several cases, these sites are partially City-owned, which will further facilitate consolidation. All sites with existing structures will require such buildings to be demolished before the sites can be developed to their full potential. Appendix C lists the potential lot consolidation sites under existing zoning and presents the net increase in housing units. A map illustrating the location of each site is included at the end of Appendix D. Four underutilized sites are zoned exclusively for residential development: Site 1 (R-2), Site 12 (split between R-1 and R-3), Site 20 (R-4). and Site 25 split between R3 and R-4). In addition, Site 26 is located in a residentially designated portion of the Artesia Corridor Specific Plan area. Another six sites are located in Specific Plan Overlay zones, with an underlying zoning of C-3: Sites 2, 3, 4, 7, 11 and 24. These sites are set aside as likely Specific Plan areas and are assumed to devote one-half of their area to residential uses, at a density of 15 units per acre. The

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remaining 15 sites are designated for residential/commercial mixed-use, with 14 of these lying in the Mixed Use Overlay zone along Rosecrans and Western Avenues and one in the C-R zone at Gardena Boulevard and Vermont Avenue.

Prime Opportunity Sites


Some of the sites selected as candidates for potential lot consolidation have been determined to represent prime opportunities for consolidation, having the greatest potential for development during the planning period. These prime opportunity sites were selected based on a number of criteria, including: Presence of vacant lots within the site Presence of low-intensity or low-value uses, such as small structures surrounded by large parking lots High or long-term business vacancies, indicating that the value of the existing use is impaired Extensive and/or severe physical blighting conditions that may be impairing the value of the existing use, such as structural problems; dilapidation/deterioration caused by long-term neglect; and obsolete design or construction Presence of multiple lots that are already under single or City ownership, potentially easing the process of site acquisition Presence of development opportunities on adjoining land

Sites having prime opportunities are identified in Table 43. The net units reflect the proposed zone amendments shown in Appendix D. These prime sites account for a potential net increase in the Citys housing stock of 594 units, of which 287 are lower-income units and 307 are moderate and above-income units. Only units on these sites are counted as credit toward the Citys fair-share RHNA allocation. Appendix C and Appendix D note which sites are prime opportunity sites in the column Existing Use/Opportunity.

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Table 43 Prime Opportunity Sites Net Units Gained Site No. 1 11 Acres 3.11 3.89 Zone R2 C3-SPO Lower Income 0 0 Mod/Above Income 39 38 Reason(s) Selected* Large site, low-intensity, adjacent to vacant lot Large portion of site is blighted, unoccupied; rest is low-intensity; large site; Brownfield Large site, single ownership, low-value use; could be consolidated with Site 11; Brownfield Site contains parking lots and blighted buildings; 4 parcels under single-ownership and 2 parcels under single-ownership Vacant land within site; underutilized commercial; only 3 owners on 6 parcels; Brownfield Large site, single ownership, low-intensity use (over-parked bank branch) Blighted commercial properties and inconsistent with General Plan and use and zoning code Vacant land within site; nonresidential uses Vacant land within site; lowvalue/low-intensity uses; contains blighted, unoccupied building Vacant land within site; severe physical blight Under single ownership

12

4.72

R1/R3 Split

41

13

1.14

C3-MUO

14

14

18

1.00

C3-MUO

15

15

19

4.61

C3-MUO

69

69

20

2.77

R-4

81

21 23

1.35 2.61

C3-MUO C3-MUO

20 39

20 39

24 25

1.84 1.73

C3-SPO R3/R4 Split (Rezone to R-4 only) SP

0 42

17 0

26 Total Net Units

1.75

0 287

15 307

Severe physical blight; in existing Specific Plan area

*Greater details of opportunities are presented in Appendices C and D.

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F.

Potential Housing Growth

As previously discussed, the Citys housing stock could grow as a result of new development on existing vacant land, recycling of blighted residential properties and lot consolidation on commercial corridors with higher-density and mixed-use development. Table 44 reflects the total potential increase in housing units in the City. It assumes housing density of 25 units per acre on R-4, 20 units per acre on C-R zoned land and 15 units per acre in the R-2, R-3 and Specific Plan zones. As Table 44 indicates, the total development credit (37 units), on vacant land (62 units), recycled land (15 units) and from consolidation of underutilized sites (1,046 units) could result in a potential net gain of 1,160 units, which would exceed the total RHNA allocation for the City of 1,105 total units during the 20062014 planning period. However, only 37 of these units, from the pending 2010 El Segundo development, would be affordable to lower-income households, leaving a shortfall of 404 lower-income units. The remaining 1,123 units are presumed to be affordable to moderate-income and above moderate-income households, leaving a surplus of 459 units for these income levels.
Table 44 Potential Housing Growth Source RHNA Allocation (2006-2014) Less Development Credit Less Vacant Sites Less Recycling Less Lot Consolidation Potential Net Gain RHNA Surplus (Shortfall) Lower Income Units 441 37 0 0 0 37 (404) Mod/above Income Units 664 0 62 15 1,046 1,123 459 Total Units 1,105 37 62 15 1,046 1,160 55

New development in the R-2, R-3, R-4 and C-R zones is likely to involve the removal of existing units, though some parcels may be able to achieve higher densities by constructing additional units in the back of the property. The replacement of existing units would likely involve some lot consolidation in cases where parcels are close to the minimum permitted size for the zone. Such consolidation would occur predominantly through the Specific Plan process, which would allow flexible development standards and requirements. Plans for consolidation are further discussed in the Small Lots and Lot Consolidation Section.

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In the last six years, four specific plan projects have been adopted. Three of the four specific plans have been developed and the one is currently under construction. Together the four specific plans provide for a total of 157 residential units. The Cottage Place Specific Plan (2003) development located at Budlong Avenue between 144th Street and 146th Street included 35 detached condominium units at a density of 12 per acre. The Normandie Estates (2004) project at Normandie Avenue and 168th Street included 21 detached condominium units at a density of 14 units per acre. The Carnellian Specific Plan (2004) located at Vermont Avenue between 141st Street and 135th Street totaled 101 single-family homes at a density of 9 units per acre. All of the residential units are market rate. Since redevelopment Housing Funds are not available to fund property acquisition to facilitate development, the City must find other sources of funds for these activities. One such source is the federal Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME) entitlement the City will begin receiving in fiscal year 2010. In addition to funding new construction activities and supporting community housing development organizations, the HOME funds will also provide monies for rehabilitation programs that help to bring owner-occupied and rental housing units into code compliance. These HOME-funded activities could be combined to facilitate the recycling of blighted and underutilized properties to higher densities, as well as to improve the condition of existing units.

G.

Actions to Make Available Adequate Sites to Accommodate the Regional Housing Need

The Citys program to address the adequate sites shortfall of 404 lower-income units consists of two primary components: the rezoning of two sites from R-3 to R-4; and the amendments to the R-4, Mixed Use Overlay and Specific Plan zone designations to accommodate higher densities.

Rezoning of Two Sites


This program will affect two properties: the City-owned property at 154th Street and Van Ness Avenue, and a parcel with split R-3/R-4 zoning located along Vermont Avenue between 149th Street and Rosecrans Avenue. In both locations, the R-3 zone will be rezoned to R-4, which will allow higher densities and accommodate affordable housing. Detail of this program is discussed in Program 19 of the Housing Programs section of this Housing Element.

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Zone Amendments
In order to facilitate affordable housing development, the City will amend the R-4 zone to put in place relaxed development standards. This program, which is discussed in detail as Program 17 in the Housing Programs section, will change the maximum permitted density to a stepped density scale in order to promote lot consolidation. The new standard will be 25 units per acre on lots under 0.5 acre, 27 units per acre on lots between 0.5 and 1.0 acre, and 30 units per acre on lots of 1.0 acre or more. In addition, landscaping and parking requirements will be relaxed. In addition, to facilitate development of affordable housing on mixed-use overlay sites, the City will change the maximum permitted density from 20 units per acre to a stepped density standard: 20 units per acre for lots of less than 0.5 acre, 25 units per acre on lots between 0.5 and 1.0 acre, and 30 units per acre for lots of 1.0 acre or greater. This program will also, allow owner-occupied and rental multifamily residential uses by-right, without requiring a conditional use permit or any other discretionary approval. More details of this program are discussed in Program 18 of the Housing Programs section. As a means of providing adequate sites for development, the City has utilized Specific Plans as a tool to provide consolidated development projects on unique development sites. Existing Specific Plans will be revised to increase the maximum residential density from 15 of 20 units per acre for Specific Plans. Details of this program are discussed in Program 9 of the Housing Program section of the Housing Element.

Effect of Proposed Actions on Adequate Sites Shortfall


The zone amendments will increase the capacity of all sites identified in the land resources inventory and located in the affected zones, both in terms of total units and the sites suitability for the development of housing for lower-income households. All R-4 sites of 1.0 acre or larger are assumed to be able to accommodate a 100-percent affordable project, and all of the units on these sites are assigned to the lower-income category. Mixed Use Overlay sites of 1.0 acre or greater are assumed to be more appropriate for mixed-income projects; thus, half of the units on these sites are assigned to the lower-income category, while the remaining units are assumed to be moderate-income and above moderateincome. Specific Plan sites, due to their lower densities, are not considered appropriate for lower-income development, and all units are assigned to mod/above.

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Together, these zone amendments will add capacity for a total of 724 lowerincome units to the inventory, while subtracting capacity for 163 moderateincome and above-moderate-income units (some sites and/or portions of sites have switched to lower income due to the zone amendments), for a net gain across all income levels of 561 units. The net effect of the adequate sites programs is presented in Table 45. According to the table, there will be a surplus capacity of 616 total units: 320 for lowerincome households and 296 for moderate-income and above moderate-income households. Please note that using only the 287 lower-income units from prime opportunity sites for lot consolidation and omitting the rest of the sites identified in Appendix C/D would still result in a lower-income RHNA surplus.
Table 45 Net Effect of Adequate Sites Programs Source RHNA Shortfall (allocation - development credit - vacant sites - recycling consolidation) Zone amendments: vacant land Zone amendments: Lot consolidation (includes rezoning of R-3/R-4 split property)* Rezoning of City-owned property RHNA Surplus +591 +118 +320 -158 0 +296 +433 +118 +616 Lower Income Units Mod/above Income Units Total Units

-404 +15

+459 -5

+55 +10

*Includes 287 lower-income and 307 mod/above-income unit from prime opportunity sites

Compliance with Adequate Sites Program Requirements


The rezoning, R-4 zone amendment MUO zone amendment, and Specific Plan programs have been designed to comply fully with the requirements for adequate sites programs under State law. Each program requirement is presented here, followed by an explanation of how the programs meet the requirement. A jurisdictions adequate sites program must accommodate 100 percent of the shortfall of sites necessary to accommodate the remaining housing need for housing for very low- and low-income households during the planning period. The adequate sites programs add capacity for a total of 724 very low-income and low-income units, which exceeds the shortfall calculated above. Additionally, counting only those lower-income units on Lot Consolidation sites identified as prime development opportunities (287 units) would still result in a total net gain

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in capacity from the adequate sites program of 420 units (15 units from vacant plus 287 units prime opportunity sites plus 118 units from City-owned land), which would also exceed the 404-unit shortfall. This requirement has been met. The program must ensure the sites are zoned to allow owner-occupied and rental multi-family residential uses by-right. All sites identified to accommodate the lower-income regional housing need either currently list multi-family residential uses as a permitted use (in the case of R-4 and R-3/R-4 split sites) or will do so under the proposed zone amendments (in the case of the MUO sites). This requirement has been met. The program must permit the development of at least 16 units per site. Appendix D, which includes only sites that are capable of accommodating at least 16 units each after implementation of the proposed zone amendments, identifies capacity for a net gain of 591 lower-income units, which exceeds the 404-unit RHNA lower-income shortfall. This requirement has been met. The program must ensure sites within suburban and metropolitan jurisdictions permit a minimum of 20 dwelling units per acre. All sites identified for rezoning or increased densities will permit at least 20 units per acre after the zone amendments have been made effective, and in many cases will permit up to 30 units per acre. This requirement has been met. The program must ensure at least 50 percent of the low- and very low-income regional housing need be accommodated on sites designated for exclusively residential uses, at appropriate densities. Lower-income housing sites designated for exclusively residential uses include: a) those sites equal to or greater than one acre in size and with R-4 zoning after implementation of the adequate sites programs. As shown in Table 46, these sites are counted against the RHNA figure. A total of 248 very low-income and lowincome units are accommodated on sites designated for exclusively residential use, which exceeds 50 percent (221 units) of the total lower-income regional housing need of 441 units. There is a surplus of 27 lower-income units. This requirement has been met.

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Table 46 Meeting the Lower-Income 50-percent Requirement Source Lower-income RHNA (2006-2014) At least 50% on sites designated exclusively residential use (number of units needed) Exclusively residential sites Sites with existing R-3/R-4 split zoning (to become fully R-4) Sites with existing R-4 zoning City owned 154th/Van Ness site (to become R-4) 49 81 118 248 27 Exceeds the 50% requirement See Appendix D site 25; new rezoning program See Appendix D site 20 New rezoning program Lower Income Units 441 221 Required under 50% rule Notes

Less: Total exclusively residential sites RHNA surplus (lower-income units on site designated exclusively for residential use)

H.

Provision for a Variety of Housing Types

Housing element law specifies that jurisdictions must identify adequate sites through appropriate zoning and development standards, to encourage the development of various types of housing. This includes, single family housing, multifamily housing, mobile homes, emergency shelters, and transitional housing, among others. The various housing types permitted under residential zones in Gardena are summarized in Table 47.
Table 47 Housing Types by Zone Category Housing Types Permitted Residential Uses Single-Family Multiple-Family Mobile Homes Mobile Home Parks Second Units Other Residential Uses Boarding House Transitional and Supportive
P = Permitted C = Conditionally Permitted Source: Gardena Municipal Zoning Code P C P C P C P P

Zone Category R-1 R-2 R-3 R-4 C-R

P P

P P P C

P P P C

C C C C

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Multi-Family Housing
Multi-family developments are permitted in the R-2, R-3, R-4 and C-R zones. The maximum densities are 17 dwelling units per acre in the R-2 zone, 27 dwelling units per acre in the R-3, R-4, and 20 dwelling units per acre in the C-R zones. Mixed-use multi-family housing is permitted in the MUO zone with a conditional use permit.

Second Units
In 2003, the City of Gardena revised Section 18.12.020 (Single-Family Residential Zone R-1, Uses Permitted) of Title 18 (Zoning) of the Gardena Municipal Code to permit second dwelling units by right in response to the passage of AB 1866. This bill requires local governments to use a ministerial process for second unit applications, in order to facilitate the production of affordable housing. As defined in the Section 18.04.163 of the Municipal Code, Second dwelling unit or second unit is an independent residential unit providing living, sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation facilities on the same parcel of land as no more than one existing single-family dwelling. Second dwelling units include detached bachelor/efficiency units and manufactured homes as defined in Section 18007 of the Health and Safety Code, provided that such units shall be subject to all development standards applicable to second dwelling units. Second units are subject to the following key standards: 1) minimum lot size of 6,100 square feet; 2) minimum floor area of 450 square feet and a maximum of 640 square feet; 3) adequate water and sewer service; 4) applicant shall be the owneroccupant of the lot on which the second unit is proposed; 5) all applicable public service and recreation impact fees shall be paid; 6) separate electric and water meters; 7) located to the rear of the existing single-family dwelling and consistent with the architectural style of the existing dwelling; 8) underground utilities; 9) existing single-family dwelling must include a two-car garage; 10) not be constructed over a garage unless vehicle access to the garage is from an alley; 11) second-floor second units shall be accessed by a completely enclosed stairway; 12) one curb cut shall be permitted; 13) detached second unit shall be at least 15 feet from the existing dwelling; and 14) variances from any development standard of this title shall be prohibited. Currently, the Citys Municipal Code also permits one Granny Unit (Section 18.12.030(D)), which is defined in Section 18.04.210 as a residential unit constructed, on the same parcel of land as no more than one single-family swelling, constructed to the side or rear of a single-family dwelling, or attached to said dwelling, on land in the R-1 zones if the unit is intended for the sole

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occupancy of 1 or 2 adults who are sixty-two years of age or older, and the area of floor space of the unit does not exceed 640 square feet. With the adoption of the Second-Unit Ordinance, the granny unit requirements have become obsolete. Therefore, the Municipal Code shall be amended to delete Section 18.04.210 (Granny Units) and Section 18.12.030(D) (Uses Permitted Subject to a Conditional Use Permit). This will make the City in full compliance with State law regarding second units.

Mobile Homes/Manufactured Housing


According to the Department of Finance, there are 1,103 mobile homes in the City, as of January 2000. Individual mobile homes are permitted in all residential zones, and mobile home parks are conditionally permitted in the R-3, R-4 and C-R zones. Individual mobile homes are subject to all of the property development standards required by the zoning ordinance.

Boarding Houses
The R-2, R-3 and R-4 zones conditionally permit boarding houses.

Transitional and Supportive Housing


The City, in compliance with State law, permits transitional and supportive housing in all residential zones (R-1, R-2, R-3, R-4 and C-R). In processing development applications, transitional and supportive housing are subject to the same development standards as any permitted residential use under these zones. The City will continue to comply with State law and allow transitional and supportive housing as a normal residential use with no added restrictions. The zoning ordinance also provides for a similar use called Community Care Facilities, which are described as facilities that provide twenty-four hour nonmedical residential care for not more than six children, adults or children and adults who need assistance with daily needs. These facilities are permitted by right in the R-3, R-4, C-2, C-3 and C-4 zones. Community Care Facilities will continue as a permitted use in the commercial zones not covered by SB 2. Community care facilities include facilities providing personal care to persons with mental disorders, persons with disabilities, dependent and neglected children, rest homes, convalescent homes, guest homes, homes for the elderly, alcoholic treatment centers, nursery homes, and foster homes.

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Single Room Occupancy (SRO)


Gardenas zoning ordinance does not refer specifically to Single-Room Occupancy, such establishments would be suitable in the M-1 zone. Currently, hotels and motels are permitted in the M-1 zone with a Conditional Use Permit (MC 18.36.030), as well as in the C-3, C-4 and M-2 zones. Additionally, the M-1 zone has access to several bus lines from multiple agencies, which should provide mobility for those SRO residents who rely on transit.

Senior Housing
In order to assist in the provision of senior housing and other affordable housing, the City provides flexibility in development standards and the approval process. In compliance with Government Code Section 65915, the City has established a method of providing incentives for the development and construction of senior citizen housing. The City provides incentives (Municipal Code Chapter 14.20) of equivalent financial value based upon the land cost per dwelling unit in the development. In order to be considered for the incentives, the developer must submit a preliminary proposal in which at least fifty percent of the total dwelling units of the development are for senior citizens as defined in Civil Code Section 51.3. The housing shall provide specially designed accommodations to meet the physical and social needs of senior citizens. The developer is required to record a covenant stating that the units designed for senior citizens shall be occupied by qualified senior citizens for a period of no less than 30 years. The City shall consider the following incentives based upon the land cost: Granting of deviation from the parking, open space, dwelling unit size and/or guest parking standards contained in the zoning title; Waiver of all or any portion of applicable planning or plan check fees or changes; Priority processing of applications for environmental review, project approval, architectural review, plan check, permit issuance and inspection; and Other nonregulatory incentives of equivalent financial values as the City deems appropriate.

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I.

Zoning to Accommodate Affordable Housing

The City of Gardenas current zoning code and allowable housing densities makes it difficult to encourage and facilitate lower-income housing development, and to meet the lower-income allocation identified under the RHNA.. However, the R-4, Commercial-Residential (C-R) and Mixed Use Overlay (MUO) zones have the greatest potential for the development of new lower-income rental units in the city. These zones have the highest allowable residential densities ranging from 20 units per acre in the C-R zone to 27 dwelling units per acre in the R-4 zone.
Based on the maximum affordability rents for Los Angeles County presented in Table 48, the median rents for all rental categories in Gardena are within the affordability levels for moderate and low-income households. According to HUD, rental housing is "affordable" if rents comprise no more than 30 percent of a tenants monthly gross adjusted income for rent, including utilities. Nonetheless, due to the relatively low densities permitted under Gardenas existing zoning and the overall difficulty of developing affordable projects in the South Bay region and in Southern California, the Citys existing zoning and densities are not adequate to support the development of housing for lowerincome households.
Table 48 Affordable Rents 2008 Los Angeles County Affordability Extremely Low (2) Income $314 $359 $404 $449 Very Low Income $524 $598 $673 $748
(1)

Category Studio 1 person 1-Bedroom 2 persons 2-Bedroom 3 persons 3-Bedroom 4 persons

Low Income $629 $717 $807 $897

Moderate Income $1,152 $1,315 $1,480 $1,645

Gardena Median Rents $606 $825 $925 N/A

Source: Stradling Yucca Carlson and Rauth, 2008 Los Angeles County Affordable Housing Worksheet, Realfacts, September 2009
1. 2.

Maximum gross rents (including a reasonable utility allowance)

Affordable gross rent for an Extremely Low-Income Household is limited to 30% of 30% of area median income, adjusted for family size appropriate to the unit.

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Potentially Suitable Zones for Affordable Housing


Based on a housing conditions survey conducted for the Housing Element, many of the existing structures in the R-4 zone exhibit conditions of physical blight. The median age of the residential buildings in the R-4 zone is 50 years old, which indicates that one half of the residential structures are candidates for significant rehabilitation or recycling. These structures would be relatively inexpensive to acquire and could increase the viability of an affordable multi-family project. Gardenas mixed-use areas can also provide opportunities for affordable housing development. Gardena has two General Plan designations that allow for this type of development: Mixed Use and Mixed Use Overlay. These designations are implemented by the C-R and MUO zones, respectively. The C-R zone, located between Normandie and Vermont Avenues along Gardena Boulevard, allows mixed-use development by right. Its maximum residential density is 20 units per acre. This C-R zone totals approximately 22 acres and is considered Gardenas downtown. The current land use mix within this zone is commercial and residential, with approximately 100 residential units. Assuming that one-half of the land zoned C-R will be residential at a maximum density of 20 units per acre, there is a potential for approximately 220 units or a net gain of 120 units. As multiple units, they could be considered affordable units. However, the absence of large, contiguous parcels and the historic nature of many structures in this area would significantly complicate any development efforts. The MUO zone is located in several non-contiguous areas and is mainly concentrated along Rosecrans, Western and Marine Avenues. It permits residential development with a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) on selected areas designated for Commercial and Industrial land uses. In addition to the CUP, the MUO zone currently requires a minimum lot size of 1.5 acres for mixed-use development, which limits development to selected areas. The Citys General Plan indicates there are approximately 106 acres of land designated as MUO. The purpose of this zone is to allow more flexible development alternatives, especially attractive higher density residential development, in appropriate areas that are experiencing both physical and economic blight. According to a blight study completed in 2005 that used the blight criteria in Redevelopment Law, the majority of the properties located along Rosecrans, Western and Marine Avenues exhibited conditions of blight, and therefore, could be candidates for lot consolidation and development.

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Market Analysis
Based on recent market data from interviews with various residential developers and also a review of recent proposals for multi-family projects in a nearby city, it has been difficult to develop multi-family housing projects, of any density. Currently, it costs $225,000 to $275,000 to build an average multi-family unit, and this does not include the underlying land cost. Therefore, building a comparable structure and taking into account the land cost, could double the asking sales price. It should be stressed that these figures are for market-rate multi-family housing developments. Cost and valuation figures for affordable housing projects were also reviewed. Costs for affordable projects could be higher than comparable market projects because some affordable projects require prevailing wages for construction labor, which adds at least 30 percent to the cost of the project. Affordable housing projects typically have more layers of financing than market-rate projects, which also add to the cost. There may also be higher property management fees for affordable housing projects, since the residents of these projects have to comply with income restriction covenants by supplying proof of income on a regular basis, and there are costs related to audits by tax credit or other entities. On the other hand, affordable housing projects are usually valued less than comparable market projects, because the rents are restricted at affordable housing levels. If the level of affordability is too low, some affordable apartment projects struggle merely to cover their operating expenses. While there were no recent affordable housing projects that occurred in Gardena, there were tax credit housing projects in the neighboring communities of Carson, Torrance, Inglewood and unincorporated Lennox. An examination of these projects indicated that densities ranged from 27 units/acre in unincorporated Lennox to 96 units/acre in the City of Inglewood. Of nine tax-credit projects in the South Bay area, the average density was approximately 48 units per acre. Gardenas R-4 zone falls at the very bottom of the range of densities appropriate for affordable units (maximum density of 27 units/acre).

Actions to Create Appropriate Zoning


The Citys adequate sites programs are focused primarily on raising maximum permitted densities to facilitate and encourage affordable development in the R-4 and MUO zones. Under these programs, each zone will be revised to include a graduated density standard in which the largest sites have permitted densities of 30 dwelling units per acre. The adequate sites inventory indicates that sufficient realistic capacity exists on such sites

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(after the zone amendments are applied) to meet the Citys RHNA fair share obligation for lower-income units. See Section V.C (Housing Programs) for more information on Gardenas adequate sites programs.
Under the program contained in this Housing Element to amend the MUO and R4 zones, mixed-use development will be permitted on sites as small as 1.0 acre, and the largest MUO and R-4 sites will be permitted to develop to as much as 30 units per acre, which will allow Gardena to meet the State "default density" as defined in Government Code Section 65583.2(c)(3)(B).

J.

Financial Resources

There are a variety of potential funding sources available for housing activities in the City. In many cases, a variety of funding sources must be used to complete a project, due to the high costs of development and limitations on the uses of the funds. Table 49 identifies the various funding sources and their eligible uses. The sources are grouped into four categories: federal resources, state resources, local resources, and private resources. The three primary funding sources used by the City are: (1) Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program; (2) State of California Home Investment Partnership Program, and (3) State of California CalHome Program. These programs are discussed in greater detail below.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Funds


Through the CDBG program, the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides funds to local governments to fund a wide range of community development activities for low-income persons. The CDBG program provides formula funding to larger cities and counties, while smaller cities (less than 50,000 population) generally compete for funds that are allocated by the County. Gardena is large enough to receive its own allocation of CDBG funds directly from HUD, and receives approximately $920,000 on an annual basis. This amount has been decreasing over the last five years. The CDBG program is flexible in that the funds can be used for a range of activities. Eligible housing activities include acquisition and/or disposition of real estate; relocation, rehabilitation and construction of housing; and home ownership assistance.

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State of California Home Investment Partnerships Program (State HOME) Funds


An additional resource available to the City for affordable housing development on vacant sites is the federal Home Investment Partnerships Program (HOME). Since 2002, the City has received a total of approximately $1.3 million in HOME funds through the State HOME Program, a competitive allocation process administered by the State of California. Beginning in fiscal year 2010, the City has opted instead to receive its HOME funds as a federal entitlement jurisdiction. By accepting entitlement HOME funds, the City will be guaranteed to receive these funds and can rely on them as an affordable housing resource, as opposed to the uncertainty of the competitive process under the State HOME Program. The entitlement funds, anticipated to number about $450,000 per year, will give the City much more control over its affordable housing programs and financing options. Beginning in fiscal year 2010, the City will begin to develop and implement two types of HOME-funded activities that will facilitate the development of new affordable housing on vacant and underutilized sites: 1. New Construction Development The City will partner with for-profit and non-profit developers to pursue new construction opportunities as they become available. The City will utilize HOME funds to help realize affordable housing goals. The City will establish and implement agreements with developers to provide gap financing for new affordable housing development. 2. Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs) - As a participant in the HOME Investment Partnerships Program, the City is required to work with CHDOs to facilitate the development of new housing units affordable to low income residents. Program activities supporting construction may include land write-downs, land acquisition, or other forms of support. The City will actively pursue partnerships with qualified CHDOS to develop and create affordable housing within the City of Gardena. In addition, these funds will be used to implement the following rehabilitation programs: 1. Rehabilitate and Preserve Rental Housing The City will continue to implement programs that emphasize rehabilitating substandard multifamily rental units occupied by low income renters, as well as preserve affordable rent levels and reasonable terms and conditions for assisted

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renters. The City currently uses CDBG funds to implement its MultiFamily Residential Rehabilitation Code Correction Program (MFRCCP). CDBG funds will be used to continue this program. 2. Owner Occupied Rehabilitation Loan/Grant Programs (OORP) The City seeks to preserve and revitalize deteriorated neighborhoods by improving the existing ownership housing stock through its Owner Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program. The State HOME funds will be used by the City to continue to implement its Owner Occupied Rehabilitation Loan Program (RRCCP). On November 16, 2009, the State of California announced an additional $25.2 million in HOME program funding awarded to 32 cities and counties to provide for housing opportunities in California. The state HOME program provides funds to eligible cities, and counties that do not receive HOME funds directly from HUD. Among the 32 awarded cities and county, is the City of Gardena.

CalHome Program
The California Department of Housing and Community Development CalHome Program was established by SB 1656 (Alarcon), which created Chapter 6 (commencing with Section 59650) adding it to Part 2 of Division 31 of the Health and Safety Code. The CalHome Program provides grants to cities, counties or local public entities within the State to support existing homeownership programs designed to assist low- and very low-income households.

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Table 49 Financial Resources Available for Housing Activities Program Name 1.


a.

Description

Eligible Activities

Federal Programs
Formula/Entitlement Grants awarded to City on a formula basis for housing and community development activities primarily benefiting low- and moderate-income households. Acquisition Rehabilitation Homebuyer Assistance Economic Development Homeless Assistance Public Services

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)

Section 8 Rental Assistance

Rental assistance payments to owners of private market rate units on behalf of lowincome (50% MFI) tenants. Administered by the Los Angeles County Housing Authority

Rental Assistance

b.

Competitive Programs
Grants to non-profit developers of supportive housing for the elderly or disabled. Rental assistance is available to low-income elderly persons (up to 50% MFI) Flexible grant program for housing activities that benefit low-income households. The City must apply competitively through the state for funding. Grants to non-profit developers of supportive housing for persons with disabilities, including group homes, independent living facilities and intermediate care facilities. Acquisition Rehabilitation New Construction Rental Assistance Support Services New Construction Acquisition Rehabilitation Homebuyer Assistance Tenant based assistance Acquisition Rehabilitation New Construction Rental Assistance

Section 202

Home Investment Partnership Act (HOME)

Section 811

2.

State Programs
Tax credit is available to persons and corporations that invest in low-income rental housing. Proceeds from the sale are typically used to create housing. Deferred payment loans to local governments, on-profit and for-profit developers for new construction, rehabilitation and preservation of permanent and transitional rental housing for lower income households. Two funding rounds annually through 2009 New Construction

Low-income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC)

Multi-Family Housing Program (MHP)

New Construction Rehabilitation Preservation Conversion of nonresidential to rental Social services within project

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Table 53 (Continued) Financial Resources Available for Housing Activities Program Name
Multi-family Housing Program Supportive Housing

Description
Deferred payment loans for rental housing with supportive services for the disabled who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Two funding rounds annually through 2009

Eligible Activities
New Construction Rehabilitation Preservation Conversion of nonresidential to rental Social services within project

Building Equity and Growth in Neighborhoods (BEGIN)

Grants to cities to provide Down payment assistance (up to $30,000) to low and moderate-income first-time homebuyers of new homes in projects with affordability enhances by local regulatory incentives or barrier reductions. One funding round annually through 2009. Grants to cities and non-profit developers to offer homebuyer assistance, including Down payment assistance, rehabilitation, acquisition/rehabilitation, and homebuyer counseling. Loans to developers for property acquisition, site development, predevelopment and construction period expenses for homeownership projects. One funding round annually through 2011. Funding for housing and related infrastructure near transit stations. One funding round annually through 2009. Funding for pilot programs to demonstrate innovative, const-saving ways to create or preserve affordable housing. Funding of public infrastructure (water, sewer, traffic, parks, site clean-up, etc) to facilitate infill housing development. One funding round annually. Low interest, short-term loans to local government for affordable infill, owneroccupied housing developments. Links with CalHFAs Down payment Assistance Program to provide subordinate loans to first-time buyers. Two funding rounds per year. CalHFA makes below market loans to fire-time homebuyers of up to 3% of sales price. Programs operate through participating lenders who originate loan for CalHFA. Funds available upon request to qualified borrows

Homebuyer Assistance

CalHome

Predevelopment, site development, site acquisition Rehabilitation Acquisition/rehab Down payment assistance Mortgage financing Homebuyer counseling Regulations under development Regulations pending

Transit-Oriented Development Program Affordable Housing Innovation Fund

Infill Incentive Grant Program

Regulations pending

CalHFA Residential Development Loan Program

Site acquisition Pre-development costs

CalHFA Homebuyers Down payment Assistance Program

Homebuyer Assistance

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Table 53 (Continued) Financial Resources Available for Housing Activities Program Name 3. Local Programs
The can support low-income housing by issuing housing mortgage revenue bonds requiring the developer to lease a fixed percentage of the units to lowincome families at specified rental rates. New Construction Rehabilitation Acquisition

Description

Eligible Activities

Tax Exempt Housing Revenue Bond

4.

Private Resources/Financing Programs


Fixed rate mortgages issued by private mortgage insurers. Mortgages, which fund the purchase and rehabilitation of a home. Low Interest Down-Payment Mortgages for Single-Family Homes in underserved low-income and minority cities. Homebuyer Assistance

Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae)

Federal Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program Savings Association Mortgage Company Inc.

Direct subsidies to non-profit and for profit developers and public agencies for affordable low-income ownership and rental projects. Pooling process to fund loans for affordable ownership and rental housing projects. Non-profit and for profit developers contact member institutions. HomeWorks- 1st and 2nd mortgages that include rehabilitation loan; City provides gap financing for rehabilitation component. Households earning up to 80% MFI qualify. The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) requires certain regulated financial institutions to achieve goals for lending in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. As a result, most of the larger private lenders offer one or more affordable housing program, such as first-time homebuyer, housing rehabilitation, or new construction.

New Construction

New construction of rentals, cooperative, self help housing, homeless shelters, and group homes Home Buyer Assistance combined with rehabilitation

Freddie Mac

Private Lenders

Varies, depending on the individual program offered by the bank.

Source: GRC Associates, Inc.

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K.

Opportunities for Energy Conservation

Title 24 of the California Administrative Code


State law requires all new construction to comply with energy budget standards that establish maximum allowable energy use from depletable sources (Title 24 of the California Administrative Code). These requirements apply to such design components as structural insulation, air infiltration and leakage control, setback features on thermostats, water heating system insulation (tanks and pipes) and swimming pool covers if a pool is equipped with a fossil fuel or electric heater. State law also requires that a tentative tract map provide for future passive or natural heating or cooling opportunities in the subdivision, including designing the lot sizes and configurations so that structures are oriented to take advantage of a southern exposure, shade or prevailing breezes. The following are among the alternative ways to meet the energy standards: Alternative 1: The passive solar approach, which requires proper solar orientation, appropriate levels of thermal mass, south facing windows, and moderate insulation levels. Alternative 2: Generally requires higher levels of insulation than alternative 1, but has no thermal mass or window orientation requirements. Alternative 3: Also is without passive solar design but requires active solar water heating in exchange for less stringent insulation and/or glazing requirements. In turn, the home building industry must comply with these standards while localities are responsible for enforcing the energy conservation regulations. Some additional opportunities for energy conservation include various passive design techniques. Among the range of techniques that could be used for purposes of reducing energy consumption are the following: Locating the structure on the northern portion of the sunniest portion of the site; Designing the structure to admit the maximum amount of sunlight into the building and to reduce exposure to extreme weather conditions; Locating indoor areas of maximum usage along the south face of the building and placing corridors, closets, laundry rooms, power core, and garages along the north face; Making the main entrance a small, enclosed space that creates an air lock between the building and its exterior, orienting the entrance away from

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prevailing winds, or using a windbreak to reduce the wind velocity against the entrance. Currently the Citys Building Division, through its review process, ensures that energy conservation features of Title 24 are incorporated into the design of residential developments. The City will incorporate already established programs and projects that encourage green development and energy conservation. The City will continue to promote the Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program, which currently incorporates energy efficient (Energy STAR) appliances, water heaters and heating and air systems in its housing rehabilitation standards.

Green Building Program


Interest in addressing the impacts of electricity consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, raw materials use, landfill waste and potable water consumption has been growing at all levels of government. California government has made major strides recently in seeking to reduce the states greenhouse gas emissions. In 2004, the governor signed an executive order and issued a Green Building Action Plan that requires increased energy efficiency for state owned buildings and encourages local government and private businesses to reduce their energy use. The State of California has adopted legislation requiring Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification for new and renovated public buildings. In addition, two more California cities, Chula Vista and Saratoga, have joined the nearly three dozen cities statewide that have adopted green building rules. The Chula Vista City Council recently pledged to become the first municipality in San Diego County with green building standards for all new construction and major renovations. The City of Saratogas new green building policy will require all newly constructed or renovated city-owned facilities over 5,000 square feet to meet the U.S. Green Building Councils requirements for LEED. Other southern California cities that have adopted similar requirements are Calabasas, Santa Monica, Long Beach and Los Angeles. A green building program considers a broad range of issues including community and site design, energy efficiency, water conservation, resourceefficient material selection, indoor environmental quality, construction management, and building maintenance. The end result will be buildings that minimize the use of resources, are healthier for people; and reduce harm to the environment. To reinforce its commitment to energy conservation, the City will, within two years of the adoption of the Housing Element, adopt a Green Building Program that considers community and site design and energy efficiency for all development projects within the City. The Green Building Program will also promote green development through marketing with flyers and reading material

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to inform and promote environment-friendly development. The City will also streamline the permit and project approval process and give priority to development projects that meet the standards of the U.S. Green Building Councils Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification system.

Southern California Edison Programs


Southern California Edison (SCE) offers a variety of energy conservation services under its Energy Management Program (EMP). The EMA program helps incomequalified households conserve energy and reduce their electricity costs. SCE pays all the costs of purchasing and installing energy-efficient appliances and equipment, which are free to eligible customers. The California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program offers income-qualified customers a discount of 20 percent or more off their monthly electric bill. In addition, the Energy Assistance Fund (EAF) assists income-qualified customers with their electric bill once in a 12month period.

Southern California Gas Company Programs


The Southern California Gas Company offers a Direct Assistance Program (DAP) for no-cost weatherization and furnace repair or replacement service for qualified limited-income customers. In addition, the Gas Company participates in the CARE program which provides a 20 percent discount on the monthly gas bill for eligible households.

Brownfield Program
The City of Gardena, in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has participated in the Brownfield Program since 2000. The Brownfield Program promotes cleaning up environmentally contaminated sites and spurs site developments ranging from housing to commercial/retail developments. As part of the Program, all projects are encouraged to incorporate energy conservation design measures. Between 2005 and 2008, Gardena completed two successful housing developments under the Brownfields Program. The first, Gardena Village, included 55 detached condominium units and is located in the 1700 block of West Artesia Boulevard. This project took the place of a manufacturing facility. The other development, known as San Lorenzo, consisted of nine detached townhome-style condominiums at 1446 West 166th Street, on the site of a former equipment rental business.

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V. HOUSING PLAN
Sections II through IV established the housing needs, opportunities, and constraints present within the City. The Housing Plan presented in this section sets forth the quantified housing goals, policies and programs to address the identified housing needs.

A.

Housing Element Goals and Policies

The goals and policies set forth in this Housing Element address five major issue areas: 1) maintain and preserve the housing stock and the neighborhoods; 2) provide a variety of housing types; 3) minimize the impact of governmental constraints on housing construction; 4) provide adequate sites for the development of new hosing; and 5) assure equal housing opportunity for all residents. Each issue area is discussed in greater detail below.

1.

Maintenance and Preservation


GOAL 1.0: Policy 1.1: Policy 1.2: Maintain and enhance the stability of the Citys housing stock and residential neighborhoods. Encourage the upkeep, maintenance and rehabilitation of existing housing units. Continue to explore programs and funding sources designed to maintain and improve the existing housing stock. Preserve the affordability of assisted rental projects located in the City. Encourage room additions in the existing housing stock to alleviate overcrowding.

Policy 1.3: Policy 1.4:

2.

Provision of a Variety of Housing Types


GOAL 2.0: Provide opportunity for increasing the supply of affordable housing within the City, with special emphasis on housing for special needs groups. Pursue methods to fund construction of housing for senior citizens, persons with disabilities, and large families.

Policy 2.1:

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Policy 2.2:

Provide incentives for new housing construction, to encourage the production of affordable units. Encourage provision of units with 3 or more bedrooms to provide adequately sized housing for large families. Participate in home ownership programs to move lower income renters into home ownership. Provide rental assistance to lower income households. Discourage the conversion of affordable rental units to condominium ownership. Cooperate with the neighboring cities to identify resources for sheltering homeless persons.

Policy 2.3: Policy 2.4: Policy 2.5: Policy 2.6:

3.

Removal of Constraints
GOAL 3.0: Policy 3.1: Minimize the impact of governmental constraints on housing construction and cost. Monitor procedures and codes to ensure streamlined case processing and permit issuance procedures as well as regulations, ordinances, codes and standards to minimize governmental impacts on development costs. Encourage the utilization of innovative construction and design techniques to reduce housing costs. Encourage the use of special development zones and other mechanisms to allow more flexibility in housing developments. Review ways to provide zoning, land division, and construction incentives to reduce the cost of new and rehabilitated housing.

Policy 3.2: Policy 3.3:

Policy 3.4:

4.

Provision of Adequate Sites for Residential Development


GOAL 4.0: Provide adequate residential sites through appropriate land use and zoning to accommodate the Citys share of regional housing needs. Implement land use policies that allow for a range of residential densities. Maintain an inventory of city-owned sites, and assist residential developers in identifying land suitable for housing development.

Policy 4.1: Policy 4.2:

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Policy 4.3:

Encourage residential development in the mixed use C-R zone along Gardena Boulevard, and on residentially zoned plant nurseries. Encourage development at maximum attainable densities, and encourage use of density bonuses for inclusion of affordable units.

Policy 4.4:

5.

Equal Housing Opportunity


GOAL 5.0: Policy 5.1: Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in the housing of their choice. Enforce the fair housing laws prohibiting arbitrary discrimination in the building, financing, selling or renting of housing on the basis of race, religion, family status, national origin, physical handicap, or other such circumstances. Support accessible residential design that facilitates use of housing units by all persons regardless of age or disability status.

Policy 5.2

B.

Evaluation of Accomplishments Under 2000-2005 Housing Element

As part of the housing element update, jurisdictions must evaluate the accomplishments made under their adopted housing elements. Wherever possible, these results should be quantified, but may be qualitative where necessary. The purpose of this analysis is to critically evaluate the success of the current programs to aid in the development of an effective five-year strategy for the updated element. This section reviews the Citys progress to date in implementing housing programs set forth in the 2000-2005 Housing Element and the continued appropriateness for the 2008-2014 Housing Element. Table 50 summarizes the Citys housing program accomplishments, followed by a review of the quantified objectives. The results of this analysis will provide the basis for developing the comprehensive housing program strategy presented in Part C of this section.

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Table 50 Review of Accomplishment Under 2000 Housing Element Goal: Maintenance and Preservation of the Housing Stock Policy/Program
1. Home Improvement Program a. Residential Rebate Program Action: Make available rebates for minor household repairs to low- and moderate-income owner-occupied homes and mobile home owners. b. Handyworker Fix-Up Program Action: Provide Handyworker crews to perform minimal household repairs for low-income owneroccupied homes and mobile home owners. Objective to assist between 105 households annually, equivalent to 525 over the five-year period c. State HOME Program Action: Provide rehabilitation loans to owner occupied single family homes and mobile homes. 2. Section 8 Rental Assistance Program Action: Provide Section 8 rental certificates through the Los Angeles County Housing Authority. Objective to assist 608 households, with additional assistance provided, as funding becomes available. Progress: The level of Section 8 assistance in Gardena has maintained at a fairly constant level receiving approximately 600 Section 8 vouchers each year. Effectiveness: The program is very successful in providing needed rental assistance in Gardena. Appropriateness: The program remains appropriate to the updated Housing Element. 3. Preservation of At-Risk Units Action: Preserve or replace at-risk housing by: a) monitor at-risk units, b) provision of other funding sources, c) purchase similar units to be maintained as affordable housing, d) building new affordable housing units to replace units lost. Progress: No at-risk units were removed from the housing market. Effectiveness: The City met its goal to monitor and preserve at-risk units. Appropriateness: The program remains appropriate to the updated Housing Element.

Accomplishments
Progress: Between 2000-2007 the City provided home improvement services to 541 low- to moderate-income households through the following programs: Handyworker/Residential Rebate Program 550 Code Enforcement Program 10,210 In addition, the HOME program provided loans to 13 homeowners and 5 mobile home residents. Effectiveness: goal. The City met its overall rehabilitation

Appropriateness: Given the ongoing need to maintain the Citys aging housing stock, the Home Improvement Program remains appropriate for the Element.

Goal: Provision of a Variety of Housing Types Policy/Program


4. Senior Housing Development Action: Continue to provide relaxed standards for senior housing and support applications for federal and state funding for quality senior developments.

Accomplishments
Progress: Through the development of its senior housing units, the City has shown a commitment to meeting the needs of the lower-income elderly population. Effectiveness: The City has been effective in its support of affordable senior housing. Appropriateness: Providing affordable senior housing remains appropriate to the Housing Element.

5.

Homeownership Programs

Action: Contact the necessary entities to initiate participation in the homeownership programs.

Progress: The City developed a first-time homebuyer program and presented a First-Time Homebuyer Orientation Meeting in partnership with Fannie Mae and the NeighborWorks Homeownership Center for residents to meet with lenders and get information on qualifying for the program. The City received HOME funds for a First-time Homebuyer Program during Fiscal Year 2005-06. Effectiveness: Due to rising home prices and income limitations, the majority of State HOME funds designated for the first time homebuyer program were transferred to the Citys Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Program. Appropriateness: Providing technical support for various homeownership programs continues to remain appropriate to the Housing Element.

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Table 54 (Continued) Review of Accomplishments under 2000 Housing Element Goal: Removal of Governmental Constraints Policy/Program
6. Density Bonus Ordinance/Affordable Housing Development Incentives Action: Adopt an affordable housing ordinance to assist in the creation of affordable housing. Develop program brochures and market program to property owners along Gardena Boulevard and the property owners of the remaining residentially zoned plant nurseries. Support R-3 zoning on the plant nursery properties.

Accomplishments
Progress: No action taken on adoption of a Density Bonus Ordinance during the Housing Element period. Effectiveness: None Appropriateness: Continue to support the adoption of a Density Bonus Ordinance and other affordable housing incentives.

Goal: Provision of Adequate Sites Policy/Program


7. Specific Plans Action: Continue to use specific plans as a tool to promote residential development within the City.

Accomplishments
Progress: Gardenas specific plan process provides more flexibility in terms of development standards and requirement than set forth in the Zoning Ordinance. Specific plans permit clustering and other techniques to accommodate development on smaller lots to meet the unique constraints or characteristics of a site. Effectiveness: Gardenas 2006 General Plan included Policy (LU 3.3): Consider the adoption of specific plans for the four corners at the Van Ness-Rosecrans, Western-Rosecrans, Rosecrans-Normandie Center and the Artesia Corridor to promote and direct revitalization efforts, and to further study and evaluate whether a mix of commercial and residential development is appropriate in these areas. In 2006, the Artesia Corridor Specific Plan was adopted. Buildout of the specific plan could result in 300 residential units. Appropriateness: Proving the specific plan process remains appropriate to the Housing Element.

8. Gardena Boulevard Action: Amend the C-R zone to incorporate incentives for residential use by Fall 2001, with adopting targeted for Spring 2002. Conduct a meeting with property owners to discuss the Citys desire for residential development along the Boulevard, and opportunities for incentives. Strive to achieve development of 125 new multi-family units. 9. Development on Vacant Residential Sites Action: Contact property owners of the larger vacant sites to discuss R-3 zoning. Inform property owners of development incentives available through the City.

Progress: No action taken to amend the C-R zone to incorporate incentive for residential use. Effectiveness: None Appropriateness: Continue to support a change in the C-R zone to incorporate residential incentives.

Progress: City worked with landowners and developers in the residential specific plans in the City. Effectiveness: Six specific plans were developed. Appropriateness: Continue to support a change in the C-R zone to incorporate residential incentives.

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Table 54 (Continued) Review of Accomplishments under 2000 Housing Element Policy/Program


10. Second Unit Ordinance Action: Promote second units by developing a brochure in 2001/2002 to distribute at the Senior Center as well as the planning counter.

Accomplishments
Progress: The Zoning Ordinance permits second units in the R-1 zone. Granny units limited to occupancy by senior citizens are permitted under the R-1 zone with a CUP. Information on second units/granny units is available at the planning counter. Effectiveness: In 2003, the City Council adopted an ordinance that amended Title 18 of the Municipal Code to establish provisions for second dwelling units. Appropriateness: development. Continue to support second unit

11. Transitional Housing/Emergency Shelters Action: Revise the Zoning Ordinance to incorporate provisions for transitional housing and emergency shelters in 2001/2002.

Progress: No action taken to revise the Zoning Ordinance to allow transitional housing and emergency shelters. Effectiveness: None Appropriateness: State law (SB-2) requires that all Housing Elements include a zoning district allowing emergency shelters by right.

Goal: Equal Housing Opportunity Policy/Program


12. Rent Mediation Board Action: Continue providing rent mediation/arbitration assistance to renters in disputes with landlords.

Accomplishments
Progress: The Citys Rent Mediation Board continues to provide rent mediation to renters and landlords. Effectiveness: Since 2000, the Board considered 262 cases of which 176 were resolved and 123 were closed or cancelled. Appropriateness: The Rent Mediation Board provides an important service to residents and landlords in the community, and remains appropriate for the Housing Element update.

13. Fair Housing Program Action: Implement Fair Housing Plan actions and continue to use the service of the Westside Fair Housing Council.

Progress: The City continues to contract with the Westside Fair Housing Council to implement the regional Fair Housing Plan and to offer fair housing services and tenant/landlord counseling to residents. Effectiveness: Over the last seven years, the Fair Housing Services has assisted 1,427 people with issues related to evictions, habitability, rent increases, notices and lease terms. Appropriateness: The Fair Housing Program provides an important service to residents in the community, and remains appropriate for the Housing Element update.

14. Homeless Assistance Action: Participate in Countys program to assist the homeless. Provide help to homeless persons transition to permanent housing and independent living.

Progress: The City coordinates with Los Angeles Housing Authority to provide transitional housing and help homeless people transition to permanent housing and independent living. The City responds to ongoing drop-in and telephone inquiries from homeless individuals and families through its Emergency Services Program. Effectiveness: Since 2000, the Emergency Services Program has served 765 homeless persons with activities such as referrals and counseling. Appropriateness: Providing emergency services to homeless persons remains appropriate for the Housing Element update.

Source: City of Gardena, Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report (CAPER) for Program Years 2000 through 2007

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C.

Housing Programs

The goals and policies contained in the Housing Element address the identified needs from the Needs Assessment, and are implemented by a series of programs offered through City departments. The housing programs define the specific actions the City will undertake to achieve specific goals and policies. Gardenas housing programs address the following five major areas: Maintaining and preserving the existing affordable housing stock. Assisting in the provision of housing. Removing governmental constraints, as necessary. Providing adequate sites to achieve a variety and diversity of housing. Promoting equal housing opportunity.

The housing plan for addressing unmet needs, removing constraints, and achieving quantitative objectives is described in this section according to the above five areas. The housing programs discussed in this section include existing programs as well as new programs that have been added to address the unmet housing needs. Table 47, Program Summary, included at the end of the section, identifies each Housing Element program, it objectives, funding source, responsible agency and time frame.

MAINTENANCE AND PRESERVATION OF THE HOUSING STOCK


Preserving the existing housing stock, including maintaining the affordability of assisted rental units, is an important goal for the City. Through neighborhood and home improvement programs, the City maintains the condition of existing housing units. In addition, the City maintains affordability through the use of Section 8 vouchers, and by preserving affordability of assisted rental units.

1.

Housing Rehabilitation Programs

The City provides four housing rehabilitation programs, the Handy-Worker Fix Up program, the Residential Rebate Program, Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program and Multi-Family Rehabilitation and Code Correction Program. Handy-Worker Fix Up: Through the CDBG-funded Handy-Worker Fix Up program, the City provides a free labor crew with up to $600 in materials and $600 for licensed contractor work for activities including health and safety compliance, energy conservation, handicapped access, door and window replacement, smoke alarms, plumbing, heating and electrical.
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Residential Rebate Program: Through the CDBG funded Light Housing Rehabilitation program, the City provides rebates of 50 percent to a maximum of $3,000 for repairs such as plumbing, heating, electrical, roofing, handicapped access, and other health and safety improvements. Multi-Family Rehabilitation and Code Correction Program: This CDBG-funded program offers exterior improvement grants to owners of rental properties between 5 and 11 units. Fifty-one percent of the units must remain affordable to low-income households for a period of three years. The grant is forgiven after three years of compliance. Program Objective: For the Handy-Worker Fix Up, Residential Rebate and MultiFamily Rehabilitation and Code Correction Programs, the City will assist 179 households annually which is equivalent to approximately 550 over the 2008-2014 period. Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program: Through this program the City provides zero interest (0%), deferred payment loans up to $35,000 to income qualified owner-occupants of single-family and mobile homes. The City was awarded $600,000 in CalHOME funds in 2008. The City will continue to permit funding from the Owner Occupied Rehabilitation Loan/Grant Program (OORP) to be used towards room additions to alleviate overcrowded conditions for extremely low-income households. The OORP will be advertised through brochures available at the Citys Office of the City Manager counter. In addition, the City will continue to post information about this program through the Economic Development website. Program information will be updated annually. Program Objective: Provide 15 deferred loans over two years.

2.

Section 8 Rental Assistance

The Section 8 rental assistance program assists very low-income households in paying their monthly rent. Under the program, the tenant contributes 30 percent of their monthly income toward rent, while the Section 8 certificate or voucher will pay for the remainder of the monthly rental cost. The Los Angeles County Housing Authority currently administers rental assistance on behalf of the City, and provides assistance to 600 households. The City of Gardena provides information on its website and informational material at the community center, city hall, and the three senior housing projects in the City. In addition, information will be in both English and Spanish. The City of Gardena encourages the use of Section 8 funds and has partnered with Cooperative Services Incorporated (CSI) in developing several senior housing projects with Section 8 funds. In the Citys effort to relieve the problem of overpayment by extremely low and very low-income-household renters, the City will continue to coordinate with the
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Los Angeles County Housing Authority in promoting the Section 8 Rental Assistance program. The City will annually provide information and referrals to landlords regarding participation in this program. Information on the Section 8 Rental Assistance program will be available at the Office of the City Manager counter and on the Citys website. Program information will be updated annually. Program Objective: Continue rental assistance to 600 households, with additional assistance provided, as funding becomes available.

3.

Preservation of At-Risk Units

As previously discussed, three projects in Gardena maintain Section 8 project based subsidies: Gardena Towers, Gardena South Park Manor, and Meadowlark Manor. Due to the uncertainty surrounding the Section 8 program, the three projects are considered to be at risk. The City has no immediate plans to purchase the at-risk units within this housing element period. The three housing developments, the Gardena Towers, Gardena South Park Manor, Meadowlark Manor, are owned and operated by non-profit corporations, which do not have conversion dates for several decades. The longterm affordability of these projects is fairly secure because of their non-profit status.

Program Objective: Prepare a Monitoring and Mitigation program to carefully evaluate and gauge at-risk units activities. In this Monitoring and Mitigation program the City will:
Create an early warning system by creating a list based on at-risk units in the ten year inventory and analysis for possible conversion within the current and next planning period. The City will monitor the list on a regular basis. Work with owners, tenants, and nonprofit organizations to assist in the nonprofit acquisition of at-risk projects to ensure long-term affordability of the development. Annually contact property owners, gauge interest and identify non-profit partners and pursue funding and preservation strategies on a project-by-project basis. Monitor owners of at-risk projects on an ongoing basis, at least every six months to one year, in coordination with other public and private entities to determine their interest in selling, prepaying, terminating or continuing participation in a subsidy program Reduce, waive or subsidize local development fees associated with preservation or replacement of at-risk units, on a case by case basis.

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PROVISION OF A VARIETY OF HOUSING TYPES


The City is committed to providing a variety of housing types to meet the needs of all residents. Through the development of senior housing units, the City has shown a commitment to meeting the needs of the lower income elderly population. In addition, through the use of homeownership programs, the City can increase home ownership opportunities for residents.

4.

Senior Housing Development

The City places special emphasis on meeting the housing needs of the elderly. Through incentives such as granting of deviation from the parking, open space, dwelling unit size and/or guest parking standards contained in the zoning title; waiving all or any portion of applicable planning or plan check fees or changes; and providing priority processing of applications for environmental review, project approval, architectural review, plan check, permit issuance and inspection the City encourages the development of senior housing. There are currently 279 assisted senior housing units in the City. Program Objectives: Continue to provide a streamline approval process and relaxed development standards for senior housing. Support applications for federal and state funding for quality senior developments by providing the information on the Citys website and making it available at the Citys Planning Department counter.

5.

Homeownership Programs

In order to increase homeownership opportunities for residents, the City can take advantage of the Fresh Rate Program operated by the Independent Cities LeaseFinance Authority. The program offers a four percent grant toward the purchase of a home on a first come, first served basis. As an associate member of the ICFLA, the City actively encourages the participation of local mortgage brokers, mortgage lenders, and real estate brokers in utilizing this ICLFA as a source for funding first mortgage loans. The City will continue efforts to refer potential homebuyers to this homeownership program. Program Objective: Develop a mailing packet that will be sent to these local lending entities to encourage their use of the primary financing funds available through ICLFA.

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REMOVAL OF CONSTRAINTS
The City is committed to removing governmental constraints that hinder the production of housing. In addition to streamlined case processing and permit procedures already in place, the City will adopt an affordable housing ordinance to help provide housing for very low and low-income households.

6.

Density Bonus Ordinance/Affordable Housing Development Incentives

Current State law mandates that local jurisdictions grant a density bonus and provide development incentives (i.e. Zoning Code waivers) to housing developments containing five or more affordable units. The percentage of density bonus and number of development incentives provided is commensurate to the level of affordability proposed. The law also limits a citys ability to require discretionary review of affordable housing projects. Pursuant to the new State Density Bonus provisions, the maximum density bonus increased from twenty five percent (25%) to thirty five percent (35%) of the total units proposed within a project based on a sliding scale dependent upon the number of affordable units and level of affordability provided by the developer. Additional density bonuses must also be granted for housing developments that transfer land to the city for the development of affordable units or if the development provides a child care facility to be used by its residents. Rental units must be held to affordable rent levels for a period of at least 30 years. This program provides both density bonuses and other incentives for the inclusion of affordable housing units in proposed residential developments. The additional incentive(s) to be offered is determined on a project-by-project basis in consultation with the developer. Program Objectives: Adopt a Density Bonus Ordinance to comply with State law. Shorten the project approval process period for housing projects that include affordable units.

7.

Green Building

Green buildings are structures that are designed, renovated, reused or operated in a manner that enhances resources efficiency and sustainability. These structures reduce water consumption, improve energy efficiency and lessen a buildings overall environmental impact. The City intends to adopt a green building program that considers a broad range of issues including community and site design, energy efficiency, water conservation, resource-efficient material
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selection, indoor environmental quality, construction management, and building maintenance. The U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification system will provide guidance in the design of the program. The program will incorporate a streamlined permitting and approval process that favors projects meeting LEED criteria, as well as marketing efforts to promote awareness. The City will also examine the potential costs and benefits associated with new green building code requirements and standards on housing development, particularly affordable housing. Meeting these new standards (i.e., energy efficiency, site design, green building materials, water conservation, etc.) may prove prohibitively costly for housing developers; however, residents are anticipated to benefit from lower energy costs due to improved efficiency and conservation. Therefore, the City will also examine the feasibility of setting aside a portion of the Gardena Economic Development Departments CDBG entitlement fund as financial assistance for developers to implement the green building practices. This incentive, coupled with assistance in finding other funding sources, would encourage developers to bring more affordable and sustainable housing projects to the City, especially mixed-use projects. The City will examine the green building code impacts on housing development within two years after the adoption of the Housing Element. Program Objectives: Adopt a green building program that considers a broad range of issues including community and site design, energy efficiency, water conservation, resource-efficient material selection, indoor environmental quality, construction management, and building maintenance. Develop a procedure to streamline the permit and approval process, giving priority to projects meeting LEED standards. Promote green development through marketing information. Complete a study of impacts of green building requirements on housing production.

8.

Multi-family Development Impact Fee

The City will extend its exemption from the multi-family development impact fee to all projects containing units restricted to households with income less than or equal to 80 percent of area median income. The exemption will be adopted within one year of the adoption of the Housing Element. Program Objective: Amend the Municipal Code to exempt lower-income multifamily development projects from the multi-family development impact fee.

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PROVISION OF ADEQUATE SITES


Meeting the housing needs of all residents of the community requires the provision of adequate sites for all types of housing. By capitalizing on the allowances of the current zoning code, or by modifying the code as necessary, the City will assure that an adequate amount of residentially zoned land is available. Section IV (Housing Resources) identified a shortfall in adequate sites for 404 units affordable to low-income and very low-income households, and a surplus of sites for 459 units affordable to moderate-income and above moderate-income households. Some of the programs identified here act directly to address the lower-income shortfall, while others are intended to bring the City into compliance with State legal requirements for specific housing types, and still other programs are intended to address housing supply and affordability more broadly and/or indirectly. The programs that directly reduce the adequate sites shortfall are the R-4 Zone Amendment, the Mixed Use Overlay Zone Amendment, and the Rezoning of Two Sites. The cumulative effect of these programs will be to add capacity for 724 lower-income units, while reducing capacity for 163 moderate-income and abovemoderate-income units (due to some units being reclassified to lower-income). This will result in a RHNA surplus of 320 units for lower-income households and 296 units for moderate-income and above moderate-income households. The net effect of the adequate sites programs is described in further detail in Section IV (Housing Resources).

9.

Specific Plans

The City shall, within two years of adopting the Housing Element, implement Land Use Policy LU 3.3, and examine the feasibility of specific plans and mixeduse developments with an affordable housing component at the three identified target areas (Van Ness-Rosecrans, Western-Rosecrans, Rosecrans-Normandie). If mixed-use development is feasible, the City will adopt specific plans for these areas. In addition, to fully realize the potential of specific plans as a tool for housing development, and to offset the reclassification of some sites from moderate-income and above moderate-income to lower-income in the land resources inventory, new specific plans will have a maximum residential density of 20 units per acre, including the Artesia Corridor Specific Plan, which currently limits the density at 15 units per acre. Program Objectives: Continue to use specific plans as a tool to promote residential development within the City.

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Examine the feasibility of establishing three new specific plan areas for mixed-use development. Increase the maximum permitted residential density of new specific plan areas from 15 to 20 units per acre, including the Artesia Corridor Specific Plan.

10.

Gardena Boulevard

Gardena Boulevard is a mixed-use area is zoned C-R (Commercial-Residential) permitting residential densities of up to 20 dwelling units per acre, to the rear of and above commercial buildings. The C-R designation has been in place since the 1970s, and has successfully achieved the Citys goal to introduce housing into the area. To further promote residential mixed use along Gardena Boulevard, the City shall introduce specific incentives for residential development in the C-R zone. These incentives may include increased maximum height and density, reduced development fees and reduced residential parking requirements. The City shall continue to promote its in-lieu parking ordinance which provides for shared parking for commercial uses along Gardena Boulevard. Program Objectives: Conduct a study to identify incentives for mixed-uses in the C-R zone and revise the zoning ordinance accordingly. Conduct meetings with property owners to discuss the Citys desire for residential mixed-use development along Gardena Boulevard. Develop 20 new multi-family units along Gardena Boulevard.

11.

Development on Vacant and Underutilized Residential Sites

In addition to Gardena Boulevard, the Housing Element has identified seven sites as suitable for future residential development. These sites provide opportunities for development of single-family ownership housing, as well as condominium and rental housing. In instances where sites contain mixed zoning (e.g. R-1 and R-3), the City is committed to supporting development at the higher density. In addition, due to the extremely limited land remaining in Gardena, the City will encourage development at the maximum attainable densities, and encourage use of density bonuses for inclusion of affordable units. In addition the City will develop and implement two types of HOME-funded activities that will facilitate the development of new affordable housing on vacant and underutilized sites:
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1. New Construction Development - The City will partner with for-profit and non-profit developers to pursue new construction opportunities as they become available. The City will establish and implement agreements with developers to provide gap financing for new affordable housing development. 2. Community Housing Development Organizations - As a participant in the HOME Investment Partnerships Program, the City is required to work with CHDOs to facilitate the development of new housing units affordable to low income residents. Program activities supporting construction may include land write-downs, land acquisition, or other forms of support. The City will actively pursue partnerships with qualified CHDOs to develop and create affordable housing within Gardena. Program Objectives:

Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element, notify all property owners of vacant residential-zone land of affordable housing development incentives, such as the density bonus program, specific plans and the streamlined project approval process. Use HOME funds to partner with for-profit and non-profit developers to construction new affordable housing on vacant and underutilized properties within the City.
Work with CHDOs to facilitate the development of new affordable housing units. Update the vacant land inventory using the Citys GIS system.

12.

Brownfield Program

The City has a successful Brownfield Program with grant funds from the U.S. EPA. Implementation of this program has remediated contaminated properties and successfully developed housing and commercial/retail use projects on these sites. Two recent Brownfield housing developments include the 55-unit Gardena Village condominium project and the nine-unit San Lorenzo condominium project. In addition, the City works in partnership with the residents and businesses within the City in the Brownfield Community Relations Committee (BCRC). The BCRC works on the redevelopment and/or reuse of Brownfield sites property that is blighted and has the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. One step the City has taken is to conduct Environmental Justice meetings as a call to action to engage and leverage residents to approach owners to develop Brownfield sites. The City will continue to conduct annual Environmental Justice meetings to give residents the opportunity to learn about different call to action tools, such as letter writing to
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property owners and oversight agencies or talking to the press. This community outreach effort will ensure that community, economic, and environmental interests are recognized and that redeveloped Brownfield sites will benefit the community. Program Objectives: Complete five Phase I Environmental Site Assessments (ESA) and two Phase II ESAs. Develop two Brownfield sites. Market Brownfield opportunity sites with information packets. Continue community outreach efforts through the BCRC.

13.

Second Unit Ordinance

Second units are currently permitted in the R-1 zone in compliance with State law. However, the Municipal Code includes obsolete language in regards to Granny Units. Therefore, the Municipal Code shall be amended to delete Section 18.04.210 (Granny Units) and modify Section 18.12.030(D) (Uses Permitted Subject to a Conditional Use Permit) within one year from the adoption of the Housing Element. This will make the City in full compliance with State law regarding second units. Program Objectives: Amend Municipal Code to delete Section 18.04.210 (Granny Units) and modify Section 18.12.030(D) (Uses Permitted Subject to a Conditional Use Permit). Provide an information packet on second-unit developments, as well as other affordable housing information, at the Community Development Department counters and on the Citys website.

14.

Single Room Occupancy

The City will amend the current M-1 zone to specifically permit SROs with a CUP. The amendment will include specific development standards related to density, common area, unit size, occupancy, facilities, building management, parking waivers and other requirements. This amendment to permit SRO development and conversion in the M-1 zone will be introduced along with the amendment to permit emergency shelters by right in the M-1 zone. The City will adopt the amendment within one year of the adoption of the Housing Element. In order to facilitate the addition of SRO units to Gardenas housing stock, the City will maintain a list of existing hotels that are candidates for conversion to
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SRO and make the list available to any interested developers. Also, the City will review SRO conversion applications on an annual basis, in order to determine whether the SRO development standards or processing procedures are overly restrictive. Currently, the Citys processing procedures for motels and hotels are no different from those for other types of development in the M-1 zone all applications are processed on a first-come, first-served basis, must undergo the plan check process, and must pay all appropriate fees and exactions. The City will continue this policy unless and until it determines that additional streamlining is required to facilitate SRO conversions. Program Objectives: Amend the zoning ordinance to permit SROs in the M-1 zone with a CUP. Maintain a list of existing hotels that are candidates for conversion. Review SRO conversion applications on an annual basis.

15.

Transitional and Supportive Housing

The City will continue to comply with State law to permit transitional and supportive housing in all residential zones (R-1, R-2, R-3, R-4 and C-R) subject to the same development standards as any permitted residential use under these zones. Program Objective: Continue to comply with State law regarding transitional and supportive housing.

16.

Emergency Shelters

The passage of SB 2 (Cedillo) legislation requires local jurisdictions to address the issue of emergency shelters in the Housing Element. SB 2, which became effective January 1, 2008, requires local jurisdictions to identify a zone or zones where emergency shelters are allowed as a permitted use without a conditional use or other discretionary permit. The identified zone or zones must have sufficient capacity to meet all of the citys identified need for emergency shelter and include appropriate development standards. The City considers the M-1 (Commercial and Light Manufacturing) zone as the most appropriate for allowance of emergency housing by right. The M-1 zone currently does not permit emergency shelters, but there are adequate sites to develop emergency housing. Therefore, the zoning ordinance shall be amended to become compliant with SB 2. The revision of the ordinance shall occur within one year from the adoption of the Housing Element. As required by State law, the identified zone (M-1) must have sufficient capacity to accommodate the emergency shelter, and at a minimum provide capacity for at least one year-round shelter. Although the M-1 zone is extensively developed
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with commercial and industrial uses, there are sufficient vacant, underutilized and blighted properties within the M-1 zone to facilitate the development of a new structure or conversion of an existing structure to accommodate at least 20 homeless individuals at any one time. The Citys Zoning Map illustrating the M-1 zone is presented in Figure 8. Examples of six sites within the M-1 zone that can accommodate an emergency shelter are illustrated by photos in Figure 8. The M-1 zone offers the benefit of enhanced access to transit bus service, as Metro lines 124, 125 and 209; Gardena Municipal Bus lines 2 and 4; and Torrance Transit line 2 all pass through the zone or close by. Additionally, the M-1 zone affords a greater degree of compatibility with surrounding uses compared to the residential and commercial zones. The City could, depending on the level of funds available, acquire and/or assemble property or assist in gap-financing for non-profit organizations in the rehabilitation of existing structures for an emergency shelter. Program Objective: Amend the zoning ordinance to allow emergency shelters by right in the M-1 zone.

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Figure 8 Potential Locations for Emergency Shelters

A: Vacant Parcel

B: Blighted Underutilized

C: Vacant Parcel

E F

D: Blighted Underutilized

E: Available Building

F:

Vacant Parcel

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17.

R-4 Zone Amendment

In order to facilitate affordable housing development and to accommodate the shortfall of adequate sites (404 units), the City will amend the R-4 zone to put in place relaxed development standards. The amendment will include the following modifications: Change the maximum permitted density to a stepped density scale in order to promote lot consolidation. Instead of the current 27 units per acre on all lots, the new standard will be 25 units per acre on lots under 0.5 acre, 27 units per acre on lots between 0.5 and 1.0 acre, and 30 units per acre on lots of 1.0 acre or more. Reduce the landscaping requirement from 600 square feet to 460 square feet. Allow for tandem parking in order to provide greater flexibility in site planning and design. Allow for an increase in floor area ratio from 0.65 to 0.75. For senior or income-restricted units, change the off-street parking requirements so that only one off-street space is required for each onebedroom or studio unit, rather than the current two. Review all setbacks and other massing standards to ensure that they do not hinder projects from reaching the appropriate maximum density for the lot size; i.e., the maximum density and the realistic density will be one and the same. Permit owner-occupied and rental multifamily residential uses by-right without a conditional use permit or other discretionary action consistent with Government Code Section 65583.2(h) and (i). Require a minimum density of 20 units per acre. On sites identified (Appendix D) to accommodate the shortfall of adequate sites (404 units) to accommodate the remaining housing need for lower income households, ensure a minimum capacity of 16 units per site and 50 percent of the identified shortfall on residential only zoned sites.

The City will amend the R-4 zone within one year of adopting the Housing Element. Program Objective: Amend the R-4 zone to facilitate affordable housing

18.

Mixed-Use Overlay Zone Amendment

In order to facilitate development of affordable housing on mixed-use overlay sites and to accommodate the shortfall of adequate sites (404 units), the City will implement the following changes to the MUO zone including sites identified in Appendix D:
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Change the maximum permitted density from 20 units per acre to a stepped density standard: 20 units per acre for sites of less than 0.5 acre, 25 units per acre on sites of at least 0.5 acre but less than 1.0 acre, and 30 units per acre for sites of 1.0 acre or greater; Require a minimum residential density of 20 units per acre on all projects developed under the MUO development standards; Permit owner-occupied and rental multifamily residential uses by-right, without requiring a conditional use permit or any other discretionary approval; Revise to reduce the minimum lot size requirement of 1.5 acre to 1.0 acre of project area, while continuing to allow projects smaller than 1.0 acre on sites surrounded on at least three sides by roadways; Review all setbacks and other massing standards to ensure that they do not hinder projects from reaching the appropriate maximum density for the lot size; i.e., the maximum density and the realistic density will be one and the same; and On sites identified (Appendix D) to accommodate the shortfall of adequate sites (404 units) to accommodate the remaining housing need for lower income households, ensure a minimum capacity of 16 units per site.

A stated objective of the MUO zone is to encourage consolidation of small parcels into viable, block size mixed use development in designated areas, which includes non-residential areas along the Rosecrans Avenue Corridor, Western Avenue Corridor, Western Addition, Civic Center area, and Dominguez Channel. Also, the zoning ordinance states that MUO development projects are encouraged to consolidate parcels across public roadways to create larger sites. The code shall continue to allow smaller project areas if bound on three or more sides by roadways; or adjacent to property not contained in the MUO zone. This would allow more areas to be developed with residential uses in non-residential areas. The City will amend the MUO zone within one year of adoption of the Housing Element. Program Objective: Amend the MUO zone to facilitate affordable housing

19.

Rezoning of Two Sites

As part of the program to address the adequate sites shortfall of 404 lower income units and ensure 50 percent is accommodated on residential only sites, this program will affect two properties: the City-owned property at 154th Street and Van Ness Avenue (Site 27, parcel number 4063-011-900 in Appendix D), and a parcel with split R-3/R-4 zoning that comprises part of Lot Consolidation Site No. 25 (parcel number 6114-031-003 in Appendix D).

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City-owned property: The rezoning and development of the City-owned property at 154th Street and Van Ness Avenue will add a total of 118 lowerincome units on 3.96 acres. This will be accomplished by changing the zone from R-3 to R-4 and marketing the site to qualified developers. The City has owned the property since 1945 and leases a 1.6-acre portion of it to the United States Army National Guard, which operates an armory on the site. Until 1999, the City operated a maintenance and storage facility for its municipal bus fleet on the remaining portion of the property. At this time, the facility was transferred to a new site at Western Avenue and 139th Street. The former bus facility contains a multi-story maintenance building and office; a fueling island with a canopy; a bus cleaning building; underground storage tanks, clarifiers and sumps. Available information indicates that environmentally regulated materials are present in the buildings, and other preliminary environmental issues have been identified. The property will have to undergo proper environmental assessment prior to any development taking place. Once these tasks have been completed, it is anticipated that monies from the Citys EPA Brownfields grant and the Revolving Loan Fund will be available to assist with making the site suitable for residential development. In order to provide additional sites for the development of lower-income units on land zoned exclusively for residential use, the City will rezone the City-owned property at 154th Street and Van Ness Avenue from Medium Density Multifamily Residential (R-3) to High Density Multi-family Residential (R-4). At the new maximum density of 30 units per acre to be enacted concurrently under the R-4 zone amendment, this 3.96-acre site will yield a total of 118 new lower-income units. The City will provide financial and technical assistance to ensure that all remaining environmental issues are resolved, and subsequently market the site to interested developers as part of its Opportunity Sites program. Rezoning of Split R-3/R-4 Zone within Lot Consolidation Site No. 25: Currently, one of the parcels that makes up Lot Consolidation Site No. 25 straddles the boundary between the R-3 and R-4 zones, due to the fact that zone boundary was originally drawn without respect to actual parcel boundaries. This parcel will be reclassified to fall fully within the R-4 zone. When combined with the R-4 zone amendment to permit increased densities, the rezoning of this parcel will result in an additional net gain of 11 lower-income units on Site No. 25. These actions will be completed within one year of the adoption of the Housing Element. Program Objective: Rezone the City-owned property at 154th and Van Ness to R4; rezone the parcel with R-3/R-4 split zoning to R-4

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20.

Adequate Sites Monitoring

To ensure that the net future housing capacity is maintained to accommodate the Citys RHNA figures, the City will maintain an inventory of adequate housing sites for each income category. This inventory will detail the amount, type, size and location of vacant land, recyclable properties and parcels that are candidates for consolidation to assist developers in identifying land suitable for residential development. In addition, the City will continuously and at least annually monitor the sites inventory and the number of net units constructed in each income category. If the inventory indicates a shortage of adequate sites to accommodate the remaining regional housing need, the City will identify alternative sites so that there is no net loss of residential capacity pursuant to Government Code Section 65863. To facilitate annual evaluation, the City will develop and implement a formal ongoing project-by-project procedure pursuant to Government Code Section 65863 which will evaluate identified capacity in the sites inventory relative to projects or other actions potentially reducing density and identity additional sites as necessary. This procedure and annual evaluation will address nonresidentially or mixed use zoned land to determine whether these sites are being developed for uses other than residential. If the City finds uses other than residential occurring on mixed use or non-residentially zoned sites, the City will identify and establish additional sites and/or incentives within six (6) months following the annual evaluation to promote residential development, particularly on sites zoned higher density. Further, as part of the annual evaluation, the City will monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of programs and incentives to encourage lot consolidation and residential development on non-vacant sites sufficient to accommodate the regional housing need. The evaluation will consider criteria such as interest in development, project proposals and approvals, lot consolidations, proposed and approved densities, impacts on development costs and the development of housing affordable to lower income households. If these programs are not effective in encouraging and facilitating the redevelopment of identified sites to provide sufficient opportunities to accommodate the Citys share of the regional housing need, the alternative strategies and sites will be identified and established within six months following the annual evaluation. New Program Objectives: Maintain an up-to-date inventory of adequate housing sites for each income category Develop and implement a formal ongoing procedure to evaluate identified capacity and identify additional sites as necessary

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Perform an annual evaluation to determine whether sites are being utilized for residential development and monitor the effectiveness of programs and incentives

21.

Opportunity Sites Listing and Outreach

Since the City does not have a redevelopment agency, financial assistance through tax increment is not available to potential developers. Therefore, the City of Gardena Economic Development Department currently maintains a list of economic development opportunity sites within the City. This list, which is available for viewing on the Citys economic development web site at http://www.gardenaecondev.com, currently identifies 23 opportunity sites within the City. It shows the name of the owner(s), phone number, address and map location, parcel number, description of the existing use and condition, zoning and lot size. While some of the sites are for commercial development, others are zoned for residential or mixed-use. In an effort to promote lot consolidation and housing development, the City will highlight those sites on the opportunities list where two or more adjoining properties are available for sale and consolidation. The City will provide technical assistance to interested buyers/developers of those opportunity sites zoned for residential uses, as well as for mixed-use (C-R and MUO). Assistance will include the City facilitating a negotiation meeting between the property owners and potential developer and providing counseling to expedite the lot consolidation, plan review and entitlement process. Written information on the lot consolidation process, its benefits and the Citys role in expediting the process, will be available at the Community Development Department counter and on the Citys web site within one year from the adoption of the Housing Element. The City will establish a program that expedites the permitting process for mixed-use development projects and property acquisition process for lot consolidation. The City will continue to update the opportunity sites list on a quarterly basis. Additionally, the City will establish an outreach program to the various real estate brokers who do business in Gardena, as well as the South Bay Board of Realtors, in order to encourage them to contact property owners concerning possible housing development opportunities that involve lot consolidation. As part of this program, the City is in the process of developing a geographic information system (GIS) database of available properties that are suitable for development. The database will include more detailed and location-specific information on each parcel and the surrounding market area, and be accessible in a visually interactive format. This will assist further in making property owners aware of opportunities to sell their property for the purpose of a larger development.

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Program Objectives: Continue maintaining an updated listing of opportunity sites, using GIS to visually catalogue and display information about each site and the surrounding properties. Establish expedited permitting procedures for mixed-use projects, including a streamlined process for lot consolidation. Initiate contact with the South Bay Board of Realtors regarding residential development opportunities involving lot consolidation.

22.

Non-profit Development Partnership

The City shall actively seek to form a partnership with developers of tax credit housing projects that propose at least 10 percent of the total units for extremely low-income households. The City will make initial contact with affordable housing developers by end of 2011 and invite them to a workshop conducted by the Economic Development Department of the Office of the City Manager. This workshop will discuss the Citys plans, resources and assistance, development opportunities and the RFQ process. From a list of interested non-profit and/or for-profit developers, the City shall send an RFQ and select and partner with an affordable housing developer. The City will work with the developer and assist in: pursuing state and federal funding sources; packaging tax credit applications; relaxing development standards, such as parking requirements on a projectspecific basis; and, giving priority processing to expedite the project entitlement and approval process. Program Objective: Hold one workshop annually

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


In order to fully meet the communitys housing needs, the City must assure that housing is accessible to all residents, regardless of race, religion, family status, age, or physical disability. Through the Gardena Rent Mediation Board, and by contracting with the Fair Housing Foundation, the City can assure that all residents have equal opportunity to obtain housing.

23.

Rent Mediation Board

The Gardena Rent Mediation Board provides rent mediation/arbitration to assist renters in disputes with landlords. The Rent Mediation Board assures that renters are not subject to excessive and unwarranted rent increases and substandard housing conditions. An annual survey is conducted to determine rental housing conditions. Also contained in the survey is the rental vacancy rate, which the

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board monitors and uses to restrict the number of apartments converting to condominiums if the vacancy becomes too low. Program Objectives: Continue providing rent mediation/arbitration assistance to renters in disputes with landlords. Continue conducting the annual survey of rental housing units.

24.

Fair Housing Program

The City contracts with the Fair Housing Foundation to provide fair housing services to renters. Services include housing discrimination response, landlordtenant relations, and housing information counseling. The City has provided information on the Fair Housing Program on the City website, as well as informational material in both English and Spanish, at the community center and city hall. Section 14.04.280 of the Municipal Code also sets forth penalties for landlords who fail to provide the Rent Mediation and Arbitration Procedures Booklet, which provides information on renters rights to tenants. The City also is in partnership with Fair Housing Foundation, a non-profit educational foundation, which provides information and assistance to the public. Program Objective: Continue contracting with the Fair Housing Foundation to assure that all residents of the City have equal access to housing in the City.

25.

Rental Assistance

The Citys fair housing service provider provides information in several languages to residents regarding the availability of Section 8 Rental Certificates. In addition, the Fair Housing Foundation works with the owners of the three senior housing developments to ensure expanded outreach efforts to affirmatively market the availability of Section 202 units. As part of its efforts to provide for the housing needs of seniors and disabled persons, the City will continue to work with the Fair Housing Foundation to notify operators of residential care facilities of the availability of financial support through HUD Section 202 funds. Currently, two facilities are supported. Program information will be updated annually. Program Objective: Continue to promote diversity through affirmatively marketing of the availability of Section 8 Rental Certificates and the availability of Section 202 units.

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26.

Accessible Housing

The City adopts updates to the Uniform Building and Housing Codes to reflect current accessibility requirements new construction. Rehabilitation loans are available through the City for modifications necessary to make units accessible to and suitable for the physically disabled. Pursuant to Senate Bill 520, jurisdictions are required to analyze constraints to the development, maintenance, and improvement of housing for persons with disabilities and take measures to remove constraints. Program Objectives: Amend the zoning ordinance to allow residential care housing facilities to be considered as a normal residential use with the same development standards and for residential housing with more than six persons be allowed with CUP Amend the Municipal Code to reflect the States standard for defining family Provide rehabilitation loans/grants to income-qualified households for access improvements.

27.

Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance

The City participates in the Countys Continuum of Care to assist homeless persons transition towards self-sufficiency. Through the Youth and Family Services Bureau, the City implements the Gardena Emergency Services Program which offers emergency and supportive services to individuals and families at risk of becoming homeless. Program Objective: Continue participation in the Countys Continuum of Care and allocate CDBG monies to fund the Citys Emergency Services Program. Table 51, on the following pages, summarizes the Housing Element programs, with complete information on objectives, funding sources, responsible agencies, and time frames.

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Table 51 Housing Program Summary


Housing Program Maintenance and Preservation 1. Housing Rehabilitation Program a) Handy-Worker Fix Up b) Residential Rebate c) Multi-Family Rehabilitation and Code Correction d) Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation Loan 2. Section 8 Rental Assistance Provide free housing repairs, including handicapped access. Provide rebates for housing repairs. Exterior improvement grants to owners of rental properties between 5 and 11 units. Deferred loans for rehabilitation of owner-occupied homes. Rental Assistance to very lowincome households. Provide 15 deferred loans over two years. Continue rental assistance to 600 households, with additional assistance provided, as funding becomes available. Prepare a Monitoring and Mitigation program to evaluate and gauge at-risk units activities. Assist 179 households annually, 550 over six years. CDBG CDBG CDBG/HOME City Manager City Manager City Manager 2008-2014 2008-2014 2008-2014 Program Purpose Program Objective Funding Source Responsible Agency Time Frame

CalHOME Program/HOME Section 8 Certificates and Vouchers

City Manager County Housing Authority; City of Gardena Human Services Community Development Department; City Manager

2008-2010 2008-2014

3. Preservation of At-Risk Units

Preserve affordability of assisted rental units.

General Fund; CDBG

One-year of adoption of the Housing Element

Provision of a Variety of Housing Types 4. Senior Housing Development Encourage development of senior housing. Continue to provide a streamline approval process and relaxed development standards. Support applications for federal and state funding for quality senior developments by providing the information on the Citys website and making it available at the Citys Planning Department counter. Independent Cities Lease-Finance Authority (ICFLA) Community Development Department; City Manager 2008-2014 General Fund, CDBG as necessary Community Development Department; City Manager 2008-2014

5. Homeownership Program Fresh Rate Program

Provide home ownership opportunities to residents.

Develop a mailing packet that will be sent to these local lending entities to encourage their use of the primary financing funds available through ICLFA.

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Housing Plan 125

Table 51 (Cont.) Housing Program Summary


Housing Program Removal of Constraints 6. Density Bonus Ordinance/Affordable Housing Development Incentives Provide incentives for inclusion of affordable housing units in residential developments. Adopt a Density Bonus Ordinance to comply with State law. Shorten the project approval process period for housing projects that include affordable units. Adopt a green building program. Develop a procedure to streamline the permit and approval process, giving priority to projects meeting LEED standards. Promote green development through marketing information. Complete a study of impacts of green building requirements on housing production. Amend the Municipal Code to exempt lower-income multi-family development projects from the multifamily development impact fee. General Fund Community Development Department; City Manager Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element Community Development Department Budget General Fund Community Development Department; City Manager Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element Program Purpose Program Objective/Action Funding Source Responsible Agency Time Frame

7. Green Building Program

Promote energy conservation and sustainable design in new and existing development

Community Development Department; City Manager

Within two years of adoption of the Housing Element

8. Multi-family Development Impact Fee

Exempt lower-income housing development from the Multi-family Development Impact Fee.

Provision of Adequate Sites 9. Specific Plans Encourage lot consolidation and the development of new housing Examine the feasibility of establishing three new specific plan areas for mixed-use development. Establish a maximum permitted residential density of 20 units/acre on new specific plan areas including the Artesia Corridor Specific Plan, which currently limits the density at 15 units/acre. General Fund Community Development Department; City Manager Within two years of adoption of the Housing Element

2008-2014 Housing Element

Housing Plan 126

Table 51 (Cont.) Housing Program Summary


Housing Program 10.Gardena Boulevard Program Purpose Promote residential mixed-use along Gardena Boulevard Program Objective/Action Conduct a study to identify incentives for mixed-uses in the C-R zone and revise the zoning ordinance accordingly Conduct meetings with property owners to discuss the Citys desire for residential mixed-use development along Gardena Boulevard. Develop 20 new multi-family units along Gardena Boulevard. Notify all property owners of vacant residential-zone land of affordable housing development incentives, such as the density bonus program, specific plans and the streamline project approval process. Use HOME funds to partner with forprofit and non-profit developers to construction new affordable housing on vacant and underutilized properties within the City. Work with CHDOs to facilitate the development of new affordable housing units. Update the vacant land inventory using the Citys GIS system. Complete five Phase I Environmental Site Assessments (ESA) and two Phase II ESAs. Develop two Brownfield sites. Market Brownfield opportunity sites with information packets. Continue community outreach through the Brownfield Community Relations Committee. EPA City Manager General Fund Community Development Department; City Manager 1. Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element, Funding Source General Fund Responsible Agency Community Development Department; City Manager Time Frame 1. 2010-2011 to amend the C-R zone. 2. 2008-2014

3. 2008-2014

11. Development on Vacant and Underutilized Residential Sites

Encourage development at the maximum attainable densities, and use of density bonuses for inclusion of affordable units

Utilized HOME fund to develop affordable housing in the City.

HOME Funds

2. 2010-2014

3. 2010-2014

4. 2010-2011

12. Brownfield Program

Remediate contaminated properties for housing and commercial/retail uses.

2010-2012

2008-2014 Housing Element

Housing Plan 127

Table 51 (Cont.) Housing Program Summary


Housing Program 13. Second Unit Ordinance Program Purpose Permits second units in R-1 zone in compliance with State law. Program Objective/Action Amend Municipal Code to delete Section 18.04.210 (Granny Units) and modify Section 18.12.030(D) (Uses Permitted Subject to a Conditional Use Permit). Provide an information packet on second-unit developments, as well as other affordable housing information, at the Community Development Department counters and on the Citys website. Amend the zoning ordinance to permit SROs in the M-1 zone with a CUP. Maintain a list of existing hotels that are candidates for conversion. Review SRO conversion applications on an annual basis. General Fund Community Development Department; City Manager Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element General Fund Community Development Department; City Manager Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element Funding Source General Fund Responsible Agency Community Development Department; City Manager Time Frame Within one year of adoption of Housing Element.

14. Single Room Occupancy

Permit SROs with a CUP in the M-1 zone.

15. Transitional and Supportive Housing

Permit transitional and supportive housing in all residential zones (R-1, R-2, R-3, R-4 and C-R) subject to the same development standards as any permitted residential use under these zones. Allow emergency shelters on the M-1 zone by right in compliance with State law Facilitate housing development by increasing permitted density and providing relaxed development standards.

Continue to comply with State law regarding transitional and supportive housing.

16. Emergency Shelters

Amend the zoning ordinance to permit emergency shelters by right in the M-1 zone. Amend the R-4 zone to facilitate affordable housing.

General Fund

Community Development Department; City Manager Community Development Department; City Manager

Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element

17. R-4 Zone Amendment

General Fund

2008-2014 Housing Element

Housing Plan 128

Table 51 (Cont.) Housing Program Summary


Housing Program 18. Mixed Use Overlay Zone Amendment Program Purpose Facilitate affordable housing development by increasing permitted density, providing relaxed development standards, and eliminating discretionary review for multifamily projects. Add capacity for lower-income housing development by rezoning two properties for high-density multi-family residential development. Ensure that future housing capacity is maintained to meet the City's RHNA obligation. Program Objective/Action Amend the MUO zone to facilitate affordable housing. Funding Source General Fund Responsible Agency Community Development Department; City Manager Time Frame Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element

19. Rezoning of Two Sites

Rezoning the City-owned parcel at 154th and Van Ness from R-3 to R-4 and the parcel comprising part of Lot Consolidation Site No. 25 from R-3/R-4 split zoning to R-4. Maintain an up-to-date inventory of adequate housing sites for each income category. Develop and implement a formal ongoing procedure to evaluate identified capacity and identify additional sites, as necessary. Perform an annual evaluation to determine whether sites are being utilized for residential development and monitor the effectiveness of programs and incentives. Continue maintaining an updated listing of opportunity sites. Establish expedited permitting procedures for mixed-use projects, including a streamlined process for lot consolidation. Initiate contact with South Bay Board of Realtors about development opportunities involving lot consolidation. Hold at least one workshop annually to discuss the Citys plans, development opportunities, resources/assistance, and the RFQ process.

General Fund

Community Development Department; City Manager Community Development Department; Economic Development Department

Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element

20. Adequate Sites Monitoring

General Fund

2008-2014

21. Opportunity Sites Listing and Outreach

Provide information on development opportunities to the local real estate community.

General Fund

Community Development Department; Economic Development Department

Updated quarterly and the Lot Consolidation information will be available within one years of adoption of the Housing Element

22. Non-profit Development Partnership

Actively work to ensure the creation of more units affordable to extremely low-income households.

General Fund

Community Development Department; Economic Development Department; City Manager

2008-2014

2008-2014 Housing Element

Housing Plan 129

Table 51 (Cont.) Housing Program Summary


Housing Program Equal Housing Opportunity 23. Rent Mediation Board Assist renters in disputes with landlords Continue providing rent mediation/arbitration assistance to renters in disputes with landlords. Continue conducting the annual survey of rental housing units. CDBG Fair Housing Foundation, City Manager City Manager 2008-2014 General Fund City Manager 2008-2014 Program Purpose Program Objective/Action Funding Source Responsible Agency Time Frame

24. Fair Housing Program

Assure equal access to housing for all residents

Continue contracting with the Fair Housing Foundation to assure City residents have equal access to housing. Continue to promote diversity through affirmatively marketing of the availability of Section 8 Rental Certificates and the availability of Section 202 units. Amend the zoning ordinance to allow residential care housing facilities to be considered as a normal residential use with the same development standards and for residential housing with more than six persons be allowed with CUP Amend the Municipal Code to reflect the States standard for defining family Provide rehabilitation loans/grants to income-qualified households for access improvements. Continue participation in the Countys Continuum of Care and allocate CDBG monies to fund the Citys Emergency Services Program.

25. Rental Assistance

Provide information on availability of Section 8 and Section 202 units Provide accessible housing to persons with disabilities

HUD

2008-2014

26. Accessible Housing

CDBG

Community Services Department; City Manager

1. Within one year of adoption of the Housing Element

2. 2008-2014

27. Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance

Participate in the regional program to assist homeless persons toward self-sufficiency.

CDBG

Youth and Family Services Bureau

2008-2014

2008-2014 Housing Element

Housing Plan 130

D.

Summary of Quantified Housing Unit Objectives

According to Government Code Section 65583 (b), local governments housing elements are required to establish quantified objectives for the maximum number of housing units which can be constructed, rehabilitated, and conserved over a five-year time frame. The objective for units to be conserved should include a subtotal for the number of at-risk units developed pursuant to Government Code Section 65583 (a)(8)(A). Table 52 presents the Housing Elements quantified housing objectives for the 2008-2014 planning period:

Table 52 Quantified Objectives 2008-2014 Category SCAG RHNA 1 New Construction Rehabilitation Units at Risk
2

Extremely Low Income 135

Very Low Income 135

Low Income 171

Moderate Income 188

Upper Income 476

Total 1,105

90 139

90 140

180 0

180 0

0 0

540 270

Source: SCAG 2007 RHNA 1 Housing Credit of 82 net units from housing development from January 2006 to January 2008 2 Continue Housing Rehabilitation Program at similar levels from 2000 to 2007.

2008-2014 Housing Element

Housing Plan 131

APPENDIX A

The City of Gardena Invites You to Attend the 2008-2014 Housing Element Community Meeting
The need for decent housing is one of the major issues facing Gardena residents, as well as residents throughout California. In response to this issue, the City is required by State Law to develop local housing programs aimed at making sure the housing supply meets the Citys fair share of the regions housing needs. To meet its fair share requirement, the City of Gardena is updating the Housing Element of its General Plan. Residents of Gardena are encouraged to participate in a community meeting to learn more about the Housing Element and its process, and to discuss their concerns and housing needs. During this meeting, residents will learn about current City housing programs, and be encouraged to help shape the new 2008-2014 Housing Element. Participants will be asked to provide ideas and strategies for meeting the State requirements, increasing the supply of affordable housing units, and improving Gardenas existing housing for all residents regardless of income, age, gender, race, or ethnic background. This community meeting will be held:

When: Time: Place:

Thursday evening, April 10, 2008 6:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Nakaoka Community Center Auditorium (rear) 1670 W. 162nd Street, Gardena (At the Civic Center)

For More Information If you have questions about the community meeting or the proposed Housing Element, please call the Economic Development Manager at (310) 217-9533.

APPENDIX B

Appendix B POTENTIAL RECYCLING AND DENSITY INCREASE


General Plan Existing Untis Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) Max. Units Income Level

Zone

Parcel No.

Acres

Net Gain

POTENTIAL RECYCLING
R2 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R4 MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR HDR 6103-014-042 6114-031-010 6114-031-006 6115-013-025 6103-021-078 6111-009-029 6114-021-014 4062-007-052 0.21 1.73 0.51 0.44 0.16 0.16 0.19 0.29 1 50 11 1 4 1 1 1 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 25 3 25 11 6 2 2 2 7 2 0 0 5 0 1 1 6 Mod/Above Mod/Above Mod/Above Mod/Above Mod/Above Mod/Above Mod/Above Mod/Above

POTENTIAL DENSITY INCREASE


R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR 4061-025-026 4061-025-035 6115-018-010 6115-018-007 6115-014-045 6103-029-014 6115-018-008 6115-018-011 6113-006-031 4062-005-022 4062-007-019 6103-029-010 6111-010-001 6103-029-044 4062-006-020 6111-010-028 4062-007-016 4062-007-002 6111-006-024 6111-005-010 6111-006-014 6111-007-023 4062-007-006 6111-006-025 6111-010-032 6113-027-018 6111-005-011 6111-010-048 4062-007-003 6111-006-026 6111-005-007 6111-007-021 6113-006-029 6111-007-033 4062-003-016 6111-010-004 4062-006-022 6111-006-034 6111-006-033 6111-005-009 6111-005-008 6111-006-015 4062-003-012 4062-003-010 6111-009-020 2.55 1.41 0.87 0.66 2.86 0.47 0.48 0.51 0.40 0.32 0.28 0.32 0.28 0.80 0.32 0.30 0.29 0.29 0.26 0.26 0.25 0.24 0.23 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.26 0.26 0.26 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.24 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.43 0.26 0.25 0.26 0.26 0.25 0.23 0.22 0.20 1 1 2 1 52 1 2 4 2 1 1 1 1 13 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 56 31 19 14 63 10 10 11 8 7 6 6 6 17 7 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 9 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 55 30 17 13 11 9 8 7 6 6 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Zone R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R4 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3

General Plan HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR HDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6111-009-012 4062-003-009 6111-007-034 6111-009-019 6111-010-003 6113-006-004 4062-007-054 6103-029-027 6111-010-031 6113-027-019 6111-009-034 6111-010-026 6111-009-033 6111-009-035 6111-009-018 6115-018-020 4063-011-041 4062-005-018 4062-007-009 4063-011-042 4063-011-038 4062-007-064 4061-025-034 6103-001-007 6103-001-022 4062-005-011 4062-003-014 4062-003-015 6113-006-023 4062-007-011 4062-005-014 4062-007-012 6103-029-187 6103-020-062 6111-005-006 4060-003-024 4062-005-017 4062-004-012 4063-011-037 4063-011-039 4063-011-036 6111-004-018 6111-004-026 4062-004-013 4062-004-011 4062-004-010 6113-027-010 6113-027-011 4062-004-014 4067-007-005 6114-031-003 6105-007-035 4067-025-076 6105-014-023 6105-012-030 6114-019-004 6103-004-065 6114-031-005 6114-019-001 6113-005-012 6103-020-038 6103-012-025 6105-007-003 6114-003-012

Acres 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.20 0.20 0.18 0.58 0.48 0.26 0.23 0.21 0.22 0.22 0.21 0.21 0.19 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.15 0.14 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.16 0.15 0.15 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.49 0.42 0.24 0.19 0.16 0.13 0.12 0.11 0.11 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.12 0.12 0.12 2.05 1.12 4.62 2.20 0.70 0.60 0.50 0.51 0.42 0.91 0.56 0.44 0.43 0.45 0.44

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 8 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 8 4 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 56 24 1 1 1 1 0 8 3 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 4 4 4 4 4 4 12 10 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 10 9 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 30 16 69 33 10 9 7 7 6 13 8 6 6 6 6

Net Gain 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 29 16 13 9 9 8 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5

Income Level

Zone R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6114-003-014 6105-012-051 6103-019-012 6114-019-005 6114-021-003 6115-011-032 6111-010-046 6114-020-021 6105-012-060 6105-005-003 6114-022-034 6114-011-003 6114-016-018 6103-021-038 6114-020-024 6106-039-009 4062-007-025 6106-024-027 6105-005-008 6114-003-019 6103-013-046 4066-023-011 6113-035-015 6114-032-008 6105-012-044 6105-012-046 6105-012-043 6114-034-039 6114-003-032 6114-003-017 6106-032-023 6114-018-037 6114-018-039 6114-018-038 6105-012-045 6114-005-041 6114-005-042 6114-005-043 6105-009-031 6114-005-045 6114-009-005 6105-011-041 6114-010-022 6114-022-025 6103-019-009 6103-019-010 6111-010-023 6103-030-007 6103-005-045 6103-031-026 6103-019-011 6103-019-014 6103-019-032 6103-005-043 6103-011-035 6103-012-047 6103-005-047 4062-007-022 6103-013-022 6103-011-037 6103-005-046 6105-010-031 6105-012-058 4066-022-031

Acres 0.44 0.42 0.42 0.41 0.38 0.38 0.36 0.34 0.39 0.38 0.38 0.37 0.35 0.34 0.34 0.34 0.33 1.03 0.52 0.45 0.37 0.37 0.34 0.32 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.29 0.29 0.29 0.28 0.28 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.26 0.26 0.26 0.26 0.26 0.76 0.37 0.35 0.34 0.26 0.24 0.24 0.23 0.23 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.20 0.26 0.26 0.25

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 12 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 15 7 6 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 11 5 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Net Gain 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Income Level

Zone R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6105-012-059 6106-032-074 6114-016-009 6106-032-073 6105-012-036 6111-010-060 6106-038-007 6103-031-041 6106-006-041 6103-009-039 6103-031-040 6103-031-039 6114-019-007 6114-016-011 6114-021-013 6114-021-022 6114-026-050 6114-016-022 6103-005-041 6103-009-034 6106-039-014 6103-009-035 6105-010-032 6105-010-033 6103-009-031 6105-010-035 6105-010-036 6103-009-038 6103-019-028 6103-009-030 6103-019-025 6103-019-031 6103-019-026 6103-019-013 6103-012-044 6103-020-035 6103-012-046 6103-012-028 6103-012-029 6103-005-044 6103-031-037 6111-009-004 6103-019-027 6111-009-003 6103-014-035 6106-031-062 4062-007-048 4062-007-049 6103-011-049 6103-011-050 4061-002-001 6103-011-027 6114-020-023 6114-020-022 6103-030-023 6106-031-032 6106-031-033 6113-017-003 6106-032-044 6106-032-024 6114-028-015 4061-002-004 4067-025-100 6114-032-024

Acres 0.24 0.24 0.24 0.24 0.24 0.24 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.22 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.76 0.51

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 6

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 11 7

Net Gain 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1

Income Level

Zone R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6106-039-016 6114-009-019 6103-021-037 4062-007-024 6103-001-028 6111-010-042 6103-031-010 6103-005-042 6114-021-011 6103-009-037 6103-011-036 6103-013-047 6111-009-007 6113-005-011 6106-040-015 6113-017-006 6115-011-014 6115-011-013 6103-014-051 6103-014-049 6103-014-047 6103-014-050 6103-014-031 6103-013-035 6103-013-034 6103-021-022 6103-022-012 6103-022-008 6114-021-027 6103-022-023 6113-014-011 6113-015-021 6106-026-002 6113-019-027 6103-019-033 4062-006-027 4062-006-024 6113-018-011 6113-018-012 6114-012-078 6103-020-028 6105-019-007 6105-019-010 4062-006-047 6106-032-035 4061-002-005 4061-002-003 4061-002-009 4061-002-008 6113-031-014 6106-023-009 6114-031-008 6114-020-020 6113-031-012 6106-031-010 6105-006-025 6105-006-026 6105-013-001 6106-032-033 6105-013-004 6105-014-011 6105-013-005 6105-013-003 6105-014-012

Acres 0.39 0.34 0.34 0.33 0.32 0.24 0.23 0.22 0.23 0.22 0.22 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.15 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.20 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18

Existing Untis 4 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6114-018-024 6103-014-048 6103-013-037 6103-013-036 6103-013-032 6103-013-040 6103-013-039 6103-013-044 6103-013-041 6103-013-031 6103-013-027 6103-013-028 6114-016-010 6103-005-049 6103-021-052 6103-021-004 6103-013-045 4061-002-006 4061-002-002 4061-002-007 4062-012-022 4061-002-010 6113-031-011 6103-013-038 6103-013-048 6103-014-067 6103-013-052 6103-014-073 6105-013-026 6105-013-013 6105-013-038 6106-032-029 6105-013-030 6105-014-019 6105-014-021 6106-025-018 6105-014-017 6105-013-027 6106-023-007 6105-013-036 6105-013-014 6105-013-021 6105-013-018 6105-013-016 6105-013-046 6105-013-017 6105-013-032 6105-013-020 6105-013-028 6105-014-018 6105-013-044 6105-013-033 6105-013-022 6114-022-010 6105-013-029 6106-024-014 6106-024-016 6105-014-022 6103-031-032 6114-023-013 6103-021-036 6103-021-047 6103-021-007 6103-022-013

Acres 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6103-021-016 6103-021-050 6103-021-041 6103-022-010 6103-021-019 6103-021-049 6103-021-017 6103-021-006 6103-021-040 6103-022-006 6103-021-011 6103-021-043 6103-001-027 6114-023-026 6114-021-033 6105-011-039 4062-012-013 4062-012-012 6103-031-028 6103-021-079 6103-021-080 6103-021-081 6103-021-082 6115-018-031 6114-022-012 6103-001-038 6105-012-073 6114-018-023 6114-021-023 4062-013-004 4063-001-001 6103-021-083 4062-013-003 6113-005-019 6111-033-002 4063-004-001 6114-026-003 6114-034-040 6103-023-005 6103-004-062 6106-025-028 6105-006-004 6105-006-002 6103-012-034 6113-016-019 6113-014-014 6113-015-028 6113-014-013 6113-015-022 6113-015-007 6105-011-042 6113-015-023 6113-014-007 6113-014-005 6113-015-008 6105-011-036 6105-011-035 6113-015-030 6113-015-031 6113-014-010 6113-015-004 6114-018-025 6114-012-013 6114-032-016

Acres 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6114-032-014 6114-032-018 6114-032-017 6114-032-015 4062-007-028 6114-023-012 6114-020-015 6113-015-019 6113-015-016 4062-006-025 6113-019-016 6113-019-014 6113-016-007 6113-016-006 6113-019-021 6114-026-023 6113-019-008 6113-019-018 6113-019-005 6113-019-010 6113-019-012 6114-029-008 6105-011-033 6113-019-003 6114-020-001 6113-005-001 6113-005-003 6106-026-013 6114-026-004 6113-005-002 6103-020-030 6103-020-029 6103-011-031 6114-003-011 6113-005-013 6113-017-015 6103-019-035 6103-019-034 6113-005-015 6115-042-043 6115-042-033 6113-005-014 6114-020-002 6114-028-018 6106-031-059 6114-026-017 6113-005-018 6113-005-016 6115-042-051 6103-019-022 6103-019-021 4062-005-015 6114-026-016 6113-005-017 6113-032-023 6113-018-018 6113-018-016 6113-018-014 6113-018-017 6111-018-027 6114-026-005 6103-019-019 4062-006-023 6103-019-023

Acres 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R3 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6113-005-004 6103-012-032 6105-019-006 6105-019-015 6115-042-042 6106-012-045 6113-015-009 6103-031-036 6113-015-012 6114-026-006 6114-016-008 4062-007-029 6113-005-005 6105-012-072 6113-005-021 6103-011-032 4063-001-006 4063-001-002 4063-004-009 4063-004-011 4063-004-003 4063-001-004 4063-004-006 4063-001-007 4063-004-008 4063-004-005 4063-004-007 4063-001-005 4063-004-010 4063-004-004 4063-004-002 4063-001-003 6103-012-033 4062-007-026 6113-017-010 6113-017-022 6113-017-024 6113-017-023 6113-017-009 6113-017-013 6113-017-014 6113-017-021 6114-020-014 6115-010-004 6115-010-003 6115-010-002 6105-003-035 6105-003-034 6105-003-030 6113-022-022 6105-003-031 4066-011-016 6105-003-029 6105-016-041 6105-016-042 6115-010-009 6115-010-006 6115-010-028 6105-003-069 4066-010-009 4066-012-014 4066-012-013 6114-016-017 6113-012-013

Acres 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 1.48 0.99 0.64 0.51 0.51 0.49 0.46 0.43 0.40 0.38 0.35 0.34 0.20 0.24 0.22 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 22 14 9 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 21 13 8 6 6 6 5 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Income Level

Zone R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 4066-024-001 6111-021-059 6105-003-012 4066-010-011 4066-010-012 4066-012-012 4066-005-009 4066-005-008 6106-008-006 6111-021-049 6105-003-001 6106-008-025 6106-008-027 6106-008-026 6106-008-028 6106-008-029 4066-005-027 4066-022-024 4066-022-026 6105-017-034 6105-019-026 4066-013-007 4066-014-007 4066-014-008 6111-021-057 6105-017-056 6106-025-001 6115-017-019 6115-010-015 6105-003-009 6111-021-024 6111-017-016 6115-006-010 6115-006-009 4066-024-012 6103-012-035 6115-010-010 6115-010-011 6115-010-012 6115-010-013 4066-015-015 4066-005-028 6113-036-006 6113-036-007 6105-011-022 6105-004-032 6105-017-066 6113-022-011 6105-011-031 6105-015-001 6113-022-019 4066-023-001 4066-022-020 4066-022-028 4066-022-025 6105-016-009 4066-022-036 4066-022-037 4066-022-022 4066-022-021 6105-015-003 6105-016-003 6105-019-027 6105-016-006

Acres 0.21 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.26 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.21 0.20 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 4066-022-029 6105-019-029 6105-017-032 6105-019-025 6105-016-002 6105-019-031 6105-015-005 6105-017-033 6105-017-036 4066-015-009 4066-015-025 4066-024-019 4066-016-010 4066-015-021 4066-014-018 4066-022-027 4066-014-019 4066-014-020 4066-014-021 4066-025-007 4066-014-017 4066-024-016 4066-023-019 4066-014-023 4066-025-008 4066-024-018 4066-024-006 4066-023-006 4066-023-010 4066-023-017 4066-023-009 4066-023-005 4066-024-005 4066-023-002 4066-024-007 4066-024-008 4066-023-007 4066-023-008 4066-024-004 4066-023-004 4066-025-010 4066-014-009 4066-014-012 4066-015-010 4066-010-006 4066-013-006 4066-024-009 4066-015-027 4066-015-028 4066-015-029 4066-013-005 4066-025-005 4066-023-003 4066-015-018 4066-015-012 4066-016-008 6106-027-018 6106-025-012 4066-015-002 6105-003-050 6111-021-060 6111-021-052 6111-021-054 6111-021-053

Acres 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 4066-023-026 6111-021-055 4066-015-003 4066-014-004 4066-012-019 6105-015-014 6105-016-016 6105-017-046 6105-017-058 6111-016-025 4066-024-002 6106-042-038 6105-015-022 6105-016-032 6105-015-017 6105-015-018 6105-019-046 6105-015-020 6105-018-008 6105-015-016 6105-016-031 6105-017-050 6105-017-062 6105-016-036 6105-018-009 6106-003-008 6105-016-037 6105-019-045 6105-018-010 6105-018-007 6105-019-047 6105-018-011 6106-024-012 6111-016-044 6105-017-063 6106-025-002 6105-015-015 6105-019-040 6106-024-005 6106-024-007 6106-024-010 6105-016-021 6105-018-024 6105-016-019 6105-019-039 6105-018-021 6106-024-008 6106-024-011 6105-016-018 6105-017-059 6106-024-006 6105-016-020 6105-018-025 6105-017-049 6105-017-043 6105-017-042 6105-017-067 6105-016-044 6105-016-045 6105-018-006 6105-018-005 6105-016-046 6105-017-068 6105-018-004

Acres 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.18 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6105-016-047 4066-012-017 6105-017-054 6105-016-023 6106-004-002 6106-004-003 6106-004-004 6105-017-052 4066-012-016 4066-012-015 6105-017-057 6106-045-001 6103-027-019 6115-017-017 6115-017-016 6106-042-033 6115-017-015 6115-017-013 6115-017-020 6115-017-014 6115-017-018 6115-017-023 6111-021-048 6105-015-009 6103-027-007 6115-017-021 6103-027-013 6111-014-031 4066-010-001 4066-005-016 4066-005-014 4066-005-013 4066-005-015 4066-005-010 4066-005-011 6111-016-047 6105-018-002 6103-027-016 6103-027-014 6103-027-018 6103-027-017 6103-027-015 4066-025-011 6105-016-026 6105-016-025 6105-015-023 6105-016-013 6105-016-038 6105-016-010 6105-016-048 6111-014-027 6106-027-035 4066-014-006 6105-011-023 6103-001-017 6105-011-025 6105-011-026 6105-011-027 6105-011-024 6103-027-003 6105-011-028 6103-027-010 6103-027-012 6103-027-006

Acres 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6103-027-009 6103-027-011 6103-027-005 6103-027-001 6105-011-030 6105-011-029 6111-017-033 6111-017-021 6111-017-025 6111-017-019 6111-017-011 6111-017-009 6111-021-029 6111-017-013 6111-017-007 6111-021-037 6111-017-029 6111-021-027 6111-021-028 6111-017-027 6111-021-023 6111-017-010 6111-021-030 4066-015-001 6113-013-014 6111-017-014 6111-021-033 6103-027-027 6113-013-016 6111-021-025 6111-017-032 6111-017-020 6111-017-024 6106-027-016 6111-017-022 6113-013-021 6113-013-022 6113-013-020 4066-010-004 4066-010-003 6106-027-014 4066-010-002 6111-017-026 6106-027-013 6113-012-022 6106-007-011 6113-013-019 6103-027-002 6113-012-017 6113-012-019 6113-012-018 6113-012-028 6106-007-005 6113-012-023 6111-017-015 6113-022-014 6113-022-015 6113-022-016 6111-021-070 6113-010-023 6111-021-073 6111-021-038 6111-017-006 6111-021-071

Acres 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.16

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6111-017-012 6106-027-033 6113-022-013 6113-012-002 6111-017-030 6111-017-028 6115-006-023 6115-006-025 6111-021-072 6106-027-032 6115-006-029 6115-006-030 4066-010-005 6115-006-024 6111-021-056 6111-015-042 6115-007-027 6115-006-012 6115-007-031 6115-007-026 6115-006-013 6115-007-024 6115-006-014 6115-007-025 6115-007-032 6115-010-023 6111-002-003 6111-002-022 6106-027-038 6115-005-013 6115-005-006 6115-005-007 6115-005-011 6115-005-016 6115-005-009 6115-005-043 6115-005-041 6111-002-021 6111-016-041 4066-007-029 4066-010-029 6111-016-029 6111-016-036 6111-016-031 6111-016-034 6111-016-038 6111-016-032 6106-007-008 6111-016-019 6111-016-049 6111-016-018 6115-006-044 6106-041-001 6106-008-024 6111-016-042 6111-016-052 6111-016-051 6113-010-001 6111-017-002 6111-017-003 6111-017-004 6111-017-005 6106-007-006 6113-012-014

Acres 0.16 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

Zone R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2

General Plan MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR MDR

Parcel No. 6113-022-017 6113-022-018 6106-007-004 6106-032-045 6105-003-048 6106-003-031 6111-015-006 4066-015-014 6111-017-001 4066-015-016 6106-003-029 4066-015-013 6105-015-010 4066-010-007 6105-003-045 6105-002-011 6111-003-032 6111-003-033 6105-003-043 6105-003-015 6105-003-049 4066-015-007 6115-010-027 6106-027-019 6106-027-020 6106-027-021 6106-027-022 4066-015-019 6105-012-039 6105-012-042 6105-012-033 6105-012-041 6105-012-032 6113-027-028 6105-012-034 6113-027-025 6105-012-040 6106-008-003 6105-012-031 6111-016-001 6106-027-036 6106-042-001 6105-003-002 4066-008-034 6105-002-012 6106-004-015

Acres 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.14 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13 0.13

Existing Untis 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Realistic Density (DU/Ac.) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

Max. Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Net Gain 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Income Level

APPENDIX C

APPENDIX C POTENTIAL LOT CONSOLIDATION UNDER EXISTING ZONING


APN Acres Existing Use/Opportunity General Plan MDR Zone Exist Units 5 Ownership (1) Potential Use Site No. 1 6115-010-002 0.64 Multi-family residential Blighted single-family with roof deterioration; large undeveloped area on lot Single-family home with blighted barn structure (poor/faulty materials, roof deterioration); large undeveloped area on lot Prime opportunity site; no known environmental issues; survey of regulated materials recommended Vacant Unoccupied restaurant building Car wash with large vacant area -underutilized Auto repair with large vacant area -underutilized Older auto repair (40+ years) Older retail (50+ years) Older retail (50+ years) Older restaurant (50+ years) Fast food Blighted commercial (roof deterioration; dry rot) Older commercial (50+ years) Restaurant driveway with large undeveloped area -- underutilized GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 R2 15 9 4 Density Potential Units Net Inc. Lower Income Units Mod/Above Income Units Program (2)

6115-010-003

0.99

MDR

R2

15

14

13

6115-010-004

1.48

MDR

R2

1 Consolidate parcels and redevelop with medium-density residential project Site No. 2 A

15

22

21

Total 4064-003-037 4064-003-028 4064-003-029 4064-003-030 4064-003-031 4064-003-032 4064-003-033 4064-003-034 4064-003-035 4064-003-036 4064-003-038

3.11 1.45 0.40 1.51 1.44 0.42 0.22 0.56 0.32 0.44 0.55 1.11

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

46 11 3 11 11 3 2 4 2 3 4 8

39 11 3 11 11 3 2 4 2 3 4 8

39

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

A B

4064-003-040

1.94

GC

C3-SPO

15

15

15

Total

All properties identified as brownfields under City's EPA grant program; some properties have historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials 10.37 recommended

GC

C3-SPO

Consolidate one vacant parcel with 11 blighted, underutilized or older commercial properties, redevelop with high density residential mixeduse project and resolve drainage easement issue.

15

77

77

77

Lot consolidation, Specific Plan, mitigate drainange easement issue through site design

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 3

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

4061-028-023 4061-028-033

0.25 0.16

Former gas station Unoccupied restaurant building Industrial -- taxicab facility; large undeveloped portion available for lease -- underutilized; undeground storage tank on property Commercial/ industrial (truck rental yard) All properties identified as brownfields under City's EPA grant program; some properties have historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended Blighted retail Older industrial (50+ years) Older industrial (50+ years) Older industrial (50+ years) Older industrial (50+ years) Older industrial (50+ years) Historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0

A A

15 15

2 1

2 1

4061-028-049 4061-028-051

4.63 3.68

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0

15 15

35 28

35 28

Total 4062-001-001 4062-001-002 4062-001-003 4062-001-004 4062-001-005 4062-001-006

8.71 0.54 0.49 0.48 0.48 0.48 0.48

GC GC GC GC GC GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Consolidate vacant former gas station with U-Haul property, small restaurant property, and taxi facility property; redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project. Site No. 4 A A A A A

15 15 15 15 15 15 15

65 4 4 4 4 4 4

65 4 4 4 4 4 4

65

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

Total

2.95

Consolidate six blighted comm/industrial lots and redevelop with high-density residential mixeduse project. Site No. 5

15

22

22

22

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

4062-001-008

1.23

Blighted retail (poor/faulty materials; inadequate parking/no circulation); aging building (50+ years); operating swap meet businesses Older industrial bldg (50+ years); sound structure with functioning real estate mgmt office Historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

20

25

25

4062-001-009

1.39

GC

C3-MUO

20

28

28

Total

2.62

Consolidate one blighted retail property and one older industrial property and redevelop with highdensity residential mixed-use project.

20

52

52

52

Lot Consolidation

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 6

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

4062-003-001

0.23

Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted, unoccupied industrial (obsolete design, inadequate parking/loading) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Blighted industrial (poor/faulty materials) Blighted industrial (poor/faulty materials) Blighted industrial (poor/faulty materials) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

20

4062-003-002

0.22

GC

C3-MUO

20

4062-003-003

0.45

GC

C3-MUO

20

4062-003-004

0.23

GC

C3-MUO

20

4062-003-005

0.23

GC

C3-MUO

20

4062-003-006

0.23

GC

C3-MUO

20

4062-003-007 4062-003-008 4062-003-021 4062-003-022 4062-003-023 4062-003-024 4062-003-025 4062-003-026 4062-003-027 4062-003-028 4062-003-029 4062-003-030 4062-003-031 4062-003-036 4062-003-037

0.22 0.22 0.23 0.46 0.23 0.19 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.43 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.21 0.22

GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 A A C D D B C B

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

4 4 5 9 5 4 4 4 4 9 4 4 4 4 4

4 4 5 9 5 4 4 4 4 9 4 4 4 4 4

Total

5.20

Consolidate 21 blighted and/or older industrial parcels and redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project

20

104

104

104

Lot Consolidation

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 7

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

4062-004-001 4062-004-005

0.16 0.24

Older restaurant (50+ years); obsolete design, inadequate parking config Older auto service (50+ years) Industrial equipment storage; no permanent structures Older industrial (50+ years) Industrial equipment storage; no permanent structures Older industrial (70+ years) Older industrial (60+ years) Older industrial (40+ years) Blighted industrial (roof deterioration, dry rot) fast food fast food

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0

15 15

1 2

1 2

4062-004-008 4062-004-032

0.26 0.13

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0

A A

15 15

2 1

2 1

4062-004-033 4062-004-036 4062-004-040 4062-004-079 4062-004-082 4062-004-002 4062-004-084

0.13 0.22 0.22 1.18 0.46 0.15 0.55

GC GC GC GC GC GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

A A

15 15 15 15 15 15 15

1 2 2 9 3 1 4

1 2 2 9 3 1 4

B B

Total

3.69

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-SPO

Consolidate nine blighted industrial parcels and a fast-food restaurant and redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project

15

27

27

27

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 8

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

4062-004-009 4062-004-021 4062-004-022 4062-004-023

0.25 0.15 0.14 0.14

4062-004-026

0.25

4062-004-027

0.25

4062-004-029

0.13

Older industrial (60+ years); incompatible w/ adjoining resiential Parking lot Parking lot Blighted commercial (roof deterioration; dry rot) Older industrial (30-50 years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Older industrial (30-50 years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Older industrial (30-50 years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Blighted older industrial (70+ years, obsolete Quonset hut const.); incompatible w/adjoining residential Older industrial (30+ years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Older commercial (80+ years) Older industrial (30+ years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Older commercial (50+ years)

GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0

A A

20 20 20 20

5 3 3 3

5 3 3 3

GC

C3-MUO

20

GC

C3-MUO

20

GC

C3-MUO

20

4062-004-030

0.25

GC

C3-MUO

20

4062-004-031 4062-004-041

0.25 0.14

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

20 20

5 3

5 3

4062-004-081 4062-004-083

0.12 0.30

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

20 20

2 6

2 6

Total

2.38

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

Consolidate 12 blighted commercial/industrial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project

20

47

47

47

Lot Consolidation

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 9

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

4094-001-003

0.61

Commercial/industrial -- lumber yard (currently operating) Commercial/industrial -- lumber yard (currently operating) Commercial/industrial -- lumber yard (currently operating) Blighted unoccupied restaurant building (poor/faulty materials, roof deterioration, deferred maintenance)

IND

M2-MUO

20

4094-001-004

0.39

IND

M2-MUO

20

4094-001-007

7.61

IND

M2-MUO

20

4094-001-008

0.18

IND

M1-MUO

20

Total

8.79

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

IND

REMOVED FROM INVENTORY

20

Lot Consolidation and Specific Plan

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 Site No. 10

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

6103-005-025

0.35

Blighted older industrial (50+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Older retstaurant (30+ years) Blighted older industrial (50+ years, poor/faulty materials) Older industrial with inadequate parking configuration (50+ years, no circulation) Older industrial with inadequate parking configuration (50+ years, no circulation) Older industrial with inadequate parking configuration (50+ years, no circulation) Older commercial (40+ years) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration)

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-005-026

0.29

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-005-027

0.15

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-005-028 6103-005-029

0.06 0.30

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

20 20

1 6

1 6

6103-005-034

0.42

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-005-051

0.34

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-005-052

0.34

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-005-053 6103-005-054

0.40 0.34

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

20 20

8 7

8 7

6103-005-057

0.24

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-005-058

0.19

GC

C3-MUO

20

Total

3.42

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

Consolidate 12 older and/or blighted commercial/industrial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project.

20

68

68

68

Lot Consolidation

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 Site No. 11

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

6114-001-008

0.21

6114-001-010 6114-001-011

1.81 0.29

Older restaurant (30+ years) Blighted, unoccupied commercial (boarded up, deferred maintenance); older bldg (40+ years) Parking lot Older commercial (40+ years); low intensity, excess parking -underutilized

GC

C3-SPO

15

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0 A

15 15

14 2

14 2

6114-001-012

1.58

GC

C3-SPO

A Consolidate blighted commercial property with older and/or underutilized commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project. Site No. 12

15

12

12

Total

3.89

Prime opportunity site; identified as Brownfield on City's EPA grant; survey of regulated materials recommended

15

29

29

29

Lot consolidation; Specific Plan

6114-001-007 4062-005-001

4.72 0.16

Plant nursery w/ split zoning - 1/4 R3, 3/4 R1 - R3 = 15 du/ac = 17 units R1 = 7 du/ac = 24 units; prime opportunity site; identified as Brownfield on City's EPA grant; historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; survey of regulated materials recommended parking lot Blighted unoccupied commercial (dry rot, deferred maintenance -deteriorated) parking lot parking lot Older commercial (60+ years) Older commercial (70+ years) Multi-family residential Older commercial (50+ years)

LDR/MDR GC

R1/R3 C3-MUO

0 0

Redevelop existing plant nursery with low/medium density multi-family project Site No. 13

15 20

41 3

41 3

41

Specific Plan

4062-005-002 4062-005-003 4062-005-004 4062-005-024 4062-005-025 4062-005-026 4062-005-067

0.14 0.14 0.13 0.13 0.14 0.15 0.15

GC GC GC GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0 0 6 0

A A B B B B

20 20 20 20 20 20 20

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 0 3

Total

1.14

Prime opportunity site; historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

Consolidate seven older and/or blighted commercial properties with one multifamily residential property and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project.

20

22

16

16

Lot Consolidation

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 Site No. 14

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

4062-006-029 4062-006-032 4062-006-033

0.14 0.15 0.15

Blighted, older commercial (60+ years, broken/boarded windows) Parking lot Parking lot Blighted, older commercial (60+ years, poor/faulty materials, poor workmanship) Older commercial (60+ years)

GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0

A B B

20 20 20

3 3 3

3 3 3

4062-006-048 4062-006-049

0.30 0.27

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

20 20

6 5

6 5

Total

1.02

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

Consolidate older and/or blighted commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project. Site No. 15

20

20

20

20

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

6103-030-014

0.37

Older commercial (50+ years); obsolete construction (outdoor auto service); incompatible w/ adjacent residential; operating business Older commercial (60+ years); small lot; obsolete construction (outdoor auto service); incompatible w/ adjacent residential; operating business Blighted older commercial/industrial (60+ years; possible structural deterioration; requires seismic retrofit); operating business; incompatible w/ adjacent residential Blighted older commercial/industrial (60+ years; possible structural deterioration; requires seismic retrofit); operating business; incompatible w/ adjacent residential

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-030-015

0.18

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-030-016

0.18

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-030-032

0.86

GC

C3-MUO

20

17

17

Total

1.58

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

Consolidate four older and/or blighted commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project.

20

31

31

31

Lot Consolidation

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 Site No. 16

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

6103-021-001 6103-021-002 6103-021-003 6103-021-025 6103-021-026

0.19 0.20 0.20 0.37 0.20

Blighted older commercial (60+ years, obsolete construction, deferred maintenance) Parking lot Vacant lot; building foundation remains Older motel (60+ years) Older commercial (70+ years)

GC GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0 0

A A

20 20 20 20 20

4 4 4 7 4

4 4 4 7 4

Total

1.15

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

Consolidate five blighted commercial properties and redevelop with highdensity residential mixed use project. Site No. 17

20

23

23

23

Lot Consolidation

6103-018-025

2.95

Older commercial (50+ years); operating retail center with approx. 20 businesses; identified as Brownfield on City's EPA grant; open RWQCB case; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C2-MUO

Develop a medium to high density mixed-use project

20

58

58

58

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 Site No. 18

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

6103-015-001

0.26

Vacant land; part of Brownfield site identified on City's EPA grant; site assessment may be needed Vacant land; part of Brownfield site identified on City's EPA grant; site assessment may be needed Vacant land; part of Brownfield site identified on City's EPA grant; site assessment may be needed Vacant land; part of Brownfield site identified on City's EPA grant; site assessment may be needed

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-015-002

0.12

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-015-003

0.16

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-015-007

0.13

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-015-048

0.18

Older commercial (60+ years); historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

20

6103-015-049

0.16

Older unoccupied commercial (60+ years); historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

C Consolidate four vacant properties and two older/underutilized commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixeduse project Site No. 19 A A

20

Total 6105-008-030 6105-008-031

1.00 0.07 0.11

Prime opportunity site Bank branch parking Bank branch parking Bank branch (over-parked) -underutilized; credible interest expressed in developing a mixeduse project; tenant is weighing proposal

GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0

20 20 20

20 1 2

20 1 2

20

Lot Consolidation

6105-008-032

4.43

GC

C3-MUO

0 Consolidate bank parking parcels and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project

20

89

89

Total

4.61

Prime opportunity site

GC

C3-MUO

20

92

92

92

Lot Consolidation

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 Site No. 20

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

6105-009-004

0.37

6105-009-005

0.37

Blighted single-family (roof deterioration, dry rot, deferred maintenance) Blighted single-family (roof deterioration, dry rot, deferred maintenance) Blighted commercial (dry rot, deferrred maintenance, incompatible use); use is marginal (no activity observed on site) Vehicle storage; use is marginal (no activity observed on site) Blighted older commercial (50+ years; possible structural deterioration, deferred maintenance, obsolete design/const); operating business Church (operating)

HDR

R4

20

HDR

R4

20

6105-009-008

0.46

HDR

R4

20

6105-009-009

0.45

HDR

R4

20

6105-009-010 6105-009-020

0.20 0.92

HDR HDR

R4 R4

0 0

20 20

4 18

4 18

Total 4066-011-020 4066-011-021 4066-012-002 4066-012-033

2.77 0.21 0.21 0.46 0.47

Prime opportunity site; historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended Vacant land Vacant land Commercial Commercial

HDR GC GC GC GC

R4 C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

Consolidate properties and redevelop to high-density residential project Site No. 21

20 20 20

55 4 4 9 9

53 4 4 9 9

53

Lot Consolidation

0 0

20 20

Total

1.35

Prime opportunity site; historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

Consolidate vacant and blighted commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixeduse project

20

27

27

27

Lot Consolidation

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 Site No. 22

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

6111-001-018 6111-001-019 6111-001-025 6111-001-900

0.14 0.13 0.44 0.53

Older commercial (80+ years) Older commercial (70+ years) Older commercial (80+ years) Parking

MU MU MU MU

CR CR CR CR

0 0 0 0 City

20 20 20 20

3 3 9 11

3 3 9 11

Total 4064-023-018 4064-023-019 4064-023-020 4064-023-021

1.23 0.72 0.11 0.26 0.17

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended Vacant Older commercial (50+ years) Older commercial (50+ years) Older commercial (50+ years) Blighted former hospital building (boarded up windows/doors, deferred maintenance) Parking

MU GC GC GC GC

CR C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0 0

Consolidate properties and redevelop with high-density residential project Site No. 23

20 20 20 20 20

24 14 2 5 3

24 14 2 5 3

24

Lot Consolidation

A A

4064-023-034 4064-023-035

1.04 0.31

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

B B

20 20

21 6

21 6

Total 6102-019-900 6102-019-901 6102-019-902

2.61 0.41 0.60 0.15

Prime opportunity site; historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended Vacant Vacant Vacant Blighted industrial (boarded windows/doors, deferred maintenance) Blighted single-family (boarded windows/doors, deferred maintenance) Blighted auto service (deferred maintenance, deteriorated) All properties except 6102-019-008 have historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 City City City

Consolidate three commercial properties, blighted former hospital and adjoining parking lot, and one vacant lot and redevelop with high density residential mixed-use project Site No. 24

20 15 15 15

52 3 4 1

52 3 4 1

52

Lot Consolidation

6102-019-007

0.17

GC

C3-SPO

15

6102-019-008

0.10

GC

C3-SPO

15

6102-019-019

0.41

GC

C3-SPO

15

Total

1.84

GC

C3-SPO

Consolidate vacant land with blighted properties and redevelop with highdensity residential mixed use project

15

13

12

12

Lot Consolidation and Specific Plan

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 1 Site No. 25

Density Potential Units Net Inc.

Lower Income Units

Mod/Above Income Units

Program (2)

6114-031-003

1.11

Parking Lot Blighted multi-family (deferred maintenance, deteriorated) Older commercial (50+ years); possible historical chemical use Prime opportunity site; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended Blighted older commercial (50+ years, poor/faulty material, deferred maintenance, incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted older single-family (80+ years, deferred maintenance, incompatible w/ surrounding industrial, no street frontage) Blighted older single-family (80+ years, deferred maintenance, incompatible w/ surrounding industrial, no street frontage) Prime opportunity site; properties adjacent to or part of DTSCregulated Gardena Sumps site; Sumps site is identified as Brownfield under City's EPA grant; surveys of regulated materials recommended

MDR/ HDR

R-3/R-4

15/25

22

22

6114-031-004

0.20

HDR

R-4

25

6114-031-005

0.42

HDR

R-4

A Consolidate parcels and redevelop with high-density residential project Site No. 26

25

11

11

Total

1.73

HDR

R-3/R-4

38

36

36

Lot Consolidation

6106-036-035 (western half of parcel)

1.29

GC

SP

15

10

10

6106-036-037

0.23

GC

SP

15

6106-036-012

0.23

GC

SP

15

Total

1.75

Consolidate parcels and redevelop with medium-density horizontal mixed-use project

15

13

11

11

Specific Plan

86.57

ALL SITES: LOWER INCOME HOUSING MOD/ABOVE INCOME HOUSING TOTAL NET GAIN (LOWER + MOD/ABOVE) PRIME OPPORTUNITY SITES: LOWER INCOME HOUSING MOD/ABOVE INCOME HOUSING TOTAL NET GAIN (LOWER + MOD/ABOVE)

1046 1046

0 1046 1046 0 375 375

(1) Letters (A, B, C) indicates same ownership. Blank indicates different owners (2) Implementation programs include those identified in Response to Comments A-1(a) (3) Refers to units gained from changes in Mixed Use Overlay, R-4 and Specific Plan densities; detailed in Housing Element Section V.C

APPENDIX D

APPENDIX D POTENTIAL LOT CONSOLIDATION AFTER PROPOSED ZONE AMENDMENTS


APN Acres Existing Use/Opportunity General Plan Zone Exist Units Ownership (1) Potential Use Site No. 1 6115-010-002 0.64 Multi-family residential Blighted single-family with roof deterioration; large undeveloped area on lot Single-family home with blighted barn structure (poor/faulty materials, roof deterioration); large undeveloped area on lot Prime opportunity site; no known environmental issues; survey of regulated materials recommended Vacant Unoccupied restaurant building Car wash with large vacant area -underutilized Auto repair with large vacant area -underutilized Older auto repair (40+ years) Older retail (50+ years) Older retail (50+ years) Older restaurant (50+ years) Fast food Blighted commercial (roof deterioration; dry rot) Older commercial (50+ years) Restaurant driveway with large undeveloped area -- underutilized GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 MDR R2 5 15 9 4 Density Potential Units With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units Program (2) Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

6115-010-003

0.99

MDR

R2

15

14

13

6115-010-004

1.48

MDR

R2

1 Consolidate parcels and redevelop with medium-density residential project Site No. 2 A

15

22

21

Total 4064-003-037 4064-003-028 4064-003-029 4064-003-030 4064-003-031 4064-003-032 4064-003-033 4064-003-034 4064-003-035 4064-003-036 4064-003-038

3.11 1.45 0.40 1.51 1.44 0.42 0.22 0.56 0.32 0.44 0.55 1.11

15 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

46 14 4 15 14 4 2 6 3 4 6 11

39 14 4 15 14 4 2 6 3 4 6 11

39

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

A B

4064-003-040

1.94

GC

C3-SPO

20

19

19

Total

All properties identified as brownfields under City's EPA grant program; some properties have historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials 10.37 recommended

GC

C3-SPO

Consolidate one vacant parcel with 11 blighted, underutilized or older commercial properties, redevelop with high density residential mixeduse project and resolve drainage easement issue.

20

103

103

103

Lot consolidation, Specific Plan, mitigate drainange easement issue through site design

26

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 3

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units 2 2

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

4061-028-023 4061-028-033

0.25 0.16

Former gas station Unoccupied restaurant building Industrial -- taxicab facility; large undeveloped portion available for lease -- underutilized; undeground storage tank on property Commercial/ industrial (truck rental yard) All properties identified as brownfields under City's EPA grant program; some properties have historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended Blighted retail Older industrial (50+ years) Older industrial (50+ years) Older industrial (50+ years) Older industrial (50+ years) Older industrial (50+ years) Historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0

A A

20 20

2 2

4061-028-049 4061-028-051

4.63 3.68

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0

20 20

46 37

46 37

Total 4062-001-001 4062-001-002 4062-001-003 4062-001-004 4062-001-005 4062-001-006

8.71 0.54 0.49 0.48 0.48 0.48 0.48

GC GC GC GC GC GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Consolidate vacant former gas station with U-Haul property, small restaurant property, and taxi facility property; redevelop with highdensity residential mixed-use project. Site No. 4 A A A A A

20 20 20 20 20 20 20

87 5 5 5 5 5 5

87 5 5 5 5 5 5

87

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

22

Total

2.95

Consolidate six blighted comm/industrial lots and redevelop with high-density residential mixeduse project. Site No. 5

20

29

29

29

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

4062-001-008

1.23

Blighted retail (poor/faulty materials; inadequate parking/no circulation); aging building (50+ years); operating swap meet businesses Older industrial bldg (50+ years); sound structure with functioning real estate mgmt office Historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

30

37

37

4062-001-009

1.39

GC

C3-MUO

0 Consolidate one blighted retail property and one older industrial property and redevelop with highdensity residential mixed-use project.

30

42

42

Total

2.62

30

78

78

39

39

Lot Consolidation

26

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 6

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

4062-003-001

0.23

Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted industrial (incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted, unoccupied industrial (obsolete design, inadequate parking/loading) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Blighted industrial (poor/faulty materials) Blighted industrial (poor/faulty materials) Blighted industrial (poor/faulty materials) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Older industrial (30-60 years) Historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

30

4062-003-002

0.22

GC

C3-MUO

30

4062-003-003

0.45

GC

C3-MUO

30

14

14

4062-003-004

0.23

GC

C3-MUO

30

4062-003-005

0.23

GC

C3-MUO

30

4062-003-006

0.23

GC

C3-MUO

30

4062-003-007 4062-003-008 4062-003-021 4062-003-022 4062-003-023 4062-003-024 4062-003-025 4062-003-026 4062-003-027 4062-003-028 4062-003-029 4062-003-030 4062-003-031 4062-003-036 4062-003-037

0.22 0.22 0.23 0.46 0.23 0.19 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.43 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.21 0.22

GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 A A C D D B C B

30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30

7 7 7 14 7 6 6 6 6 13 6 6 6 6 7

7 7 7 14 7 6 6 6 6 13 6 6 6 6 7

Total

5.20

Consolidate 21 blighted and/or older industrial parcels and redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project

30

156

156

78

78

Lot Consolidation

52

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 7

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

4062-004-001 4062-004-005

0.16 0.24

Older restaurant (50+ years); obsolete design, inadequate parking config Older auto service (50+ years) Industrial equipment storage; no permanent structures Older industrial (50+ years) Industrial equipment storage; no permanent structures Older industrial (70+ years) Older industrial (60+ years) Older industrial (40+ years) Blighted industrial (roof deterioration, dry rot) fast food fast food

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0

20 20

2 2

2 2

4062-004-008 4062-004-032

0.26 0.13

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0

A A

20 20

3 1

3 1

4062-004-033 4062-004-036 4062-004-040 4062-004-079 4062-004-082 4062-004-002 4062-004-084

0.13 0.22 0.22 1.18 0.46 0.15 0.55

GC GC GC GC GC GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

A A

20 20 20 20 20 20 20

1 2 2 12 5 1 5

1 2 2 12 5 1 5

B B

Total

3.69

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-SPO

Consolidate nine blighted industrial parcels and a fast-food restaurant and redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project

20

36

36

36

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 8

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

4062-004-009 4062-004-021 4062-004-022 4062-004-023

0.25 0.15 0.14 0.14

4062-004-026

0.25

4062-004-027

0.25

4062-004-029

0.13

Older industrial (60+ years); incompatible w/ adjoining resiential Parking lot Parking lot Blighted commercial (roof deterioration; dry rot) Older industrial (30-50 years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Older industrial (30-50 years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Older industrial (30-50 years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Blighted older industrial (70+ years, obsolete Quonset hut const.); incompatible w/adjoining residential Older industrial (30+ years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Older commercial (80+ years) Older industrial (30+ years); incompatible w/ adjoining residential Older commercial (50+ years)

GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0

A A

30 30 30 30

8 4 4 4

8 4 4 4

GC

C3-MUO

30

GC

C3-MUO

30

GC

C3-MUO

30

4062-004-030

0.25

GC

C3-MUO

30

4062-004-031 4062-004-041

0.25 0.14

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

30 30

8 4

8 4

4062-004-081 4062-004-083

0.12 0.30

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

30 30

4 9

4 9

Total

2.38

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

Consolidate 12 blighted commercial/industrial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project

30

71

71

36

35

Lot Consolidation

24

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 9

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

4094-001-003

0.61

Commercial/industrial -- lumber yard (currently operating) Commercial/industrial -- lumber yard (currently operating) Commercial/industrial -- lumber yard (currently operating) Blighted unoccupied restaurant building (poor/faulty materials, roof deterioration, deferred maintenance)

IND

M2-MUO

30

4094-001-004

0.39

IND

M2-MUO

30

4094-001-007

7.61

IND

M2-MUO

30

4094-001-008

0.18

IND

M1-MUO

30

Total

8.79

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

IND

REMOVED FROM INVENTORY Site No. 10

30

Lot Consolidation and Specific Plan

6103-005-025

0.35

Blighted older industrial (50+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Older retstaurant (30+ years) Blighted older industrial (50+ years, poor/faulty materials) Older industrial with inadequate parking configuration (50+ years, no circulation) Older industrial with inadequate parking configuration (50+ years, no circulation) Older industrial with inadequate parking configuration (50+ years, no circulation) Older commercial (40+ years)

GC

C3-MUO

30

11

11

6103-005-026

0.29

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-005-027

0.15

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-005-028 6103-005-029

0.06 0.30

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

30 30

2 9

2 9

6103-005-034

0.42

GC

C3-MUO

30

13

13

6103-005-051

0.34

GC

C3-MUO

30

10

10

6103-005-052

0.34

GC

C3-MUO

30

10

10

6103-005-053 6103-005-054

0.40 0.34

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

30 30

12 10

12 10

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

6103-005-057

0.24

Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration) Blighted older industrial (80+ years, poor/faulty materials, inadequate parking configuration)

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-005-058

0.19

GC

C3-MUO

30

Total

3.42

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

Consolidate 12 older and/or blighted commercial/industrial properties and redevelop with highdensity residential mixed use project.

30

102

102

51

51

Lot Consolidation

34

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 11

Density

Potential Units 2

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units 2

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

6114-001-008

0.21

6114-001-010 6114-001-011

1.81 0.29

Older restaurant (30+ years) Blighted, unoccupied commercial (boarded up, deferred maintenance); older bldg (40+ years) Parking lot Older commercial (40+ years); low intensity, excess parking -underutilized

GC

C3-SPO

20

GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO

0 0 A

20 20

18 3

18 3

6114-001-012

1.58

GC

C3-SPO

A Consolidate blighted commercial property with older and/or underutilized commercial properties and redevelop with highdensity residential mixed use project. Site No. 12

20

16

16

Total

3.89

Prime opportunity site; identified as Brownfield on City's EPA grant; survey of regulated materials recommended

20

38

38

38

Lot consolidation; Specific Plan

6114-001-007 4062-005-001

4.72 0.16

Plant nursery w/ split zoning - 1/4 R3, 3/4 R1 - R3 = 15 du/ac = 17 units R1 = 7 du/ac = 24 units; prime opportunity site; identified as Brownfield on City's EPA grant; historical industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; survey of regulated materials recommended parking lot Blighted unoccupied commercial (dry rot, deferred maintenance -deteriorated) parking lot parking lot Older commercial (60+ years) Older commercial (70+ years) Multi-family residential Older commercial (50+ years)

LDR/MDR GC

R1/R3 C3-MUO

0 0

Redevelop existing plant nursery with low/medium density multifamily project Site No. 13

15 30

41 5

41 5

41

Specific Plan

4062-005-002 4062-005-003 4062-005-004 4062-005-024 4062-005-025 4062-005-026 4062-005-067

0.14 0.14 0.13 0.13 0.14 0.15 0.15

GC GC GC GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0 0 6 0

A A B B B B

30 30 30 30 30 30 30 Consolidate seven older and/or blighted commercial properties with one multifamily residential property and redevelop with highdensity residential mixed use project.

4 4 4 4 4 4 5

4 4 4 4 4 0 5

Total

1.14

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

30

34

28

14

14

Lot Consolidation

12

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 14

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

4062-006-029 4062-006-032 4062-006-033

0.14 0.15 0.15

Blighted, older commercial (60+ years, broken/boarded windows) Parking lot Parking lot Blighted, older commercial (60+ years, poor/faulty materials, poor workmanship) Older commercial (60+ years)

GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0

A B B

30 30 30

4 5 4

4 5 4

4062-006-048 4062-006-049

0.30 0.27

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 A

30 30

9 8

9 8

Total

1.02

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

Consolidate older and/or blighted commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project. Site No. 15

30

30

30

15

15

Lot consolidation and Specific Plan

10

6103-030-014

0.37

Older commercial (50+ years); obsolete construction (outdoor auto service); incompatible w/ adjacent residential; operating business Older commercial (60+ years); small lot; obsolete construction (outdoor auto service); incompatible w/ adjacent residential; operating business Blighted older commercial/industrial (60+ years; possible structural deterioration; requires seismic retrofit); operating business; incompatible w/ adjacent residential Blighted older commercial/industrial (60+ years; possible structural deterioration; requires seismic retrofit); operating business; incompatible w/ adjacent residential

GC

C3-MUO

30

11

11

6103-030-015

0.18

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-030-016

0.18

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-030-032

0.86

GC

C3-MUO

30

26

26

Total

1.58

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

Consolidate four older and/or blighted commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project.

30

47

47

24

23

Lot Consolidation

16

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 16

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

6103-021-001 6103-021-002 6103-021-003 6103-021-025 6103-021-026

0.19 0.20 0.20 0.37 0.20

Blighted older commercial (60+ years, obsolete construction, deferred maintenance) Parking lot Vacant lot; building foundation remains Older motel (60+ years) Older commercial (70+ years)

GC GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0 0

A A

30 30 30 30 30

6 6 6 11 6

6 6 6 11 6

Total

1.15

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

Consolidate five blighted commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project. Site No. 17

30

34

34

17

17

Lot Consolidation

11

6103-018-025

2.95

Older commercial (50+ years); operating retail center with approx. 20 businesses; identified as Brownfield on City's EPA grant; open RWQCB case; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C2-MUO

Develop a medium to high density mixed-use project

30

88

88

44

44

30

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 18

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

6103-015-001

0.26

Vacant land; part of Brownfield site identified on City's EPA grant; site assessment may be needed Vacant land; part of Brownfield site identified on City's EPA grant; site assessment may be needed Vacant land; part of Brownfield site identified on City's EPA grant; site assessment may be needed Vacant land; part of Brownfield site identified on City's EPA grant; site assessment may be needed

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-015-002

0.12

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-015-003

0.16

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-015-007

0.13

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-015-048

0.18

Older commercial (60+ years); historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

30

6103-015-049

0.16

Older unoccupied commercial (60+ years); historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

30

Total

1.00

Prime opportunity site

GC

C3-MUO

Consolidate four vacant properties and two older/underutilized commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project

30

30

30

15

15

Lot Consolidation

10

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 19

Density

Potential Units 2 3

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units 2 3

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

6105-008-030 6105-008-031

0.07 0.11

Bank branch parking Bank branch parking Bank branch (over-parked) -underutilized; credible interest expressed in developing a mixeduse project; tenant is weighing proposal

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

A A

30 30

6105-008-032

4.43

GC

C3-MUO

0 Consolidate bank parking parcels and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project Site No. 20

30

133

133

Total

4.61

Prime opportunity site Blighted single-family (roof deterioration, dry rot, deferred maintenance) Blighted single-family (roof deterioration, dry rot, deferred maintenance) Blighted commercial (dry rot, deferrred maintenance, incompatible use); use is marginal (no activity observed on site) Vehicle storage; use is marginal (no activity observed on site) Blighted older commercial (50+ years; possible structural deterioration, deferred maintenance, obsolete design/const); operating business Church (operating)

GC

C3-MUO

30

138

138

69

69

Lot Consolidation

46

6105-009-004

0.37

HDR

R4

30

11

10

6105-009-005

0.37

HDR

R4

30

11

10

6105-009-008

0.46

HDR

R4

30

14

14

6105-009-009

0.45

HDR

R4

30

14

14

6105-009-010 6105-009-020

0.20 0.92

HDR HDR

R4 R4

0 0

30 30

6 28

6 28

Total

2.77

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

HDR

R4

Consolidate properties and redevelop to high-density residential project

30

83

81

81

Lot Consolidation

28

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 21

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units 6 6 14 14

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

4066-011-020 4066-011-021 4066-012-002 4066-012-033

0.21 0.21 0.46 0.47

Vacant land Vacant land Commercial Commercial

GC GC GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO 0 0

30 30 30 30

6 6 14 14

Total

1.35

Prime opportunity site; historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

Consolidate vacant and blighted commercial properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed-use project Site No. 22

30

40

40

20

20

Lot Consolidation

13

6111-001-018 6111-001-019 6111-001-025 6111-001-900

0.14 0.13 0.44 0.53

Older commercial (80+ years) Older commercial (70+ years) Older commercial (80+ years) Parking

MU MU MU MU

CR CR CR CR

0 0 0 0 City

20 20 20 20

3 3 9 11

3 3 9 11

Total 4064-023-018 4064-023-019 4064-023-020 4064-023-021

1.23 0.72 0.11 0.26 0.17

Historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessments may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended Vacant Older commercial (50+ years) Older commercial (50+ years) Older commercial (50+ years) Blighted former hospital building (boarded up windows/doors, deferred maintenance) Parking

MU GC GC GC GC

CR C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0 0 0 0 A A

Consolidate properties and redevelop with high-density residential project Site No. 23

20 30 30 30 30

24 21 3 8 5

24 21 3 8 5

24

Lot Consolidation

4064-023-034 4064-023-035

1.04 0.31

GC GC

C3-MUO C3-MUO

0 0

B B

30 30

31 9

31 9

Total

2.61

Prime opportunity site; historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC

C3-MUO

Consolidate three commercial properties, blighted former hospital and adjoining parking lot, and one vacant lot and redevelop with high density residential mixed-use project

30

78

78

39

39

Lot Consolidation

26

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

Exist Units

Ownership (1)

Potential Use Site No. 24

Density

Potential Units

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Net Inc. Income Income Units Units 4 6 1

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

6102-019-900 6102-019-901 6102-019-902

0.41 0.60 0.15

Vacant Vacant Vacant Blighted industrial (boarded windows/doors, deferred maintenance) Blighted single-family (boarded windows/doors, deferred maintenance) Blighted auto service (deferred maintenance, deteriorated) All properties except 6102-019-008 have historical commercial/industrial uses with likely chemical use/storage; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended

GC GC GC

C3-SPO C3-SPO C3-SPO

City City City

20 20 20

4 6 1

6102-019-007

0.17

GC

C3-SPO

20

6102-019-008

0.10

GC

C3-SPO

20

6102-019-019

0.41

GC

C3-SPO

20

Total

1.84

GC

C3-SPO

Consolidate vacant land with blighted properties and redevelop with high-density residential mixed use project Site No. 25 A

20

18

17

17

Lot Consolidation and Specific Plan

6114-031-003

1.11

Parking Lot Blighted multi-family (deferred maintenance, deteriorated) Older commercial (50+ years); possible historical chemical use Prime opportunity site; site assessment may be needed; survey of regulated materials recommended Blighted older commercial (50+ years, poor/faulty material, deferred maintenance, incompatible w/ adjoining residential) Blighted older single-family (80+ years, deferred maintenance, incompatible w/ surrounding industrial, no street frontage) Blighted older single-family (80+ years, deferred maintenance, incompatible w/ surrounding industrial, no street frontage) Prime opportunity site; properties adjacent to or part of DTSCregulated Gardena Sumps site; Sumps site is identified as Brownfield under City's EPA grant; surveys of regulated materials recommended

MDR/ HDR

R-3/R-4

30

33

33

6114-031-004

0.20

HDR

R-4

30

6114-031-005

0.42

HDR

R-4

30

13

13

Total

1.73

HDR

R-3/R-4

Consolidate parcels and redevelop with high-density residential project Site No. 26

30

51

49

49

Lot Consolidation

13

6106-036-035 (western half of parcel)

1.29

GC

SP

20

13

13

6106-036-037

0.23

GC

SP

20

6106-036-012

0.23

GC

SP

20

Total

1.75

Consolidate parcels and redevelop with medium-density horizontal mixed-use project

20

17

15

15

Specific Plan

APN

Acres

Existing Use/Opportunity

General Plan

Zone

With Proposed Zone Amendments: Lower Mod/Above Density Net Inc. Income Income Units Units Site 27 (Not Included in Lot Consolidation Programs -- See Program 19: "Rezoning of Two Sites") Exist Units Ownership (1) Potential Use Potential Units

Program (2)

Net Gain from Zone Amdts (3)

4063-011-900

3.96

National Guard Armory, former Gardena Transit facility; possible historical chemical use; surveys of regulated materials recommended

HDR

R-4

City

Redevelop with high-density affordable residential project

30

118

118

118 591 888 1479 591 -158 433 287 249 536 287 -126 161

Rezone from R-3 to R4; General Plan amendment from MDR to HDR

118

ALL SITES (4): LOWER INCOME UNITS MOD/ABOVE INCOME UNITS TOTAL NET GAIN (LOWER + MOD/ABOVE) GAIN FROM ZONE AMENDMENTS (4): LOWER INCOME UNITS MOD/ABOVE INCOME UNITS TOTAL NET GAIN (LOWER + MOD/ABOVE) PRIME OPPORTUNITY SITES ONLY: LOWER INCOME UNITS MOD/ABOVE INCOME UNITS TOTAL NET GAIN (LOWER + MOD/ABOVE) GAIN FROM ZONE AMENDMENTS (PRIME OPPORTUNITY SITES ONLY): LOWER INCOME UNITS MOD/ABOVE INCOME UNITS TOTAL NET GAIN (LOWER + MOD/ABOVE)

888 888

(1) Letters (A, B, C) indicates same ownership. Blank indicates different owners (2) Implementation programs include those identified in Response to Comments A-1(a) (3) Refers to units gained from changes in Mixed Use Overlay, R-4 and Specific Plan densities; detailed in Housing Element Section V.C (4) Does not include Site 27