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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms: M&D Category:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Lyperobius carinatus Broun, 1881 I

Conservancy Office: NM, CA Area Office: South Marlborough, Waimakariri, Raukapuka, Aoraki

Description: A large, reddish-brown to black, flightless weevil, with white or yellowish white scales. The body is 20.4 - 24.8 mm long, and 8.6 - 10.8 mm wide (Craw 1999). Type Locality: No locality, came from J.D.Enys, Esq. (CMNZ). Has been labelled holotype female, Lyperobius carinatus Broun, 1881, R.C.Craw det. 1997" (Craw 1999).
Body length: 24.8 mm

Specimen Holdings: CMNZ, MONZ. Distribution: Kahutara Saddle, Seaward Kaikoura Ranges; Craigieburn Range; Broken River Basin; Mt Temple; Jollie Peak; Mt Hutt; Mt Somers; Carneys Creek; McCoys Creek, upper Rangitata River; Mt Cook National Park; Mt Dalgety (Craw 1999). Habitat: Alpine. Adults are diurnal (Craw 1999). Threats: Not known. Work Undertaken to Date: Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Survey to determine distributional limits and population status because this poorly known species occurs in the drier, environmentally degraded mid-eastern South Island ranges and may be endangered. 2) Assess taxonomic status of north-eastern South Island Lyperobius populations because there may be undescribed taxa in this area (Craw 1999). Include verification that the Kahutara Saddle population is indeed L. carinatus (I. Millar pers. comm. 2000). Management Needs: Contacts: Robin Craw.
See Plate 3, No. 10.

Photo: Andrew Townsend.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Lyperobius huttoni Pascoe, 1876 Huttons speargrass weevil (Scott & Emberson 1999), speargrass weevil B

Synonyms: M&D Category:

Conservancy Office: WL, NM, CA Area Office: Poneke, South Marlborough, Waimakariri

Description: A large, flightless, reddish-brown to black weevil, 18 - 26.2 mm long and 9.2 - 11.8 mm wide (Craw 1999). Type Locality: Tarndale, near the head of the Wairau River, in the Nelson Province.
Body length: 26.2 mm

Specimen Holdings: AMNZ, BHPC, CMNZ, LUNZ, MONZ, NZAC, OMNZ (Craw 1999). Distribution: In the South Island from Tarndale, upper Wairau Valley; Black Birch Range; Seaward Kaikoura Range (Haycock Range, Mt Fyffe, Kahutara Saddle); Jacks Pass, Hanmer Range; Hanmer Plain; Mt Binser; Craigieburn Range; Horwell Downs Station, north of Burkes Pass, Two Thumb Range; Albury Range; Grampian Mts; Hunters Hills (Craw 1999); Mt Cockayne3. There is also a specimen from Peel Ridge, Nelson in the MONZ collection, although it is unlikely that this is L. huttoni as it is outside of its known range, or it may be mislabelled (R. Craw pers. comm. 2000). North Island: on the Wellington south coast, between Owhiro Bay and Tongue Point2; Owhiro Bay 152 m; Happy Valley; Island Bay; Red Rocks1, 3; Karori Stream; Sinclair Head; Long Gully. Present distribution unknown, but a search of areas in the Craigieburn Mts and near Hanmer did not find any sign of weevils. On the Wellington coast, they are only present in Long Gully, with a minimum population estimate of 135 individuals3.
1

Bull 1967; 2Beauchamp 1988; 3Hunt 1996. Habitat: Inhabits tussock grassland (Meads 1990a) and herbfields (Hunt 1996) in sub-alpine regions ranging from 609-1219 m in the South Island, but found at low altitudes on the Wellington coast. Covers a range of climates, from dry montane in the South Island to humid maritime in the North Island (Bull 1967). Usually found on moist south-east facing slopes on the Wellington south coast, which is where the speargrass grows (Beauchamp 1989). The adults are diurnal (Meads 1990a, Craw 1999), and have a host association with the speargrasses Aciphylla aurea, A. colensoi, A. squarrosa (Craw 1999), and A. glaucescens (Hunt 1996). On

Permission: Manaaki Whenua Press. Craw 1999, p. 40, Fig. 7.

Photo: Andrew Townsend.

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the Wellington south coast they are dependent on A. squarrosa (Beauchamp 1989). They are more likely to be found on large plants, and on plants which are in flower or have more than one crown. Adults feed on foliage and hide in the leaf litter under the plant. Commonly associated with unstable environments (areas with bare rock or scree), and occur where the host plant is not overgrown by other plants. Eggs are laid in leaf sheaths near the base of the Aciphylla plant (Hunt 1996). The larvae are subterranean, feeding on roots (Bull 1967, Hunt 1996, Schops 1998). Larvae construct a bare pupal chamber in the soil adjacent to the roots of the host (Craw 1999).There is a population overlap with L. carinatus at Kahutara Saddle, Kaikoura (I. Millar pers. comm. 1999). Sign of Presence: There are two main types of feeding sign; leaf nicking on the outer leaflets of the host, and a deep ovoid notching of the leaf petioles (Craw 1999). This can be confused with the feeding damage made by the larva of the noctuid moth Graphania nulliferA. L. huttoni notches the leaf margin, but only feeds to the midrib. The base of the notch is at a consistent depth along the entire length of the notch, forming a straight line. The other main feeding sign is deep (about 5 mm), ovoid, and round-bottomed holes made in the thick basal stems. Less common is feeding at the thicker part of the leaf at the point of division of the pinnate leaves. In the South Island at Kahutara, holes in the centre of the leaf similar to those formed on the petiole occur. Feeding damage on A. aurea results in the exudation of gummy sap which dries to a white crystalline substance (Hunt 1996). Threats: It is possible that rodents are a threat (Bull 1967), through either competition for food as they feed on the roots of Aciphylla (Craw 1999), or predation. There has been positive evidence of predation by mice (Bull 1967, Craw 1999). Habitat destruction is also a major concern. Quarrying (Henderson 1980, Craw 1999) at Owhiro Bay removed the entire habitat of one population (Bull 1967), and a landslide threatened one population (Beauchamp & Sherley 1988). Destruction of host plants through grazing (Bull 1967), especially by goats (Beauchamp 1988) and cattle (Beauchamp 1990b) puts further pressure on the populations. Another possible threat is competition for food with the caterpillar Graphania nullifera (Bull 1967; Beauchamp 1990b). Succession by gorse (Ulex europaeus) (Bull 1967), tutu (Coriaria sp.), flax (Phormium spp.), and tawhinu (Ozothamnus leptophylla) is a potential problem (Henderson 1980; Beauchamp 1990b). The early practice of tussock burning would have contributed to the decline of this species (Bull 1967; Henderson 1980; Beauchamp 1990b). The Wellington population which appears to be a Pliocene relict (Craw 1988) is threatened. Extinction of this population seems inevitable because it is dependent upon a host which is part of a seral plant community, and present in high density only for a short time after disturbance (Hunt 1996). Recent studies provide genetic support that the North and South Island populations are conspecific. North Island specimens are smaller, but this fits in with a general tendency for alpine individuals to be larger than coastal ones due to physiological demands (Hunt 1996). Work Undertaken to Date: Wellington south coast area: 1965 - 67: Bull identifies 6 weevil sites. Failed to find at other localities in the Cook Strait area including areas adjacent to the mouth of the Wainuiomata Stream and Orongorongo River, the area south of Owhiro Bay and the coast north and south of Titahi Bay (Bull 1967). 1979: Search of Bulls 6 sites, suggested that only 2 of the sites still had weevils. 1980: Added to the protected fauna list of the Wildlife Act (1953).

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1983: 4.65 ha purchased with the purpose of creating a reserve for wildlife preservation. 1985: Over 400 pot-grown speargrass (Aciphylla squarrosa) plants planted in and around the reserved area, an electric fence erected to exclude goats. 1986: Beauchamp surveys 2 sites that were believed still to have weevils, only a low level of sign observed. 1987 - 90: Beauchamp reports show a declining distribution of the weevil. 1989: Beauchamp locates new inland populations towards Hawkins Hill. Estimates total population to be between 141 and 210 individuals, at 25 sites. 1990: Beauchamp reports decline in number of sites from 25 to 17. 1991: Search of Beauchamps search areas conducted, feeding sign observed. 1993: Search of Bulls and Beauchamps sites. 1994 - 1996: Study finds weevils only in Long Gully, and Aciphylla distribution generally heavily reduced on that reported by Beauchamp. 1995: Electrophoretic comparison of Kaikoura and Long Gully populations by MorganRichards in progress (Hunt 1996). 1999:Resurvey of Wellington south coast by M. Hunt and R. Stone. Locations mapped for browsing sign and presence of weevils. In situ management including trials with fencing, Aciphylla planting, and weeding, is being undertaken in the Wellington south coast region. South Island: Captive breeding programme underway at Lincoln University using six pairs of weevils taken from Kahutara (R. Stone pers. comm. 2000). Distribution surveys undertaken at Kahutara Saddle, My Fyffe, Black Birch, and Blairich. No weevils found at Blairich (I. Millar pers. comm. 2000). Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Conduct a population viability analysis of the Wellington population, once sufficient information on productivity, recruitment and survival has been obtained. 2) Survey the status and health of speargrass populations. 3) Survey to check the status of the southern populations from Hunters Hills and Mckenzie Country because all records from these areas are 30-40 years old (R. Craw pers. comm. 2000). Management Needs: 1) Ongoing management in situ could lead to an increase in numbers and density, and a translocation project in the future (Hunt 1996). Contacts: Robin Craw, Maree Hunt, Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel, Jan Clayton-Greene, Faith Barber.
See Plate 3, No. 9.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms: M&D Category:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Megacolabus bifurcatus May, 1973 I

Conservancy Office: NL Area Office: Kerikeri

Description: A dull black, flightless weevil, with red-brown antennae and tarsi (feet). There are patches of white and red-brown scales, and sparse, pallid hairs lying flat along the body. The body is 3.5 - 5.5 mm long and 1.8 - 2.5 mm wide (May 1973).
Body length: 5.5 mm

Type Locality: Road verges between Tutamoe and Waimatenui, Northland (May 1973). Specimen Holdings: NZAC (May 1973). Distribution: Between Tutamoe and Waimatenui, Northland (May 1973). Habitat: Feed at night on sori on the underside of Blechnum capense fern fronds. In general Megacolabus species rarely occur below 500 m (May 1973). Threats: It is believed that these weevils are not endangered, just seldom collected (G. Kuschel pers. comm. 2000; R. Craw pers. comm. 2000). Work Undertaken to Date: Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Survey suitable habitat in the area between Tutamoe and Waimatenui, as well as adjacent areas, to determine distributional limits and population estimates. Management Needs: 1) Dependent on the results of the survey. Likely that this species will be removed from the list of conservation priorities. Contacts: Robin Craw, Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel.

Photo: Andrew Townsend.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms: M&D Category:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Megacolabus obesus May, 1963 I

Conservancy Office: NL Area Office: Kerikeri

Description: A dull black, flightless weevil, with red-brown antennae and tarsi (feet), and a clothing of scattered, yellowish scales, mostly flat against the body,. The body is 4.5 mm long, and 2.6 mm wide (May 1963).
Body length: 4.5 mm

Type Locality: Mataraua, Kaikohe. Specimen Holdings: NZAC (May 1963). Distribution: Mataraua, Kaikohe, North Auckland Peninsula (May 1963). Habitat: Found on the underside of fern leaves at night (May 1963). Threats: It is believed that these weevils are not endangered, just seldom collected (G. Kuschel pers. comm. 2000; R. Craw pers. comm. 2000). Work Undertaken to Date: Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Survey suitable habitat at Mataraua and adjacent areas to determine distributional limits and population estimates. Management Needs:1) Dependent on the results of the survey. Likely that this species will be removed from the list of conservation priorities. Contacts: Robin Craw, Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel.

Permission: SIR Publishing. May 1963, Plate 1, Fig. c.

Lateral view. Permission: SIR Publishing. May 1963, p. 161, Fig. 7d.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms: M&D Category:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Megacolabus sculpturatus Broun, 1893 Akaroa weevil X

Conservancy Office: CA Area Office: North Canterbury

Description: A slightly shining, pitchy black, weevil, with yellowish and greyish scales lying flat against the body. The broad, rather shiny pronotum, dense elytral (wing case) clothing and short, stout legs are the distinguishing features. The body is 7.5 mm long, and 3.8 mm wide (May 1963).
Body length: 7.5 mm

Type Locality: Akaroa. Specimen Holdings: Broun Collection NHML (May 1963). Distribution: Akaroa, Banks Peninsula, Canterbury (May 1963). Habitat: May be a nocturnal fern feeder as are other members of the genus (Sherley 1990a), which feed on the underside of ferns at the edge of native forest. During the day they hide on the ground in leaf litter (Meads 1990a). This species was originally collected on spaniards (Aciphylla sp.) (Johns 1986), but the host plant is more likely to be Polystichum (shield fern) (R. Craw pers. comm. 2000). Threats: Reduction of habitat or host plant (Johns 1986). The availability of the host plant is most likely the limiting factor. Work Undertaken to Date: Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Survey suitable habitat at Banks Peninsula to try and determine if this weevil still exists. Management Needs: -

Permission: SIR Publishing. May 1963, Plate 1, Fig. f.

Contacts: Peter Johns.

Lateral view. Permission: SIR Publishing. May 1963, Fig. 1d.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms: M&D Category:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Nothaldonus peacei (Broun, 1880) Peaces weevil (Scott & Emberson 1999) Aldonus peacei (Lyal 1993) I

Conservancy Office: NL Area Office: Whangarei

Description: A shiny black, flightless weevil. The body is 11-12 mm long (Lyal 1993), and covered with depressed yellowish scales. There are black spots on the thorax and elytra (wing cases) (Broun 1880).
Body length: 12 mm

Type Locality: Parua (Lyal 1993). Specimen Holdings: NHML, NZAC Distribution: Northland (Lyal 1993) at Waipoua River, Parua Bay, and Maungataupere Bush (NZAC; Maddison 1991). Habitat: Larva almost certainly burrows in wood (Lyal 1993). Based on close relatives, it probably occurs in both primary and regenerating forest and tall scrub communities (R. Craw pers. comm. 2000). Threats: Not believed to be endangered (G. Kuschel pers. comm. 2000; R. Craw pers. comm. 2000). Seldom seen rather than endangered. Work Undertaken to Date: Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Survey forest remnants in the vicinity of Waipoua River, Parua Bay, and Maungataupere Bush to try and determine distributional limits and population estimates. Management Needs: Contacts: Robin Craw, Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel.

Permission: Manaaki Whenua Press. Lyal 1993, p. 167, Fig. 1.

See Plate 3, No. 13.

Photo: Andrew Townsend.

Permission: Manaaki Whenua Press. Lyal 1993, p. 179, Fig. 50.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Oclandius cinereus (Blanchard, 1853) Campbell Island weevil (Foord 1990) Catodryobius cinereus (Brookes 1951) C. benhami, C. erubescens, C. tetricus, Aucklandius cinereus (Gourlay 1950), A. tetricus, A. erubescens, A. cupreosus, A. sorenseni, A. aterrimus aterrimus, A.aterrimus aucklandicus, Catadryobius erubescens (in error), C. benhami (in error), C. tetricus (in error), Inocatoptes incertus (Kuschel 1964). I

M&D Category:

Conservancy Office: SL Area Office: Southern Islands

Body length: 18.8 mm

Description: A large, flightless pitchy-black or black weevil. The body is 12.0 - 18.8 mm long and 4.8 - 8.7 mm wide. The large number of synonyms could suggest a high degree of variation in this species, but the range of variation is normal for a large species inhabiting a cold climate (Kuschel 1964). Type Locality: Auckland Island. Specimen Holdings: Specimen originally in Paris Museum (Brookes 1951), Laoboratoire dEntomologie, Paris, not located (Kuschel 1971), NHML, CMNZ, NZAC, MONZ. Distribution: Found in the Auckland Islands group at Ewing Island (1989); Port Ross, Ocean Island (NZAC); Rose Island; Enderby Island; Auckland Island at Musgrave Peninsula, Carnley Harbour (Kuschel 1971), Ranui Cove, Erebus Cove (1989) (MONZ); Adams Island at Magnetic Station Cove, Fairchilds Garden, NE ridge of Mt Dick, Lake Turbott (Kuschel 1971), Dome 640 m (Kuschel 1964); also found on Campbell Island (Kuschel 1971) at Head of Tucker Cove, west coast, Mt Azimuth, Mt Honey,Windlass Bay Cliffs, Mt Puiseux (MONZ), Shoal Point, Venus Cove, Beeman Camp, Lyall Ridge near Trig 15, saddle between Mts Filhol and Honey, west coast behind St Col Peak, St Col Azimuth ridge, Tucker Cove Valley, Mowbray Hill, behind north-west beach, between Tucker and Campbell Coves, and north-west slopes (NZAC), head of Tucker Cove 20 m, Perseverance Harbour (Kuschel 1964). Kuschel (1964) notes that it is a very common species occurring from supralittoral zone to the highlands throughout the Auckland and Campbell Islands. Habitat: Has commonly been found associated with Maori onion (Bulbinella sp), feeding upon the leaves at night and hiding at the base in daytime (Kuschel 1964). Has also been collected on southern rata (Metrosideros umbellata), Pleurophyllum criniferum, under stones in maritime vegetation, and under stones in alpine swards and fellfields (Kuschel 1971).

Reprinted by permission of Bishop Museum Press. Kuschel 1964, p 491, Fig. 275g.

Permission: Manaaki Whenua Press. Meads 1990a, p 10.

Threats: Not known. Rodent predation is likely to be a factor.

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Work Undertaken to Date: First stage of rodent eradication from Campbell Island completed, with bait acceptance trials conducted in August 1999 (I. McFadden pers. comm. 1999). Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Survey Auckland Islands to determine distributional limits and population estimates. Management Needs: Contacts: Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel.
See Plate 3, No. 14.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Oclandius laeviusculus (Broun, 1902) Lyperobius laeviusculus (Broun 1902), Heterexis laeviusculus (Brookes 1951),Catodryobius grandis, Catadryobius grandis (in error), Aucklandius grandis (Kuschel 1964). The specimen from CMNZ labelled Oclandius grandis is therefore also likely to be the same because the genus Aucklandius was emended to Oclandius. C

M&D Category:

Conservancy Office: SL Area Office: Southern Islands

Description: A large flightless pitchy-black weevil, sometimes pale red-pitchy-black (Broun 1902). The body is 17 - 23.4 mm long and 6.8 - 10.8 mm wide (Kuschel 1964). Type Locality: Auckland Islands group,Adams Island - Dome and neighbouring ridge, under stones on summit, alt 640 m (Heterexis laeviusculus) (Brookes 1951).
Body length: 23.4 mm

Specimen Holdings: CMNZ, MONZ, NZAC, NHML. Distribution: Auckland Islands group on Adams Island1, 2, 3, 4, 8 at Dome1, 8 and neighbouring ridge under stones on summit 640 m1, Magnetic Station Cove & Fairchilds Garden, northeast ridge of Mt Dick 350 - 550 m, Lake Turbott3, Magnetic Bay8; Auckland Island4, 7, 8; Ewing Island2, 6, 7, 8; Ocean Island6 (1989); French Island2, 7; Disappointment Island2, 9; Dent Island5.
1

Brookes 1951; 2Kuschel 1964; 3Kuschel 1971; 4Meads 1990a; 5Sherley 1990a; 6MONZ; 7 CMNZ; 8NZAC; 9Edwards 1999. Habitat: A ground species found from the supralittoral zone to the highlands, under logs and stones, but more commonly under Pleurophyllum (Compositae), Stilbocarpa (Araliaceae) and Anisotome (Umbelliferae). Feeds mainly on the large leaved daisy Pleurophyllum criniferum (Kuschel 1971; Meads 1990a) in the daytime. Has also been collected from Anisotome latifolia, southern rata (Metrosideros umbellata), tussock, under stones in maritime vegetation and alpine swards and fellfields (Kuschel 1971), Ligusticum antipodum (now Anisotome antipodium) (Brookes 1951), Stilbocarpa, Urtica (nettle) in sand; Stilbocarpa and Pleurophyllum under roots and feeding on their leaves, plus possible specimens collected from under a dead trunk of inanga (Dracophyllum longifolium) on peat, on foliage of Stilbocarpa polaris, and in peat among S. polaris roots and stems (NZAC). Threats: Pigs uproot and eat the host food plants (Meads 1990a). Rodent predation may be a concern. Work Undertaken to Date: Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Survey Auckland Islands to determine distributional limits and population estimates. Managment Needs: Permission: Manaaki Whenua Press. Meads 1990a, p 30

Contacts: Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel.


See Plate 3, No. 15.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms: M&D Category:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Stephanorhynchus insolitus Broun, 1893 I

Conservancy Office: WL Area Office: Poneke

Description: A pale brownish-grey weevil, lacking any definite markings, about 7 - 8 mm long (Hudson 1934).
Body length: 8 mm

Type Locality: Wellington. Specimen Holdings: NZAC, RHNZ. Distribution: Wellington (Hudson 1934) at Red Rocks (1941, 1960); Sinclair Head; and the cliffs near Sinclair Head (NZAC); Houghton Bay; Cape Palliser;Wainuiomata (R. Hornabrook pers. comm. 2000), Island Bay (1884); Happy Valley (1887); Breakers Bay (sic) (Wellington) (1919); Sinclair Head (1934) (information from Hudson, Hudsons Log Book p.31 #177, National Museum); possibly also Petone (NZAC). Habitat: Beaten from speargrass blossoms on the coast-hills around Wellington (Hudson 1934). Most specimens have been collected in late winter to early spring (R. Hornabrook pers. comm. 2000). Threats: Not known. If speargrass is the host plant, then the loss of this plant is a major threat. Rodents could then be a threat either through direct predation or competition for food, as they feed on the roots of Aciphylla (Craw 1999). The caterpillar Graphania nullifera is another possible threat via competition for food (Bull 1967, Beauchamp 1990b). Habitat modification through grazing or succession is another possible threat if Aciphylla is the host plant. Work Undertaken to Date: Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Survey south coast of Wellington to determine distributional limits and population estimates. Management Needs: Contacts: Robin Craw, Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel.
See Plate 3, No. 12.

Photo: Andrew Townsend.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms: M&D Category:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Thotmus halli Broun, 1911 I

Conservancy Office: WL Area Office: Chatham Islands

Description: A reddish-chestnut weevil, with the legs thickly clothed in grey hairs. The body is 13 mm long and 6.5 mm wide (Broun 1911). Type Locality: Pitt Island (Broun 1911).
Body length: 13 mm

Specimen Holdings: Broun Chatham Is collection, NHML. Distribution: Pitt Island in the Chatham Islands. Only known from the type specimen (Emberson 1998b). Habitat: Broun (1911) had no doubt that it was an inhabitant of the seashore. Presumed to be associated with sand dunes (Emberson 1998b). Sign of Presence: Threats: Not known. Work Undertaken to Date: Known from one specimen only. A variety of sand-dune habitats on Pitt Island and Chatham Island had daytime searches conducted without success in 1992, 1997, and 1998. A search of the dunes at night at Waitangi and Te One in late December 1998 and early January 1999 was also unsuccessful (R. Emberson pers. comm. 1999). Pitt and Chatham Islands searched without success by G. Kuschel (G. Kuschel pers. comm. 1999). Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: 1) Conduct night searches of dune habitats on Pitt and Chatham Island to try and find a specimen (R. Emberson pers. comm. 1999). Scoop sand from under plant and scatter, weevils will move and be seen if present (G. Kuschel pers. comm. 1999). Management Needs: 1) Dependent on result of survey, move to Category X if repeated surveys are unsuccessful. Contacts: Rowan Emberson, Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel.
See Plate 3, No. 8.

Photo: John Marris, Lincoln University.

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Order: Family: Taxonomic Name: Common Names: Synonyms:

Coleoptera Curculionidae Tychanopais tuberosus (Broun, 1923) Hatasu tuberosa, H. tuberosum (Lyal 1993), H. tuberosus (Hudson 1934). I

M&D Category:

Conservancy Office: NM, CA Area Office: Golden Bay, Sounds, St Arnaud, Waimakariri

Description: A flightless matt black weevil (Lyal 1993), 12 - 16 mm long, with the elytra (wing cases) covered with rounded tubercules (Hudson 1934). This family (Cryptorhynchinae) is distinguished by the presence of a groove on the underside of the body, into which the rostrum (snout) can fit.
Body length: 16 mm

Type Locality: Lectotype male designated, Mt. Arthur (Broun) Hatasu; tuberosa. Specimen Holdings: NHML (Lyal 1993), NZAC. Distribution: Has been collected from Mt Arthur 914 m; Maud Island (1980), Pelorus Sound; east side of Cassy, Andrews Stream Saddle; Bullock Track, Cobb catchment area; Mt Roberts, Lake Rotoiti, Nelson; Canaan 609 m, Nelson; Lake Mason, Hurunui; Flora Track, Mt Arthur (NZAC), and at various locations in the Nelson Lakes region (R. Hornabrook pers. comm. 2000). Habitat: Adults of Tychanopais tuberosus have been collected from Nothofagus, kawakawa (Macropiper excelsum), and on dead wood (Lyal 1993), including dead beech branches (R. Hornabrook pers. comm. 2000). Threats: Not believed to be endangered (G. Kuschel pers. comm. 2000; R. Craw pers. comm. 2000). Work Undertaken to Date: Priority Research, Survey, and Monitoring: Management Needs: 1) Recommend that this species is removed from the list based on current available information. Contacts: Robin Craw, Guillermo (Willy) Kuschel.
See Plate 3, No. 4.

Photo: Andrew Townsend.

Permission: Manaaki Whenua Press. Lyal 1993, p. 181, Fig. 66.

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