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DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Department of Philosophy COURSE SYLLABUS COLLEGE: College of Liberal Arts COURSE CODE: MORPHIL CLASS DAYS AND CLASS TIME: __________ COURSE DESCRIPTION This course examines the questions of ethics through a critical analysis of different theories of right and wrong found in the works of Western and Eastern Philosophy. It introduces students of philosophy to theories that continuously shape contemporary discussions in the field of ethics. The initiating point of departure is the ethical inquiry exemplified by Plato. The first part develops the ethical problem through critical survey of teleological and deontological theories. These include Egoism, Eudaimonism, Act and Rule utilitarianism, Rational Intuitionism, and Ethics of Self-Determination. The second part is an introduction to meta-ethics. The text for the course is Great Traditions in Ethics edited by Denise, Peterfreund and White. The text provides the core readings which will be analyzed and discussed during the term. The conceptual organization of the topics is patterned after John Deighs An Introduction to Ethics. LEARNING OUTCOME On completion of the course, the student is expected to be able to do the following:
ELGA Critical and Creative Knowledge Producer Socially Responsible and Collaborative Citizen Competent Professional Diversity-sensitive Communicator Morally Principled and Faith-inspired Leader LEARNING OUTCOME LO1: Collaborating with other students, presenting and supporting their ideas in public through class participation. LO2: Analytic reasoning about ideas by evaluating content, structure, and strategies of ethical works, and applying concepts and arguments to contemporary issues and their own lives. LO3: Interpreting texts by accurately and fully describing concepts and arguments. LO4: Familiarity with ethical positions and arguments from antiquity to today, and from diverse cultural and social-political contexts. LO5: Critical reasoning and ethical reflection through considering a variety of moral issues and approaches to ethical questions.

DEPARTMENT: Philosophy COURSE TITLE: MORAL PHILOSOPHY ROOM: __________

FINAL COURSE OUTPUT


LEARNING OUTCOME LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 REQUIRED OUTPUT Panel discussion Case study, critical paper Written examination Research Paper Position paper DUE DATE

RUBRIC FOR ASSESSMENT OF ESSAY-TYPE REQUIREMENTS


CRITERIA 1. Grammar and Spelling EXEMPLARY 4.0 No spelling and grammatical errors SATISFACTORY 3.0 3.5 Spelling and grammar is mostly correct DEVELOPING 2.0 2.5 Spelling and grammatical errors are frequent BEGINNING 1.0 1.5 Spelling and grammatical errors are found in almost every sentence Authors intended meaning is impossible to understand Ideas presented are not defended RATING

2. Exposition of Ideas

Authors intended meaning is readily and easily understood Ideas presented are cogently and clearly defended Sequence of ideas is fluid and easy to follow

Authors intended meaning is generally easy to understand

Authors intended meaning is difficult to understand

3. Development of Ideas

Ideas presented are satisfactorily defended

Ideas presented are weakly and incoherently defended Sequence of ideas is jumpy

4. Organization

Sequence of ideas is generally smooth

Sequence of ideas is awkward and confusing AVERAGE:

OTHER REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENTS Class participation Participation in departmental activities GRADING SYSTEM Midterm Examination Final Examination Recitation

40% 40% 10% ==== 100%

RATING SYSTEM
POINTS 97-100 93-96 89-92 85-88 80-84 75-79 70-74 Below 70 FINAL GRADE 4.0 3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.0

LEARNING PLAN
LEARNING OUTCOME LO1 LO3 LO4 LO5 LO3 LO4 LO5 The Problems of Ethics Plato, Selections from the Gorgias and the Republic, Books i-ii, iv, vivii, and ix Egoism 1: Epicurus on the Pleasant Life Epicurus, Selections from the letters to Herodotus and To Menoeceus, the Principal Doctrines, and the Fragments Hobbes, Selections from the Leviathan, Chapters vi, xii-xv, and xxixxxx, and Philosophical Rudiments, Chapter i 2 Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc. TOPIC WEEK LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1 Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

LO1 LO3 LO4 LO5

Egoism 2: The Hobbesian Program and its Derivations Epicurus, Selections from the letters to Herodotus and To Menoeceus, the Principal Doctrines, and the Fragments Hobbes, Selections from the Leviathan, Chapters vi, xii-xv, and xxixxxx, and Philosophical Rudiments, Chapter i

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

LO3 LO4 LO5

4 Eudaimonism 1 : Plato on Knowledge and Virtue Plato, Selections from the Gorgias and the Republic, Books i-ii, iv, vivii, and ix John Stuart Mill, Hedonism, from Utilitarianism Aristotle, Selection from Nichomachean Ethics, Books i-ii, vi, and x, Aristotle

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

LO3 LO4 LO5

Eudaimonism 2: Aristotles Eudaimonia Plato, Selections from the Gorgias and the Republic, Books i-ii, iv, vivii, and ix John Stuart Mill, Hedonism, from Utilitarianism Aristotle, Selection from Nichomachean Ethics, Books i-ii, vi, and x, Aristotle

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

LO3 LO4 LO5

6 Utilitarianism 1: Two Versions of Utilitarianism Mill, Selections from Utilitarianism, Chapters ii-iii

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

LO3

Utilitarianism 2: Mills the Greatest Happiness Principle

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film

LO4 LO5 Mill, Selections from Utilitarianism, Chapters ii-iii LO1 LO3 LO4 LO5 The Moral Law 1: Divine Command Theory and Rational Intuitionism Hobbes, Selections from the Leviathan, Chapters vi, xii-xv, and xxixxxx, and Philosophical Rudiments, Chapter i Kant, Selections from Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals First and Second Sections LO1 LO3 LO4 LO5 The Moral Law 2: Kants Formalism Hobbes, Selections from the Leviathan, Chapters vi, xii-xv, and xxixxxx, and Philosophical Rudiments, Chapter i Kant, Selections from Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals First and Second Sections LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5 The Ethics of Self-Determination 1: The Formula of Autonomy and the Kingdom of Ends Kant, Selections from Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals First and Second Sections Sartre, Selections from Existentialism and Human Emotions LO3 LO5 The Ethics of Self-Determination 2: Personal Autonomy and Existentialist Ethics Kant, Selections from Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals First and Second Sections Sartre, Selections from Existentialism and Human Emotions 11 10 9 8

showing, etc.

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

LO3 LO4 LO5

Metaethics 1: Metaethical Disputes and the Eliminability of Teleological Explanations Kant, Selections from Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals First and Second Sections Hume, Selections from An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

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Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5

Metaethics 2: Humes Meta-ethics and Kants Practical Reason Kant, Selections from Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals First and Second Sections Hume, Selections from An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals

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Lectures, discussions, close reading of texts, film showing, etc.

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION Several teaching methods shall be employed throughout the course including lectures, activities, student reports, film viewings, and enrichment lectures outside class. A number of exercises in philosophical reasoning will also be done inside the classroom.

CLASSROOM POLICIES All guidelines stipulated in the handbook regarding plagiarism, cheating, student discipline, etc. will be implemented. Students are required to come to class prepared (e.g., has read the scheduled readings for the day, etc.) and on time. Active participation in class is encouraged, and attendance will be checked regularly. A student who exceeds the allowed number of absences, which includes the accumulation of tardiness, will get a final grade of 0.0. Late submissions are not allowed. Unless specified, requirements must be submitted during class hours of the specified date. Requirements that will be submitted late shall only be considered for acceptance in extremely extenuating circumstances, which also depends on the discretion of the lecturer. There will be no make up for exams and classroom activities. The lecturer has the discretion to modify the course requirements depending on the performance of students and the class. OTHER REQUIREMENTS Each student is required to submit a 3x5 index card with full contact details and a 2x2 recent ID picture. SUGGESTED REFERENCE MATERIALS
Aristotle, Selection from Nichomachean Ethics, Books i-ii, vi, and x, Epicurus, Selections from the letters to Herodotus and To Menoeceus, the Principal Doctrines, and the Fragments Hobbes, Selections from the Leviathan, Chapters vi, xii-xv, and xxix-xxx, and Philosophical Rudiments, Chapter i Hume, Selections from An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals John Stuart Mill, Hedonism, from Utilitarianism Kant, Selections from Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals First and Second Sections Mill, Selections from Utilitarianism, Chapters ii-iii Plato, Selections from the Gorgias and the Republic, Books i-ii, iv, vi-vii, and ix Sartre, Selections from Existentialism and Human Emotions