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1. The teacher walked into the classroom, greeted the students, and took attendance.

(The correct answer was Simple) 2. Juan played football while Juanita went shopping. (The correct answer was Complex) 3. Juan played football, yet Juanita went shopping. Compound ... CORRECT 4. Although Mexico has the better football team, it lost. (The correct answer was Complex) 5. The island was filled with many winding trails, a small lake, and dangerous wild pigs. (The correct answer was Simple) 6. Naoki passed the test because he studied hard and understood the material. (The correct answer was Complex)

There are four sentence types in English. The first sentence type is the most common: Declarative A declarative sentence "declares" or states a fact, arrangement or opinion. Declarative sentences can be either positive or negative. A declarative sentences ends with a period (.). Examples I'll meet you at the train station. The sun rises in the East. He doesn't get up early. Imperative The imperative commands (or sometimes requests). The imperative takes no subject as 'you' is the implied subject. The imperative form ends with either a period (.) or an exclamation point (!). Examples Open the door. Finish your homework Pick up that mess. Interrogative The interrogative asks a question. In the interrogative form the auxiliary verb precedes the subject which is then followed by the main verb (i.e., Are you coming ....?). The interrogative form ends with a question mark (?).

Examples How long have you lived in France? When does the bus leave? Do you enjoy listening to classical music? Exclamatory The exclamatory form emphasizes a statement (either declarative or imperative) with an exclamation point (!). Examples Hurry up! That sounds fantastic! I can't believe you said that! Sentence Types All of these sentence types further fall into four basic sentence type categories in English.

Simple Compound Complex Compound - Complex

Simple Sentences Simple sentences contain no conjunction (i.e., and, but, or, etc.). Examples Frank ate his dinner quickly. Peter and Sue visited the museum last Saturday. Are you coming to the party? Compound Sentences Compound sentences contain two statements that are connected by a conjunction (i.e., and, but, or, etc.). Examples I wanted to come, but it was late. The company had an excellent year, so they gave everyone a bonus. I went shopping, and my wife went to her classes.

Complex Sentences Complex sentences contain a dependent clause and at least one independent clause. The two clauses are connected by a subordinator (i.e, which, who, although, despite, if, since, etc.). Examples My daughter, who was late for class, arrived shortly after the bell rang. That's the man who bought our house Although it was difficult, the class passed the test with excellent marks. Compound - Complex Sentences Compound - complex sentences contain at least one dependent clause and more than one independent clause. The clauses are connected by both conjunctions (i.e., but, so, and, etc.) and subordinators (i.e., who, because, although, etc.) Examples John, who briefly visited last month, won the prize, and he took a short vacation. Jack forgot his friend's birthday, so he sent him a card when he finally remembered. The report which Tom complied was presented to the board, but it was rejected because it was too complex.
A phrase is a group of two or more grammatically linked words without a subject and predicate -- a group of grammatically-linked words with a subject and predicate is called a clause.

1. Pauline and Bruno have a big argument every summer over where they should spend their
summer vacation. A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence You're right! The independent clause is "Pauline and Bruno have a big argument every summer; the dependent clause is "where they should spend their summer vacation." (The dependent clause is a noun clause, the object of the preposition "over.")

2. Pauline loves to go to the beach and spend her days sunbathing.


A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence You're right! There is only one independent clause here, and no dependent clause. The "and" is connecting two infinitive phrases ("to go" and "[to] spend").

3. Bruno, on the other hand, likes the view that he gets from the log cabin up in the mountains,
and he enjoys hiking in the forest. A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence The correct response is D. There are two independent clauses here -- "Bruno likes the view" and "he enjoys hiking. . ." -- and one dependent clause -- "that he gets . . . ."

4. Pauline says there is nothing relaxing about chopping wood, swatting mosquitoes, and
cooking over a woodstove. A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence The correct response is C. The independent clause is "Pauline says"; the rest of the sentence is an elliptical clause, a dependent clause with the "that" left out.

5. Bruno dislikes sitting on the beach; he always gets a nasty sunburn.


A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence

C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence The correct response is B. There are two independent clauses in this sentence; they are separated by a semicolon.

6. Bruno tends to get bored sitting on the beach, watching the waves, getting sand in his
swimsuit, and reading detective novels for a week. A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence You're right! There is only one independent clause in this sentence. The participles -"sitting," "watching," "getting," and "reading" -- are verb forms, not verbs, and do not constitute a clause.

7. This year, after a lengthy, noisy debate, they decided to take separate vacations.
A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence You're right! This sentence contains one independent clause, one subject-verb relationship ("they decided").

8. Bruno went to the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and Pauline went to Cape Cod.
A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence The correct response is B. There are two independent clauses here, connected by the coordinating conjunction "and."

9. Although they are 250 miles apart, they keep in constant contact on the internet.
A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence The correct response is C. This sentence comprises one independent clause -"they keep in constant contact. . ." -- and one dependent clause -- "Although they are 250 miles apart."

10. Bruno took the desktop computer that he uses at work, and Pauline sits on the beach with
her laptop computer, which she connects to the internet with a cellular phone. A. Simple Sentence B. Compound Sentence C. Complex Sentence D. Compound-Complex Sentence The correct response is D. The sentence contains two independent clauses -"Bruno took the desktop computer" and "Pauline sits . . ." (connected by the coordinating conjunction "and") -- and two dependent clauses -- "that he uses at work" and "which she connects. . . ."