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Migration and Refugee Services Office of Special Programs/Childrens Services

Safe Passages FAMILY REUNIFICATION TOOLKIT SERIES

Helping Minors and their Sponsors Understand Juvenile Justice and Immigration
July 2011 Dinandrea Vega, LICSW & Jessi Pore, MSW

A Juvenile Justice and Immigration-themed Toolkit: FAQs, Visual Tools, Terms You Should Know & Minor-Sponsor Handouts

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CONTENTS
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I. Introduction 3 II. About the Juvenile Justice and Immigration Toolkit 5 III. Acknowledgements 5 III. FAQs 6 IV. Juvenile Justice & Immigration Dynamics 12 V. Terms You Should Know 13 VI. Works Cited/Consulted 17 VII. Additional Resources 17 VIII. SPONSOR-MINOR HANDOUT USER GUIDE 18 X. Appendix A: SPONSOR-MINOR HANDOUT: Juvenile Justice & Immigration Cartoon (English) XI. Appendix B: SPONSOR-MINOR HANDOUT: Juvenile Justice & Immigration Cartoon (Spanish)

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ABOUT USCCB/MRS
________________________________________________________________ Who We Are Since the National Catholic Welfare Conference (USCCBs predecessor) was founded in 1920, the National Catholic Church has assisted immigrants and refugees in their resettlement within the U.S. The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Department of Migration and Refugee Services (USCCB/MRS) is a leader among nongovernmental agencies in addressing the needs of children and families separated by migration. USCCB/MRS works with a broad network of Catholic and non-Catholic agencies to assist refugee and undocumented children who have been separated from adult relatives. USCCB/MRS supports these minors in safely joining their families once in the U.S. and providing post release follow-up services in their communities through our Safe Passages Program. Who We Serve The Safe Passages II, Family Reunification program serves undocumented children detained by the Department of Homeland Security and placed in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement/Division of Unaccompanied Childrens Services (ORR/DUCS). Some minors in the program have been detained while entering the U.S., and others have been placed into custody after living in the U.S. for several years. What We Do The USCCB/MRS Unaccompanied Alien Children or Safe Passages program began in 1994 and is currently funded by the Division of Unaccompanied Childrens Services (DUCS) of the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). The program provides for the release and family reunification or long-term foster care of unaccompanied, undocumented children who have been apprehended by immigration officials.

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INTRODUCTION
________________________________________________________________ The Safe Passages II program provides an alternative to detention and supports family reunification whenever possible. Safe Passages provides pre-release home study and post-release services for children intending to be released/released to sponsors in the U.S. and its territories through a national network of over 100 established partner agencies. The program provides continuous guidance and technical assistance at the national level to local providers for up to 175 cases at anytime nationwide. USCCB/MRS has established successful partnerships with social service and legal organizations to implement its program. USCCB/MRS continually outreaches to new providers to expand geographic coverage, train new and existing sub-recipients, monitor cases and programs for compliance and respond to emergent needs. All services provided through USCCB/MRS are consistent with Catholic Social Teaching.

The Safe Passages FAMILY REUNIFICATION Toolkit Series was developed as a stand-alone, technical guidance resource for local social service case workers within USCCBs network of providers. Each individually-themed toolkit is designed to specifically address difficult-to-manage themes and frequentlyoccurring issues and case scenarios. The Toolkit Series is supported by the United States federal governments Office of Refugee Resettlement, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services, Grant No. 90ZU0065/01 & 90ZU0056/01. Any views expressed in The Toolkit Series resources are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent views held by the Office of Refugee Resettlement. Material in this document may be reproduced and publicly distributed only for purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship or research, or any use which falls within the definition of fair use set forth in federal copyright law (17 U.S.C. 107), but any such use must attach USCCBs copyright notice and link to www.usccb.org, but no distribution by sale, rental or any other exchange for anything of value is permitted. For more information about The Safe Passages FAMILY REUNIFICATION Toolkit Series, please contact USCCBs Family Reunification Program at: MigratingChildren@usccb.org
A Gift of the United States

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ABOUT The Juvenile Justice and Immigration TOOLKIT
________________________________________________________________ The Juvenile Justice and Immigration Toolkit provides practical guidance to case workers working with minors and their families as they navigate some of the more frequently-occurring issues and concerns that arise when minors are concurrently involved in the Juvenile Justice and Immigration systems. Our case outcomes and findings have shown that this population of minors is an incredibly resilient group. We want to ensure that this resilience continues to be positively enabled by effective guidance and technical support. The following material in this toolkit will assist you in being better equipped to manage the often difficult-to-discuss, themes, issues and scenarios that arise in these minors cases. This toolkit will assist you in sorting out the legal terms, professional jargon and some of the dynamics that accompany these cases.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
________________________________________________________________ The authors of The Juvenile Justice and Immigration Toolkit are grateful for the assistance of many staff within USCCB/MRS who contributed to technical advising, consulting, editing and support: Jaime Duckett, Rebecca Trego, Hilary Chester, Beth Englander, Nathalie Lummert, Kathryn Kuennen, Laura Gardner and Jacquelin Zubko.

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FAQs
________________________________________________________________ What is the most important thing I should be doing on these cases? (Page 7) What kinds of safety precautions should I take with juvenile justice-related cases? (Page 7) How much interaction should I have with the minors probation officer? (Page 8) What are some of the discrepancies between immigration and conditions of probation/probation requirements? (Page 8) What should I do if I see indications that the minor continues to be involved in gang activity or other forms of delinquency? (Page 9) What if the minor is rearrested? (Page 10) What if the sponsor decides they no longer wish to care for the minor? (Page 10) What should be done if the minor goes to live somewhere else? (Page 11) How might a juvenile delinquency history impact a minors chances for immigration relief in the future? (Page 11)

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What is the most important thing I should be doing on these cases? As soon as it is reasonably possible, begin to impress upon both the minor and the sponsor that the Family Reunification Program is a special program serving undocumented minors who arrive in the U.S. Ensure that they understand that this program was offered to them with the understanding that they would abide by the conditions set forth by the Office of Refugee Resettlements (ORR) Division of The minor is basically under a Unaccompanied Childrens Services (DUCS). In microscope until their short, the minor is 1) expected to get along with immigration case is finalized it his sponsor and other family/household is in the minors best interest to members, 2) attend school and 3) refrain from refrain from any behaviors or any illegal activity and abide by any court activities that would draw orders. negative attention to them The minor is basically under a microscope until their immigration case is finalized and depending on the outcome of their case, perhaps longer. The minor and the sponsor should both know that it is in the minors best interest to refrain from any behaviors or activities that would draw negative attention to them, or encourage any such attention from law enforcement officials. Negative, illegal behaviors could ultimately result in a minor being arrested and/or detained/incarcerated. This could later adversely impact their immigration proceeding outcomes.

What kinds of safety precautions should I take with juvenile justice-related cases? During the family reunification process, all of the adults in the home are required to complete criminal background checks. In most cases, USCCB has this information prior to the first home visit, and will provide this information to the local worker. This information will be used to identify and address issues early on, including local workers safety. There may; however, be circumstances that will allow for the first home visit to occur pending completion of criminal background check(s). If during a home visit, there is another adult in the home that was not listed in the original referral, then the worker should ask who the adult is and what their role, if any, will be in caring for the minor. If in any way, you feel unsafe or threatened during an interview, please use your own judgment, leave as soon as you can and inform your Childrens Service Specialist (CSS) as soon as possible.

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How much interaction should I have with the minors probation officer? Your interaction with a minors probation officer (PO) is case-specific. If the minor has been following their conditions of probation without any issues, it may be likely that your direct involvement and communication with the PO may be minimal or none at all. However, minors who fail to comply with their conditions of probation may need more support in abiding by these conditions, as well as encouragement to initiate their own contact with their PO. When the sponsor or the case worker [...] updates the PO, it can make the minor believe that he/she is not the most important person in his/her own life situation.

Whenever possible, its most appropriate for the minor to be the one to both contact and follow-up with their probation officer on their own. This arrangement is less taxing on the sponsor and the provider agency and has the added benefit of making the minor more accountable. This is something that you want to promote and encourage as their service provider and specifically in juvenile justice-related cases. When the sponsor or the caseworker is the one who updates the PO on what the minor is doing, it can make the minor believe that he/she is not the most important person in his/her own life situation. This is something you want to work to avoid because it is disempowering. Adolescents are especially ego-centric. They need to believe that they are most important and what they do really matters and has an impact. When this is in serious doubt, an adolescent with an already questionable sense of self and an added trauma history can easily become apathetic and reckless in regard to their thoughts, ideas and ultimately their behavior. Allowing them to take as much responsibility as is reasonably possible for their situation feeds this desire and need.

What are some of the discrepancies between immigration and conditions of probation/probation requirements? Sometimes a minors conditions of probation may dictate that the minor be involved in commercial ...support the minor in finding a work activities; however, according to way to remain compliant with the immigration statutes, minors who are in the terms and conditions of their U.S. under the Family Reunification program probation by becoming engaged are in open immigration proceedings and in structured and productive are not legally able to work without a specific activitieswithout compromising permit to do so. It is important, that the minor their special status and the sponsor understand this in order for them, in conjunction with you, the local provider, to be able to educate the PO in this regard.
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It would be important to discuss with the PO other alternatives to employment for the minor. The goal here is to support the minor in finding a way to remain compliant with the terms and conditions of their probation by becoming engaged in structured and productive activities (beyond school) without compromising their special status under the Family Reunification Program. Activities such as volunteering or finding placement in an internship may satisfy this requirement. What should I do if I see indications that the minor continues to be involved in gang activity or other forms of delinquency? If you observe any behaviors or actions that seem to show that the minor may still be involved in markedly negative or criminal behavior, work to address your concerns directly with both the minor and the minors sponsor. Often we do not like to address issues that may generate unease or tension or those that we feel may be premature; however, addressing problematic behaviors early on often does much to prevent more difficult situations later. It would be important to ensure that both the minor and the sponsor understand that the Family Reunification program is one that was specially-designed to prevent minors from having to remain in federal custody and in traditional detention facilities or group homes. The Family Reunification program allows minors to avoid the safety hazards and unpleasantness of residing in detached, impersonal facilities without their families or the comfort and support of being with members of their own cultural and ethnic group while they continue with their immigration proceedings. Entering the Family Reunification program affords minors unique conditions and protections, including the ability for minors to be with their families in the community while their immigration cases are still pending. Taking part in The Family Reunification Program is a special opportunity that should be fully understood, appreciated and protected. Although the program allows minors to remain in the country and offers support services to minors and their families, it is not permanent, nor is it a form of immigration relief that grants the legal right to remain in the U.S. indefinitely. Review with the minor and his/her family the possible consequences of continuing the negative behaviors. These can be, but are not limited to 1) receiving a warrant for their arrest due to violation of their conditions of probation; 2) being detained and transferred back to federal custody only to begin the process of family reunification or removal proceedings all over again and/or 3) making a cycle of the process of delinquency, detention and reunification while under age, but eventually being turned over to the standard (non-juvenile) Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention/incarceration system after age 18. In this case, they will have less of a chance of achieving permanent status due to now having an expanded criminal history and having reached the age of majority (18).

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What if the minor is rearrested? As mentioned previously, a minor can be detained and possibly return to federal custody, and have the whole family reunification process start over again. Family reunification and release from custody is also not guaranteed. If the minor is rearrested and transferred to DUCS/federal custody, it is possible for release to be denied a second time. This can result in the minor being removed to his country of origin. If the minor is re-arrested and transferred to DUCS/federal There have been cases where the custody, it is possible for minor is detained by the juvenile court release to be denied a second for a short period of time after time...the minor [could] be to complete a previous detainment removed to his country of that was not fully served. In origin. these cases, the minor is returned to their family after completing their detention adjudication. In either case, it would be important to consult with your Childrens Services Specialist (CSS) to discuss the needs of the case and whether services should continue as they were, or intensify, or if it would be best for the case to be closed.

What if the sponsor decides they no longer wish to care for the minor? Please remind the sponsor of their responsibility, and that he/she knowingly and voluntarily signed a document with the United States government agreeing to sponsor the minor. If necessary, review the Roles and ...remind the sponsor of their Responsibilities of Sponsorship with the responsibility, and that he/she sponsor. Such cases have occurred, knowingly and voluntarily especially when the sponsor is not a signed a document with the biological parent. United States government agreeing to sponsor the If the sponsor abandons the minor, asks minor. him/her to leave the home, or places him/her in the home of another person, notify your CSS immediately and follow your agencies and/or state guidance/protocols regarding mandatory reporting to child welfare authorities. If the minor is in another persons home and the local provider/USCCB is able to continue services to the minor, this should be done. If the minor moves a significant distance, and it is no longer reasonable for the original local case worker to provide services, continue to work with your CSS, as USCCB continues to find another local service provider.

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What should be done if the minor goes to live somewhere else? If a minor moves to another location (with or ...all physical/geographical without with the sponsor), you should moves by the minor should be notify your CSS as soon as possible. reported. Unauthorized moves You should also inform the minor and of this type can, in and of the sponsor of the importance for minor themselves, be cause for failing to notify his/her PO, as any and all to comply with conditions of physical/geographical moves by the probation. minor should be reported. Unauthorized moves of this type can, in and of themselves, be cause for failing to comply with conditions of probation, which can result in a warrant and an arrest of the minor. Upon being notified, if necessary, the PO and juvenile court may need to submit a transfer request for probation services on behalf of the minor. This is especially so if the minor moves to a new county or state. The minor and the sponsor should understand that a state does not have to accept a request for transfer. If a request for transfer is rejected, the minor could be ordered to return to the state of origin and/or receive other law enforcement-related consequences. If a request is approved, a Change of Address (COA) will need to be completed by the sponsor and submitted to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and a petition for a Change of Venue (COV) will need to be presented to immigration court in order to continue the immigration case in the minors new jurisdiction. Your CSS can guide you through these procedures. If the minor is interested in returning to their country of origin, you should inform your CSS of this as well. The sponsor should be advised to consult with his/her immigration attorney on how to proceed with this request. If there is no attorney, the sponsor can contact their local consular office for guidance. How might a juvenile delinquency history impact a minors chances for immigration relief in the future? This question should be directed towards the minors immigration attorney. Providing legal counsel/advice is beyond the scope of services that your Childrens Services Specialist (CSS), or that you, as a provider, can offer. Neither the local provider, nor USCCB can ever offer such advice, or ever guarantee any sort of immigration relief. A documented delinquency history does not always have a seriously adverse effect on the minors immigration case. This is especially so if the minor has a strong case for relief. Outcomes are case-specific. As previously stated, only the minors attorney can legally advise the minor and assist him or her in preparing a legal course of action.

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IMMIGRATION AND JUVENILE JUSTICE DYNAMICS
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Flowchart adapted from: Policy Brief Building Bridges to Benefit Youth National Collaboration for Youth & National Juvenile Justice Network Youth: Guide for Advocates and Service Providers Policy Brief No. 2, November 2006

INTERIOR APPREHENSIONS (ICE) Arrested in immigration sweeps, or for violating U.S. Immigration Law Referred to ICE by Local Officials as Undocumented

JUVENILE/DEPENDENCY COURT

Housed in ICE Facilities for up to 72 Hours

Arrested For an Offense

Discovered After Parent/Guardian Death or in Neglect/Abuse Case

PENDING PROCEEDINGS

Referred to ICE (may remain in juvenile facilities with ICE notice) Unaccompanied Placed in ORR 3 Facility

Housed in Foster Care/Juvenile Residential Facility

Placed w/Relative or in Foster Home/Group Juvenile Residential Facility

Accompanied Housed in DRO or Family Shelter, 1 if available

Unaccompanied Release into custody of sponsor if 2 available

ORR Locates Potential Sponsor

In the U.S. Legally: Apply to adjust immigration status

May apply for SJIS or other Visas under court 4 jurisdiction

Reunify with family here or REMOVED to Country of Origin

EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW (Immigration Court)

Removal Proceedings by ICE

Granted asylum or Visa by CIS or allowed to withdraw application

CHART TERMS CIS: Citizen and Immigration Services DRO: Detention and Removal Office ICE: Immigration and Customs Enforcement ORR: Office of Refugee Resettlement SJIS: Special Immigrant Juvenile Status CHART NOTES The Detention and Removal Office (DRO) at Immigration and Customs enforcement attempts to keep families together by finding available space in a family shelter. However, on occasion, such as when criminal charges are filed against the parent or bed space is not available, the juvenile is separated from the adult relative and is treated as unaccompanied juvenile under Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR)s jurisdiction. ICE or ORR will run fingerprint and criminal checks on potential sponsors to make sure that sponsors can provide proper care for the children. As of October 2004, ORR oversaw 41 facilities (group homes. Shelters, etc.) nationwide, with a total dedicated capacity of approximately 920 beds. The facilities provide housing with differing levels of security restrictions. The average time in 2003 for a child in ORR custody was 45 days. It had 6,200 unaccompanied youth in custody in 2004. Three percent of the children were placed in secure detention centers. Special Immigrant Juvenile Status is for children under the juvenile court jurisdiction and unable to reunify with family to apply for legal permanent residence. Other visa options for undocumented immigrant children include: Violence Against Women Act (for children abused by a U.S. citizen or permanent resident parent); Family Visas (for children with a U.S. citizen family member); U Visas (for victims of serious crimes who are helpful to the criminal investigation); T Visas (for victims of severe trafficking); Family Unity (for children of persons who obtained resident status through special amnesty programs of the late 1980s); Asylum (for children who fear prosecution in their home country); Temporary Protected Status (for children from countries that have experienced unstable circumstances).

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TERMS YOU SHOULD KNOW

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________________________________________________________________ Accompanied Youth: A youth who is with a parent, legal guardian, or other immediate adult relative. Adjudication: The hearing at which a judge hears witnesses, receives evidence, and makes a finding about whether the youth was involved in the offense. Adjustment of Immigration Status: The procedure allowing children already in the U.S. to apply for a different immigrant status. Children admitted to the U.S. in a nonimmigrant or refugee category may have their status changed to that of lawful permanent resident if eligible Asylum/Refugee: The protection provided by the U.S. to children found to be unable or unwilling to return to their country of nationality because of persecution or a wellfounded fear of persecution. Asylees/refugees are eligible to adjust to lawful permanent resident status after one year of continuous presence in the U.S. After Care: Juvenile aftercare is similar to adult parole. After care is the period after out-of-home placement. It is when a minor is still under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court system. A minor on aftercare is generally supervised and may have several requirements that he or she must meet (e.g., attending school, staying away from delinquent peers). Cancellation of Removal: A discretionary benefit adjusting status from that of removable, undocumented youth to one lawfully admitted for a permanent residence. Application for cancellation of removal is made during the hearing before an immigration judge. Change of Venue: The transfer of a case from a court in one location or jurisdiction to a court in another, or from one court to another in the same judicial district. Change of venue often takes place for reasons of fairness, or for the convenience of the parties or of the witness(es). Conditions of Probation: When the Courts impose probation or community control as a sanction, the probationer is bound by agreeing to, and in most cases signing, an actual, specific list of items called standard conditions of probation. The list includes things that the probationer has agreed that he will or will not do during the course of his probation time. Some of the standard conditions of probation are as follows: Report to probation as directed Permit probation officers to visit him or her at his or her home or school Remain within a specified geographic area Not associate with persons engaged in a criminal act Submit to random drug testing

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Often the courts impose additional special conditions of probation. These special conditions of probation often depend on what the criminal charge is and typically include one or more of the following: Community service hours Drug treatment (residential or out-patient) Anger management class Violating any of these standard conditions or special conditions of probation is commonly called a "technical violation" and will most often result in a violation of probation being filed and the probationer getting arrested on a no-bond warrant. Removal (formerly, deportation): The formal removal of children from the U.S. when they are found removable for violating immigration laws. This may be based on grounds or inadmissibility or removability. Removal is ordered by an immigration judge. Removal functions are managed by ICE. Detainment: Immigration detention is the policy of holding individuals suspected of visa violations, illegal entry or unauthorized arrival, and those subject to removal and removal in detention until a decision is made by immigration authorities to grant a visa and release them into the community, or to repatriate them to their country of departure. Detention Hearing: At a detention hearing, the judge must decide whether to continue detaining the minor or whether the law violation can be safely and effectively resolved if the minor goes home in the meantime. The judge may decide to release the minor from detention and monitor his or her actions through an alternative form of supervision, such as electronically monitored home detention or community-based detention. Delinquent Offense: An offense, which if committed by an adult, would constitute a crime under the laws of that jurisdiction. Disposition: This term can be used to refer to how a case is resolved. However, within juvenile justice, the term is used to refer to a courts sanctions placed on a minor that was found to be involved in a delinquent offense. Diversion: A process that may take place at the arrest, intake, prosecutorial, or court level. It refers to the minors movement out of the system, avoiding further penetration into the juvenile justice system. It may or may not include referrals for treatment and it may or may not have requirements for treatment associated with the process. Guardian ad Litem: Can be either an attorney or a volunteer, appointed by the court to protect the rights and advocate for the best interests of a minor involved in court proceedings.

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Inadmissible: Children seeking admission to the U.S., but who do not meet the criteria for admission. These minors may be placed in removal proceedings or, under certain circumstances, allowed to withdraw their application for admission. Incarceration: Refers to the courts commitment of a minor to a secure, communitybased or juvenile correctional facility. Intake: When minors are deemed to be engaging in a delinquent or illegal offense, they are referred to and processed through a courts juvenile intake unit. This unit is responsible for screening and investigating the referral, determining best the method of handling the offense and sometimes making additional referrals to other agencies when appropriate. The process may involve an interview with the minor, the minors caretakers, school personnel, other agencies (if involved) and the referring person. Lawful Permanent Resident: Any person, who is not a citizen of the U.S., but who is residing in the U.S. with legal recognition. Port of Entry: Any location in the U.S. or its territories that is designated as a point of entry for non-U.S. and U.S. citizens. All district offices where immigrants adjust their immigration status are also considered ports of entry. Removal Proceedings: Removal hearings are conducted to determine whether certain aliens are subject to removal from the country. The distinction between exclusion and removal proceedings has been eliminated, and aliens subject to removal from the United States are now all placed in removal proceedings. Thus, the removal proceeding is now generally the sole procedure for determining whether an alien is inadmissible, removable, or eligible for relief from removal. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which absorbed the functions of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), is responsible for commencing a removal proceeding. If the DHS alleges a violation of immigration laws, it has the discretion to "serve" the alien with a charging document, known as a Notice to Appear. This document orders the individual to appear before an Immigration Judge, and advises him or her of, among other things: Nature of the proceedings against the individual; Individual's alleged acts that violated the law; Individual's decision of whether or not to retain an attorney; and Consequences of failing to appear at scheduled hearings. Removal proceedings generally require an Immigration Judge to make two findings: (1) a determination of the alien's removability from the United States, and (2) whether the alien is eligible for a form of relief from removal.

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Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS): A permanent status designation for children under the juvenile court jurisdiction and unable to reunify with family to apply for legal permanent residence. Transfer Request: Initiates the process for transferring a juvenile probation case in between cities, counties, or states in the U.S. The process is usually started by contacting the minors probation officer and requesting the transfer. Interstate transfer requests go through a process of Interstate Compact. During the process the state holding the probation order contacts the state where the minor intends to transfer and provides them with the necessary information about the minor, their case and progress made on the minors probation. The receiving state is not obligated to accept the request and may therefore accept it or reject it. Usually, the most important factors in the decision to either accept or reject a transfer request are 1) nature of the offense more serious offenses may be less likely to be accepted and 2) how successful the minor has been on his/her probation up until the time of the transfer request if the minor has complied with his conditions of probation, they have a better chance of having their transfer request received more favorably. Unaccompanied Youth: A child, who has no lawful status in the United States, has not attained 18 years of age; has no parent or legal caretaker in the U.S. and/or has no parent or legal caretaker available to them in the U.S. to provide physical custody and care for their well-being. Voluntary Departure: Departure from the U.S. without an order of removal. The departure may or may not have been preceded by a hearing before an immigration judge. This type of departure admits that the minor was removable by way of a removal order, but does not necessarily bar the minor from seeking admission at a port of entry at some time in the future in the same way that an order of removal may do. Warrant (Arrest): An arrest warrant is a legal document, often issued by a court of law, by and on behalf of the state, which authorizes the arrest and detention of an individual.

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WORKS CITED/CONSULTED
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Building Bridges to Benefit Youth - Undocumented Immigrant Youth: Guide for Advocates and Service Providers Policy Brief No. 2, November 2006 www.gcir.org/system/files/ImmigrationBrief.pdf National Council of La Raza Latino Youth, Immigration, and the Juvenile Justice System Marlene Sallo, (March 26, 2011) Issue: Juvenile Justice, Juvenile Justice Publication Type: Fact Sheet www.nclr.org/images/uploads/publications/Latino_Youth_Immigration_and_the_J uvenile_Justice_System.pdf The Intersection of Juvenile Justice and Considerations for Legal Professionals, Probation Officers, and Social Service Providers (PowerPoint Presentation) The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops/MRS Childrens Services and Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. Rebecca Trego, MSW Sarah Bronstein, Esq. Matias Robles, MSW USCCB/MRS Family Reunification Program Webinar: Juvenile Justice Part II Jaime Duckett, MSW Lucy Brigman-Caceres, MSW

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON JUVENILE JUSTICE AND IMMIGRATION


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Bridging Refugee Youth and Childrens Services - Caseworkers Toolkit on Special Immigrant Juvenile Status http://www.brycs.org/SIJS Catholic Legal Immigration Network Online Trainings http://cliniclegal.org/ Catholic Legal Immigration Network - National Pro Bono Project for Children http://cliniclegal.org/pro-kids Immigrant Justice Network www.immigrantjusticenetwork.org Living in the U.S.: A Guide for Immigrant Youth KYR Guide in English & Spanish (under Immigrant Youth tab) www.ilrc.org

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Sponsor-Minor Handout USER GUIDE
________________________________________________________________ Sponsor-Minor Handouts in the Safe Passages Family Reunification Toolkit Series are client-friendly resources designed to facilitate difficult conversations. By using these cartoons and their humor, local providers can broach subjects that are often difficult to discuss. The cartoon in this toolkit lends a humorous bend to the otherwise lofty subject of Mental Health and Substance Abuse as it relates to minors and sponsors in the Family Reunification program. Humor, directness and a little bit of cynicism is the way of many of todays youth. The authors of the toolkit series have designed the cartoons with this idea in mind. The cartoons are not stand-alone didactic materials or self-help tutorials. They are intended to be presented by a local provider during a home or office visit. The cartoons are designed to assist in establishing rapport, enabling conversations and planting seeds of thought in the mind of a minor and/or sponsor. For this to happen, the local provider will need to engage the family and utilize the other sections of this toolkit as support. Through full conversations, providers can help families understand the larger issues and ideas behind the scenes depicted in the cartoons and included in the whole of this toolkit.

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