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A COMPREHENSIVE PROJECT REPORT ON CUSTOMER USAGE LEVEL OF AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENTS NAMELY

COMBINE HARVESTER & TRANSPLANTER IN ORISSA

IN IMRB INTERNATIONAL SUBMITTED TO THE PARTIAL FULFILLMENT FOR THE REQUIREMENT OF THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA) SUBMITTED BY SITAKANTA BEHERA REGD NO:-0906260072 SESSION- 2009-2011.

UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF


CORPORATE GUIDE Mr. ASHUTOSH CHOUDHURY FIELD MANAGER IMRB INTERNATIONAL, BHUBANESWAR FACULTY GUIDE Prof. RAJEEV KUMAR PANDA FACULTY, MARKETING RIMS.

ROURKELA, ORISSA.

ROURKELA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, ROURKELA

Certificate of the company Date-08.12.2010 To Whom It May Concern

This is to certify that Mr. Sitakanta Behera, student of Rourkela institute of management studies, Rourkela had accepted specific assignments on freelance basis against payment of agreed fees. These assignments were given to him as a part of his summer training and related to fieldwork on market research projects undertaken by us on behalf of our clients.

Sitakanta undertook these assignments in between 1st July 09 to 17th August 09.

He had completed all assignments given to him to our satisfaction.

I wish Sitakanta every success in life.

For IMRB international

Ashutosh Chaudhury Field Manager- Bhubaneswar

ROURKELA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, ROURKELA

CERTIFICATE OF THE INTERNAL GUIDE

This is to certify that the project titled CUSTOMER USAGE LEVEL OF AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENTS NAMELY COMBINE HARVESTER &

TRANSPLANTER IN ORISSA is an original work of Mr. Sitakanta Behera bearing University Registration 0906260072, a student of Rourkela Institute of Management Studies, Rourkela & is being submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of the degree of Master of Business Administration of Biju Patnaik University of Technology, Rourkela. The summer project report has not been submitted earlier to this Institute or to any other University/Institution for the fulfillment of requirement of a course of study.

Date:

Name and Signature of the Guide Prof. Rajeev Kumar Panda Faculty, Marketing RIMS.

ROURKELA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, ROURKELA

DECLARATION

I, Sitakanta Behera, pursuing MBA (Master Of Business Administration) from Rourkela Institute of Management Studies, Rourkela do hereby declare that this project on CUSTOMER USAGE LEVEL OF AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENTS NAMELY COMBINE HARVESTER & TRANSPLANTER IN ORISSA undertaken by me is a true work of myself and is not submitted to any other university or published at any other time before the purpose of any degree. All data regarding IMRB International is solely meant for academic use only.

Sitakanta Behera Regd. No. 0906260072

Place: Date:

ROURKELA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, ROURKELA

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The successful completion of the present research work conducted by me has been possible under the able and sincere guidance of Mr. Ashutosh Chaudhury (Field Manager, IMRB) his persistent supervision and cooperation has been the source of inspiration for me carries the survey. My deepest gratitude to him and Mr. Chandan Nayak (Field Executive, IMRB) and Mr. Laba Kishore Dalai (Team leader) for making my task easier with their profound advice which has been of immense value to me.

At last I thanks to all respondents, whom I interviewed and who has given me their valuable time and views regarding this topic and they has helped me to understand the issues related to this topic.

Sitakanta Behera Regd. No. 0906260072

ROURKELA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, ROURKELA

CONTENTS Chapter-I Introduction Page No.

1.1 Background of the study 1.2 Objectives of the study 1.3 Scope of the study 1.4Geographical area of study

1 2 2 3

Chapter-II

Secondary Literature Review 4 6 7 8 10 15

2.1 Agricultural Marketing in India 2.2 Combine Harvesters 2.3 Transplanters 2.4 Previous Studies on Agricultural marketing 2.5 Marketing as a concept 2.6 Marketing Research

Chapter-III

Company Profile IMRB 16 16 20 20

3.1 Introduction to the company 3.2 IMRB International 3.3 Clients of IMRB International 3.4 Companys Vision & Mission

ROURKELA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, ROURKELA

Chapter-IV 4.1 Data Source 4.2 Sampling 4.3 Data Collection

Research Methodology

Page No. 22 22 23 23 26

4.4 Sampling Methodology 4.5 Limitations and future research

Chapter-V

Data Analysis & Interpretation 27 34

5.1 Data Analysis & Interpretation 5.2 Findings

Chapter-VI 6.1 Suggestion 6.2 Conclusion Appendix : Bibliography Questionnaire

Suggestion & Conclusion. 35 36

37 38

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CHAPTER-1

INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background of the Study Orissa is an agrarian state. Almost70% population of the state is dependent on agriculture. The agriculture sector contributes only about 26% of the GSDP, with more than70% population dependence resulting in low per capita income in farm sector. The state has about 64.09 lakh hectare cultivable area out of total geographical area of 155.711 lakh hectare. About 40.17 lakh hectare of cultivable area is acidic soil and approx 4.00 lakh hectare suffers from salinity. About 3.00 lakh hectare of cultivable area suffers from water logging. About 26% SGDP contributed by agriculture. Rice is the main crop in state. For the low productive low level of mechanism is another big problem.

The combine harvester, or simply combine, is a machine that harvests crops. It combines into a single operation processes that previously require among the crops harvested with a combine are oats, rye, barley, corn (maize), soybeans and flax (linseed). The waste straw left behind on the field is the remaining dried stems and leaves of the crop with limited nutrients which is either chopped and spread on the field or baled for feed and bedding for livestock. The combine harvester was invented in the United States by in 1834, and early versions were pulled by horse or mule teams. By 1860, combine harvesters with a cutting width of several meters were used on American farms.] In 1882, the Australian Hugh Victor McKay had a similar idea and developed the first commercial combine harvester in 1885, some of them quite large, were drawn by mule or horse teams and used a bull wheel to provide power. Later, steam power was used, and George Stockton Berry integrated the combine with a steam engine using straw to heat the boiler. Tractor-drawn, PTO-powered combines were then used for a time. These combines used a shaker to separate the grain from the chaff and straw-walkers (grates with
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small teeth on an eccentric shaft) to eject the straw while retaining the grain. Tractor drawn combines evolved to have separate gas or diesel engines to power the grain separation.

1.2 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

1.

To understand the perception of farmers towards the new technological

agricultural products. 2. To find out the growth pattern in the acceptability of technologically

superior agricultural products. 3. To know the awareness level of farmers towards Combine Harvesters

and Transplanters.

1.3

SCOPE OF THE STUDY

Our research has the following scope: i. What is to be needed to take your business in a progressive situation? ii. Finding out the new market for expansion of business. iii. Making modification in the existing product as per the demand of the customers. iv. The product is known to the farmers or it is completely new to them. v. Understand the potential customers.

ROURKELA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, ROURKELA

1.4

AREA OF STUDY

We have done research over three districts in Orissa on behalf of IMRB International and we have collected relevant data. These three districts are PURI, BALANGIR & BARGARH. We also visited three villages in each of the above mentioned districts. First we went to Puri district then we went to Balangir. At last we went to Bargarh & completed our research.

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CHAPTER-II

SECONDARY LITERATURE REVIEW After green revolution there is a dramatical change in agricultural sector, as the world is dynamic we should have to cope up with other change. My scope of research was confined to Odisha only. I have visited different area as assigned by the company and met different people categorically- user, non user, owner etc. Among the people I have met most are nonuser .That means potentiality of these products in Odisha market from analysis of present situation that leads to confusion. As for economic condition of people the agricultural sector cannot be modernized. On my finding most of respondent are 60% non-user and 30% are user and10% are owner. I asked different question relating to their general way of cultivation and collect information about the awareness of these two equipments by showing their utility.

2.1 AGRICULTURAL MARKETING IN INDIA

Farm mechanization helps in effective utilization of inputs to increase the Productivity of land and labour. Besides it helps in reducing the drudgery in farm Operations. The early agricultural mechanization in India was greatly influenced by the technological development in England. Irrigation pumps, tillage equipment, chaff cutters, tractors and threshers were gradually introduced for farm mechanization. The high yielding varieties with assured irrigation and higher rate of application of fertilizers gave higher returns that enabled farmers to adopt mechanization inputs, especially after Green revolution in 1960s. The development of power thresher in 1960, with integrated Bhusa making attachment and aspirator blower and mechanical sieves for grain and straw separation, was the major achievement of Indian engineers. These threshers were widely adopted by the farmers. Gradually demand for other farm machinery such as reapers and combine harvesters also increased. Equipment for tillage, sowing, irrigation, plant protection and threshing have been widely accepted by the farmers. Even farmers with small holdings utilize many improved farm equipment through custom hiring to ensure timeliness of farming operations. The present trend in agricultural mechanization is for high capacity machines through custom hiring and for contractual field
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operations. However, mechanization of horticulture, plantation crops and commercial agriculture is yet to be introduced in the country. The pace of farm mechanization in the country accelerated with the manufacture of agricultural equipment by the local industries. With the modest beginning of manufacture of tractors in 1960s with foreign collaboration, to-day the Indian farm machinery industries meet the bulk of the requirement of mechanization inputs and also export. The manufacture of agricultural machinery in India is quite complex comprising of village artisans, tiny units, small-scale industries, State Agro-Industrial Development Corporations and organized tractor, engine and processing equipment industries. Traditional hand tools and bullock drawn implements are largely fabricated by village craftsmen (blacksmith and carpenters) and small-scale industries. The small scale industries depend upon public institutions for technological support. These industries, however, upgrade these designs and production processes with experience. Organized sectors confine to the manufacture of machines like tractors, engines, milling and dairying equipment. These industries have adopted sophisticated production technologies, and some of them match international standards. The enhanced scope of import of technology (product designs and manufacturing process) by organized sector and entry of foreign investors is likely to accelerate exports. Since cost of production of farm machinery in India is more competitive due to lower labour wages, the importers from various Countries will find Indian farm equipment more attractive. Indian products, however, shall need improvements in quality for gaining major export growth. For this, mass production of critical and fast wearing components and their standardization would greatly help.

The Agricultural Equipment market in India is estimated to be valued at INR 299.1 bn in 2010 and has huge potential to grow. The increasing credit available to farmers and the benefits of productivity due to mechanization has created a demand for agricultural machinery. Tractors and tractor driven products account for the maximum share of usage as its the most commonly used farm equipment. The increasing credit amount for farmers ascertained by the government and rising productivity resulting from using farm machinery is encouraging farmers to opt for farm equipments.

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2.3 COMBINE HARVESTER a) CONVENTIONAL COMBINE HARVESTERThe cut crop is carried up the feeder throat (commonly called the "feeder house") by a chain and flight elevator, then fed into the threshing mechanism of the combine, consisting of a rotating threshing drum (commonly called the "cylinder"), to which grooved steel bars (rasp bars) are bolted. The rasp bars thresh or separate the grains and chaff from the straw through the action of the cylinder against the concave, a shaped "half drum", also fitted with steel bars and a meshed grill, through which grain, chaff and smaller debris may fall, whereas the straw, being too long, is carried through onto the straw walkers. This action is also allowed due to the fact that the grain is heavier than the straw, which causes it to fall rather than "float" across from the cylinder/concave to the walkers. The drum speed is variably adjustable on most machines, whilst the distance between the drum and concave is finely

adjustable fore, aft and together, to achieve optimum separation and output. b) HILL SIDE LEVELING: In northwest of the United States the combine is retrofitted wa hydraulic hillside leveling system. This allows the combine to harvest the steep but fertile soil in the region. Hillsides can be as steep as a50%slope. Gleaner, IH and CasIH, John Deere, and others all have made combines with this hillside leveling systemand local machine shops have fabricated them as an aftermarket add-on.pictures below show the technology. The first leveling technology was developed by Holt Co., a California firm, in 1891.] Modern leveling came into being with the invention and patent of a level sensitive mercury switch system invented by Raymond Alvah Hanson in 1946. Raymond's son, Raymond, Jr., produced leveling systems exclusively for John Deere combines until 1995 as R. A. Hanson Company, Inc. In 1995, his son, Richard, purchased the company from his father and renamed it RAHCO International, Inc. In April, 2007, the company was renamed The Factory Company International, Inc.[14]Production continues to this day.

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MANTAINING THRESHING SPEED Another technology that is sometimes used on combines is a continuously variable transmission. This allows the ground speed of the machine to be varied while maintaining a constant engine and threshing speed. It is desirable to keep the threshing speed constant since the machine will typically have been adjusted to operate best at a certain speed.

2.4 TRANSPLANTER: Rice Transplanter is a specialized transplanter fitted to transplant rice seedlings onto paddy field. Although rice is grown in areas other than Asia, rice Transplanters are used mainly in East, Southeast, and South Asia. This is because rice can be grown without transplanting, by simply sowing seeds on field, and farmers outside Asia prefer this fuss-free way at the expense of reduced yield. A common rice transplanter comprises: a seedling tray like a shed roof on which mat type rice nursery is set; a seedling tray shifter that shifts the seedling tray like a carriage of

typewriters; and plural pickup forks that pick up a seedling from mat type nursery on the seedling tray and put the seedling into the earth, as if the seedling were taken between human fingers.

Machine

transplanting

using

rice

Transplanters

requires

considerably

lesstimeandlaborthanmanualtransplanting.Itincreasestheapproximate area that a person can plant from 700 to 10,000 square meters per day.

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However, rice Transplanters are considerably expensive for almost all Asian small-hold farmers. Rice Transplanters are popular in industrialized countries where labor cost is high, for example in South Korea. Rice Transplanters were first developed in Japan in 1960s, whereas the earliest attempt to mechanize rice transplanting dates back to late 19th century. In Japan, development and spread of rice Transplanters progressed rapidly during 1970s and 1980.

2.5 Previous Studies on Agricultural Marketing Agriculture contributes about 30% of the Net State Domestic Product (NSDP) and is, therefore, the backbone of the States rural economy. It provides employment both direct and indirect to about 73% of the total work force. About 39% of the total geographical area is the net sown area, which is 61 lakh ha. In the kharif season, irrigation facilities are available in 39% of cultivated area. Out of 30 districts of the State, 8 KBK districts are characterized by low production and productivity. Considering the importance of the

agricultural sector, the State has adopted an agriculture policy since 1996 with emphasis on creation of additional irrigation facilities, crop diversification with cash crops and horticultural crops, application of modern technology and farm mechanization, promotion of private enterprises etc. There was a bumper harvest of 82.33 lakh tonnes of food grains again during 2001-02. The food grain production during 2003-04 was 77.40 lakh tonnes. The details of production targets and anticipated achievements during 2004-05 are furnished as under: (In lakh tons)
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Crops

10th

Plan Annual Plan Target 2004-05 Target Achievement

Annual Plan 2005-06 Target

Target*

Rice Wheat Maize Other Cereals Pulses Oil seeds Coconut (crore nuts) Other Horticulture Crops * Cumulative

412.95 1.83 11.19 9.79 36.50 30.73 127.00 61050

82.00 0.33 2.31 1.88 7.51 6.42 26.00 102.91

66.45 0.26 2.11 1.56 6.35 5.52 14.89 99.80

82.40 0.38 2.50 1.93 7.92 6.73 26.00 104.69

The main thrust of the Agriculture sector is on diversification of traditional cereal crops to more remunerative crops and development of horticulture and floriculture. The new

Agriculture Policy is in a formative stage. The main objective of the Policy is sustainable development in agriculture and horticulture with target growth of 4% per annum. During the Tenth Plan period average growth of agriculture has been 3.37%. All interventions in crop production including seed replacement and extension of production technologies are being made under three integrated programmes viz. the Work Plan (for Cereals and Sugarcane), ISOPOM (for Pulses, Oilseeds and Maize) and National Horticulture Mission (NHM) supplemented by programmes under the RLTAP for KBK districts. Seed replacement rate has been increased for paddy, pulses, and for cotton from 2002-03 onwards. However, it has decreased in the case of oil seeds. The major schemes proposed under agriculture include grants to State Seed Certification Agency, grants to Institute of Management for extension, Revised Long Term Action Plan (RLTAP) for KBK districts,
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grant to OUAT for agriculture, research & education etc. Besides, work plan has been proposed under centrally sponsored schemes for ISOPOM The National Horticulture Mission (NHM) is being implemented in the State from 2005-06, & the mode of macro management (work plan) has been discontinued. The rate of assistance is 100% during Tenth Plan. A Project Proposal for Rs. 75,994crore has been approved by the Government of India for the year 2005-06. The mission will be operated, broadly under A. Plantation Development including supporting infrastructure, B. Post Harvest

Infrastructure and Management, C. Mission Management components in 14 districts for 7 specific crops viz. mango, cashew, banana, ginger, turmeric, flowers and betel vine. The main schemes proposed under Cooperation are provision of share capital to cooperative credit institutions, subsidy/loan to State Cooperative Bank for agricultural credit, stabilization fund, etc.

2.5 Marketing as a concept Marketing is the process by which companies create customer interest in goods or services. It generates the strategy that underlies sales techniques, business communication, and business developments. It is an integrated process through which companies build strong customer relationship and creates value for their customers and for themselves

MARKET In marketing, the term market refers to the group of consumers or organizations that is interested in the product, has the resources to purchase the product, and permitted by law and other regulations to acquire the product. The market definition begins with the total population and progressively narrows as shown in the following diagram.

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Beginning with the total population, various terms are used to describe the market based on the level of narrowing:

Potential market - those in the total population who have interest in acquiring the

product. Available market - those in the potential market who have enough money to

buy the product. Qualified available market - those in the available market who legally are

permitted to buy the product. Target market - the segment of the qualified available market that the firm

has decided to serve (the served market). Penetrated market - those in the target market who have purchased the

product. In the above listing, "product" refers to both physical products and services. The size of the market is not necessarily fixed. For example, the size of the available
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market for a product can be increased by decreasing the products price, and the size of the qualified available market can be increased through changes in legislation that result in fewer restrictions on who can buy the product. 4P MARKETING MIX The marketing mix is probably the most famous marketing term. Its elements are the basic, tactical components of a marketing plan. Also known as the Four P's, the marketing mix elements are Price, Place, Product and Promotion.

Servicing Marketing will increase the mix to Seven Ps. They are People, Physical Evidence, and Process. Now a new Service Marketing Mix has been developed called as 7P service marketing mix for service marketing.

4P MARKETING MIX As stated above, marketing mix is created to satisfy customers and organizational objectives. Hence todays marketing strategies are more customer driven creating values form customers perspective. In reality, customers do not only purchase any product or service but they purchase the value/utility of that product or service. Through Marketing Mix a marketing manager attempts to create and deliver customer value. All elements of marketing
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mix corresponding to the value/utility. Because of services are usually produced and consumed simultaneously, customers are often present in the firms factory, interact directly with the firms personnel, and are actually part of the service production process. Also, because services are intangible, customers will often be looking for any tangible cue to help them understand the nature of the service experience. For example, in the HCL CDC (Service Sector) the design and dcor of the products as well as the appearance and attitudes of its employees will influence customer perceptions and experiences.

PRODUCT: - The term "product" refers to tangible, physical products as well as services. Under this heading a marketer needs to consider the thing that is being sold. This is not just the physical product itself, but also anything related to how it is made, packaged and named. Under this heading the marketer also needs to consider product/service options, the aftersales service, warranties, and servicing. Here are some examples of the product decisions to be made: Brand name Functionality Styling Quality Safety Packaging Repairs and Support Warranty Accessories and services

PRICE:- This heading refers to decisions about how much to charge for goods and services. It may be easy for you as a manager to neglect this aspect of the mix in favor of the more 'glamorous' promotion and product areas, but ultimately decisions over price affect the viability of a brand and the profitability of an organization. Pricing is also much more complex than you might think. Some examples of pricing decisions to be made include: Pricing strategy (skim, penetration, etc.) Suggested retail price
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Volume discounts and wholesale pricing Cash and early payment discounts Seasonal pricing Bundling Price flexibility Price discrimination

PLACE:- This heading refers to distribution. This means all aspects related to how goods and services are 'moved' from the producers to the end user. This means the coordination of retailers and/or wholesales and in the case of products the logistics involved in moving from factory/warehouse/head office, to the end user. Distribution is about getting the products to the customer. Some examples of distribution decisions include: Distribution channels Market coverage (inclusive, selective, or exclusive distribution) Specific channel members Inventory management Warehousing Distribution centers Order processing Transportation Reverse logistics Promotion Decisions

PROMOTION:- In the context of the marketing mix, promotion represents the various aspects of marketing communication, that is, the communication of information about the product with the goal of generating a positive customer response. Marketing communication decisions include. This heading refers to all types of communication that relate to a specific marketing campaign. This includes communication with retailers and distributors, communication with purchasers and end users and also internal communication with the sales force and other employees. Promotion is an area with considerable I innovation. Marketers put great efforts into finding new ways to communicate with consumers.
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Advertising Personal selling & sales force Sales promotions Public relations & publicity Public relations & publicity Limitations of the Marketing Mix Framework

2.6 MARKETING RESEARCH :

Research is the process of collecting and analyzing information about the customers you want to reach, called your target market. This information provides you with the business intelligence you need to make informed decisions. Market research can help you create a business plan, launch a new product or service, fine tune your existing products and services, expand into new markets, develop an advertising campaign, set prices, and/or select a business location. Market research and marketing research are often confused. 'Market research is simply research into a specific market. It is a very narrow concept. 'Marketing' research is much broader. It not only includes 'market research, but also areas such as research into new products, or modes of distribution such as via the Internet. Here are a couple of definitions: "Marketing research is the function that links the consumer, customer, and public to the marketer through information - information used to identify and define marketing opportunities and problems; generate, refine, and evaluate marketing actions; monitor marketing performance; and improve understanding of marketing as a process. Marketing research specifies the information required to address these issues, designs the methods for collecting information, manages and implements the data collection process, analyzes, and communicates the findings and their implications."

American Marketing association - Official Definition of Marketing Research Obviously, this is a very long and involved definition of marketing research "Marketing research is about researching the whole of a company's marketing process."

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CHAPTER- III COMPANY PROFILE 3.1 Introduction to the Company Established in 1971, IMRB International is a pioneer in market research. A member of the Kantar Group, WPPs information, insight and consulting division. IMRB's footprint extends across 11 countries - India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Dubai, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Singapore, Malaysia, Korea and London. With over 1200 full time staff, IMRB provides high quality conceptualization, strategic thinking, execution and interpretation skills. IMRB International is the only research

company in India that offers such a wide range of research based services to its clients. IMRB International's specialized areas includes consumer market research both quantitative and qualitative, industrial market research , business to business market research, social and rural market research, media research, retail research , and consumer panels. IMRB International has been offering for over 35 years, both general as well as specialist research services to clients in India and overseas. IMRB International operates out of its five full service offices in Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata, Chennai and Bangalore and is supported by 15 other regional centers for collection of survey information. 3.2 IMRB International, Over 33 years of experience in researching India. We have five full service offices and thirteen field offices in India. Our research supports 40 of the top 50 brands in the country. With one of the largest field networks for custom research, knowledge of local culture, normative databases, specialists with industry/ sector knowledge, and an international toolkit of research methods, IMRB International is uniquely positioned to provide innovative solutions to any marketing issue. Cygnus is IMRBs Knowledge Management System which connects every IMRB executive and helps enhance the quality of the thinking that we provide to Clients. Product and Services IMRB International has eight specialist units - 1)Probe Qualitative Research (PQR) 2)Social and Rural Research Institute (SRI) 3)Media & Panel
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Group 4)CSMM: Partners in Managing Stakeholder Relationships 5)BIRD: Research-based Consultancy for B2B and Technology Markets 6)etechnology Group@IMRB 7)IMRB MindTech Systems: Software development house 8)Abacus Research: Data Processing House to the World IMRB International, in association with Mill ward Brown, offers Advanced Tracking Programmers, Brand Dynamics and the Link pre-test as well as other MB services throughout this region. With over 1000 ads pre-tested, over 200 on-going ad and brand health tracking research studies, over 400 brand equity studies, we have a good understanding of how communications work, what works best and how we can best leverage the advantage that our Clients brand has over competition. Probe Qualitative Research is one of the pioneers of qualitative research in India and has executives specially trained in India and overseas in qualitative research methods. Drawing on learning from ethnography, psychology and anthropology, PQR has created a validated tool-kit for new product development, brand launch, communication and brand building and strengthening. Ask to use PQRs Qualitative toolkit for actionable insights The Stairway to Success. The Media Group has probably one of the most comprehensive media research services anywhere in the world whether it is Press (NRS, measuring print passion), Television (TAM People meter systems, Mapping minds and moods), Radio (continuous radio ratings), Outdoor (signage effectiveness), and Internet and Media Multiplier studies. We run the countries only Household Purchase Panel with over 70,000 households from 114 towns and 700 villages providing data on a monthly basis for over 50 product categories. So if you wanted to segment by shopping and usage behavior, or model the sales effects of a price change or a promotional offer, the data, the models and the minds are available to you. The Social and Rural Research Institute specializes in social research and in conducting research on emerging rural markets. It has staff with special expertise in conducting Knowledge, Attitudes & Practice (KAP) Studies on health and sanitation, water, environment and other fields, in India as well as internationally. CSMM is part of the Walker Information Global Network and is the first such specialist organization in India with an exclusive focus on customer and employee satisfaction, reputation and stakeholder assessment. BIRD and the eTechnology Group@IMRB has over a decade experience in telecom research, information technology, mass media and convergence. It has been publishing the Internet in India studies, which is used by net-driven businesses as strategic marketing input since 1998. The study on IT office products and hardware is sponsored by MAIT and the software market tracks by
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NASSCOM. The Quality of Basic and Cellular service is published quarterly by the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI).

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To cater to its growth , especially, its growing international business , IMRB Office is looking for experienced quantitative market researchers at all levels as well as leading market

trainee MBAs and postgraduates without Market Research experience for a career in quantitative consumer research. IMRB research International is South Asias

consultancy organization. IMRB

International with over 800 full time

staff and over 30 offices in South Asia and the Middle East offers full spectrum research consultancy to leading multinational and Indian clients in India and outside India. International projects account for about a third of IMRBs business. IMRB International is a part of WPPs Insights & Consultancy Division Kantar.WPP, one of the worlds leading communications service companies with billings of 36 billion, provides national, multinational and global clients with advertising, media investment management, information, insight and consultancy, public relations and public affairs; branding & identity, healthcare and specialist communications. Collectively, WPP employs 91,000 people in over 2000 offices in 106 countries. WPP companies include JWT, Ogilvy & Mather, Y&R Advertising, Grey Worldwide, and Mindshare. Kantar is one of the worlds largest research, insight and consultancy networks and brings together a diverse group of outstanding marketing insight and consulting companies. Kantar companies include: Mill ward Brown, Research International, Added Value Group, BMRB, IMRB, BPRI, Glendenning Management Consultants, Henley Centre Light speed (online) Research. The group operates in 160 offices across 60 markets worldwide. (For further information please visit: In India, IMRB International is an autonomous division of Hindustan Thompson Associates Limited (HTA), HTAs divisions include JWT (Advertising), Fortune (Advertising), Thompson Connect (direct marketing), IPAN (Public Relations).

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3.3 Clients of IMRB International IMRB works for a large number of clients multinationals and Indian companies. Some of IMRBs leading & regular clients are Bharti Airtel,Britannia,British American Tobacco (BAT),Cadbury,Castrol,Cavinkare,De Mirchi, Ford,Frito Lay, Gillette,Glaxo Smithkline,Heinz,Hero

Beers,Radio

Honda,Honda,Hutch,ICICI Bank,Idea Mobile,Indian Airlines,Indian Oil,Intel,ITC Ltd etc 3.4 Companys vision and mission:VISION : To be the agency of choice for marketers across the Middle East and North Africa region by consistently providing cutting-edge market research services from conceptualization Through to execution, interpretation and reporting, thereby enabling clients to take strategic decisions. By 2010 IMRB will be the leading research in India. Loved by more customers. Targeted by top talent. Benchmarked by more business. MISSION Service focus Empowered Employees Innovative Service Cost efficiency Accurate in survey

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CHAPTER IV

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: To make my project a complete one and an efficient one I have opted some sampling techniques for the completion of research work. The entire Orissa is taken as the population and the sample units are taken area wise. The technique of cluster sampling followed by random sampling and purposive sampling is applied for the research work. The response of farmers was noted down simultaneously at the time of approaching them for the pump set and each response was noted down. To maintain database which would contains person profile like name, address,

contact no. To get back to those prospect who are really interested in the job.

In marketing research no two list are exactly identical, but there is a single procedure that can be followed in all investigation. However, the general procedure followed now days is applicable to most projects. Some of the step are inter related, some overlap & some are unnecessary in most project. The steps in marketing research are: 1) Define the objective & the problem. 2) Conduct a situation analysis. 3) Determining the information needed & the source of information. 4) Deciding research design. 5) Tabulation analysis & interpreting the data. 6) Preparing research report. 7) Follow up recommendation. The first basic step was to define the Marketing problem in specific term. This include ascertainment of the company competition , this share in the market , characteristic to compete with major competitor acceptance, pricing, policies, distribution channel etc. The next step was to conduct situation analysis. It involved getting acquainted with the Company, its business, its product, market environment, advertising, etc through extensive formal investigation which consisted of talking to people outside the company as well as the company official, the customer distribution etc.
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The next was to determine the information needed in specific. This depended a lot on the nature of product. The objective is to get better people &to satisfy customer need. No less important was the determination of the source of information both primary & secondary data source has been used here to obtain more accurate informations& results. Primary data have been collected through questionnaires & interviews of nearly 1010 farmers and data source like publication Journals & reports was also consulted in order to get prior information about the market. After consulting the secondary data source, questionnaire used here is a systematic structure questionnaire & the method was both of opinion survey type opinion survey require on individual to express his personal opinion ,give his evaluation &thinking on a particular question .In survey respondent are asked question which give factual

information. The answer is generally in affirmative or negative. The communication was done with the respondent, in verbal form also care was taken to ensure that the response.

4.1 DATA SOURCE: The entire group of study objects is called as population of the research study. These may be people, geographic areas, organizations, products, services, and so on. The population may be of any size and may cover any geographic area. Therefore the largest population which is the ideal population, regarding which the researcher should like to generalize his findings, rarely exists. Available population is the practical population with which the researcher has to deal with. Therefore, he seeks a representative sample from a restricted portion of population and tries to spell out details so that the relevance of the results to other portions of the population can be checked.

4.2 SAMPLING:

Sampling is the process of selecting the process of selecting a sample from the population. The sample is in some sense a fair representative of the underlying population. Ideally selection procedures should be such that every individual in the population has equal chances of being chosen. The population may consist of sub population of varying sizes, or the purpose of sampling may be to different

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conditions of sampling. A sampling method has to be chosen to meet these conditions.

4.3 DATA COLLECTION METHOD: For the completion of this project I have taken the help of both primary and secondary data. PRIMARY DATA:For collection of primary data I have opted the sampling techniques and the perception and response of each sample unit is included. We obtained the data through direct communication with respondent in one form and through personal interviews. There are several method of collecting primary data, particularly in survey and descriptive research. SECONDARY DATA:For the secondary data I have taken the help of my company guide as well as the web site of IMRB as well as web site of various telecom companies. Apart from this I have also taken the help of some magazines, journals and from various published article. METHODS OF SAMPLING:1. 2. Stratified Random Sampling. Purposive / Booster Sampling.

There are two types of Sample are:1. 2. Listing Sample. Main Sample.

4.4 SAMPLING METHODOLOGY : Agricultural product 2009 will be carried out using the following sampling methodology Stratified Random Sampling Purposive Sampling

Sampling Methodology for listing We have made an assumption that all the main interviews can be easily met through approximately 13,000 random listings (which is 70% of the sample). At a centre level this means that of the entire total listing sample, 70% listings will be done randomly. After completing 70% listings randomly, in case any quotas are remaining then booster can be done
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to achieve these. However in the more probable case of no mains remaining after the 70% random, then remaining 30% listing should also be done as random. For e.g. looking at Sonepur sample alone.., write your own experience 1087 total listings to be done with 150 Main Interviews (125 Internet Owner questionnaire + 25 Claimed but not Active user questionnaire) 100% random would mean 1087 listings done random, within these random listings 150 main interviews of particular SEC and Demographic quotas should be achieved. But in case some quotas are still remaining booster sampling may be done. Please note that once all mains are achieved all remaining Listings must be done by Random technique

Specific instructions on listing 1) Calculate 100% of total listing sample. 2) Give starting addresses for this number ( 10 contacts per starting address) 3) After every successful random contact please skip 3 households. Thus if your listing sample is 500, so you would have to give 500/10=50 starting addresses. Specific instructions on Main interviews 1) During the course of random listing, identify respondents from the household

eligible for the main interview. 2) Within one household you can interview maximum of 4 main questionnaires combine (user of combine harvester and transplanter), along with (owner of

harvester and transplanter). These 2 main users should not be administered the same questionnaire. Therefore maximum numbers of main interviewers which can be done in a single household are 2. E.g. USER 1- combine harvester user (Only if all decision made by owner of land) USER 2: Combine harvester owner (only if all decision made by owner of land) USER3: Transplanter user (if all decision made by owner of land) USER4: Transplanter non user (if all decision made by owner of land) 4) For each Active user interviewed the corresponding details have to be filled up in the latter Pages of the listing questionnaire (Contact Internet User Pages/grid listing). Maximum for 4 active in transplanter and combine harvester users grid listings can be filled per household. However, this can be min 0, where there is no active transplanter and combine harvester user in the household.

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Quotas: 1) 2) 3) 4) There are no quotas for grid listings. There are only SEC wise quotas for the listings SEC D/E is covered only in the top 4 rural area. There are SEC wise or demographic wise quotas for combine harvester and

transplanter owners

SAMPLING DETAILS Rural study for Combine harvester and transplanter2009 will be carried out using the following sampling methodology Stratified Random Sampling Purposive Sampling

For random sampling please calculate: 100% of the random sample Carry out 70% of the random survey and then use booster exercise to meet the quota

There are two quotas for carrying out this study at district level: Quota 1: As per Internet Usage Combine harvester Users District level Population 10% Combine Non-Users 90% harvester

Quota 2: As per Socio-Economic classification: R1 District level Population 45% R2 35% R3 10% R4 & R5 10%

Please divide the villages in clusters of houses (hamlets) then select one hamlet and conduct all interviews there. The interviews should be spread across the hamlet
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Only one interview is allowed per HH

Market Research is done in two phases are: Pre- launching. Post- launching. Methods of Research: Accompany:- It means the Team Leader(TL) of the group or team checks the interviews that are taken by the Interviewer from the respondents or target group. Scrutinizing:- It means the scrutiny of the samples or questionnaires that are to be filled up by the interviewer from the respondents. Back check:-It means the back check of the interviews that are properly taken by the interviewer or not.

4.5 LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE RESEARCH:

The exploratory nature of this study results in several limitations that future studies can address. Firstly, the education of the people was not satisfactory. Sometimes the farmers could not understand the version or preference cards. So it was better if there was a quota of education. Secondly, the attitudinal behavior is totally different from the loyal behavior. The study focuses on cognitive determinants to explain attitudinal and,

subsequently, behavioral loyalty. It does not consider the impact that affective factors may have on attitudinal and behavioral loyalty. Secondly during some time ,at the time of data collection farmers thought that we were conducting research on behalf of government to give subsidy or any kind of facility. So all the data collected was not 100% right. At some time the respondents were giving inappropriate data by thinking that we were there for rectifying BPL list. So future research should be done by keeping this thing in mind.

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CHAPTER-V

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION Research is the process of collecting and analyzing information about the customers you want to reach, called your target market. This information provides you with the business intelligence you need to make informed decisions. Market research can help you create a business plan, launch a new product or service, fine tune your existing products and services, expand into new markets, develop an advertising campaign, set prices, and/or select a business location. Market research and marketing research are often confused. 'Market research is simply research into a specific market. It is a very narrow concept. 'Marketing' research is much broader. It not only includes 'market research, but also areas such as research into new products, or modes of distribution such as via the Internet. Here are a couple of definitions: "Marketing research is the function that links the consumer, customer, and public to the marketer through information - information used to identify and define marketing opportunities and problems; generate, refine, and evaluate marketing actions; monitor marketing performance; and improve understanding of marketing as a process. Marketing research specifies the information required to address these issues, designs the methods for collecting information, manages and implements the data collection process, analyzes, and communicates the findings and their implications. Out of the respondent 60%are user 30% non user and 10% owner.

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Respondent

user non user owner

So most of respondent are aware about the product if these are well promoted they can acquire the market share different company have to give different promotional activity and of course government have to take an active role by providing different subsidy facility. Most of respondent are from rural area and the two machine are imported from Punjab and other state most of my question are continued about process of ploughing and cutting and their way of cultivation .
100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 land sowing seed preparation adding fertiliser removal weed harvesting thresing crop crop manual machine Column1

Fig: Graph showing usage or non-usage of machinery

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70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 tractor rotary rotary cultivator plough tiller own rent Column1

levelerer

threser

Fig: Graph showing usage of various equipments based on ownership or rent

CAUSES OF NOT USE


80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Column1 EXTERNAL FACTOR INTERNAL FACTOR

INTERNAL FACTOR EXTERNAL FACTOR Column1

Fig: Graph showing causes of non usage of equipments

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PROCESS OF THRESHING
TRACTOR MANUALLY OTHER

Fig: Graph showing medium of threshing

CAUSES OF USING COMBINE HARVESTOR


SHORT OF LABOUR LABOUR COST INCREASING LABOUR TAKE MORE TIME AVAILABILITY

Fig: Graph showing causes of non-usage of Combine Harvester

The respondent I met 30% are non user but know about these two equipment but there is a potentiality of there use if machine are available in there area because these two equipment are imported from Punjab.

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non user user owner

Causes of non user Different people that I have met gives different causes of their non use out of them some of them are un aware ,non availability ,economic factor like poor people who dont have adequate area for cultivation or compatibility like hill side area where these two equipments are non compatibility for use .

14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

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SOURCE OF FINANCE

OWN FUND SUB SIDY BANK LOAN BOTH

Out of 60% of user some are owner and other are hiring on the rent basis most of using this as on rent basis that is 90% of people .

REASON FOR PURCHASE

SHORT LABOUR WELL RIPNESS COST EFFECTIVE TIME FACTOR

Fig: Graph showing reason for non-purchase Out of 70 respondents that I have met only 10% are owner who have combine Harvester and transplanter with different brands like class Swaraj Mahindra, John Deere, Kartar ,Vishal, class, Preet , new Hira etc and have purchase from various sources.

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50 40

Own saving

Subsidy only 30 20 10 0 % Farmers Own saving & subsidy

Bank loan

problem faced

manatainance service other causes

Fig: Graph showing various problems faced by the user

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FINDINGS:

From my above analysis and interpretation I found following things There is a potentiality of these two equipment if these are well

promoted. Out of my respondent 60% are user that shows people are aware about

these two products. There are few owners in Odisha market if government plays any role

like providing subsidy etc. Few distributor are available in Odisha market company should be

look after the following thing. There is a larger scope of acquiring of Odisha market if these are well

promoted.

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CHAPTER VI

SUGGESTION:

Need more powerful machine The company should have to provide easy finance scheme. Companies have to make some road show & advertisement for more

awareness among the peoples. Reason for not purchases should be carefully watched. Companies have to focus on more cultivated area. Questionnaire should be easy for respondent that they can easily understand

by farmer. It needs more promotional activity.

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CONCLUSION:

The IMRB organization is purely a marketing research organization which does basically research work for their clients. These two products (combine harvester and transplanter are one of the top agriculture product in India providing various services to the customers. But as we all know the competition is increasing day by day in agricultural sector and new products are entering every day. This study is all about finding out that how much farmers or villages or individuals have the interest to acquire this two machines(combine harvester and transplanter). And also to know what are the customers views or opinion regarding these products. I come to know that all customers are agrees with all the terms and conditions expect price. The price of these two products are too high than other agricultural product. So this market research study can help the client or organization to better understand the process, products, customer market, and competition. On conducting this survey I came across various hindrances but somehow the other I managed to complete the study in scheduled time. I can conclude from this long study that the customers of Orissa are very careful in spending money. Such a study can help the organization to identify policies, strategies and tactics that will most likely to succeed. This survey will be helpful for the organization to reorganize again all the things. So that they can again get back the customers loyalty.

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APPENDIX

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Websites http://www.imrbint.com/divisions/index.html http://agricoop.nic.in/Farm%20Mech.%20PDF/05024-09.pdf http://agreecultural.in http://planningcommission.gov.in/plans/annualplan/pr/OAPR0405.doc

Books Research Methodology Methods & Techniques by C.R. Kothari (New age

publisher) Business Page numbers- 55, 60, 95, 97, 100, 122, 123. Research by A K Swain (Kalyani Publisher) Marketing Management by Philip Kotler 12th edition (Pearson publication)

Page numbers- 48, 86, and 87,146,159. Marketing management by Rajan Saxena (Tata Mc-Graw publication) Page

number- 115-136, 237.

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QUESTIONNAIRE

I. SCREENING QUESTIONNAIRE

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

NAME OF THE RESPONDENT: ADDRESS OF THE RESPONDENT: NEAREST LANDMARK: VILLAGE: MOBILE NO.:

S1. I WILL LIKE TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR INVOLVEMENT IN THE DAY TO DAY ACTIVITIES RELATED TO FARMING IN YOUR LAND. PLEASE TELL ME WHICH OF THESE BEST DESCRIBES YOUR INVOLVEMENT? I OWN THE LAND HENCE, I TAKE ALL DAY TO 1 DAY DECISIONS RELATES TO FFARMING I DO NOT OWN THE LAND, BUT I TAKE ALL DAY 2 TO DAY DECISIONS I PARTIALL OWN THE LAND & I TAKE ALL DAY 3 TO DAY DECISIONS MOST OF THESE DECISIONS ARE TAKEN BY 4 SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK OUT FOR APPROPRIATE PERSON GO TO S3 GO TO S3 GO TO S3

S2. CAN YOU PLEASE TELL ME THE NAME OF THE PERSON WHO TAKES DECISION ON MOST OF THE DAY TO DAY MATTERS RELATED TO FARMING IN YOUR LAND? NAME OF THE PERSON: PHONE NUMBER:
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S3, DO YOU GROW ANY OF THE FOLLOWING?

RICE WHEAT SOYABEAN PULSES NONE OF THE ABOVE

1 2 3 4 5

CONTINUE TO S4 CONTINUE TO S4 CONTINUE TO S4 CONTINUE TO S4 TERMINATE

S4. HOW MUCH LAND YOU HAVE?

CROPS GROWN

S5. CROPS GROWN

S6. IN S7. HOW MANY LAND SOWING MONTH

S8.

S9.

HARVESTING SELLING MONTH PRICE

RICE WHEAT

1 2

SOYABEAN 3 MOONG 4

S10. WHETHER YOU ARE USING MANUAL LABOUR OR ANY KIND OF MACHINERY FOR THE PROCESS MENTIONED:

PROCESS

MANUAL LABOUR (%)

MACHINERY (%)

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LAND PREPARATION SOWING OF SEEDS ADDING FERTILIZERS REMOVAL OF WEEDS HARVESTING OF CROPS THRESHING OF CROPS

10 70 20 40 40 10

90 30 80 60 60 90

1. TELL ME IF YOU USE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING MACHINERY FOR YOR AGRICULTURE S12. DO YOU OWN THESE OR TAKEN ON RENT?

S11.

USAGE

OF S12 OWN (%) RENTED (%)

MACHINERY

TRACTOR ROTARY CULTIVATOR ROTARY PLOUGH TILLER LEVERER THRESER

40 30

60 20

20 60 0 70

0 20 0 20

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S13. WHAT IS THE SOURCE OF GETTING WATER? S14. HOW MAN MEMBERS ARE IN THIS HOUSE HOLD? S15. HOW MANY MEMBERS OF THIS HOUSE HOLD ARE INVOLVED IN AGRICULTURE? S16. WHAT IS YOUR APPROXIMATELY HOUSEHOLD INCOME? S17. HAVE YOU EVER USED A COMBINE HARVESTER? S18. HAVE YOU OWN A COMBINE HARVESTER? S17. USED YES NO 1 2 S18. OWNED 1 2

This is mandatory to all respondent. This decide the preference of respondent whether he is given preference to user, non user , owner because all respondent are categorically divide into 3 types above listed in table. Different questionnaire are asked like name and address Process through which they cultivate their crops and technique they adopted either manually or machinery especially for ploughing plant Cutting and threshing .several question decide whether he is an owner user, non user and accordingly, I met 70 respondents assigned by IMRB and ask question as for above mentioned.

2. NON USER QUESTIONNAIRE 1. YOU ARE NOT USING COMBINE HARVESTER, HOW YOU ARE HARVESTING YOUR CROPS? I. MANUAL HARVESTING (EXTERNAL LABOUR) II. MANUAL HARVESTING (BY RESPONDENT & FAMILY MEMBERS) III. USAGE OF SMALL MACHINES

2. TELL ME THE REASONS FOR NOT USING A COMBINE HARVESTER.

3. OUT OF THER VARIOUS REASONS TELL ME THE TOP TWO REASONS.


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REASONS NO HARVESTERS AVAILABLE I USED OTHER HARVESING MACHINES VERY SMALL LAND UN EVEN LAND WET LAND LACK OF MONEY ALL NEIGHBOURS USED

OPTIONS RANK1 RANK2 1 2 3 4 5 6 MANUAL 7

LABOURS

3.

WHAT ARE YOU USING FOR THRESHING OF CROPS?

THRESHERS OPERATED BY TRACTORS THRESHERS OPERATED MANUALLY USAGE OF MANUAL LABOUR USAGE OF ANIMALS ANY OTHER PROCESS( PLEASE SPECIFY)

1 2 3 4 5

4. SAY ME WHETHER YOU ARE FACING ANY PROBLEM IN HARVESTING. I. NO PROBLEMS

II. III. IV.

SHORTAGE OF LABOUR TOO MUCH TIME REQUIRED HIGHER COST INCURRED


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5.

TELL ME HOW MUCH YOU SPEND PER ACRE FOR THE FOLLOWING

ACTIVITIES: I. II. III. IV. COST OF CUTTING & GATHERING COST OF THRESHING COST OF CLEANING ANY OTHER COST

6.

DO YOU LIKE TO USE A COMBINE HARVESTER IN THE NEAR

FUTURE?

7.

FOR WHAT REASONS YOU ARE INTERESTED TO USE COMBINE

HARVESTER? SHORTAGE OF MANUAL LABOUR COST OF MANUAL LABOUR IS INCREASING MORE TIME TAKEN BY MANUAL LABOURS EASY AVAILABILITY OF COMBINE HARVESTERS MOST OF THE FARMERS ARE USING 1 2 3 4 COMBINE 5

HARVESTER

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3. COMBINE HARVESTER USER QUESTIONNAIRE 1. TELL ME HOW LONG YOU HAVE USED COMBINE HARVESTER FOR HARVESTING? 2. FOR WHICH REASONS YOU ARE MOTIVATED TO USE COMBINE HARVESTER? 3. SELECT THE TOP TWO RESONS

REASONS SHORTAGE OF MANUAL LABOUR USING OF HARVESTER IS COST EFFECTIVE CROP IS HARVESTED IN TIME BY

OPTION

RANK1 RANK2

HARVESTER MOST FARMERS ARE USING HARVESTER

4. SAY ME SOME DISADVANTAGES OF HARVESTER INABILITY OF HARVESTER FOR HARVESING IN WET LAND 1

NEED LABOURS FOR MAINTAINING WHICH ARE UN 2 AVAILABLE IN THIS AREA LOSS OF SEEDS 3

5. WHICH OF THE 2 TYPES OF HARVESTER YOU ARE USING? I. SELF PROPELLED II. TRACTOR MOUNTED 6. WHAT ARE THE VARIOUS FACTORS CONSIDERED BY YOU WHILE

TAKEN A HARVESTER ON RENT? 7. SELECT THE TOP 2 REASONS & RANK THEM OPTION
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REASONS

RANK1 RANK2

ROURKELA INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, ROURKELA

QUALITY OF CUTTING QUICK AVAILABILITY RENTAL CHARGE CREDIT PERIOD ALLOWED BRAND EXPERIENCE OF MACHINE OWNERS

1 2 3 4 5 6

8. YOU? 9. 10.

WHAT IS THE UNIT BASING ON WHICH CONTRACTOR CHARGE

HOW MUCH DOES THE CONTRACTOR CHAGE FROM YOU? DO YOU WANT TO PURCHASE A HARVESTER IN THE NEAR

FUTURE? 11. TELL ME THE FACTORS YOU WILL CONSIDER BEFORE

PURCHASING A HARVESTER

12.

RANK THEM

REASONS KIND OF HARVESTER PRICE BRAND PRODUCTIVITY EASY AVAILABILITY OF SPARE PARTS AFTER SALES SERVICE

OPTION 1 2 3 4 5 6

RANK1 RANK2

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13.

WHAT SHOULD BE THE SOURCE OF FINANCE FOR BUYING I. II. III. IV. OWN FUND SUBSIDY FROM GOVT. BANK LOAN OWN AS WELL AS BANK LOAN

4. COMBINE HARVESTER OWNER QUESTIONNAIRE

1. HOW LONG YOU HAVE BEEN USING COMBINE HARVESTER? 2. WHEN DID YOU BUY THE HARVESTER? 3. TELL ME THE APPROXIMATE TOTAL NUMBER OF HARVESTER AVAILABLE IN YOUR TOWN 4. TELL ME THE VARIOUS REASONS FOR PURCHASING A HARVESTER

5. RANK THE TOP 2 REASONS SHORTAGE OF MANUAL LABOUR USING THAT COMBINE CROP IS HARVESTER HARVESTED OPTION 1 ENSURES 2 AT THE RANK1 RANK2

APPROPRIATE RIPNESS LAND BECOMES EMPTY FASTER COST EFFECTIVE HARVESTED QUICKLY GRAIN QUALITY AVAILABLE 3 4 5 6

ALL FARMERS IN MY VILLAGE ARE USING 7 HARVESTER

6. TELL ME THE DIS ADVANTAGE YOU ARE FACING


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7. RANK THE TOP 2 REASONS CERTAIN DAMAGED LOSS OF GOOD QUALITY EFFECTS THE SOIL QUALITY NEED USE OF ADDITIONAL LABOUR 2 3 4 AMOUNT OF GRAINS OPTION ARE 1 RANK1 RANK2

8. TELL ME IF YOU WANTS ANY IMROVEMENTS IN YOUR HARVESTER

REASONS NEED HIGHER FUEL EFFICIENCY THE MANUUFACTURER OFFER

OPTION 1 BETTER 2

AFTER SALES SERVICE SPARE PARTS OF THE HARVESTER SHOULD 3 AVAILABLE MORE EASILY SHOULD BE ABLE TO PROVIDE GOOD 4 QUALITY PROCESS SHOULD BE LESS PRICES SHOULD BE LESS 5 6

9. TELL ME ANY PROBLEMS FACED IN CASE OF OWING A HARVESTER: REASONS LACK OF GOOD DRIVERS PROBLEMS WITH REGARDS TO MAINTENANCE OPTION 1 2

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AFTER SALES SERVICE IS NOT GOOD LACK OF SUFFICIENT BUSINESS IN MY REGION FARMERS ARE NOT WILLING TO PAY RENTALS UP FRONT

3 4 5

COST OF MAINTENANCE ARE INCREASING BUT FARMERS ARE 6 NOT READY TO INCREASE RENT

10. TELL ME THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF HARVESTER ABOUT WHICH YOU ARE AWARE OF. 11. TELL ME THE TYPE OF HARVESTER YOU OWN 12. TELL ME THE SOURCE OF PUCHASING HARVESTER 13. TELL ME THE PRICE OF THE HARVESTER YOU PURCHASED 14. KINDLY TELL ME THE NATURE OF TRANSACTION YOU HAVE MADE WHILE PURCHASING THE HARVESTER 15. YOU ARE PROVIDING YOUR HARVESTER ON RENT OR NOT? 16. WHAT IS THE TOTAL AREA OF LAND YOU HAVE HARVESTED LAST YEAR? 17. TELL ME THE BASIS OF CHARGING RENT 18. WHAT IS THE TOTAL AMOUNT YOU HAVE EARNED LAST YEAR FROM HARVESTING? 19. TELL ME THE ANNUAL EXPENSE ON FUEL THAT YOU HAVE INCURRED? 20. TELL ME THE OTHER EXPENSES 21. WHAT IS THE EMI YOU HAVE PAID FOR TAKING LOAN FOR HARVESTER? 22. DO YOU WANT TO PURCHASE ANY OTHER HARVESTER IN THE NEAR FUTURE? 23. IN HOW MANY DAYS YOU WILL BUY? 24. WHAT KIND OF HARVESTER YOU INTEND TO PURCHASE/ 25. FROM WHOM YOU WILL PURCHASE? 26. WHAT SHOULD BE THE LIFE TIME FOR A HARVESTER

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