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Lee Canters

Assertive Discipline
A QuickGuide for Corps Members
Lee Canter 2010
For use only by Teach For America: No reproduction without the written consent of the author This QuickGuide complements the Video Programs available at http://www.tfateams.org/assertive-discipline
Page 2 Program 1 Page 9 Program 2 Page 11 Program 3 Page 13 Program 4 Page 15 Program 5 The Need for Effective Classroom Management Training (Teacher Voice & your Management Plan) Teaching Policies and Procedures at the Beginning of the Year The Behavior Management Cycle Step 1 Effectively Giving Directions The Behavior Management Cycle Step 2 Utilizing Behavioral Narration The Behavior Management Cycle Step 3 Taking Corrective Action Implementing the Behavior Management Cycle throughout the School Year

Page 16 Programs 6 & 7 Page 18 Program 8 Page 21 Program 9

Building Trusting Relationships with Students Building Trusting Relationships with Parents
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The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition

PROGRAM ONE:

The Need for Effective Classroom Management Training


An essential factor in your students success is your ability to manage the behavior of your students. You will never be able to raise the academic achievement of all your students until you can establish a classroom environment in which you can teach and they can learn free from disruptive behavior.
80% of teachers say that disruptive behavior interferes with their ability to teach 40% of students surveyed said disruptive behavior of a classmate lowered their academic achievement

The overwhelming majority of new teachers struggle with classroom management issues. They find it challenging to develop the strong teacher voice and consistently implement the right strategies that are required to take charge of the classroom and earn the respect of the students especially the 10-20% of students who have a tendency to be non-compliant. In order to help you learn to take charge of your classroom in a firm yet positive manner, Lee Canter, an expert in the field of classroom management, has developed this series of Assertive Discipline video programs. These programs will train you in a model of classroom management that has been successfully implemented by thousands of corps members in regions throughout the country. Through the use of this program, corps members have learned how to establish and maintain confident leadership of a positive, efficient, in-control classroom environment that is focused on academic achievement and in which all students can learn.

DEVELOPING YOUR TEACHER VOICE


Developing a strong Teacher Voice is absolutely critical to your success. Teachers who have developed their Voice speak in an assertive yet caring manner that communicates to the students that they mean what they say and say what they mean. In order to develop your Voice you will want to: Speak in an Assertive Tone Teachers who have developed their Voice assertively communicate their behavioral expectations to their students. By assertive it is meant they speak in a decisive, firm, self assured manner that leaves no question in the students minds as to who is running the classroom. It is silent reading time. I expect everyone will immediately take out their books and read for 10 minutes without any talking. The assertive tone of the teacher voice should never be confused with a teacher speaking to the students in a hostile or angry manner. Make sure your Voice fills the classroom When you use your teacher voice you will want to make sure that you project your voice so that every student even those in the far corner of the room, will without question, be able to clearly hear each and every word you have to say. You want your students to know by your volume, as well as tone, that when you speak they need to pay attention-period.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Never speak over Students Teachers with the Voice will never speak when any student is not paying attention and is speaking out; they expect total silence when they are speaking. If students talk when youre talking immediately stop in mid sentence, and let the students know that what they are doing is unacceptable: Marquez, when Im speaking I expect all students will be silent and paying attention to me, by talking, you have chosen to receive the next consequence from our discipline plan. Use the Voice when Recognizing Appropriate Student Behavior The most effective way to assert your authority is by constantly monitoring student behavior and letting them know you are doing so by singling out students who are meeting your expectations. Thus in a firm voice that fills the room you would want to constantly make statements such as: I see James, Luis, and Hope are working and are not talking Use the Voice when correcting Disruptive Students When dealing with disruptive students, teachers with the Voice will in a calm firm manner simply tell the students what they are to be doing and, if appropriate, the disciplinary consequence they have chosen to receive by their behavior. Tyree, the directions was to work on your assignment and not talk, you have chosen to go to Time Out. Never argue with Students When teachers with the Voice tell students to do something, youll never see them engaging in a discussion or argument with them until they do what they have asked. Teacher: Nick it is time to get to work on your journal entry. Nick: Why are you on me? Other students havent started. Teacher: Nick, thats not the point. You need to get to work on your journal entry. Nick: But why do I have to if other students dont? Teacher: I said thats not the point; time to start on your journal. Nick: Man, youre on my case. Teacher: Nick, you have a choice: immediately start working on your journal, or you will choose to receive lunch detention. Strategies to build your Voice There are several steps you can take to help you build your voice. Role Play With a colleague, practice using the Voice and get feedback on your efforts. Observe a Colleague Watch a fellow teacher who has good management skills and model her voice tone and mannerisms. Model after a Teacher You have Known Model the Voice of an effective disciplinarian you have known well, a former teacher of yours, your master teacher or a former colleague you have observed.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Model after a Teacher in this Video Series Model the Voice of any of the effective teachers in this series. Get Dramatic If you feel it simply is not your style to be assertive, what can you do? Simply go into your classroom and playact having the Voice. Frequently teachers who act like they have the Voice soon find that they are more comfortable than they ever thought they would be with it, and the Voice soon becomes part of their teaching persona. Receive Real Time Coaching One of the most effective strategies to help any teacher improve a teacher voice is to receive immediate, inthe-moment feedback from a colleague, mentor, coach or supportive administrator.

DEVELOPING YOUR CLASSROOM DISCIPLINE PLAN


The goal of a classroom management plan (sometimes called a discipline place) is to have a fair and consistent way to establish a positive classroom environment that promotes the well-being and academic achievement of all the students. A classroom management plan serves as the cornerstone of your efforts to motivate students to behave appropriately in your classroom. A classroom management/discipline plan has three parts: Rules that the students need to follow at all times in the classroom. For example: Follow directions the first time they are given Keep hands feet and objects to yourself No cussing or teasing

Positive recognition that the students will receive for following the rules. For example: Positive verbal comments Positive phone call or notes to parents Behavior award Class-wide rewards Consequences that the students will receive if they choose not to follow the rules. For example: First time students disrupt: Warning Second time students disrupt: Fill out Think Sheet and send to parents Third time students disrupt: Lunch/recess or after school detention Fourth time students disrupt: Call parents Fifth time students disrupt: Time out in other teachers classroom or send to administrator Severe disruption: Send to administrator There are many benefits of having a classroom management plan, including: Increasing your ability to respond in a more consistent and fair manner to student behavior Increasing your ability to get the support of parents Increasing your ability to get the support of your administrators

The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition

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Determine your Classroom Rules Rules are those expectations that are in effect the entire school day or period, no matter what activity the students are engaged in. Rules are those expectations that, if not met by students, will result in you taking corrective action to motivate the students to improve their behavior. Here are the guidelines for determining your rules. Have only a limited Number of Rules You want to have only a few rules, typically a maximum of five. Rules Need To Be Observable Rules need to describe behaviors that are observable i.e. behaviors that you can clearly see and or hear. For example: Keep hands and feet to yourself. No cussing or teasing. Follow directions. Be sure to avoid vaguely stated, non-observable expectations that do not clearly state exactly how you want the students to behave. Vague Rules (these are not effective!) Be nice to the other students. Be respectful. Always act appropriately. Rules Must Always Include Follow Directions There is only one rule that is necessary for all teachers to include, which is follow directions. This rule is critical since the foundation of effective classroom management is the need for students to follow the teachers directions. Sample Effective Classroom Rules Follow directions. Keep hands, feet, and objects to yourself. No cussing or teasing. Do not leave the classroom without permission. No yelling or screaming. Determine your Positive Recognition Strategies Positive recognition is the sincere and meaningful attention that you give to students in response to their behaving according to your expectations. The effective use of positive recognition strategies will help you motivate your students to follow your rules, reduce disruptive behavior and help you build positive relationships with your students. There are various strategies you can plan to utilize to provide positive recognition to your students. Positive Verbal Feedback The most effective way to motivate students to follow your rules is to verbally recognize in a positive manner, students who are behaving appropriately. In later sessions you will be introduced to the use of the Behavioral Narration strategy a highly effective tool to help you increase your positive feedback.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Positive Phone Calls and Notes The goal of positive notes or phone calls is to let the students parents know that it is important for you to recognize appropriate behavior in your classroom. Letting your students know that you will send positive messages to their parents can often serve as an excellent motivator. Get in the habit of making positive phone calls or sending home positive notes or emails. A good rule of thumb is two positive contacts per day or period. If you are making a phone call it can be brief This is Ms. Lewis, Jessies teacher. I just wanted to let you know he is off to a great start this year. He is a pleasure to have in class. Please let Jessie know I called and how pleased I am with how he is doing in class. Special Privileges All students, especially at the elementary level, have something special that they enjoy doing at school. Special privileges that students tend to enjoy include: First in line Tutor younger students Help the teacher Work on a favorite activity Classroom monitor Extra free time Points on the Board Class-wide Reward System A class-wide reward system is a program in which all of your students work together to earn a reward that is given to the entire class. Such a strategy is highly effective with upper elementary - secondary level students. One of the most effective class-wide reward systems for beginning teachers to utilize is called points on the board. In this simple to implement system you establish a goal for the number of points the class must earn to get its reward. Whenever you observe students following your directions you let the class know the students have earned a point on the board that will move the class closer to its reward. Juan is going back to his seat, Kris has started working, Allie is working without talking and they have earned a point for the class. Here are the guidelines for utilizing a Points on the Board class-wide reward system in your classroom. Determine Reward Class Will Earn Come up with a reward that the students will work toward. Keep in mind this reward must meet two criteria: 1) you are comfortable having the students earn it; and 2) the students truly want the reward. Typical rewards teachers find useful: Extra free time Extra P.E. time Preferred activity time Missed (skipped) homework assignment Special treat, such as popcorn or other snack, e Listen to music in class Make Sure Students Earn the Reward Quickly l day Grades K-1 Grades 2-3 2 days to 1 week Grades 4-5 1 week Grades 6-12 1-2 weeks
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The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition

After the class has earned a reward, determine another reward the class will work toward. You should keep up the use of a class wide reward system as long as you feel the students need an extra incentive that reinforces your behavior management strategies. The Students Need To Earn Points Frequently Throughout the Day or Period A good rule of thumb is that students need to earn at least 10 points per hour or approximately 50 points per day. Establish a Points Corner In a Prominent Location Determine a place on the chalk/white board where you will record whenever the students earn points. Make sure the location is convenient for you to reach. Determine your Disciplinary Consequences There are going to be times when students choose not to follow the rules you establish in your classroom. When this disruptive behavior occurs, you need to have a plan for how you will calmly and quickly correct the students inappropriate behavior. Here are basic guidelines to follow in determining the consequences you will utilize. Consequences Do Not Have To Be Severe To Be Effective If used consistently, minimal consequences such as time out, or missing part of recess, or a short detention can be as effective as going to the office. Consequences Must Be Something That Students Do Not Like, but They Must Never Be Physically or Psychologically Harmful Unless the students do not like the consequence they will have no impact on motivating behavior. On the other hand, you must take care to insure the consequences will not be physically or psychologically harmful, such as corporal punishment or verbal abuse, etc. Consequences you would want to consider include: Time Out Removing a student from the groups can be an effective corrective action for elementary age students. Set up a chair or table as the time out area. The time spent in the time out area should range from 5-15 minutes. Students should sit silently in time out and do any assigned class work. If the students choose to be disruptive in time out an additional consequence should be provided to them. Think Sheet The purpose of a Think Sheet is to encourage the student to think about his or her misbehavior. You will want the students to take the Think Sheet home for parents to sign and return. On the Think Sheet the students should write down: The rule that was broken Why the student chose to break the rule What the student could do differently next time Miss Free Choice/Preferred Activity Time Simply take away part or all of the students free time or preferred activity time Recess/Lunch or After School Detention Have the students spend part or all of recess/lunch or a period of time after school with you or in the schools detention room or location.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Time Out in another Classroom Send the student to another classroom for approximately twenty minutes with academic work. This is a useful corrective action, especially if you do not have administrative support. Call Parents Calling parents/another adult family member (if possible with the student present) at the next break after the student chose to misbehave can be a highly effective corrective action. Consequences need to be included in a Discipline Hierarchy You need to plan out what consequences students will receive when they choose to disrupt. The most effective way to determine what consequences students will receive is to organize them in what is known as a discipline hierarchy. A discipline hierarchy lists the consequences in the order that they will be given to students for disruptive behavior during a day or period. The consequences in the hierarchy are progressive starting with one that is minimal, such as a warning, then become gradually more substantial if the student chooses to continue disrupting. Sample Hierarchy for Grades K-3 First time: Warning Second time: Five minute time out Third time: Miss free choice time Fourth time: Call parents Fifth time: Time out other classroom or send to administrator Sample Hierarchy for Grades 4-5 First time: Warning Second time: Fill out Think Sheet Third time: Recess/lunch or after school detention Fourth time: Call parents Fifth time: Time out other classroom or send to administrator Sample Hierarchy for Middle/Secondary First time: Warning Second time: Think Sheet Third time: Lunch or after school detention Fourth time: Time out other classroom or send to administrator Discipline Hierarchy should also include a Severe Clause A severe clause states that if a student is severely disruptive (i.e. defiant, violent, engages in any behavior that stops the entire class from functioning) you need to skip all the other steps of the hierarchy and immediately send the student to the administrators office. Each Day Students start over with a Clean Slate No matter how far students have gone the previous day on your discipline hierarchy, the next day they should start over with a clean slate. That means the first time they disrupt each day they should receive a warning.

The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition

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Keep Track Of Consequences In order to insure that you will remember to provide the students the disciplinary consequences they have chosen to earn, you will need to have a record keeping system to keep track of when students are disruptive. Here is a simple method to consider. Write Disruptive Students Names on a Clipboard The first time a student is disruptive and is warned you simply write his or her name on a sheet of paper you have on a clipboard. If a student disrupts a second time you simply put a check next to their name. Each subsequent disruption earns an additional check recorded next to the students name. When you record a check next to the students name, you will also, if appropriate, provide them the consequence they have earned. For example, if an elementary student has disrupted a second time he would go to time out for five minutes after a check is recorded next to his name. Some consequences will need to be provided at a later time, i.e., staying after class. When this is the case, be sure to periodically check the clipboard to make sure you remember to provide the students the consequences they have chosen to receive. Before you implement your classroom management plan you will want to: Share your plan with your principal/vice principal Introduce the plan to your students Send your plan home to parents

PROGRAM TWO: Teaching Policies and Procedures at the Beginning of the Year
TEACH POLICIES AND PROCEDURES AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SCHOOL YEAR
An important aspect of being an effective classroom manager is teaching your students how you expect them to behave in all classroom activities. Determine Classroom Activities The first step in teaching policies and procedures is to determine all your classroom activities that students will engage in. Instructional Activities These are activities where your students will be learning: Teacher-directed instruction Whole-class discussion Sitting on the rug Working with a partner Independent work Teacher working with a small group while other students work independently Working in groups
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Taking tests Working at centers Working at labs Procedures These are basic routines that involve movement into, within, and out of the classroom: Responding to an attention getting signal In-seat transitions Out-of-seat transitions Lining up to leave the classroom Walking in line Entering the classroom after recess, lunch or the beginning of the period Students going to pull-out programs Distributing and collecting materials/papers Attending an assembly Emergency drills Beginning-of the-day or period routine End-of the-day or period routine Policies These are expectations that are in effect at all times in the classroom: Classroom rules Positive recognition Corrective actions Bringing appropriate materials to class Making up missed work due to an absence Sharpening pencils Use of materials on bookshelves or in cabinets Individual students leaving class to go to the restroom Classroom interruptions Late or missing assignments Student helpers Taking care of desks, tables, and chairs Use of the drinking fountain Plan How to Teach a Lesson on Responsible Behavior You will want to plan how you will teach students to behave in various classroom activities. Determine What Behavior you will Teach Think about what behavior you will need the students to engage in during the specific activity to be successful. Determine only a limited number of behaviors and make sure they are observable. For example: Teacher Directed Instruction o Follow directions o Sit up straight and keep their eyes on the teacher o Do this without talking During a Whole-class Discussion o Raise hand and wait to be called on before speaking
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The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition

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o Sit up straight and look at the student who is speaking o Stay seated Entering the Classroom o Put away belongings o Get right to work o Do not talk

Prepare Visual Aides You will need to post your Rules and Consequences. You may want to list the behaviors being taught on an overhead transparency, flipchart or Power Point presentation. You may want to make posters of expectations during frequently-used activities or procedures until it is habit for you and your students. Teaching a Lesson on Responsible Behavior Introduce Lesson Students will be more motivated to learn appropriate behavior when they understand the objective of what you are trying to accomplish and why it is important. Explain the Behaviors you want the Students to Learn Clearly present the behaviors you want to see and hear during the activity you are focusing on. Model the Behavior To make sure students have a clear picture of how you expect them to behave, have a few of them model what you want to see and hear and also what you do not want to see and heard. Check for Understanding In order to be sure all the students know how they are expected to behave during the activity in question you will want to check for understanding. Have the Students practice the Behavior As soon as the lesson is finished give the students an opportunity to practice the desired behavior (e.g. when you finish teaching the students how to behave during independent work, give the students a short independent work lesson which you can monitor.) It is a best practice to teach students expectations for a procedure soon before they are to use that behavior. Note: You will likely need to stop and re-teach specific responsible behavior expectations until they become predictable habits for both your students and for you.

PROGRAM THREE: The Behavior Management Cycle Step One Effectively Giving Explicit Directions
The definition of Classroom Management is: The ability to motivate students to follow directions. This means 100% compliance from 100% of students 100% of the time.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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This is a high bar, but this level of Classroom Management is essential to students success. Without students attention, you will not be able to effectively teach them. Without student behavior that can be trusted, you will never be able to let them engage in more exciting, student-centered learning experiences. Mastering the steps of the Behavior Management Cycle will enable you to dramatically increase your ability to positively manage their students behavior in a way that leads to 100% compliance from 100% of students 100% of the time. This cycle begins whenever you give directions to your students. The Behavior Management Cycle has three steps: Step One: Clearly communicate the Explicit Directions you need your students to follow. Step Two: Utilize a unique strategy called Behavioral Narration to provide positive support to students who are complying with your directions. Step Three: Take Corrective Action with students who are still not complying with your directions. STEP ONE: EFFECTIVELY GIVE EXPLICIT DIRECTIONS Students generally want to follow directions, and often misbehave because they truly dont know what the teachers expectations are. As the teacher, you must be very explicit about exactly what you want the students to do, and how you want them to do it, so that students are clear on what is expected of them. Directions tell Students what to do and how to do it Whenever you give directions to students you need to communicate expectations for how the students are to behave related to three key areas: Verbal Behavior Up to 80% of the disruptive behavior of students can be categorized as some form of inappropriate verbal behavior. Thus whenever teachers give directions to the students, they need to explicitly communicate what verbal behavior is expected. o No talking. o Use your 12 inch indoor voice. o Raise your hand and wait to be called upon before you speak. Physical Movement Approximately 15% of the disruptive behavior of students involves inappropriate movement. Thus the second area which teachers need to communicate what behavior they expect when they give directions relates to student movement. o Stay in your seat. o Walk. o Go directly to your seat. Participation in the Activity In most activities that teachers ask students to engage in, they need to know how they want the students to participate in the activity in order to be successful. Thus, the third area in which teachers need to communicate what behavior they expect is how they want the students to participate in the activity. o Get right to work. o Do your own work. o Take turns with your partner.

Examples: I need everyone to work on the assignment. That means I should see you all doing your own work while staying in your seat, and I should hear no talking. If you need help turn over your help card.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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I want each of you to silently pick up your chair and without talking, walk directly to your study group, sit down and wait for my directions on how to do your assignment. When I say go, I want everyone to take out your workbooks and immediately turn facing your partner and begin working on the questions on page 14, using your indoor voices.

Have all the Students Attention when giving Directions Only give directions when you have the attention of all of your students. Utilize an attention getting signal (e.g. a hand signal, verbal cue, flash of the lights, etc.) to ensure you quickly get all the students focusing on what you are about to say. Check to make certain Students understand the Directions Whenever you give directions, check to see if all the students understand the directions. Cue the Students to Start the Activity Often when teachers give directions to the students, students will begin the activity before the teachers are ready for them to do so. You need to be sure to always youre your students not to start the activity until you say, GO! [Many effective teachers begin their directions with When I say go, I need you to...(what students are to do & how they are to do it)]

PROGRAM FOUR: The Behavior Management Cycle Step Two Behavioral Narration
The most effective way to motivate your students to follow your directions is through the use of a concept called behavioral narration. Here is how it works. When you finish giving directions to the students, you immediately monitor the class looking for students who are complying, and then in a voice that is loud enough for all the class to hear, simply narrate or describe what you see them doing. With elementary level students you can single out students by name. When I say GO, I want everyone to go directly back to their seats, take out their books and immediately get to work, and I want you to do this without talking. Ill be looking for students who are following my directions. Ready, GO! Lisa is going directly back to her seat without talking. Kyla has taken out her book and is already getting to work. Juan has gone back to his seat, taken out his book and is working without talking. (Behavioral Narration) Since middle-secondary level students often do not want to be singled out by their teachers for being good, with older students you would want to narrate groups of students who are following your directions. When I say GO I want everyone to go directly back to their regular seats, take out their books and immediately get to work and I want you to do this without talking. Ready, GO! I see students walking back to their seats without talking. Students at table three already have their books out. Students at table five are working without talking. (Behavioral Narration) Benefits of Using Behavioral Narration Enables You to Repeat Directions In A Positive Manner When you utilize behavioral narration you are basically repeating your directions to the students by describing the behavior of those students who are following your directions.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Enables You to Set A Positive Tone In The Classroom When you use behavioral narration you give attention to the students who are following your directions rather than those who are not, this helps set a positive tone to your interactions with students. Enables You to Let Your Students Know You are On Top of their Behavior in a Positive Manner Through the consistent use of behavioral narration you will let your students know you are aware of how they are behaving by your calling out students who are on task. Behavioral Narration Enables You to Motivate Students without the Drawbacks of Praise Praise is judgmental and has drawbacks if used too often. Behavioral narration enables you to recognize students who are following your directions in a descriptive manner that can be more effective. Guidelines to Utilizing Behavioral Narration Utilize Behavioral Narration within Two Seconds of Giving Your Directions You need to immediately begin narrating the behavior of students who are following directions. Narrate Using a Strong Teacher Voice When narrating the behavior of on task students be sure to do so using a strong teacher voice that lets all the students know you are on top of all that is going on in the classroom. Narrate without Judgment Simply objectively state what compliant students are doing. Do not add judgments like I like the way that ___ is doing ___ or Nice work, Josh, on silently getting out your homework. Narrate the Behavior of Two to Three Students or Groups of Students You will want to narrate the behavior of several students. This will again insure you have sufficiently repeated the directions to be certain that all the students understand them, and second, you will set a positive tone. Utilize Behavioral Narration Before You Correct Student Behavior After you give your directions be sure to narrate on task students before correcting those who are off task or disruptive. Monitor Students Who Have Difficulty Following Directions and Be Sure to Narrate Their Behavior when They Choose to Behave The more you monitor the behavior of students who are difficult, and narrate their behavior when they follow your directions, the more you will motivate them to behave appropriately. Utilize Behavioral Narration only as Frequently as Necessary When you begin using behavioral narration use it every time you give your directions. Over time you can phase out the frequency of how often you use behavioral narration. Utilize Behavioral Narration every 60 Seconds to Keep Students on Task Behavioral narration is a highly effective tool to not only motivate students to get on task but also to keep them on task. As a rule of thumb, when you first start using behavioral narration you need to narrate the behavior of students who are staying on task every 60 seconds during an instructional activity. As the students behavior improves you can use the strategy less frequently.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Combine the Use of Behavioral Narration with A Points on the Board Class-Wide Reward System With upper elementary and middle-secondary level students you may want to combine the use of behavioral narration with a Points on the Board class wide reward system. Whenever you observe students following your directions you not only narrate their behavior, but also let the class know the students have earned a point on the board that will move the class closer to its reward. Juan is going back to his seat, Kris has started working, Allie is working without talking and they have earned a point for the class.

PROGRAM FIVE: The Behavior Management Cycle Step Three Taking Corrective Action
When you have followed the first two steps of the Behavior Management Cycle, (you have effectively given explicit directions and narrated the behavior of 2-3 students who are complying) yet still have students who are engaging in inappropriate behavior, you need to move to the third step of the cycle and take corrective action. Guidelines for Taking Corrective Action Follow the 10-20 Second Rule You need to take corrective action immediately. You basically have a maximum of only 10-20 seconds from the time you cue the students to begin following your directions to correct any off task or disruptive students, or the number of such students will quickly grow. In a Firm Teacher Voice Restate Directions and provide Consequence as a Choice The most effective response you can make to students who are not following your directions is to in a calm, strong, firm teacher voice tell the students to follow the directions you have just given, and the consequence they have chosen. Such clear firm responses communicate to the students that you are serious about all students following directions. In addition, when you give students a choice as to whether or not they receive a consequence, you place responsibility where it belongson the students. Be sure to avoid nagging, threatening, or growing angry. Lastly, you should never apologize to a student for taking corrective action with him or her; it should simply be a matter of inevitable business. Examples: Connie, the directions were to sit and look at me without talking; you have chosen to get your warning. Jack, students need to do their own work without shouting out. You have chosen to go to time out. My directions were stay in your seat when youre working, Carlos; you have chosen a lunch detention. Administer Consequences from a Discipline Hierarchy The consequences you provide students should be part of a predetermined discipline hierarchy that has been presented to the students. Correct Inappropriate Talking Inappropriate talking is the most common behavior problem, and you must firmly and consistently correct this behavior.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Take Corrective Action Every Time Students Are Disruptive Students will never believe you mean business and follow your directions unless and until they know you will take corrective action you must provide disciplinary consequences each and every time students choose not to follow directions. Catch Students Being on Task After you have had to provide consequences to students, you will want to find the first possible opportunity to narrate the students on task behavior. You want to be sure to demonstrate to students that you are not simply going to limit their inappropriate behavior, but that you are committed to supporting their appropriate behavior as well. Prepare for the Students to Test Limits There may be times when students will continue to disrupt even after they have been given a warning or a consequence. In these situations, you should: Move in Move closer to the student, show concern in a firm quiet voice, and let the student know that his behavior is inappropriate. Remind the student of the consequences received so far and what will happen next if the misbehavior continues. Move out - With older students, it may be more appropriate to move out of the classroom to speak with them. Removing the audience of peers may increase the effectiveness of your corrective actions. Stay calm Students feed off a teachers emotional upset and use it to further fuel their own anger. The more upset the student gets, the calmer you need to become. Dont argue You need to stand your ground and simply keep repeating what you want the students to do. You should not ever engage in a back-and-forth with a student. Have a Back-up Plan For the small percentage of students who become defiant when you set limits, you must have a back up plan to insure you can get support to remove students from your classroom.

Please Note: When students test you, they are sending a clear message that the relationship between the two of you needs work. You need to reach out and build a positive relationship with such students.

PROGRAMS SIX & SEVEN: Implementing the Behavior Management Cycle throughout the School Year
The ultimate goal of any classroom management program is to teach the students to manage their own behavior with as little direction from the teacher as possible. Effective teachers have learned that the more behavioral structure they provide their students at the beginning of the school year, the easier it will be to give students the freedom to manage their own behavior as the year progresses.

LEVELS OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE


Effective teachers utilize three distinct levels of behavioral structure throughout the school year. Level One: Teacher Managed Highly teacher directed
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Utilize at the beginning of the school year or when turning around a disruptive classroom Primary focus is teaching students responsible behavior, not academic content Level Two: Transitioning to Student Self Management Utilize when 90% of the students have mastered behavioral expectations Loosen the reins Focus on both teaching responsible behavior and academic content Level Three: Student Self Management The ultimate goal of behavior management Students rarely need behavioral direction Focus is solely on teaching academic content MANAGING BEHAVIOR AT THE TEACHER MANAGED LEVEL Instructional Activities Top priority is teaching behavior Consistently give explicit directions Narrate behavior every 60 seconds Utilize class-wide rewards Stop lesson and take corrective action from discipline hierarchy if student disrupts Transitions Give explicit directions Check for understanding Chunk complex directions Enforce no talking Narrate behavior Offer timed incentive Take corrective action from discipline hierarchy if student disrupts TRANSITIONING TO STUDENT SELF MANAGEMENT Instructional Activities Focus on both teaching responsible behavior and academic content Continue to give explicit directions Check for understanding Reduce frequency of behavioral narration Phase out class-wide rewards Continue to take corrective actions with consequences from discipline hierarchy Transitions Continue to give explicit directions Check for understanding Dont chunk directions Still enforce no talking
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Reduce frequency of behavioral narration Phase out timed incentives Continue to take corrective actions with consequences from discipline hierarchy STUDENT SELF MANAGEMENT Instructional Activities Sole focus is on teaching academic content Vague directions are sufficient Narration is rarely needed There is no longer the need to use the discipline hierarchy consequences Transitions Vague directions are sufficient Narration is rarely needed There is no longer the need to use the discipline hierarchy consequences

PROGRAM EIGHT: Building Trusting Relationships with Students


Establishing positive relationships with students is not only critical to reducing the disruptive behavior of students, but is essential in investing and effectively teaching students. Many teachers, however, have difficulty in building positive relationships with their students. The False Assumption that Students Trust Teachers One key reason many teachers have difficulty building positive relationships with students is that they assume the students will automatically trust them because they are the teacher, and assume students believe all teachers have the students best interest at heart. Most students do have a basic level of trust in teachers. These students tend to have had teachers who have dealt with them in a positive manner in the past. In addition, these students tend to be from a home where their parents back the teachers efforts and they encourage the students to behave and succeed in school. Due to their previous life experience these students will tend to trust you, the teacher. Thus, you will be able to more easily establish a positive relationship with them and motivate them to behave appropriately in your classroom. There are, however, a percentage of students who enter your classroom with a negative view of school and teachers. These students may have had teachers who interacted with them in a negative or demeaning manner. In addition, they may have parents or other family members who do not have a positive view of school or teachers. Due to these students life experiences, teachers are not adults who they instinctively trust. The reality is that if students dont trust you or your intentions, there is a higher probability that they will not care about complying with your behavioral and academic expectations. You will find you have students who are going to continually fight you and give you a hard time by being disruptive and defiant, because in their eyes you are the teacher, and teachers from their perspective dont care about their well being.
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Establishing positive relationships with students who have trust issues with teachers will take extra effort on your part. The steps you take to build relationships with your other students will be insufficient. You are going to have to convince these students that you are on their side, that you are not like other teachers with whom they have had unfortunate past experiences, and that you will insure that they have a positive, productive experience in your classroom. HOW TO BUILD POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH ALL YOUR STUDENTS Establish Mutual Respect You must respond in a respectful manner in all your interactions with students. As well, you must earn the respect of your students. Students will only respect you if you demonstrate you care enough about their success to take charge of the classroom in a firm fair manner that respects the self-worth of each student. Bottom line, unless and until the students respect you, they will not value your positive attention or extra efforts you make to reach out to them. You will not be able to establish a positive relationship with students until youve earned their respect. Learn about your Students Another initial step in building positive relationships with students is to learn about them and their lives. Most effective teachers learn the following information from their students, be it from discussions or questionnaires. What adults do you live with? Do you have any brothers or sisters? How old are they? Who are your best friends? Why? What do you like to do best at home? Do you have any favorite hobbies? What are you really good at? What do you want to get better at? What is your favorite video game/movie/book/TV show/song? If you had one wish, what would it be? What would you like to be doing in 5 years? 10 years? Of what are you most proud? School would be better if.? What did your teacher do last year that you liked best? What did your teacher do last year that you liked least? Provide Positive Attention Effective teachers respond to students in a positive manner. A basic rule of thumb to follow is that you want to make three positive comments to students for each negative or corrective one you make. Be Authentic Teachers who are able to build positive relationships with students relate to them in what would be described as an authentic manner. They want to be a real person, not just a teacher. These teachers do not want to be friends with the students but they are very friendly with them. Let the Students Get to Know You To be real, let the students know about your personal life, but not your personal problems. For example share: Why you became teacher What kind of school experiences you had, both positive and negative
The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition
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Your familywhere are you from? are you married? do you have a boy/girlfriend? do you have children? do you have pets? Your favorite hobbies Favorite music/movies/books/TV shows/songs In addition, when appropriate, let the students know what is going on in your life. What you did over the weekend, on your vacation etc., and whats up with the significant people in your life. Admit Your Mistakes An important aspect of being authentic is to be willing to admit your mistakes. Dont try to pretend to be perfect. Dont be afraid to admit youve messed up because the students will lose respect for you. Reach Out to Students Greet Students at the Door At the beginning of each day or period make it a point to personally greet and find something special to say to each student, especially those with whom you need to work on your relationship. Talk With the Students about Non-Academic Topics One of the key strategies to building positive relationships, especially with students with whom you are working to build a positive relationship, is to talk with them about personal topics (e.g. their interests, concerns, joys and fears, etc). Contact Students after a Difficult Day If you have a rough day with a student (have to send him out of class, etc.) be sure to reach out to him before the next day begins. That may mean finding time to talk to the student after school or calling him at home that night. Let the student know you want to find a way for the two of you to resolve any issues that come between your having a positive relationship. Recognize Absences Call students on days they are absent to see how theyre feeling and to let them know you missed them. Attend the Students Extracurricular Events Another step you can take to reach out to your students is to attend events the students are participating in, such as athletic events, artistic performances, etc. Make Home Visits There are few ways you can let students know you care that are more effective than taking the time to go to their home. Conduct Problem Solving Conferences When you have students who are having behavioral issues in your classroom, you will want to know how to sit down with them and come up with solutions to help them be more successful. Here are the basic guidelines to follow when conducting a problem solving conference with students. 1. Meet with the Student when you can give Her Your Undivided Attention -- You only want to conduct a problem solving conference with a student when you will not be disturbed or interrupted.

The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition

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2. Show Empathy and Concern -- When problem solving with students, let them know you are concerned about their success and are meeting with them to help -not punish- them. 3. Question the Student to find out why there is a Problem -- Dont assume you know why the student is misbehaving. Do some gentle inquiring about her behavior. 4. Determine what you can do to Help -- What can you, as a concerned teacher, do to help the student solve the problem? You may discover a simple answer that will get the student on track. 5. Determine how the Student can improve her Behavior -- You also need to focus on what the student needs to do to improve her behavior in the future. 6. Agree on a Course of Action -- Combine your input with the students input and agree upon what both of you can do to improve the situation. Often capturing this agreement in writing and both signing it can be effective. 7. Restate your Expectations -- Let the student know that you care too much about her and will not allow her to continue her inappropriate behavior. 8. Summarize the Conference -- Wrap up the conference by summarizing what was said. Most important, end your meeting with a note of confidence.

PROGRAM NINE: Building Trusting Relationships with Parents & Families


You absolutely need family support to help your students reach their full potential.

BUILD POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH PARENTS


You will need to earn the trust of students parents or other adult family members. Just like with some students, some parents dont have an innate trust in teachers. Following are some tips: Reach out and begin to build positive relationships with students families even before the school year begins Make your first contact with families positive Dont just give family members information, but ask questions to get to know them and their child better, and to learn ways that they can support their child (or the whole class) throughout the year Each day make positive contact with at least two of your students parents, be it via phone call, email or note Contact parents/family members at the first sign of a problem; dont wait to contact parents until their child has significant issues

PLAN OUT PARENT/FAMILY CONFERENCES


Before you ever talk with parents/adult family members about a classroom management concern, plan out what youre going to discuss.

The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition

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Begin with a statement of concern why this behavior issue is holding the child (and/or other children) back from being successful Always start by sharing your genuine concern for their child Describe the students behavior in objective terms Avoid making vague, subjective or judgmental comments to family members Describe the steps you have taken to help their child Let the family know want to do all you can to assist their child Always get the family members input and perspective on what s/he feels is causing the problem and what they feel may help solve it Discuss the next steps you want each party to take to help their child Plan out what actions you will take in your classroom to assist their child Discuss why the parents help is needed to solve their childs problem Plan out what actions the parent or family will take to assist their child Plan out what actions the child needs to take Express your confidence that the problem can be resolved Parents maybe worried; reassure them that if you work together you can help their child Let the family member know you will follow up Set up a time to talk about how their child is progressing

The content of this QuickGuide is excerpted from Lee Canters Assertive Discipline 4 Edition

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