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Marinduque State College


SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

ACCEPTABILITY OF COCONUT BAGASSE AS MEAT EXTENDER

Aicyl P. Regencia , Jonard C. Macayaon , Renalyn Q. Matimtim Marineth M. Jinao , Marie Joy R. Abling

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY FOOD TECHNOLOGY

Copyright, March 2011

Marinduque State College SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY Tanza, Boac, Marinduque

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APPROVAL SHEET
This research-innovation work entitled ACCEPTABILITY OF COCONUT BAGASSE AS MEAT EXTENDER developed and submitted Aicyl P. Regencia , Jonard C. Macayaon , Renalyn Q. Matimtim, Marineth M. Jinao and Marie Joy R. Abling in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology, major in Food Technology is hereby approved.

Mr. Carlo T. Almadrones Adviser

PANEL OF EXAMINERS
Romulo H. Malvar, PhD Chairperson Virginia M. Sotto, EdD Member Carlos J. Andam PhD Member

Diosdado P. Zulueta DPA Member

Accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology

Mercedita M. Hermosa Dean, School of Industrial Technology Date signed: ____________________

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
We wish to convey our sincerest appreciation and most profound gratitude to those who gave their valuable assistance in preparation and completion of this study To the internal source of knowledge and wisdom, Almighty God, who has bestowed us his guiding torch in making this work possible despite hardship and difficulties. To Mr. Carlo T. Almadrones, our thesis adviser, for his assistance on the specific detailed techniques, suggestions and for untiring effort in editing and statistical treatment of data. To Professor Panchito Labay, our thesis writing Professor, for his expertise in research that made us knowledgeable along his field. To Mrs. Nenita O. Gonzalez, for her generosity and hospitality in providing our shelter during data analysis, interpretation and other related works for thesis. Especial thanks are given to our loving parents, brothers and sisters for their unending moral and financial support. To our friends, classmates and respective special someones who inspired us in doing this work. To them, this piece of work is dedicated. The Researchers

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THE ACCEPTABILITY OF COCONUT BAGASSE AS MEAT EXTENDER


Aicyl P. Regencia, Jonard C. Macayaon, Marineth M. Jinao, Renalyn Q. Matimtim, Marie Joy R. Abling Mr. Carlo T. Almadrones Adviser 2011

ABSTRACT
The study attempted to determine the most acceptable quantity of Coconut Bagasse as Meat Extender. Specifically the study finds out if theres a significant difference in Organoleptic characteristic quality of Meat Balls, Burger Patties and Skinless Longanisa with the different quantity of Coconut Bagasse as Extender. The study attempted to test the acceptability of Coconut Bagasse as Meat Extender to determine the significant differences of the meat products as well as the treatments which include Control (10% Coconut Bagasse. The finding revealed that all the three products and the four treatments are acceptable to moderately acceptable with the 10% Coconut Bagasse as the most preferred treatment in TVP), 10% Coconut Bagasse, 20% Coconut Bagasse and 30%

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the three processed meat products. The F test or the Analysis of Variance has revealed a non-significant difference in both the products and the treatments. The finding that the treatments are acceptable to moderately acceptable in the three processed meat products in terms of taste, texture, appearance and aroma points to the usefulness of Coconut Bagasse as meat extender. The hypothesis which states that there is no significant differences in the organoleptic characteristics of meat balls, hamburger patties and skinless longanisa and the treatments such as Control (10% TVP), 10% Coconut Bagasse, 20% Coconut Bagasse and 30% Coconut Bagasse point out to the similarity of the products and of the treatments in terms of taste, texture, appearance and aroma. The hypothesis is therefore accepted. Based on the foregoing findings and conclusion, the researchers are confident in offering the following recommendations: 1. The 10% coconut baggasse can be utilized at meat extender to meat balls, hamburger patties, skinless longanisa or other products with ground meat as base ingredient. 2. Not to use coconut bagasse beyond 30% level. 3. To add some amount of salt when the products are to be frozen as the taste tend to be reduced during freezing. 4. A follow-up study may be conducted to confirm this findings or to tap other processed meat products that can be extended using coconut bagasse.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRELIMINARIES Title Page ....i Approval Sheet ...ii Acknowledgement .iii Abstract ..iv Table of Contents ..vii CHAPTER 1: THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND Introduction ....1 Objectives of the Study......2 Statement of the Problem ..2 Significance of the Study .3 Scope and Limitation . ....3 Definition of Terms 4

CHAPTER 2: REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES Related Literature .. ..6 Conceptual Paradigm .....10 CHAPTER 3: METHOLOGY Research Locale.........11 Research Design ..............11 Research Instrument .........13 Respondents of the Study.... .....14 Sampling Technique .....14 Data Gathering ........14 Statistical Treatment of Data .....15

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CHAPTER 4: PRESENTATION, INTERPRETATION AND ANALYSIS Table 1. Organoleptic Characteristic of Meat Products with Coconut Bagasse as Meat Extender ....20 Table 2. Comparisons of the Different Organoleptic Characteristic Processed Meat Products using Coconut Bagasse as Extender .24 CHAPTER 5: SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS Summary ..28 Conclusion .29 Recommendation ..29 Bibliography .. 30 APPENDICES Appendix Table 1. Data of the Organoleptic Characteristics of Processed Meat with Coconut Bagasse as Meat Extender ..31 Appendix Table 2. Analysis of Variants for the Comparison of the Processed Meat Product and Treatments (Coconut Bagasse as Meat Extender) ..33 Appendix Table 3. Table 3.1. List of Evaluators from 329 Household Residents of Barangay, Tanza, Boac, Marinduque Using Random Sampling 34 Table 3.2 List of Faculty & Students Evaluators Using Random Sampling.36 Appendix Table 4. List of Tools, Equipments and Materials Used ..37 Appendix 5. Ingredients & Procedures for the Production of Meat Products Appendix 6. Letters ..39

.42 ....45

Appendix 7. Sample of Evaluation Sheet

ABOUT THE RESEARCHERS 46

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Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION

Background of the Study One of the thriving enterprises in the Philippines and the other countries is meat processing. It provides income to home makers and out of school youth in the rural and urban areas. This compliments the livestock industry by utilizing its output in the form of various meat products which can be produced from beef, pork and poultry such as sausages, tapa, hamburger patties, patties, barbecue and others; these products may be in sliced piece by piece or ground form. Those made out of ground form are added with extender in order to increase its volume, flavor and texture thus to gain more profit. Among the extender utilized by meat processor, the Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP) is the most common which is available in the market; however, the supply is limited only in the urban centers. These become a burden to some meat processors in the province as they have to travel and spend some other amount in purchasing TVP for their adventure. Finding an alternative that is locally available and cheaper made the researchers decide to try coconut bagasse as substitute meat extender. Coconut bagasse is commercially utilized in the form of desiccated coconut. Its utilization is confined in baking and pastries

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and no studies nor literatures are sufficient enough to support for the right quantity of this product when used as meat extender, hence this study. Objectives of the Study This proposed study aimed to determine if coconut bagasse would be acceptable to consumer as meat extender. Specially, it would measure the acceptability rating of coconut bagasse used as extender for meat balls, burger patties and skinless longanisa in terms of taste, texture, aroma and appearance as evaluated using the hedonic scale. The study would also determine the most acceptable quantity of coconut bagasse as meat extender. Statistically, the study would find out if there would be a significant difference in the quality of coconut bagasse and the organoleptic characteristic rating of coconut bagasse with the meat three productions.

Statement of the Problem 1. What is the acceptability rating of coconut bagasse used as extender for meat balls, burger patties and skinless longanisa in terms of taste, aroma, texture and appearance as evaluated using the hedonic scale.

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2. Is there any significant difference in the organoleptic characteristics between the processed meat product and between treatments (control vs. 10% CB vs. 20% CB vs. 30% CB)?

Significance of the Study The study will be more beneficial for those people living in Tropical countries such as the Philippines because coconut suitable in tropical area. This will encourage people to develop and cultures coconut to generate additional income for their family. The use of coconut bagasse as meat extender will also increase the profit of meat, processors since the cost increase of production is reduced.

Scope and Limitation This study concerns mainly about the acceptability of coconut bagasse as extender to meat balls, burger patty and skinless longanisa. The taste, aroma, texture and appearance of the three meat products will be tested with pure meat as control, while the meats include 10%, 20% and 30% coconut bagasse extender. The basis for the computation of the quantity of coconut bagasse is the weight of the meat that is 1000 grams. All the meat products will have an equal proportion of spices and condiments as specified in the list of inputs. For control, 10% TVP will be used.

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In determining the acceptability rating, a 10 points hedonic scale will be used. The products will be evaluated by the SIT Faculty, 3rd year Food Technology students and the community of Barangay Tanza, Boac, Marinduque, all chosen using the Stratified Sampling Technique. The shelf life of the product will not be determined in this study. The significant differences between products and treatments will be tested using the Analysis of Variance. The researcher will not subject the product to physco-chemical evaluation.

Definition of Terms To facilitate easy understanding of the important terms used in this thesis, the operational definition of the following is discussed.

Aroma this pertains to smell that the meat product gives off after cooking. Appearance this pertains to what can be seen as to color and shape of the cook meat product. Burger Patties a process meat product primarily made up of beef used in the preparation of hamburger. Coconut Bagasse grated coconut meat in which the milk is extracted, in this thesis the fresh weight was made as basis in the determination of the ratio bagasse from the meat.

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Extender any food additive used to increase the volume of the meat mixture, in some cases, it may enhance flavor. Evaluators group persons who have done the taste test of the meat product with coconut bagasse as extender. They rated the organoleptic characteristics of the treatments employing the 1 10 hedonic rating scale. Flavor pertains to the distinct taste of the cooked meat product. Meat Balls a cooked ground meat shaped into 1 inch balls. Organoleptic it refers to the sense organs particularly tongue, nose and eyes used to preceive an impression of taste, aroma and appearance respectively. Texture in this thesis was determined through the feel of the mouth. Texture Vegetable Protein a commercially prepared meat extender made up of ground soy beans seeds.

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CHAPTER 2 REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDY

According to the website www.google.com.ph the meat is a common term used to describe the edible portion of animal tissues and any processed or manufactured products prepared from these tissues. Meats are often classified by the type of animal from which they are taken. Red meats refer to the meat taken from mammals, white meat refer to the meat taken from fowl, seafood refers to the meat taken from fish and shellfish, the game refers to meat taken from animals that are not commonly domesticated. Rivera (2006), the acknowledged meat processing guro in the country, claimed that the value of meat is more is more than double though processing. Adding value to the meat

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through modern processing is profitable. And more people, including the animal raisers themselves, should know how to process the meat they produce. She added that the most popular meat processing recipe that one can produce in big quantity for commercial consumption are Tocino, Skinless Longanisa, Fresh Native Sausages, Quick Cured Ham, Corned Beef and Beef sausage. Pearson (1976) has provided the description of meat extenders in the Bio Science Journal. According to him, meat extenders are primarily plant protein from legumes, with soybeans as the major source that the use of meat extender and substitute is not a new development. It predates the dawn of civilization. Even though meat extender and substitute have been available for well over 30 years, the great expansion for human food had occurred during the past few years. The Food and Agriculture Organization (1995) reported that TVP (Texture Vegetable Protein) is the most common soybean extender. These cheaper plant proteins extended the more expensive meat protein, resulting in the acceptable over all protein content of lower cost meat products. Extenders are added in sizeable amount that increase the bulk of the meat products, but this may also alter their quality from animals protein source, whole milk and eggs considered as meat extenders. In some countries, replacement of meat by fish is gaining popularity resulting in fish products which maybe meat technology and process as Viennas made of meat.

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According to Clark, J.D. et. al (1991), TVP is made from a mixture of protein extracted primarily from soybean, but also cottonseeds, wheat and oats. It is texture into various shapes (chucks, flakes, nuggets, grains and strips) and sizes, existing the nozzle while still hot and expanding as it does so. The defattedmoplastic protein is heated to 150 200 C, which denatures them into a fibrous, insoluble, porous network that can soak up as much as three times its weight in liquids. As the pressurized molten protein mixture exits the extruder, the sudden drop in pressure causes rapid up to 1:3 (rehydrated TVP) without reducing the quality of the final product, sometimes improving it if the meat used in poor. TVP is primarily used as a meat substitute due to its very low cost as less than a third the price of ground beef, and when cooked together will help retain more weight from the meat by the absorbing juices normally lost. Among the possible substitute for soybean based meat extenders, Coconut is potentially developed by the Philippine Coconut Authority (2009) in its state of the arts processing and utilization research and development. Botanically, coconut is a fruit that is consumed in a number of form raw ( flesh ), milk, water and oil. The origin of the fruit is not clear, though the two most possible places of its origin are the South Asia and South America. However, today it is cultivated in almost all the tropical countries. Coconut is a simple dry nut, formed of a number of layers. The outmost is the brown husk formed of fibers called coir, while the second one is endocarp i.e. an inner stone. As you remove the layers, you get the testa, which covers the white and fleshy edible part of the fruit. Inside it

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is the coconut water, associated with a number of health benefits. Coconut water is mostly from the green coconut, which is not fully ripe ( Philippine Coconut Authority, 2009) The Philippine Coconut Authority, Market Research and Promotion Division (2005) has described desiccated coconut as the pure white, dehydrated from the fresh kernel of the coconut crispy, sweet, pleasant and fresh lasting. It contains the basic nutritive components of coconut meat. It is prepared in different cuts: extra fine, medium, granular, macaroons, flakes, chips, long and threads, rice cut and coarse. Its general uses include: 1. Confectionary main flavor ingredients in chocolate bars and as filler in nuts based chocolate products and candies. 2. Bakery an ingredient in cakes as decoration or nut meat miller. 3. Frozen Food an ingredient in flavoring and decorating ice cream and other Frozen Products. 4. Consumers an ingredient in ready-to-cook mixers for dishes and homemade pastries. Similarly, the website http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-desiccated-coconut.htm described desiccated Coconut as coconut meat which has been shredded or flaked and then dried to remove as much moisture as possible. There are a number of different styles of desiccated coconut used around the world, and availability of this coconut product varies, depending on the region where one is shopping. If desiccated coconut is not available, regular dried coconut can be used as a replacement, although dried content tends to have higher moisture content, despite the dried in the name. One of the most common forms of desiccated coconut is an unsweetened, very powdery product which is produced by drying shredded coconut and then grinding the shreds. It is also possible to find coarser desiccated

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coconut, such as desiccated shreds and even flakes of coconut. Many producers also make sweetened versions. The label should clearly specify whether or not the coconut has been sweetened. According to the website www.google.com.ph the coconut meat is the flesh of the coconut fruit, a tropical fruit produced by the coconut tree. There are number of uses for coconut meat, along with other parts of the coconut. Some grower sell fresh coconuts which can be cracked open for their meat, and coconut meat can also be purchased in canned and dried form. Some Southeast Asian dishes call for this coconut product, and it appears in some Western style dishes as well.

CONCEPTUAL PARADIGM
INPUT
Meat Balls Equipment Sauce pah, weighing scale, stove, mixing bowl, knives, meat balls molder, chopping board, strainer, food tong, 1 set measuring cup and spoon, graduated cylinder, mortar and pestle. Materials Burger Patties Cooking oil, ground meat, onion, garlic, phosphate, coconut bagasse (yamas), egg, milk, bread crumb, salt, MSG and Worcestershire sauce. Burger Patties Equipment 1. 2. 3. 4. Preparation Mixing Shape into patties Fry in thin oil 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

PROCESS
Meat Balls Preparation Mixing Shape the mixtures into balls Deep fry until golden brown Evaluation

OUTPUT

Meat balls with the desired quantity of coconut bagasse as a meat extender

Burger Patties with the desired quantity of coconut bagasse as a meat extender

Skinless Longanisa

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Evaluation Taste Texture Appearance Aroma

CHAPTER 3 METHODOLOGY

This chapter percents the materials and procedures employed in this study. It included the research locale, research design, sampling techniques, respondent and statistical treatment of data.

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Research Local This study was conducted at the M.S.C. School of Industrial Technology. The cooking of meat to be evaluated was done at the Food Technology Laboratory of MSC SIT. The taste test of evaluating of the meat product (treatment) was conducted at the MSC SIT also for the faculty and student evaluations, for the community, it was conducted at Brgy. Tanza, Boac, Marinduque.

Research Design The study is experimental in nature and involves comparison of the organoleptic characteristic of three meat products with coconut bagasse as extender. In this study the meat balls, burger patties and skinless longanisa were prepared, cooked and evaluated for taste, aroma, texture and appearance. The three products served as replication while the treatment, the utilization of T.V.P. as extender for control, 10% coconut bagasse for the first treatment, 20% coconut bagasse for the second treatment and 30% coconut bagasse for the third treatment. The experimental layout is presented below: Product Treatment Control 10% CB MB HP SL

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20% CB 30% CB

The sample size was determined as follows: 1.1. Stratified Sampling n = ___N___ 1+N (e) 2

_ 373__ 1+373(-1)2 = __ 373__ 1+373(.01)1 _ 373__ 1+3.73 78.85 or 79 _ __ 373__ 4.73

N Faculty FT Student Brgy. Tanza = = = 28 16 329 ---------373

% .075 .043 .882 ----------1.001

n 6 4 70 ----------80

1.2. Stratified sampling of Sitio for community evaluators Name of Purok Tanguile 1 N 46 % .139 n 10

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Tanguile 2 Narra 1 Narra 2 Yakal Acacia Guijo

36 56 80 51 42 18 -------329

.109 .170 .243 .155 .127 .055

36 12 17 11 9 4 -------71

Research Instrument The standard format was utilized for food product evaluation that will measure the acceptability level of the products taste, aroma, texture and appearance. The forms were distributed to every evaluator during the taste test session. REPLICATIONS MEAT BALLS PATTIES Control(10% TVP) Control(10% TVP) T1 (10%) CB T2 (20%) CB T3 (30%) CB
TVP %CB Texture Vegetable Protein based on the one kilo meat

TREATMENTS

T1 (10%) CB T2 (20%) CB T3 (30%) CB


CB

SKINLESS LONGANISA Control(10% TVP) T1 (10%) CB T2 (20%) CB T3 (30%) CB


Coconut Bagasse

Respondents of the Study

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This study employed evaluators chosen at random from the sectors, namely: SIT Faculty, Third Year Food Technology Students and the Community (household heads or representatives) of Brgy. Tanza, Boac, Marinduque.

Sampling Techniques The respondents who acted as evaluators of the products were determined employing two Sampling Procedures that is: Stratified Sampling for the determination of the number of evaluators from each sector and the simple random sampling with the use of lottery method for the determination of the actual evaluators from among the pre-determined number of evaluators in each sector. A ten percent margin of error, (10%) was the basis of the determination of sample size.

Data Gathering The data gathering activity for this study commenced, after cooking. The data on the taste, texture, aroma and the appearance were taken from the evaluators who tasted the cooked meat product and rated the required characteristics of each product using the hedonic rating scale. The quantity of the finished product was also recorded and collated.

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Statistical Treatment of Data The data were collated and analyzed using appropriate statistical equations. The differences of the product taste, aroma, texture and appearance were subjected to F-test (Analysis of Variance). If there is a significant difference, the Duncans Multiple Rage test (DMRT) is employed further. The procedures and equations for weighted means, F-test and DMRT are presented in this section: 1. Weighted mean: weighted mean was used to determine the level of acceptability of the meat products as evaluated by the faculty, students and the community. The formula for weighted mean is shown below: WM = TWF =N Where: WM = Weighted Mean Total Weighted Frequency total number of the respondent

TWF = N =

2. F-Test: This was used to test the significant between the taste, aroma, texture and appearance as well as the three products. The procedures and the equations involved in F-test (Pagoso et. al. 1992) are the following: Step 1. State the null hypothesis HO; there is no significant difference among the samples.

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Step 2. Step 3.

Set the desired level of significance. Compute the sum of square by the following formulas: TSS = x2 (x)2
_____

N SSb = 1 (x i j)2 (x)2 ____ ____ r N TTS - SSb

SSw Step 3.a.

Compute the degrees of freedom. dfb dfw = = k1 dft dfb

Step 3.b. Compute the mean sum of squares. MSb MSw = = SSb/dfb SSw/dfw

Enter the sum of squares, degrees of freedom and the mean sum of squares into an ANOVA Table. Source of Variation Between product Between Treatment Error Total Sum of Squares Degree of freedom (3-1) 2 (4-1) 3 Mean square Computed F Tabular F .051/.01

(3-1)(4-1) 6 (12-1) 11

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Step 4. Locate the tabular value of F by getting the intersection value of nj (df of greater MS) and (df of smaller MS) Step 5. Calculate the value of F by the following formula. F = MSb -----MSw

Step 6. Compare the computed F value with the tabular value, then state the conclusions arrive at. If the computed value < tabular value, the comparison is not statistically significant and the null hypothesis is accepted. If > tabular value, the comparison is not statistically significant and the null hypothesis is rejected.

3. Duncan Multiple Range Test: If the comparison is found to be significant, further testing should be done to find out which among the pairs of treatment means vary significantly, this were tested using the Duncan s Multiple Range Test (DMRT). The steps in computing the DMRT are (according to Gomez, K.A. and A.A. Gomez, 1976) shown below: Step 1. Arrange the treatment means in decreasing or increasing order. Step 2. Calculate standard error of the treatment mean, as follows: Sx = Where : S2 = is the error mean square S2/r

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is the number of replications

Step 3.

Calculate the shortest significant ranges for various ranges of mean as follows: Rp Where: Rp ( p = 2,3.........t) are values of significant stuentize ranges from appendix 6 based or the error degrees of freedom. t = is the number of treatments. obtained = rpSr

Step 4. Group the treatments means according to the statistical significance for this, the following method may be used: 1. From the largest mean, subtract the shortest significant range of the largest p. Declare all means less than this significantly different from the largest mean. For the remaining means not declared significantly different, compare the range (1.e...., difference between the largest and the smallest) with appropriate Rp. If the range is smaller than its corresponding Rp, all remaining means are not significantly different. 2. From the second largest means, subtract the second largest Rp. Declare all means less than this value significantly different from the second largest mean. Then, compare the range of the remaining means with the appropriate Rp.

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3. Continue the process with the third largest mean, then the fourth, and so on, until all means have been properly compared.

The variability of the data was measured by using the Coefficient of Variation ( CV ), that is: CV = S ------X2

Where: CV X S = = = Coefficient of Variation Grand Mean Standard Deviation

CV is expressed in percent and this denotes that the variation is ____ percent above or below the mean. This also indicates the accuracy and validity of the data gathered.

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CHAPTER 4 PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

This chapter presents the findings derived from three sets of evaluators among community members of Brgy. Tanza, Boac, Marinduque, the Faculty members of the School of Industrial Technology and the third year student of the BSIT major in Food Technology. The findings are presented in tabular form and substantiated by the discussion of the interpretation and analysis of the data. Table 1 contains the data or the organoleptic characteristic of the meat products with coconut bagasse extender. Table 2 on the other hand, shows the comparison of the products as well as the treatments as tested by the F-test. The significant differences on the organoleptic characteristics between the products and the treatments are also indicated.

Table 1:

Organoleptic Characteristic of Meat Products with Coconut Bagasseas Meat Extender

1.1 Meat Balls Characteristics Weighted Mean Rank Interpretation

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Taste: Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean 7.71 8.31 7.71 6.66 7.60 2.5 1 2.5 4 Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable

Table 1.1 continued Texture: Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Appearance : Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Aroma: Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean 6.21 7.90 7.05 5.95 6.68 7.32 7.87 7.45 6.25 7.23 7.62 8.08 7.76 6.86 7.58 3 1 2 4 Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable

3 1 2 4

Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable

3 1 2 4

Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable

Note: 9-10 Highly Acceptable, 7-8 Moderately Acceptable, 5-6 Acceptable, 3-4 Moderately unacceptable and 2-1 unacceptable

Table 1 shows the organoleptic characteristics of processed meat products with coconut bagasse extender. Specifically, Table 1.1 describes the acceptability rating of Meat Balls. It can be gleaned from the table that all treatment had a rating ranging from 6 to 8 which means that the Meat Balls, with TVP (control) and with 10%, 20% and 30% coconut

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bagasse are moderately acceptable. The Meat Balls extended with 10% coconut bagasse was rated as the number one in all the characteristics tested. Meat Balls with 20% control and 30% are rated least respectively.

1.2 Burger Patties Characteristic Taste: Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Texture: Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Appearance : Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Aroma: Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Weighted Mean 8.10 8.16 7.02 6.20 7.37 7.60 7.61 6.41 5.71 6.83 6.69 7.59 6.20 5.82 6.57 7.56 7.57 7.51 6.29 7.23 Rank 2 1 3 4 Interpretation Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable

2 1 3 4

Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable

2 1 3 4

Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable

2 1 3 4

Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable

Note: 9-10 Highly Acceptable, 7-8 Moderately Acceptable, 5-6 Acceptable, 3-4 Moderately unacceptable and 2-1 unacceptable

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Table 1.2 shows the rating on the organoleptic characteristic of Burger Patties ranging from 6 to 8.16 which indicate that burger patties with coconut bagasse is acceptable to moderately acceptable in terms of taste, texture, appearance and aroma. Similar with meat balls, the patties with 10% coconut bagasse, registered the highest mean score in all characteristics tested. The burger patties added with 30% coconut bagasse was rated lowest taste, texture, appearance and aroma. However, the rating obtained by this treatment indicate that more coconut bagasse is still acceptable although the texture had the lowest mean.

1.3 Skinless Longanisa Characteristic Taste: Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Texture: Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Appearance : Control 10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean Aroma: Control Weighted Mean 8.305 8.66 7.04 6.30 7.57 7.90 8.54 6.99 4.96 7.10 6.55 8.50 7.01 5.67 6.93 7.94 Rank 2 1 3 4 Interpretation Moderately Acceptable Highly Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable

2 1 3 4

Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable

3 1 2 4

Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable

Moderately Acceptable

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10 % CB 20 % CB 30 % CB Mean

8.74 7.16 6.37 7.55

1 3 4

Highly Acceptable Moderately Acceptable Acceptable

Note: 9-10 Highly Acceptable, 7-8 Moderately Acceptable, 5-6 Acceptable, 3-4 Moderately unacceptable and 2-1 unacceptable

The Table 1.3 shows the rating of organoleptic characteristics of Skinless Longanisa ranging from 5.67 8.74 which indicate that burger patties with coconut bagasse is acceptable to moderately acceptable in terms of taste, texture, appearance and aroma. Similar with meat balls, the patties with 10% coconut bagasse, registered the highest mean score in all characteristics tested. The burger patties added with 30% coconut bagasse was rated lowest taste, texture, appearance and aroma. However, the rating obtained by this treatment indicates that more coconut bagasse is still acceptable although the texture had the lowest mean.

Table 2:

Comparison of the Different Organoleptic Characteristics Meat Products using Coconut Bagasse as Extender

Table 2 show the comparison the different organoleptic characteristics processed meat using coconut bagasse as extender. The comparison was made based on the result of the F-test or the Analysis of Variance. The interpretations and analysis was made separately per characteristic.

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2.1 Taste Products Burger Patties 8.10 8.16 7.02 6.20 29.48 7.37 a

Treatment Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Total Mean

Meat Balls 7.71 8.31 7.71 6.66 30.39 7.60 a

Skinless Longanisa 8.305 8.66 7.04 6.30 30.3 7.57 a

Total 24.11 25.13 21.77 19.16 90.17

Mean 8.04 a 8.38 a 7.26 a 6.39 a 7.51

Note: Product and treatment means with common letters superscript are not statistically significant.

Table 2.1 presents the findings on the taste of the meat products as well as the treatments. It can be gleaned from the table that the meat balls, burger patties and the skinless longanisa with 10% TVP (control), 10%, 20% and 30% coconut bagasse registered acceptable to moderately acceptable ratings. The F-test, however, has failed to detect a significant difference between products and treatments. No related study was available to confirm these findings. The non significance between the products and treatments in terms of taste maybe attributable to the spices and condiments rather on the amount of coconut bagasse.

2.2 Texture Products Burger Patties 7.60 7.61 6.41 5.71

Treatment Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB

Meat Balls 6.21 7.90 7.05 5.95

Skinless Longanisa 7.90 8.54 6.99 4.96

Total 21.71 24.05 20.45 16.62

Mean 7.24 a 8.02 a 6.82 a 5.54 a

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Total Mean

27.11 6.68 a

27.33 6.83 a

28.39 7.1 a

82.83 6.90

Note: Product and treatment means with common letters superscript are not statistically significant.

Table 2.2 presents the findings on the texture of the meat products as well as the treatments. It can be gleaned from the table that the meat balls, burger patties and the skinless longanisa with 10% TVP (control), 10%, 20% and 30% coconut bagasse registered acceptable to moderately acceptable ratings. The F-test, however, has failed to detect a significant difference between products and treatments. The least rating obtained by the meat products extended with 30% coconut bagasse indicates that this treatment is not ideal in terms of texture. As more coconut bagasse is added the texture of the meat product tend to be gritty or rough with the presence of a foreign matter easily detectable. Similarly the researchers were not able to find related study to support this finding.

2.3 Appearance Products Burger Patties 6.69 7.59 6.20 5.82 26.30 6.57 a

Treatment Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Total Mean

Meat Balls 7.32 7.87 7.45 6.25 28.91 7.23 a

Skinless Longanisa 6.55 8.50 7.01 5.67 27.73 6.57 a

Total 20.56 23.96 20.66 17.76 82.94

Mean 6.85 a 7.99 a 6.89 a 5.92 a 6.91

Note: Product and treatment means with common letters superscript are not statistically significant.

Table 2.3 presents the findings on the appearance of the meat products as well as the treatments. It can be gleaned from the table that the meat balls, burger patties and the

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skinless longanisa with 10% TVP (control), 10%, 20% and 30% coconut bagasse registered acceptable to moderately acceptable ratings. Similarly, the F-test, failed to detect any significant differences between the products and the treatments. Meat balls, Burger patties and Skinless longanisa with 10% TVP (control) appeared darker in color when cooked or fried. The products added with coconut bagasse turn lighters or paler as the concentrations of coconut bagasse are added. This finding is not also substantiated by any related literature or studies.

2.4 Aroma Products Burger Patties 7.56 7.57 7.51 6.29 28.93 7.23 a

Treatment Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Total Mean

Meat Balls 7.62 8.08 7.76 6.86 30.32 7.58 a

Skinless Longanisa 7.94 8.74 7.16 6.37 30.21 7.55 a

Total 23.12 24.39 22.43 19.52 89.46

Mean 7.71 a 8.13 a 7.48 a 6.51 a 7.45

Note: Product and treatment means with common letters superscript are not statistically significant.

Table 2.4 presents the findings on the aroma of the meat products as well as the treatments. It can be gleaned from the table that the meat balls, burger patties and the skinless longanisa with 10% TVP (control), 10%, 20% and 30% coconut bagasse registered acceptable to moderately acceptable ratings. Similarly, the F-test, failed to detect any significant differences between the products and the treatments. Meat balls, Burger patties

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and Skinless longanisa with 10% TVP (control) appeared darker in color when cooked or fried. The products added with coconut bagasse turn lighters or paler as the concentrations of coconut bagasse are added. This finding is not also substantiated by any related literature or studies.

CHAPTER 5 SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

This chapter presents the recapitulation of the foregoing chapter that is the presentation, analysis and interpretation of the findings of the study. Here, the findings are summarized based on the order of arrangement of the specific statements of the problem. The confirmation and the decision about the hypothesis is also provided in this chapter. Also discussed in this section are the recommendations offered by the researchers.

Summary

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The study attempted to test the acceptability of coconut bagasse as meat extender to three determined the significant differences of the meat products as well as the treatments which include Control (10% TVP), 10% Coconut Bagasse, 20% Coconut Bagasse and 30% Coconut Bagasse. The finding revealed that all the three products and the four treatments are acceptable to moderately acceptable with 10% Coconut Bagasse as the most preferred treatment in the three processed meat products. The F-test or the Analysis of Variance has revealed a non-significant difference in both the products and the treatments.

Conclusion The findings that the treatments are acceptable to moderately acceptable in the three processed meat products in terms of taste, texture, appearance and aroma points to the usefulness of Coconut Bagasse as meat extender. The hypothesis which states that there is no significance difference in the organoleptic characteristics of meat balls, burger patties and skinless longanisa and the treatments such as control ( 10% TVP ), 10% coconut bagasse, 20% coconut bagasse and 30% coconut bagasse point out to the similarity of the products and of the treatments in terms of taste, texture, appearance and aroma. The hypothesis is therefore accepted.

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Recommendation Based on the foregoing findings and conclusion, the following are highly recommended: 1. The 10% coconut bagasse can be utilized at meat extender to meat balls, hamburger patties, skinless longanisa or other products with ground meat as base ingredient. 2. Coconut bagasse should not be used beyond the 30% level; and 3. Add some amount of salt when the products are to be frozen as the taste tends to be reduced during freezing. 4. A follow-up study may be conducted to confirm this finding or to tap other extenders. The use of coconut bagasse based on maturity stages of coconut is an ideal follow-up spuds.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BOOKS Pagoso et. al (1992)

INTERNET http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-desiccated-coconut.htm

www.google.com.ph

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Philippine Coconut Authority (2009); Research and Development Highlights. Diliman, Quezon City. Philippine Coconut Authority (2005); Market Research and Promotion Divison. Rivera (2006); Meat Processing FAO (1995); Texturized Vegetable Protein Clark, JD. et. al (1991) Gomez & Gomez (1976)

JOURNAL Pearson A.M. 1976. Meat Extender and Substitute Bioscience Vol. 26, No. 4 California; American Institute of Biological Science. Pp. 249-256

LEAFLETS Philippine Coconut Authority (2005); Market Research and Promotion Division. Diliman, Quezon City.

MAGAZINES Agriculture Vol. X No. 3 March 2006 S APPENDIX TABLE 1 DATA ON THE ORGANOLEPTIC CHARACTERISTICS OF PROCESSED MEAT WITH COCONUT BAGASSE AS MEAT EXTENDER Table 1.1 Meat Balls Characteristics 1 Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Control 0 0 0 0 0

2 0 0 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 3 0

4 1 2 0 6 2

5 6 Taste 7 11 2 5 6 10 12 18 Texture 8 13

7 12 15 17 15 15

8 26 21 28 14 26

9 10 14 6 5 4

10 13 21 13 7 12

TWF 617 665 617 533 497

WM 7.31 8.31 7.71 6.66 6.21

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10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB

0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

1 2 5 0 1 1 5 1 0 0 3

0 0 3 1 1 3 5 2 0 2 4

2 6 16 5 10 15 12 13 13 Appearance 2 10 3 2 9 7 4 8 9 13 8 10 Aroma 2 7 12 6 6 6 3 4 12 11 11 6

11 14 6 11 6 12 7 7 5 13 7

24 14 17 19 15 11 13 20 18 18 6

13 10 4 9 15 8 9 12 12 14 17

17 10 5 15 24 24 9 17 27 15 13

632 564 476 586 530 596 502 610 647 621 549

7.90 7.05 5.95 7.32 7.87 7.45 6.27 7.62 8.08 7.76 6.86

Table 1.2 Burger Patties Characteristics 1 2 Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Control 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 3 1 1 0 4 19 1 0 10 12 4

3 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 3

5 6 Taste 0 0 14 2 1 11 8 2 21 8 0 8 Texture 1 0 19 4 2 18 7 3 21 12 13 9 Appearance 8 4 18

7 6 5 6 1 8 5 2 1 3

8 32 32 22 17 39 30 25 17 27

9 6 7 2 3 0 3 1 3 0

10 21 22 15 10 12 17 10 9 12

TWF 648 653 562 496 608 609 513 496 535

WM 8.10 8.16 7.02 6.20 7.60 7.61 6.41 5.71 6.69

Appendix Table 1.2 continued 10% CB 0 3 2 20% CB 0 9 2 30% CB 2 14 3 Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB 0 1 0 3 2 2 9 10 0 2 2 4

3 14 10 5 2 8 3

3 10 4 13 5 11 Aroma 3 16 3 16 1 15 6 11

6 2 2 5 5 16 7

30 28 23 16 33 26 24

4 0 2 3 5 0 1

19 8 8 20 20 13 11

607 496 466 605 606 601 503

7.59 6.20 5.82 7.56 7.57 7.51 6.29

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Table 1.3 Skinless Longanisa Characteristics Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB Control 10% CB 20% CB 30% CB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 14 1 0 0 2 1 0 3 0 3 0 0 1 4 0 0 1 8 4 0 1 5 0 0 0 3 5 6 Taste 0 0 10 0 2 10 10 2 15 11 7 19 Texture 1 3 12 0 1 6 5 7 16 17 5 12 Appearance 7 18 10 1 3 6 10 4 10 15 18 13 Aroma 1 1 14 0 2 6 3 5 15 11 17 10 4 7 6 1 15 12 8 7 23 3 7 5 21 5 6 5 16 8 8 28 20 23 18 31 25 15 6 21 24 21 10 30 17 23 21 9 12 14 9 5 7 17 6 3 5 14 7 1 12 18 6 3 10 23 33 5 2 17 34 7 8 7 27 6 8 15 32 9 6 TWF 666 693 563 502 630 683 559 397 524 678 561 454 635 699 572 510 WM 8.305 8.66 7.04 6.30 7.90 8.54 6.99 4.96 6.55 8.50 7.01 5.67 7.94 8.74 7.16 6.37

APPENDIX TABLE 2 ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE FOR THE COMPARISON OF THE PROCESSED MEAT PRODUCT AND TREATMENTS (COCONUT BAGASSE AS EXTENDER)

Table 2.1 TASTE Source of Sum of Degrees of Mean F Ratio Tabular F

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Variation
Between Products Between Treatments Error Total

Squares
670.18 677.12 669.45 677.85

Fredom
(3-1) 2 (4-1) 3 (3-1)(4-1) 6 (12-1) 11

Square
335.09 225.73 -111.575 -3.00ns -2.02ns

.05

.01

5.14 10.82 4.76 4.78

ns-not significant

CV=1.5%

Table 2.2 TEXTURE


Source of Variation Between Products Between Treatments Error Total Sum of Squares 565.07 40.78 -28.5 577.35 Degrees of Fredom (3-1) 2 (4-1) 3 (3-1)(4-1) 6 (12-1) 11 Mean Square 282.54 13.59 -4.75 F Ratio -59.48ns -2.86ns Tabular F .05 .01 5.14 10.82 4.76 4.78

ns-not significant

CV=2.24%

Table 2.3 APPEARANCE


Source of Variation Between Products Between Treatments Error Total
ns-not significant

Sum of Squares 427.85 572.77 -419.17 581.45

Degrees of Fredom (3-1) 2 (4-1) 3 (3-1)(4-1) 6 (12-1) 11

Mean Square 213.92 190.92 -69.86

F Ratio -3.06ns -2.73ns

Tabular F .05 .01 5.14 10.82 4.76 4.78

CV=1.8%

Table 2.4 AROMA


Source of Variation Between Products Between Treatments Error Total
ns-not significant

Sum of Squares 659.76 663.73 -658.62 664.86

Degrees of Fredom (3-1) 2 (4-1) 3 (3-1)(4-1) 6 (12-1) 11

Mean Square 329.88 221.24 -109.77

F Ratio -3.00ns -2.01ns

Tabular F .05 .01 5.14 10.82 4.76 4.78

CV=1.26%

APPENDIX TABLE 3 LIST OF EVALUATOR FROM 329 HOUSEHOLD RESIDENT OF BRGY. TANZA, BOAC, MARINDUQUE SELECTED USING RANDOM SAMPLING (lottery)

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Table 3.1 Code Number 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 Appendix Table 3.1 Continued 034 Name of Household Daria Malangis Noel Maling Antonio Loto Beje Labos Guillermo Romasanta Nonito Mogol Crisanto Sena Alfredo Sena Angeles Laso Medel Sena Marito Ramos Marapia Ramos Felicito Oliverio Liticia Leal Justino Riego Albert San Jose Romulo Monteagudo Alejandra Hintay Constantino Manrique Rio Luha Rodolfo Malvar Wilma Lintot Edimer Magalang Ramil Mercene Armando Tan Isidro Jalaan Pedro Jasmin Bernardo Ocacdin Romualdo Olavides Rafael Jayag Rustico Mantal Arsenia Maling Virgilio Mendoza Jose Almonte

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035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062 063 064 065 066 067 068 069 070

Luis Labos Nolasco De Luna Ulyssis Largo Alex San Jose Lenticia Leal Mylene Lial Jocelyn Mercene Genesis Sena Siony Mantal Marina Cipriano Julieto Romasanta Nelia Mayores Rowena Abaro Jesica Quis Daisy Obaltero Alberto Porley Alex Sena Mayolo Marapia Rogelio Guevarra Ronaldo Cipriano Wilfredo Malapad Felilia Linga Adolfo Largado Cristino Mercado Joseph Mabuti Reynaldo Malimata Alicia Serrano Ofelia Labos Joseph Leal Belen Retardo Ruel Mogol Inocencio Marciano Mary Ellah Mercene Janeth Mogol Marilyn Macunat Lito San Jose

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LIST OF FACULTY AND STUDENT EVALUATORS USING RANDOM SAMPLING Table 3.2 Code Number 071 072 073 074 075 076 077 078 079 080 081 Name of Faculty and Student Ernani Sto. Domingo Nenita Gonzalez Teressa Chaves Luci Oliverio Lovely Mangana Anthony De Guzman Cezar Olao Sharmin Chaves Nestle Joy Baldovino Lurisel Montiel Hector Carlo Olao

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APPENDIX TABLE 4 LIST OF TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS USED

4.1Tools and Equipment NUMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 QUALITY 1 1 14 4 2 2 1 1 1 2 4 UNIT Set Set Pieces Pieces Pieces Pieces Pieces Pieces Pieces Pieces Pieces SPECIFICATION Measuring Cup Measuring Spoon Mixing Bowl Knives Chopping Board Sauce Pan Gas Range Weighing Scale Wooden Spoon Ladle Tapper Ware REMARKS Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment Shop Equipment

4.2 Materials NUMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 QUALITY 8 4 1 1 4 4 2 1 12 1 1 1 UNIT Kilos Kilos Packs Bottle Packs Packs Packs Cup Pieces Kilo Kilo Pack Kilo Pack Pack SPECIFICATION Pork Beef Curing Salt Anisado Wine Milk Milk Powder Bread Crumbs Phosphate Eggs Garlic Onion Salt Sugar MSG Black Pepper REMARKS Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased Purchased

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16 17

3 1

Cans Bottles

Pineapple Juice Worcestershire Sauce

Purchased Purchased

4.3

Bills of Materials and Supplies Needed QUALITY 8 4 1 1 4 4 2 1 12 1 3 1 1 1 10 UNIT Kilos Kilos Pack Bottle Cans (big) Packs Packs Packs Piece Kilo Kilo Packs Cans Kilo Pack Pack Bottle Pieces SPECIFICATION UNITPRICE TOTAL Pork 170.00 1,360.00 Beef 230.00 920.00 Curing Salt 5.00 5.00 Anisado Wine 28.00 28.00 Milk 25.00 100.00 Milk Powder 20.00 80.00 Bread Crumbs 30.00 60.00 Phosphate 35.00 35.00 Eggs 5.00 60.00 Garlic 30.00 30.00 Onion 40.00 40.00 Salt 5.00 5.00 Pineapple 25.00 75.00 Sugar 30.00 30.00 Black Pepper 10.00 10.00 MSG 1.00 1.00 Worcestershire 40.00 48.00 Coconut 16.00 160.00 Total 3,047.00

NUMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

4.4 Total Budgetary Requirements


PARTICULAR 1.Personal Service (PS) 1.1 Technical Consultant 1.2 Contractual Labor 1.2.1Laboratory Testing 1.2.2Others pls. specify a. Printing b. Photo Copy Total Personal Service 2.Maintenance and other Operating Expenses 2.1 Travel Expenses AMOUNT

50.00 450.00 500.00

600.00

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2.2 Materials and Supplies 2.3 Sundries/Laboratory Fee 2.4 Food Total Maintenance and other Operating Expenses Total Budget

500.00 4,147.00 4,647.00

APPENDIX 5 INGREDIENTS & PROCEDURES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF MEAT PRODUCTS

5.1 How To Make A Meat Balls

Ingredients: 1 kls. Lean Pork Ground 1 cup Breadcrumbs cup Evap Milk 1 tbsp. Salt 1 tsp. Worcestershire Sauce tsp. Black Pepper Ground 2 pcs. Onion Minced 2 pcs. Eggs Beaten 1 tsp. Phosphate dissolve in cup of water *Coconut Bagasse (100g, 200g and 300g)

Procedures: 1. Preparation of all the ingredients 2. Mixing 3. Shape into balls 4. Deep fry until golden fry

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5.2 How To Make Burger Patties

Ingredients: 1 kl. Ground Lean Pork 1 cup Breadcrumbs cup Milk Powder 1tbsp. Worcestershire Sauce tsp. Black Pepper Ground 2 pcs Onion Minced 1 clove Garlic Minced 1 pack Magic Sarap 1 tsp. Phosphate dissolve into cup water *Coconut Bagasse (100g, 200g and 300g)

Procedures: 1. Prepare all the ingredients 2. Mixing 3. Shape into patties 4. Fry

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5.3 How To Make Skinless Longanisa

Ingredients: 1kilo Lean Pork Ground 2 tbsp. Salt 8 tbsp. White Sugar 2 tbsp. Anisado Wine cup Pineapple Juice 1 clove Garlic, Minced finely 1 tsp. Black Pepper Ground tsp. Prague Powder 1 tsp. Phosphate dissolves in cup water

Procedures: 1. Mix all ingredients 2. Cure the mixture (8-10 hours) room temperature or (12-24 hours) refrigerator 3. Wrap with paperlyne 4. Cook or freeze

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Republic of the Philippines MARINDUQUE STATE COLLEGE Boac Main Campus Tanza, Boac, Marinduque

March 2011 Mr. Carlo T. Almadrones Instructor 111 This College Sir: We are please to inform you that we are now writing our thesis entitled Acceptability of Coconut Bagasse as a Meat Extender. In view of this, we may avail of your expertise and able service to be our adviser. You believe you are the person in authority who could give us helpful suggestion and good advices to carry out of this endeavor successfully. We look forward for your favorable to this matter.

Respectfully yours,

Aicyl P. Regencia Jonard C. Macayaon Renalyn Q. Matimtim

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Marineth M. Jinao Marie Joy R. Abling Noted:

Prof. Panchito Labay Thesis Writing Instructor

Conformed: Mr. Carlo T. Almadrones Thesis Adviser/Statistician Republic of the Philippines MARINDUQUE STATE COLLEGE Boac Main Campus Tanza, Boac, Marinduque

March 2011 To Barangay Captain Sir/Madam; May we have the honor to request your permission to conduct evaluation in your barangay. We are presently writing our thesis entitled Acceptability of Coconut Bagasse as a Meat Extender, to complete the requirements in Bachelor of Science and Industrial Technology. Thank you very much and god bless.

Very truly yours,

Aicyl P. Regencia Jonard C. Macayaon Renalyn Q. Matimtim Marineth M. Jinao Marie Joy R. Abling

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Noted: Mr. Carlo T. Almadrones Thesis Adviser/Statistician

Prof. Panchito Labay Thesis Writing Instructor

Republic of the Philippines MARINDUQUE STATE COLLEGE Boac Main Campus Tanza, Boac, Marinduque

March 2011 Prof. Mercidita M. Hermosa Dean of School of Industrial Technology Marinduque State College Dear Maam: We would like to request to use the laboratory shop (Deli Chef Cafe) in conducting our thesis titled Acceptability of Coconut Bagasse as a Meat Extender, in preparation of our product. Your kind consideration to this matter is gently appreciated. Thank you very much.

Respectfully yours,

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Aicyl P. Regencia Jonard C. Macayaon Renalyn Q. Matimtim Marineth M. Jinao Marie Joy R. Abling Noted: Prof. Panchito Labay Thesis Writing Instructor

Mr. Carlo T. Almadrones Thesis Adviser/Statistician Evaluation Sheet Code Number: 10


Taste Texture Appearance Aroma
9-10 Highly Acceptable, 7-8 Moderately Acceptable, 5-6 Acceptable, 3-4 Moderately Unacceptable, 1-2 Unacceptable

Name of Recipe: 7 6 5

Date: 2

Signature of Evaluator

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Evaluation Sheet Code Number: 10 Taste Texture Appearance Aroma


9-10 Highly Acceptable, 7-8 Moderately Acceptable, 5-6 Acceptable, 3-4 Moderately Unacceptable, 1-2 Unacceptable

Name of Recipe: 9 8 7 6

Date: 3 2

Signature of Evaluator

Evaluation Sheet Code Number: 10 Taste Texture Appearance Aroma


9-10 Highly Acceptable, 7-8 Moderately Acceptable, 5-6 Acceptable, 3-4 Moderately Unacceptable, 1-2 Unacceptable

Name of Recipe: 7 6

Date: 3 2

Signature of Evaluator

ABOUT THE RESEARCHERS

Self-confidence is the founder of great success and achievements AICYL PERLAS REGENCIA, Cyl as she called by her friends, saw the first light of the dawn on Bangcuangan, Sta. Cruz, Marinduque on July 4, 1992 under the guiding star of Cancer. Shes the youngest among the eight children of Mr. Ambrocio P. Regencia and Mrs. Delma P. Regencia. She got her elementary diploma at Santa Cruz North Central School and took her secondary at Landy National High School. At present she is third year student of

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Marinduque Stae College, Boac Campus taking up Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology with specialization in Food Technology. For her, education is the road to success in every endeavor in life. In spite of the challenges that she encountered and presently facing, she hope to be the one luckiest candidate for graduation this coming April 2012.

A Journey of thousand miles begin in a single step JONARD CARANDANG MACAYAON was born in a light of dawn of the 28th day of June, year 1992 in Corecheas Clinic, Sto. Tomas, Batangas. He is under the guiding star of cancer, year of the monkey. He is the 6th child among the seven siblings of Mr. Adriano and Mrs. Estela Macayaon. He studied his grade one to three at San Roque Elementary School in Sto. Tomas, Batangas and he got his diploma in elementary education at Tanuan North Central School in Tanuan City, Batangas. He finished his high school journey at Sta. Anastacia San Rafael National High School in Sto. Tomas, Batangas. God tested his ability of being independent when his uncle sent him and his brother in Marinduque to pursue their college life. He has a goal to pursue his journey in studying college so he decided to study at Marinduque State College taking up Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology with specialization in Food Technology. In spite of all challenges that he encountered and presently facing, he hope to be the one of the lucky candidate for passing in the depending of the thesis in this coming March 2011.

Failure is the mother of success RENALYN QUEZON MATIMTIM saw the beauty of Brgy. Kaibiga, Novaliches, Caloocan City on November 12, 1991 in the guiding star of the poisonous Scorpio and year of the goat. She is the eldest child among the eight siblings of Mr. Reynaldo and Mrs. Erlinda Matimtim. She achieved her elementary diploma at Mainit Elementary School in Boac, Marinduque and she got her high school diploma at Marinduque National High

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School in Boac, Marinduque. At present, she is a 3rd year college student taking up Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology with specialization in Food Technology at Marinduque State College. In spite of the challenges that she encountered and presently facing, she hope to be the one of the luckiest candidate for passing in depending their thesis in this coming March 2011.

Experience is the good teacher MARIE JOY ABLING was born on midnight of the 29th of November, 1989 in Barangay Caigangan, Buenavista, Marinduque. She is under the zodiac sign Saguitarious. She is the 2nd child among the five siblings of Mr. Joelito Abling and Marietta Abling. She finished her elementary education in Sitio Pag-asa, Brgy. Caigangan Buenavista, Marinduque. She continued studying in Buenavista National High School in Brgy. Uno, Buenavista, Marinduque. She stopped two years. God tested her strength by giving more problems and trials but she never gave up. She had a goal to finish college when she decided to study at Marinduque State College taking up Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology, major in Food Technology.

Just be yourself. Express who you are Marineth Malabayabas Jinao is 18 years old, from Barangay Bunganay, Boac, Marinduque. Her birthday is July 18, 1992. She is the eldest among the five children of Mrs. Cherlita Malabayabas and Mr. Rodolfo Jinao. She graduated in Cawit Elementary School and Cawit National Comprehensive High School. At present she is studying at Marinduque State College, a third year student taking up Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology, major in Food Technology.