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idiosyncratic

paranoid point du caption

delusional, paranoiac psychotic neurotic

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cosmogony

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objection

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convenient but cheap

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1f:


200

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2b

borderless cosmopolitan

2c

2000

24

,
co-citizenship, cosmocracy, cosmopolitan social democracy, cosmopolitan world order, cultureless
space, third space, international space, denationalization, global democratization, earth politics,
federation of the world, intergovernmental, international society, postmodern, post-national
constellation, statelessness, superstate layer of global governance, transnationalization, universal
scope of nation-states, world republic, world society,
2d

2e

2f

2g

2h

2i


2j:

25

2k

Zola

2l

3a:

26

27

171

28

luxe speculative, speculative luxury

XX

mandarin

polarisation

29

voice modality

denotation

30

XX

31

1.
2.
XX

neurotic


32

171

detour

2001

80

53

democratie venir democracy to come

logos plemos

33

34

35

36

therapy

37

yu

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:
()

GRE

38

()

30

1949 35 70
65 :

:
39


:
20

10

40

2
coveragescale

articulation

lector

operatur de language

2 1993
1194

signification forceviolence,
institutional distribution of power bureaucratic hegemony

41

auctor
lector(legere librum audire librum )

P. Collins Routledge Kegan Paul1977 10112

R. Rice Sage1977 265859


lector

functionary
communication
academic
anti-academic142146

H.H. Gerth, C.W. Mills amd ycf , Kegan Paul, 1947


,437 /Puns,
euphemisms, allusions to classical quotations, and a refined and purely literary intellectuality were
considered the conventional ideal of the genteel man.And in fact, one did not manage the
administration with mere poetry even in China. But the Chinese prebendary official proved his
status quality, that is ,his charisma, through the canonical correctness of his literary forms.
Therefore, considerable weight was placed on these forms in official communications.

Mal dArchive
Galile1995 28
auctor lector

commentaryargumentative discourse

disputation peers

42

R.Nice 47

7268

imprime et publie sa parole

119410
groupwise
demogogue mass intellectual

Die Worte, die man braucht, sind dann nicht Mittel wissenschaftlicher Analyse, sonder politischen
Webens um die stellungnahme der anderen. SOZIOLOGIE/WELTGESCHICHTLICHE
ANALYSE/POLITICAlfred Krner 1964 325

relevant,
pertinent, ground-breaking

NO
YES

43


Fachprfungswesen
tenure

3 G. Roth, C. Wittich 1968 9629989


1049

universitas artistorumuniversitas
corporation

facultas
consortium magistrorum

9098
facultas facultas magister, magister scolarum, caput
scolae, scolasticus licentia docendi
facultas inceptio

802 Facultas

disputatio
disputatio

44

professorial
jurisprudence

45

A B
A
a.

administration of justice

1996 97

a producer (producteur) produces for other producers

illusio

S. Emannuel
Polity1996 22731

claim claim

Galilee, 1991 427


topicality

46

argumentative discourse

M. Papastephanou MIT1998 1978

b.


Tenure

3 9981003 114346

finality

47

Dozent essay


jurisprudence

4 P. Collier
12858
d.

48

B
a.

ground-breaking

b. facultas
tenure-track lector

200

49

c.1

tenure

d.

e.

position disposition

125
R. Johnson Polity1993 189

50

L. WirthE. Sils
Kegan Paul, 1936 7879
topicality

f.

g.

51



h.

ideologist
liability
>>>>
> liability

i.

finality

auto-immunation

Galilee, 2003 1438


52

pathologique normal-e pervers-e


patheticit

Collier-McMillam Ltd., 1965, 55

53

--zhong
1

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competence

von Their

54

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competence, methodology, performatives

Augenmass

occupation

nationality .

55

topology

lart moyen

R. Johson 1993 125 1616



56

\\\"\\\"\\\"\\\"

indispensable!

guaiguai

57

irrelevant

58

ge ge

social scientization capital-savoir

idiomaticite

topology

transcontinentalit

1991 524

59


veritable genealogie du monde,

Galilee2003 56

labime de la traduction entre les differentes langues

172
double
bind,
121

Une raison doit se laisser raisonner.


217

realize

relaxed

We must read far more widely than we do, and we must strongly
encourage our students to do so. WeAnd it is crucial for us to learn languages. A scholar who
cannot read three to five major languages is severely handicapped. English is surely crucial, but
English alone means that one has access to at most 50% of what is written, and as the decades go
by, the percentage will diminish because the areas greatest growth in the production of scholars
will be increasingly non-English in their written production. Increased reading knowledge of
language goes hand in hand with increased internationalization of our corps of scholars, even if
they are not identical.
The End of the World as We Know ItSocial science for the 21st
century, Minneapolis, 1999, p.248


thematized

60

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62

2.2A
observable-reportablesocially demonstrable;
socially organized and managed procedure

a.

socially
demonstrable

Polity,1996 7
conjuncture

rou

act of judicature natural reason equity


be consonant to natural reason and equity

meditation self-love
and other passions Oxford, 1996 191
195197

agents, positions, dipositions topology

write more
finer detailing

63


double contingency

the person assumes, assumes the other person, the other person assume it of
him, and assumes that as he assumes it of the other person the other person assumes the same for
him that

50

b.

the judgement of peers

natural liberty

64

c.

5
Karl Kraussays that anyone who rejects the pleasure and easy profits of long
distance criticism, in order to investigate his immediate neighbourhood, which everything bids
him hold sacred, must expect the torments of subjective persecution. Thus we have been tempted
to adopt the title, A Book for Burning, which Li Zhi, a renegade mandarin, gave to one of those
self-consuming works of his which revealed the rules of the mandarins games. We do so, not in
order to challenge those who , despite their readiness to denounce all inquisitions, will condemn to
the stale any work perceived as a sacrilegious outrage against their own beliefs, but simply to state
the contradiction which is inherent in divulging tribal secrets and which is only so painful because
even the partial publication of our most intimate details is also a kind of public confessionby
mobilizing all available scientific expertise in an attempt to objectify our social milieu, far from
exerting reductive violence or totalitarian imperialismhe the sociologist offers a potential
libety; and he can at least hope that his treatise on the academic passions will be for others what it
has been for him, a means of socio-analysis.
(reflectivity)

d.
play around
site

social scientization of all knowledge, The End of the World as We Know


ItSocial Science for the 21st Century, Minnesota, 1999 191 216

65

We seek to discover the


reality on the basis of which we have constructed reality. And when we find this, we seek to
understand how this underlying reality has in turn been socially constructed
216

e. the doer of
an accountable person

81 rational behaviours
263 actual settings

33

Alfred Schutz

horizons

22 Catch 22

66

Marvin Farber The Foundation of Phenomenology 1943


4

professional practices if socially managed demonstration


the rational
accountability of practical actions as an ongoing, practical accomplishment
observable-and -reportable
1 7 9

corporate pursuit34

uninteresting

67

physically

self-love and other passions

nur bedingt
unbedingt

Galilee, 2003 188

Galilee1994 15993

equaliberty

68

70 6030 40

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

3.1

3.1.1
3.1.2

3.1.3
tolerated outsider

69

rong

3.1.4

4
4.1

4.2
4.3

4.4

.
5

5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4

5.5 A A A

6.1
6.2
70

6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6

6.6.1

6.6.2

6.6.3

6.6.4
7

7.1

7.2

7.3

8.1

8.2

9 13

if you like
71

72

le calculable et lincalculable

du pouvoir-svoir, du pouvoir du savoir, du savoir comme


pouvoir Galilee 2003 190
1

73

liberty

B
1 >
>>

2 facultas

C
1

2
74

whip

75

sentimental

jia

qi

76


corrupt

in seiner Versponnenheit
Husserliana VI, La Haye, M. Nijhoff, 1954, p. 348

77

1994 24

1977 7

78

2.5B
observable-reportablesocially demonstrable;
socially organized and managed procedure
2A

the
unsatisfied programmatic distinction between and substitutability of objective for indexical
expressions
denotation

.
opus operatum modus operandi

massaging

Nice 1979 738


expressions whose
sense cannot be decided by an auditor without his necessarily knowing or assuming something
about the biography and the purpose of the user of the expression, the circumstances of the
utterance, the previous course of the conversation, or the particular relationship of actual or
potential interaction that exists between the expresser and the auditor. 4
let it localise itself

uninterestingthe uninteresting
essential reflexivity of accounts

members take for granted that a member must at the outset


know the settings in which he is to operate if his practices are to serve as measures to bring
particular, located features of these settings to recognizable account. They treat as the most
passing matter of fact that members accounts, of every sort, in all their assembly are constituent
features of the settings they make observable. Members know, require, count on, and make use of
this
reflexivity
to
produce,
accomplish,
recognize,
or
demonstrate
rational-adequacy-for-all-practical-purposes of their procedures and findings.

79

Not only do
members-the jurors and the others-take that reflexivity for granted, but they recognize,
demonstrate, and make observable for each other the rational character of their actual, and that
means their occasional, practices while respecting that reflexivity as an unalterable and
unavoidable condition of their inquiries. 8

intimately connected to the terms of employment, to various


internal and external chains of reportage, supervision, and review, and to similar organizationally
supplied priorities of relevances for assessments of what realistically, practically, or
reasonably needed to be done and could be done, how quickly, with what resources, seeing
whom, talking about what, for how long, and so on. Such considerations furnished We did what
we could, and for all reasonable interests here is what we came out with14

83
78
its features of organizationally
appropriate sense, fact, impersonality, anonymity of authorship, purpose, reproducibility--i.e., of a
properly and visibly rational account of the inquiry. ()
Members were required in their occupational capacities to formulate accounts of how a death
really for all-practical-purposes happened. Really made unavoidable reference to daily,
ordinary, occupational workings. Members alone were entitled to invoke such workings as
appropriate grounds for recommending the reasonable character of the result without necessity for
furnishing specifics. On occasion of challenge, ordinary occupational workings would be cited
explicitly, in relevant part. Otherwise those features were disengaged from the product.
the analyzability of
actions-in-context as a practical accomploshment,

anthropologically strange
makes familiar,
commonplace activities of everyday life recognizable as familiar, commonplace activities; that on
each occasion that an account of common activities is used, that they be recognized for another
first time; that the member treat the processes and attainments of imagination as continuous
with the other observable features of the settings in which they occur; and of proceeding in such a
way that at the same time that the member in the midst of witnessed actual settings recognizes
that witnessed settings have an accomplished sense, an accomplished facticity, an accomplished
objectivity, an accomplished familiarity, an accomplished accountability, for the member the
organizational hows of these accomplishments are unproblematic, are known vaguely, uniformly,
80

with enormous standardization and as an unaccountable matter.


isolatable, typical, uniform, potential repetition,
connected appearance, consistency, equivalence, substitubility, directionality, anonymously
describable, planfulin short, the rational properties of indexical expressions and indexical
actions.910
\'
B

finality, applicability

les vices des tudes; haillons de la scolastique

/
Galilee1991
134

docta ignorantio(
)
19

la contradiction intra-institutionnelle

critrologie, titrologie, auto-intituleration


rong

C
This assumption of a common
intersubjective world of communication is startlingly modified in the actions of scientific
theorizing. The relevant other persons for the scientific theorizer are universalized Anymen.
They are, in the ideal, disembodied manuals of proper procedures for deciding sensibility,
objectivity and warrant. Specific colleagues are at best forgiveable instances of such highly
abstract competent investigators. The scientific theorizer is obliged to know only what he has
decided to lend credence to. It is his mere option to trust the findings of colleagues on the grounds
of membership in a professional or any other society. If he witholds credence, he is permitted to
justify this by invoking as grounds his impersonal subscription to a community of competent
investigators who were anonymous with respect to collectivity membership and whose actions
conform to norms of the manual of procedures. By such actions, he may risk criticism for
unreasonable rigor. 275 theorizer, theorizer
theorizing
81

to produce bewilderment,
consternation, and confusion; to reduce the socially structured affects of anxiety, shame, guilt, and
indignation; and to produce disorganized interaction
378

the conditions of its membership are the
attributions that its determinations, whatever they might substantively consist of, could be seen by
the other person if their positions were exchanged, or that its features are not assigned as matters
of personal preference but are to be seen by anyone, i.e., the previously enumerated features.
56
habitaus, disposition position
the production of a conmmonsense world endowed with
the objectivity secured by consensus on the meaning (sens) of practices and the world, in other
words the harmonization of agents experiences and the continuous reinforcement that each of
them receives from the expression, individual or collective, improvised or programmed of similar
or identical experiences.

80
Endless methodological studies are directed
to the tasks of providing members a remedy for indexical expressions in members abiding
attempts, with rigorous uses of ideals to demonstrate the observability of organized activities in
actual occasions with situated particulars of talk and conduct. 11
common sense
knowledge of social structures

socially-sanctioned-facts-oflife-in-society-that-any-bona-fide-member-of
the-society-knows .
76-77

Then, for anything the students wrote, they


could assume that I, as a competent co-member of the same community(the conversations were
after all commonplace) should be able to see the correspondence and its grounds. If I did not see
the correspondence or if I made out the content differently than they did, then as long as they
could continue to assume my competencei.e., as long as my alternative interpretations did not
undermine my right to claim that such alternatives needed to be taken seriously by them and by
meI could be made out by the students as insisting that they furnish me with finer detailing than
practical considerations required. In such a case, they should have charged me with blind pedantry
and should have complained that because anyone can see when, for all purposes, enough is
enough, none are so blind as those will not see.28
82


the conditions of its membership are the attributions that its determinations,
whatever they might substantively consist of , could be seen by the other person if their positions
were exchanged, or that its features are not assigned as matters of personal preference but are to be
seen by anyone, i.e., the previously enumerated features. These and only these enumerated
features irrespective of any other determinations of an event define the common sense character of
an event.

83

equity natural reasonto be able in judgement to


divest himself of all fear, anger, hatred, love, and compassion

, 1996 1956

Sammlung, Lgos.

84


100

85

at large

86

our
very own

1990 1815

C.

87

When this world began, it was heavens plan: there should be a girl for
every single man.Somebody loves me, I wonder who it can be. For every boy who passes me I
shouted: Hey, maybe you were meant to be my loving baby.
Anglicat

la prostitution collective

le couple
anglique

88

d.

idiosyncrasy

e.

89

transference

topologie de sujet

f.

g.

90


2.7 /


XX XX

>>>
,

>>>

91

Nice 1979 19
docta ignorantia learned ignorance

auto-critique

Third Worlder//


monolinguisme monologisme

corpus

92


un dogme positiviste de la linguistic

/
1991
163
monlinguisrme monologisme

die ausserste
Realisierung der Feindschaft
auf die reale Moglichkeit der physischen
Totung

93

80

Seuil, 1967
6197
1 Gallimard2001
, 1150

94

Meno

orth doxa opinion


true opinion

95

autocritiques

begin the beginning.


.

predispose
n+1

wir letzen Europer mit gutem Gewissen

n+1

96

Grndlich-Anderes

contextualize, recontextualize

prose

97

genealogical-histography

social scientization by the recognition that reality is a constructed


reality and that the purpose of scientific/philosophical activity is to arrive at usable, plausible
interpretations of that reality, interpretations that will inevitably by transitory but nonetheless
correct, or more correct, for their time, than alternative interpretations. But if reality is a
constructed reality, the constructors are the actors in the real world, and not the scholars. The role
of the scholars is not to construct reality but to figure out how it has been constructed, and to test
the multiple social constructions of reality against each other. In a sense, this is a game of
never-ending mirrors. We seek to discover the realty on the basis of which we have constructed
reality. And when we find this, we seek to understand how this underlying reality has in turn been
socially constructed. In this navigation amid the mirrors, there are however more correct and less
correct scholarly analyses. Those scholarly analyses that are more correct are more socially useful
in that they aid the world to construct a substantively more rational reality. The End
of the World as We Know It, U of Minnesota Press, 1999, pp.216-7

98

taken for granted

in the very beginninggleichursprnglich

hallucination

H2O
99

100

prose

genres de discoursregimes des phrases

signification signification signification

topology

101

make senseradical
interpretation X

X

force
de phrase

regime de phrase

genre type

idiosyncrasy idioms
102

les idioms existants


nach Auschwitz Gedichte zu schreiben
barbarisch seikein richtiges Leben im falschen denkbar

genre

103

artiste maudit

The writer-or the intellectual-is enjoined to a double status,


which is a bit suspect: as possessor of a dominated weak power, he is obliged to situate himself
somewhere between the two roles represented, in medieval tradition, by the orator, symbolic
counter-weight of the bellator, charged with preaching and praying, with saying the true and the
good, with consecrating or condemning by speech, and by the fool, a character freed from
convention and conformities to whom is accorded transgression without consequences, inspired by
the pure pleasure of breaking the rule or of shocking
Polity, 1993 167

104

para-text

si

105

Payot, 1979 327

106

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genetically stupid

LX

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

117

/first draft

10

118

2003 3 5

119

2003 11 9

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

pervert/corrupt

120

la science la littrature

121

2003 11 7

LX

122


genetically stupid

123

""

2001
1978 1949 1919

""

A-

B-

C-

124

D-

E-

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--

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W.
1978 56-78
125

1975 37-45 .

.
1995 32

126

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1988
77

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1992 181-220

L.1986 160
--

127

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1995 437-78

----

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1990 182

128

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129

--
--

I.
W.H..1981 181

130

"
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MIT 1989
57-67

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181

N.

R.1994 3-38

007

131

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132


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133

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

134

1974 45 Sollers F.Wahl Tel Quel


5 24

3 325

fadeur

assentiment

Le Tao parfait noffre pas de


difficult, sauf quil vite de choisirNe vous opposez pas au monde sensoriel Le sage ne lutte
pas

135

Sollers

easy available

communication

2002 121

30
Badiou

20

136

934

pensee philosophie

137

\\\"

\\\"

\\\"\\\"\\\"
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138

139

analit

2 1993 3813

140

micrologie

141

\"\"--

\"\"

b:

a::

b.
\"\"\"\"(new age)

142


(Jugen Habermas)(The Philosophical Discourse of
Modernity)
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1500
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5 5
2345
c

c:
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a:\\\\\\\"\\\\\\\"\\\\\\\"
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b. 1990

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1980

144

a: 20 \"\"

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tutors

modernity, modernitt, modernit moderne,


modern categorical

mystified

a:
b.
c. contamporainit, epocalittemporalit

d.
e. Jetztzeit
f. Why the West?

End of the world as we know it:social science for the 21st century1999 13941

146

wide open

transfusion

Seuil, 1991 711

Gallimard, 1970 163


1612

147

1955 48

38

237

148

149

1991
professor profess
profiteor, professus sum, eri; pro, et factoeor

profess
profess

2002 2145

profess

202

profession
profess profess

150

2178

mondialisation, worldwide-ization

203

profess?

22021

mondialisation
globalisation Globlisierung monde, Welt, mundus
globe cosmos 203
modialisation

as if
236

151

Instrumente der Regierung

75 6

Idioten

ffentliche Darstellung der Warhrheit

Begierde zu herrschen
performativit

152


1990 414

42324

berleben, fortleben,
422

1999 128

4213

153


1794
.

78

710

718

719

720

723

728 29

730

Wundermnner
731

154

731

735

bereitwilligern Gehorsam
75

2002 208

208

1

performative
2

3 performative
23133

2002 12 18

155

1983 352


422

2
425

fenzi le

156

1974 10 8
3 75

1.
2.

3.

157

1974 11 15
76

158

2 1994 541

159

huai

160

1986 124

125


126






161

A. de Guruyter, 1993 , 124

89










1994 338




129







132

176
162

177

163

164

1991 202

165

mao
pense Denken

19

22

40

44

45

45

53

54

75

une mise en relation76 spasm


76
106

107
114

115 114

139

145

147
154

Vernu ngen Schmerz 156

213

235

237

238
242
266

177

166

Now

critical discourse analysis, genres analysis, voice and modality analysis, forensic
analysis

167

a:

b
gossip
gossip

c:
.

e:

f:

..

g.

168

169

/////

sentimental

diffedent

nichts Deliebtes
B91A101

mission impossible

170

wir gewinnen endlichlieb

, A169

Glckseligkeit

Mitteilbarkeit

1991
284

sensus communis

sensus
communis

238

171

Mitteilbarkeit Einteilung/
/ both divide and share

Einteilung

B370

<>>
P.Emad K. Maly 2 2923

Bilbung

2 1993 413

Chic

416
172

1987 35

13

1982 135
Kritik


vulnerable

2815

29

22
1

A21B36
Schema Figura Bild
Gemtzustandnuance

23
173

non-vouloirnon-sens

semiologiser philologiser
chroatise
gradualise

rangerarranger
.candeur
anciennet, Karel Appel

1988 1567

2 1993 1641

die zutr?glichste
Gemtskrafte

243

44
Amphibolie

Stimmensammlung

7985

174

MutterwitzA133B172

A68B93

Urteilskraft

47

mit sich selbst einstimmig denken

a.
b.
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>
77 97 280

269
existentialien

270

Affektion
175


B93 A68

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B151

Nachbilden

Vorbilden
Abbilden
Dichtungsverm?gen,


283

verstehen
einbilden

2003

verstehen einbilden
glen

OK

utterance Ich denken

176

image Bild

aura Sprahausdrucke
ein unabsenliches Feld

Jaques Monory
Gerard Titus-Carmel

Amphibolie

surabondance

un supplment de naturalit
177

90

Einbilden

500

choregrocentrism
cinematocentrism

178

Window2003

retry or cancel

MBA
8

G MBA

career

discharge

14

179

inference

a classical, OR average, utilitarian principle WOULD NOT be


accepted by peoples, SINCE no people organised by its government is prepared to count, AS a
first principle, the benefits for another people as outweighing the hardships imposed on itself.

lacuna
the baser side of human nature

gentleman

180


The Law of Peoples

peoples

007

007
2010 007

partners

Peter Singer
911
911

181

911

2002 177

1958

The Law of
Peoples

The Law of Peoples


40
117 first things first
are the people who live in America 911 here and
across the world

Leif Wenar Leif Wenar,


179

182

one thing too many

one thing too many,

183

1967

2003

184

pstmtransgression surdtermination

modality
modality

sensational

185

noncs

2003 10 30

. 1849 1875

1856 25


.


.


1
294



Roussel

1 298
.

186


Shenval, 1964 9199

1 544

1 2601

1 278

4 605

187

4 607

1
407

lasus

1 412

18 1967 27879

1 430

1 436

188



1
502

2 109

pstm

2 118

2 132

2 412

2 2523

Jean Demelier

Tony Duvert

1975
189

J. Almira J. Le Marchand 1 734

3 489
.

2 425

3 2523

1 506

1 412

1 2801
190

Sollers
1 277

Roussel

le contre-univers.
1 5825

1 260


191

1 2502

1 593

1 660

192

--

1972 pp.77195

71

zero

logosCest pourquoi, avec la politeia et le march, commnce le


193

logos1974 pp.189-200

1971
16

194


1 1994 811

4 412

195

1994

1962 7 22

99.99

196

Seuil, 1972 159



197

speech act

1 790

1 792
198

799

(October, 2002)

199

mimesis

Volk an das Geschick des Staates im geistgen Auftrag

54 89

hullucinations fantasmmatics Q

1905
1949

1965

200

trs trs bien

YES NO

grand
genres

XX


201

2 2002 12649

pop

911 The world wont be the same again


2003 11 6
a:
b:
202


c:

Yves Angelo

10

office hour

1789 1848 1917 1949 1968 198991

203

international community

48
27

204

1792 1815

161177

205

2001 758

simulating

10

206


10

300

10

1815

207

S/Z

2 1993 5912

Charles Brun
758

bourgeoisie

810
810 1620
1620
208

1620 144 Harmonie


1996 623 94

1620

S/Z

/
Paulin
Limayrac
2001
7445

541

776

J. Chaudes-Aigues
7689


ethnographical ethnomethodological thick description
global configuration

the real the rational

1990 216

184

209

18

210

2 1993 1263

meaning potential

103

relire dscrire

3
1993 947

71
422

211

libertin victime

J-Lo
128
XX

2 1993 1064

mimesissmiosis

1130

re-production

11345

representation describe
relate

scnographie

Logos Eros
1153
212

Pierre hamp ,

769
1865 1835

H. Clouzot r. H. Valensi,
760

self-orientation

package

213

1789 7 11 .

constater

1990 5860

689

11

214

1844 1832

164

2003 6

1832 2 1926 3 5 12
1832 10 Salmigondis 1835
12 1844
12

215

5
146

Byron
moral blackmailing

Silka etymologist

5
1234

5
//// Kurt Goldstein

1930 3
In reply to my question, Professor Heidegger has kindly
216

written me that the picture to which he referred is one that he saw in a show at Amsterdam in
March 1930. This is clearly de la Failles no. 225
They are the shoes of the artist, by that time a man of the town and city

The still Life as a Personal


Object-A Note on Heidegger and Van Gogh

The Reach of Mind, Spring Publishing Company,


1968

Flammarion, 1978 352


srialit

352
355

non-savoir, san-savoir

ohne Vorstellung eines Zwecks

1968

entracement

laisser, lacer, entrelacer

217

37
1905 10 23 Emile Bernard
//
JE VOUS DOIS LA VERITE EN PEINTURE ET JE VOUS LA DIRAI.

la mise en abyme Riss

eigentlichen Dingenbloss Dinge un nu


/
entkledetewas
noch brigbleibt

idiophantasmatique

386

/
342343345
hors-doevre 344
////


///

////
He has rendered them as if facing us
397

Phallus penis

218

Glas
trichotomie:

John Mortomer

freie Schnheit pulchritudo vaga


precipite

ZeugDingWerk
eigenwchsige
semantisation

paradigmatic

syntagmatic

3401

prcipite dans labme They are clearly


219

pictures of the artists own shoes, not the shoes of a peasant


356

Was ist im Werk am Werk


lexample de lexample,

Beispiel, examplarisch, examplarit


wir uns vor das
Gemlde van Goghs brachten
369

378

le dedans cadrable.383

392

GeviertRingGering
402

390

391
396

/ Verlsslichkeitla fiabilit


3989
la solidit,
Wir
sagen nur und irren dabie; denn die Verlsslichkeit des Zeuges gibt erst der einfachen Welt ihre
Geborgenheit und sichert der Erde die Freiheit ihres stndigen Andranges

4067

220

Spiegelspiel fort/da/

Sein Da da fort

fort da?
integral

aletheia /
message
Das Bild stellt eigentlich nichts
dar
Was ist da seiend
Doch welcher
Weg fhrt zum Zeughaften des Zeuges
Grunderfahrung

Bodenlosigkeit
bildliche Darstellung
Veranschaulichung
2003 11 12

221

chaque

chaque
duguo de

Die Buerin auf dem Acker trgt einfach die SchuheDie Buerin dagegen
trgt einfach die Schuhe.

image study
iconology icongraphyology
-graphy
icon phrasing

genre

forensic

1977 10 6

chaque

222

hui

alto-ego ,

(configuration)

Qualitative Research Methodology

der wahrscheinlicher Weise allen anderen


dereinst Gesetze geben wird

peer review

223

utterance

224

2003 275

169

225

196

19


situational
attitudinal

topology topography

2745

226

semanticlexical

fraternit
252

258

249

265

227

267

PS
critique2004@yahoo.com.cnThank you all!

228

8 31 9 2
2001
Subjective, Intersubjective, Objective

crude
There is a sense in which
anything we think about is, while we are thinking about it, before the mind. But there is another
sense, well known to philosophers, in which only some of the things we can think about are said to
be before the mind. Some are before the mind when we think about anything at all; others we do
not have to think about for them to be before the mind. Both of these are things supposed to be
directly before the mind that it is impossible to misidentify them, or we can misidentify them only
if we do not know what we think; in this they differ from ordinary physical objects or indeed any
other objects at all, all of which simply because it is these objects that fix the contents of our
thoughts. It is the things of this second sort I want to discuss.53 )
If you and I are the only speakers in the world, and you spoke
Shepa while I spoke English, we could understand one another, though each of us followed
different rules. So, while it may be true that speaking a language requires that there be an
interpreter, it doesnt follow that more than one person must speak the same language. This is
fortunate, since if we are precise about what constitutes a language, it is probably the case that no
two persons actually speak the same languagespeaking a language cannot depend on speaking
as someone else does (or as many others do). (115 )
,
The universe is, needless to say, indifferent to our concepts. But we care very much about the
instantiation of the concepts on which the concept of thought depends: such as belief, desire,
intentional action, memory, perception, and all the rest of our human attitudes and attributes. (123
)
Thus if I intentionally sit down I unintentionally move some air molecules out of the way; I
unintentionally depress the cushion on which I sit; I unintentionally change the center of gravity of
the earth, the solar system, and our home galaxy. Even our failures are intentional. Not that we
intend to fail, of course; the point is that in failing there nevertheless is something we are doing on
purpose. If my return of serve goes long , an intention failed; still, I did intentionally
strike the ball.

put to rest I inveigh


229

against the picture of the mind that is presupposed by the dualisms, and so against dualisms
themselves, and the epistemological and metaphysical positions based on themIt is claimed that
empirical knowledge has no epistemological foundation, and needs none. (14 )
We know in a way no one else can what we believe, fear, want, value, and intend. We know how
things seem to us, how they look to us, feel to us, smell and sound to us to be. We know these
things in a way we can never know about the world around us. Whether or not we are sometimes
wrong about the contents of our own minds, whether or not we can be in doubt about our own
sensations and thoughts, one thing is certainly
True of such beliefs: they cannot be generally mistaken. If we think we have a certain thought or
sensation, there is a strong presumption that we are right. (p.193)
,
:For even if a speaker were (impossibly) to utter every sentence in some one language,
many other languages would be consistent with all his behaviour and internal states, as Quine has
maintained; and I agree. (110 )
to talk about talk, or write about writing(108 ).
world society
The intrepid interpreter, working without
a bilingual trot, seeks to assign a propositional content to the utterances of a speaker. In effect he
assigns a sentence of his own to each of the sentences of the speaker. To the extent that he gets
things right, the interpreters sentences provides the truth conditions of the speakers utterances.
210

230


commutation? permutation? contamination? transference?transmutation? transposition?
contraposition? interposition? co-presentation?

The classical representative of the decisionist type (if I may be


permitted to coin this word) is Thomas HobbesHe illustrated this with one of those comparisons
that in the unmistakable soberness of his healthy common sense, he knew how to
C
Globalization at Large

231

ABC

bu
gai

bu

natural reason equity

1996
1996 :
23
24
28
28
29
32 17
36 The Light of human minds is Perspicuous Words;
47
48

50 good wit
53 the right use of Speech
53
53 passions
59
59 worldly lusts
dao zi qian

60
100 he Strauss
101
232

107 civil law


122

127
147 civil law
148
148 every Subject is Author of every act the Soveraign doth; 149
In these western parts of the world, we are
150 there was never anything so dearly bought,
as these western parts have bought the learning of the Greek and Latine tongues.
185 civil law natural law
186 civil law natural law
200 For Right is liberty, namely that liberty which the Civil Law leaves us: But Civil Law is an
Obligation; and takes from us the Liberty which the Law of Nature gave us
206 Of all Passions, that which enclineth men least to break the Laws, is Fear.
224 But to those Lawes which the the Soveraign himselfe, that is, which the Common-wealth
maketh, he is not subject. For to be subject to Lawes, is to be subject to the Commin-wealth, that
is to the Soveraign Representative, that is to hiwselfe; which is not subjection, but freedom from
the Lawes.
233 the Common-peoples minds, unless they be tainted with dependance on the Potent
, or scribbled over with the opinions of their Doctors are like clean paper, fit to
receive whatsoever by Publique Authority shall be imprinted in them.

233

doxosophist

Pierre Bourdieu
reflex reflexivity

Gustave Flaubert

234

Alfred Schultz
Harold Garfinkel

Homo Academicus

235

Academic Discourse, 1967

Reproduction in Education, Society and Culture1967

The
Logic of Practice, 1980

seminar
Claude
Levi-StraussJean Hyppolite

Le Nouvel Observateur
LiberationGallimard

236

Samir Amin

Jean
Baudrillard

1945

Anthony Giddens

237

238

3327

1969 2 22 1970

1979 infra 258 1983 6 Littoral


9 1984 P.Rabinow

239

1970 9
10

1978 4

3
619

623

620

240


1965 78 LesSuivantes

1966 13 La pose du monde, 1969 12


6 19

H.Drefus P. Rabinow1983 4
G. Barbedette

241

1983 12 F. Ringelheim

4 636

51

61
79

1966 R.Bellour

1 498
1981 3 11 J. Francois J. de Wit
nosographie

242


4 656

4 539

4 578

1983 4
D.H.Dreyfus P. Rabinow

4 610

243

1982 10
25 R.Martin

topology

theatralit

Flammarion 1980
11273

4 779

4 697

1
244

1
78990

1 591

1 660

2 166

3 669

3 . 3767

245

2 434

2 7

1977 7 D. Colas, Le Gaufey, J. Livi, G. Miller, J-A.


Miller, C. Millor, G. Wajeman
246

4 42

2
3


instantiation

247

1994

248

249

1980

250

2003-11-27 15:27:11

,
1999

1987

19001901

1928

1 1907
19001901
19131921

1928

77

251

252

Glas

100 100
100

253

Seuil 241

entreinter

categormesyncategrme

signification incomplte
Seuil 272

tre la cartto be in a gap


297

232

182

177
248

eidetic

anecdotal gossipy

100

aporia
254

idealities
lobjectivitdes objctits idales dans une certaine fixitintemporelle et dans leur autonomie au
regard dun certain denenir subjectivf
119

<>
Seuil 229251

Jewgreek
is greekjew. Extremes meet.

232

la prtention transcendentale de sa recherche


232
une enqute abusive

229

230

quid qiomodo

235

eidtique
250

60 64
eidtique mais elle est ncessairement inexacte

une mathmatique des phnomnesest impossible

I
9 37 241

255

12 9

256

257

1980

258

Baudrillard obscenity

Verso, 2003257

40 20

550

200

259

ZAI

11

260

MEN

1980

chuan
Q
za
Q

14 11 3

1200 1500 8

261

6000
400600 80100 150
130 37 80
8001000 40
10 10

bug

262

MTV

YING
5

educate inform

DVD

263

100 DVD
DVD

DVD

DVD

2003

264

1895 30
1946 8

36

1950

130

60

1950

20
265

XXXX

90

90

266

200
200

1949

386199

267

50 50

90
1989

268

schizo-analyse

Moi, je suis mon fils,/mon pre, ma mre/ et moi. Ci-Gt


Seuil 285

flux

Un homme vrai na pas de sex

1
145 27980
n
/

269

n n

. 40
40

rondo
scherzo

le grand Gestaltiste

1974 Minuit 27
suo
les
machines dsirantes/, la machine sociale, la machine despotique
, les corps sans organes/
/ 1946 , la production
dsirante et la production sociale, nvrose, psychose et perversion,
de-territorialisation, re-territorialisation, flux-schizo, territoriale,
despotique et capitaliste (codage, surcodage, dcodage)

270


oNeil 2002 3360 94109
Sauvages, barbares, civiliss

12

surcode

neuroticpsychotic

Minuit 1972/3

16
18
21

23
33
271


36

39

43
il machine son corps
55
57

57
58

60
62

58
64

65

65

66
82

trans-seus

82

83

89

90

92
Nijinsky
92
272


95
.

95
95

101

102

108

129

schizo-analyse

130

132

133
156
156

160
160
167

168
176
202
273


213

227

229

233

237
248
surcodage 249

250
250

251
254
266

273

274
300
305

314
344

360
361
274


361
370
373

404

412

422

275

I feel the pain


I am in pain
(I tell you now that) I suffered

DNA

actant, behavioural committing

XX

276

tinkering CT

tinkering

liberal

277

3 2002 827

815
XX

278

Bruce Humes

""

opacit

""""

""

""

Shanghai Babe
Shanghai Baby

stereotpes

""

279

"
"

MBA

280

bug

idiopathy

heteropathy
/

P.Heath 1973 1836

Bruce Humes

281

"body"
RMB

251 We lay naked in bed, listening to Suzhou ballads, watching videos and playing chess.
When hungry, we cooked noodles or wonton in the kitchen. We rarely slept, and no longer read
each other's eyes; it would only have added to our troubles. When semen, saliva and sweet had
glued shut every pore in our bodies, we

quickie

""

""""

""

Lessing

Lara Croft

282

""

""

""

""
"
"

""

""""

283

metropolitanizationcosmopolitanization

""

284

285

""

286

""

Staatsintendant
287

2001 8 20 138
45

7 2

""

"

"

1887 157

288

""

""

2000

2001 600

7 30 13949

11520

289

""

16

290

//

China Syndrome2000

ideoscapes

291

carried away

materialit

292

priodisation

a:

b:

illuminating,

c:

293

desperate,

1993

1967 Genet

*
[] *

undesirable?
tacit consensus?

unpopular?

teleological triumph?
294

minimalism?

redetermination?

(Richard Rorty)

Bourdieu

295

*Milton Freedman

the sublime

296

1. 1987

2.

3.
beyond representation

4.

microsoft

297

demodernification

Promethean,

298

299

*
(Anthony Giddens)
The
Consequences of Modernity

post-modern

300

---

301

1919

ontological
ontic

302

2002 7 28

303

1941 9

304

1941 3 15

305

Sony
PlayStation2

1918 5 Mandelstam

306

1998 43

1924

307

.
2001 9

308