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Parabola Project

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Menaechmus (380 BC - 320 BC) found the parabola Apollonius (262 BC - 190 BC) named the parabola Pappus (290 - 350) found the focus and directrix of the parabola Galileo (1564 - 1642) saw that objects falling due to gravity due so in parabolic paths Gregory (1638 -1675) studied properties of the parabola Newton (1638 - 1675) studied properties of the parabola

Definition: A parabola is is a set of all points that are the same distance from a fixed line (directrix) and a fixed point (focus)not on the directrix

Equation: Standard Form when directrix is parallel to the y-axis: (y-k) = 4p(x-h) Standard Form when directrix is parallel to the x-axis: (x-h) = 4p(y-k)

When p is positive, the parabola opens upwards When p is negative, the parabola opens downwards When h is negative, it moves to the left of the orgin. When h is positive, it moves to the right of the orgin. When k is negative, it moves towards the bottom of the graph. When k is positive, it moves towards the top of the graph.

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The Commonwealth Institute building was built between 1960 and 1962 and officially opened on 6 November 1962 by HM the Queen. It was designed by architects Robert Matthew, Johnson - Marshall and Partners (project architect Roger Cunliffe) with engineering contribution by A.J & J.D Harris (project engineer James Sutherland) and based on the theme of a tent in the park. Between 1960 and 1962 works were also undertaken on the design of the surrounding landscape, comprising a garden and hard landscaped area to the south, west and east of the building. In the 1970s a number of works were undertaken to the building and landscaped area. These included additional car parking and an extension to the building replacing a wooded area that was part of a landscaped garden. In 1988 the building was listed as Grade II* and the landscaped garden was included on the National Register of Park and Gardens of special interest as Grade II. 224 KHS Developments Ltd. 2008 Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy Contact Us Designed & Developed by Four Communications

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The History of Parabolas Definition" A parabola is is a set of all points that are the same distance from a fixed line (directrix) and a fixed point (focus)not on the directrix

Menaechmus (380 BC - 320 BC) found the parabola Apollonius (262 BC - 190 BC) named the parabola Pappus (290 - 350) found the focus and directrix of the parabola Galileo (1564 - 1642) saw that objects falling due to gravity due so in parabolic paths Gregory (1638 -1675) studied properties of the parabola Newton (1638 - 1675) studied properties of the parabola

The earliest known work on conic sections was by Menaechmus in the fourth century BC. He discovered a way to solve the problem of doubling the cube using parabolae. (The solution, however, does not meet the requirements imposed by compass and straightedge construction.) The area enclosed by a parabola and a line segment, the so-called "parabola segment", was computed by Archimedes via the method of exhaustion in the third century BC, in his The Quadrature of the Parabola. The name "parabola" is due to Apollonius, who discovered many properties of conic sections. The focusdirectrix property of the parabola and other conics is due to Pappus. Galileo showed that the path of a projectile follows a parabola, a consequence of uniform acceleration due to gravity. The idea that a parabolic reflector could produce an image was already well-known before the invention of the reflecting telescope.[ Designs were proposed in the early to mid seventeenth century by many mathematicians including Ren Descartes, Marin Mersenne, and James Gregory. When Isaac Newton built the first reflecting telescope in 1668 he skipped using a parabolic mirror because of the difficulty of fabrication, opting for a spherical mirror. Parabolic mirrors are used in most modern reflecting telescopes and in satellite dishes and radar receivers.

340 BC - Menaechmus, about 340 BC, gave two solutions: one using the two parabolas y2 = lax, x2 = ay, and the other using the latter parabola along with the rectangular hyperbola xy = 2a2. Without the benefit of algebraic notation, this was surely a marvellous achievement

|| || 200 BC - The most comprehensive ancient book on conic sections is the Conies of Apollonius. It was also written around 200 BC, but it does not mention the focus of the parabola, although it includes a proof of a more difficult focal property of the ellipse. To give a ...The most comprehensive ancient book on conic sections is the Conies of Apollonius. It was also written around 200 BC, but it does not mention the focus of the parabola, although it includes a proof of a more difficult focal property of the ellipse. To give a modern proof of this theorem, it helps to know that the ellipse + = 1 has eccentricity e = b2/a2, foci at (ae, 0), and directrices x = a/e. (There are two of each because of the obvious symmetry of the ellipse.)

Edited by Zachary Li!!!!!!!!!


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