You are on page 1of 86

The Times Leader

C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 $1.50
6 09815 10077
timesleader.com
7
3
3
3
7
3
$
20
VOUCHER
FOR ONLY
$
10
WILKES-BARREOne month
before theyvotedtoraise taxes 31
percent in 2008, three
city council members
and the city controller
spent five days in Or-
lando, Fla. on a tax-
payer-funded trip that
cost more than $3,000
in hotel fees alone.
The trip to the an-
nual convention of the
National League of Ci-
ties was among dozens of excur-
sions city council members and
other city officials have taken
over the past seven years that
have cost taxpayers more than
$113,000 in hotel and conference
fees, according to a review of
credit card statements of four
city officials from 2004 to 2011.
The majority of the money --
$74,139 -- was
charged to the credit
card of City Clerk
Jim Ryan for 43 sep-
arate hotel stays of
council members
and other officials in
cities across a wide
section of the Unit-
ed States.
The charges rang-
ed from single-day stays in Char-
lotte, N.C., Virginia Beach, Va.
WI L KES- BARRE CI TY OF F I CI AL S
Phoenix, Ariz.
Reno, Nev.
New Orleans, La.
Washington, D.C.
(two years)
San Antonio, Texas
Denver, Colo.
$6,325
$3,096 $5,116
$4,792
$4,920
$2,714
Indianapolis, Ind.
Orlando, Fla.
CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE
The number of Wilkes-Barre City
Council Members and city ofcials who
attended national and state League of
City conferences from 2004 through
2011, and the total credit card charge
for hotel and conference fees.
Source: City credit card statements Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
$2,083
Pittsburgh
Bethlehem
Gettysburg
Erie
$1,178
$886
$1,069
$1,645
$1,199 $1,372
Travel costs since
04 stun activists
$113,000 spent on travel in
last six years, according to a
credit card statement review.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
Two took trip with
month left in office,
Page 14A
W-B costs high,
other third-class city
officials say, Page
14A
I NSI DE
Editors note: This is the first of a
two-part series on perks, salaries
and benefits paid to Wilkes-Barre
city officials
See COSTS, Page 14A
health complications, family
spokesmanDanMcGinnsaidina
brief statement Saturday to The
Associated Press. His doctors
have now characterized his sta-
tus as serious.
His family will have no com-
ment on the situation and asks
that their privacy be respected
during this difficult time, he
said.
Paternos sons Scott and Jay
each took to Twitter Saturday
STATE COLLEGE Joe Pa-
ternos doctors say the former
Penn State coachs condition has
become serious after he experi-
enced complications from lung
cancer in recent days.
The winningest major college
football coach of all time, Pater-
no was diagnosed shortly after
Penn States Board of Trustees
ousted him Nov. 9 in the after-
math of the child sex abuse
charges against former assistant
Jerry Sandusky. Paternos been
getting treatment since, and his
health problems worsened when
he broke his pelvis an injury
that first croppedupwhenhe was
accidentally hit in preseason
practice last year.
Over the last few days Joe Pa-
terno has experienced further
night to refute reports that their
father had died.
Wrote Jay Paterno: I appre-
ciate the support & prayers. Joe
is continuing to fight.
The 85-year-old Paterno has
been in the hospital since Jan. 13
for observation for what his fam-
ily had called minor complica-
tions fromhis cancer treatments.
Not long before that, he conduct-
ed his only interviewsince losing
his job, with The Washington
Post. Paterno was described as
frail then and wearing a wig. The
second half of the two-day inter-
view was conducted by his bed-
side.
Roughly 200 students and
townspeople gathered Saturday
night at a statue of Paterno just
outside a gate at Beaver Stadium.
Former Penn State football coachs
condition takes a turn for the worse
Doctors say he recently has experienced
complications from lung cancer
PATERNO CONDITION IS SERIOUS
AP FILE PHOTO
Former Penn
State football
coach Joe
Paterno has
been in the
hospital since
Jan. 13 for
observation
for what his
family had
called minor
complications
fromhis can-
cer treat-
ments. A
family spokes-
man said
Saturday that
Paterno is
now in serious
condition.
By GENARO C. ARMAS
AP Sports Writer
Over the last few days
Joe Paterno has experi-
enced further health
complications.
Dan McGinn
Family spokesman
See PATERNO, Page 12A
INSIDE
A NEWS
Local 3A
Nation & World 7A
Obituaries 2A, 10A
B PEOPLE
Birthdays 9B
C SPORTS
Outdoors 12C
D BUSINESS
Motley Fool 4D
E VIEWS
Editorial 2E
F ETC.
Puzzles 2F
Travel 6F
G CLASSIFIED
Basketball
Irish upset
#1 Syracuse
Sports, 1C
COLUMBIA, S.C. Former
House Speaker Newt Gingrich
stormed to an upset win in the
South Carolina primary Satur-
day night, dealing a sharp set-
back to former front-runner
Mitt Romney and suddenly
scrambling
the race for
the Republi-
can presi-
dential nom-
ination.
Thank
you, South
Carolina! a
jubilant Gin-
grich swiftly
tweeted to
his support-
ers. He ap-
pealed for a
flood of do-
nations for
the next-up Jan. 31 primary.
Help me deliver the knockout
punch in Florida. Join our
Moneybomb and donate now,
said his tweet.
Romney was unbowed. He
vowedtocontest for every vote
in every state and unleashed a
double-barreledattackonPres-
ident Barack Obama and Gin-
grich simultaneously.
Referring to criticism of his
business experience, Romney
said, When my opponents at-
tack success and free enter-
prise, theyre not only attack-
Gingrich
storms to
S. Carolina
upset win
Suddenly, race for
Republican presidential
nomination is scrambled.
By DAVID ESPO and
THOMAS BEAUMONT
Associated Press
See GINGRICH, Page 4A
Gingrich
20 1 2
ELECTION
WORTH THE WAIT, BUT IT WONT LAST
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
G
uy Rothery, 3, helps his dad clear the walks by his home in South Wilkes-Barre on
Saturday morning. Guy was excited to make a snowman and tunnel in the snow.
This was the first major snowstorm this winter. But it wont last for long as rain and
higher temperatures are expected to wash the snow away early this week. For a story,
see Page 6A. For weather details, see Page 14C.
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


Cosgrove, Richard
Crahall, Elizabeth
Garner, Edward
Gill, Dorothy
Hilgert, William
Honis, Ronald
Kosek, Reynold Jr.
Krell, Matushka
LaRue, Ricky
McHugh, Marie
Migatulski, Raymond
Pesta, Lillian
Ritzer, Dolores
Shotwell, Thomas Sr.
Skaff, Thomas III
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 10A
THE FIRST QUARTER HON-
OR roll for James M. Coughlin
High School that was publish-
ed on Page 2B on Jan. 15
omitted numerous names. A
complete list of the additional
students appears in todays
paper on Page 2B.
BUILDING
TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
timesleader.com
Newsroom
829-7242
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Circulation
Jim McCabe 829-5000
jmccabe@timesleader.com
Delivery MondaySunday $3.50 per week
Mailed Subscriptions MondaySunday
$4.35 per week in PA
$4.75 per week outside PA
Published daily by:
Impressions Media
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Periodicals postage paid at
Wilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing ofces
Postmaster: Send address changes
to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)
USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-022
WILKES-BARRE Whoever
said there are no second acts in
life obviously never met Darius
Rucker.
The now 45-year-old singer
who fronted Hootie &The Blow-
fish in the 1990s has totally rein-
vented himself over the past few
years as a country singer, scoring
five No. 1 hits in the genre. His
live shows like his sold-out
headlining concert at the F.M.
Kirby Center for the Performing
Arts on Friday have become a
crowd-pleasing, raucous good
time in which he treats his fans
to both his past Hootie hits and
his current country smashes, and
a few choice covers.
Unlike some singers trying to
start a second career, Rucker has
never shied away from his past,
always giving the crowds what
they came to hear and that has
worked out splendidly for the
singer.
Fridays show, which felt like it
took place in a bigger venue than
the Kirby Center with Ruckers
stage setup of 11 video screens
and a state-of-the-art light show,
began with Rucker taking the
stage in a dark blue T-shirt,
jeans, cowboy boots and a base-
ball cap and launching into
Love Will Do That from his
most recent album, Charleston,
SC 1966.
From that moment forward,
the huge crowd was completely
with him, as concertgoers were
standing from the first row in
front of the stage to the last row
of the balcony, and heartily sing-
ing along with pretty much every
song.
Not wasting much time chat-
ting with the audience, Rucker
and his stellar six-piece band let
the music do the talking all eve-
ning long. Early highlights in-
cluded his No. 1 solo hit Al-
right and a stunning version of
the Hootie hit Let Her Cry.
I have been lucky enough to
spend the last two years on the
road with Brad Paisley, Rucker
said following his fourth number.
And now I need me my Brad
Paisley fix. With that, he and
the band played a cool cover of
Paisleys Ticks, which went
over well with the country-music
loving fans.
As much of a response as he
was getting to his hits, perhaps
the biggest noise of the night
came when he played Steve Mill-
er Bands The Joker, as the ec-
static audience sang along at the
top of its collective voice.
Other standouts of Ruckers
performance included Hootie fa-
vorites Only Wanna Be With
You and Hold My Hand and
his country smashes Come
Back Song, This, Dont
Think I Dont Think About It
and It Wont Be Like This For
Long.
Rucker ended his main set
with a raucous rendition of Hank
Williams Jr.s Family Tradition,
then came back for a two-song
encore ending with an awesome
version of Princes Purple Rain.
Mallary Hope, a singer-song-
writer from Georgia, opened Fri-
days show with a strong 25-min-
ute showcase of her songs, in-
cluding one she wrote on Tues-
day and debuted for the Kirby
Center crowd. Standouts of her
five-song, solo-acoustic set in-
cluded her opening number
Daughter of the South and her
closing cover of Fleetwood Macs
Landslide.
Rucker was last in our area
when he opened for Rascal Flatts
at the Toyota Pavilion at Mon-
tage Mountain in July 2009. He
will perform in Easton tonight.
He will head back to Pennsylva-
nia on Feb. 4 to play the Bryce
Jordan Center in University Park
and on May 6 to play the Giant
Center in Hershey.
The next show at the Kirby
Center is comedian Kathleen
Madigan on Friday.
Singer Rucker at top of game
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Darius Rucker,
who has had
five No. 1 hits
as a country
music solo
artist in recent
years after
first finding
fame in the
1990s as the
lead singer of
Hootie & The
Blowfish, per-
forms Friday
night at the
F.M. Kirby Cen-
ter for the
Performing
Arts in Wilkes-
Barre.
He scores well with audience,
whether doing covers, his solo
hits, or Hootie favorites.
R E V I E W
By BRAD PATTON
Times Leader Correspondent
More Obituaries, Page 10A
D
orothy Gill, 85, died on Dec. 15,
2011.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre, on
Oct. 6, 1926 to her dear parents Ray-
mond and Margaret Migatulski.
Dorothy was a bank teller for P &
C in Newark, N.J.
She was a kind, caring, generous
person, who will be sadly missed by
all who knew her.
She was predeceased by her be-
loved husband, Toddy Gill; her par-
ents, brother, Paul Migatulski, sis-
ter, Rita Schappert and brother-in-
law, Archie Schappert.
Dorothy is survived by her loving
sons, Ronald (Karen) Gill, Gary
Gill, and Gregory Gill; dear brother,
Raymond (Joan) Migatulski, sister-
in-law, Mary Migatulski and five
wonderful grandchildren.
Viewing was held Tuesday, Dec.
20, 2011 followed by Religious Ser-
vices at theBongiovi Funeral Home,
416 Bell Ave., Raritan, NJ 08869
(908 725-1887).
Burial was in Brigadier General
William C. Doyle Veterans Memo-
rial Cemetery, 350 Provinceline
Road, Wrightstown, N.J.
Forever In Our Hearts
Dorothy Gill
December 15, 2011
FRESNO, Calif. When a 23-
year-oldFresnowomanfatallyshot
her two toddlers and a cousin, crit-
ically wounded her husband then
turned the gun on herself last Sun-
day, investigatorsimmediatelysus-
pected methamphetamine abuse
inwhat otherwisewasinexplicable
carnage. It turned out the mother
had videotaped herself smoking
meth hours before the shooting.
Fresno police found Aide Men-
dez dead on the bathroom floor of
her home. Her chil-
dren 17-month-old
Aliyah Echevarria and
IsaiahEchevarria, 3
were in the bathtub.
Mendezs cousin was
dead in the kitchen.
She had shot each in
the head. The chil-
drens father remains
hospitalizedwithstab-
bing and gunshot
wounds.
In family photos,
the children are adora-
ble, the mother pretty.
They lived in a large
apartment complex
near a freeway with
neatly clipped lawns
and mature trees. The
father was recently
laid off froma packing
house job.
When you get this
type of tragedy, its not
a surprise that drugs
were involved, said
Lt. Mark Salazar, the
Fresno Police Departments homi-
cidecommander. Methhasbeena
factor in other violent crimes.
A Bakersfield mother was sen-
tenced Tuesday for stabbing her
newborn while in a meth rage. An
Oklahoma woman drowned her
baby in a washing machine in No-
vember. A New Mexico woman
claiming to be God stabbed her
son with a screwdriver last month,
saying, God wants him dead.
Once people who are on meth
become psychotic, they are very
dangerous, said Dr. Alex Stalcup,
who treated Haight Ashbury hero-
in users in the 1960s, but now re-
searches meth and works with ad-
dicts intheSanFranciscoBayArea
suburbs. Theyre completely
bonkers; theyrenuts. Weretalking
about very extreme alterations of
normal brainfunction. Oncesome-
onebecomes triggeredtoviolence,
there arent any limits or bounda-
ries.
The Central Valley of California
isahubof thenationsmethamphe-
tamine distribution network, mak-
ing extremely pure forms of the
drug easily available locally. And
law enforcement of-
ficials say wide-
spread meth abuse
is believed to be
driving much of the
crime in the vast
farming region.
Chronic use of
the harsh chemical
compound known
as speed or crank
can lead to psycho-
sis, which includes
hearing voices and
experiencing hallu-
cinations. The stim-
ulant effect of meth
is up to 50 times
longer thancocaine,
experts say, so users
stay awake for days
on end, impairing
cognitive function
and contributing to
extreme paranoia.
Your children
and your spouse be-
come your worst
enemy, and you tru-
ly believe they are after you, said
Bob Pennal, a recently retired
methinvestigator fromthe Califor-
nia Bureau of Narcotic Enforce-
ment.
Methamphetamine originally
took root in Californias agricultu-
ral heartland in the late 1980s and
early 1990s as a poor mans co-
caine. Its use initially creates feel-
ings of euphoria and invincibility,
but experts sayrepeatedabuse can
alter brain chemistry and some-
times cause schizophrenia-like be-
havior.
Meths availability and its poten-
tial for abusecombinetocreatethe
biggest drug threat in the Central
Valley, according to a new report
from the U.S. Department of Jus-
tices Drug Intelligence Center.
From2009 to 2010, methampheta-
mine busts in the Central Valley
more than tripled to 1,094 kilo-
grams, or morethan2,400pounds,
the report says.
Large tracts of farmland with
isolated outbuildings are an ideal
place to avoid detection, which is
why the region is home to nearly
all of the nations super labs, con-
trolledbyMexicandrugtrafficking
organizations, said John Donnelly,
resident agent incharge of the U.S.
DrugEnforcement Administration
office in Fresno.
They have the potential to
make 150 pounds per (each)
cook, he said. There are more su-
per labs in California than any-
where else. Every weekanother of-
fice calls us St. Paul, Dayton,
Kansas, Texas and says, Weve
got a meth case here and they say
the suspects are from Turlock or
Visalia. Were slinging it all over
the country from here.
Last month, a drug task force
working in four central California
counties busted 24 alleged mem-
bers of the Mexican drug cartel La
Familia Michoacana with 14
pounds of powdered meth, 30 gal-
lons of meth solution, 17 guns,
$110,000 incashanda fleet of vehi-
cles with sophisticated hidden
compartments for smuggling.
Most law enforcement agencies
dont keep statistics on how many
homicides, burglaries and thefts
aremeth-related, but thoserespon-
ding to the National Drug Intelli-
genceCenters2011surveysaidthe
drug is the top contributor to vio-
lent crimes and thefts.
It drives more crime thanother
drugs do. Meth is in its own cate-
gory, becauseits somuchmoread-
dictive than other drugs, said
Fresno County Sheriff Margaret
Mims.
Across the valley, meth addicts
steal any metal they can resell
agricultural plumbing, copper wir-
ing, lawn sprinklers.
We lose five to10 manhole cov-
ersaweek,saidCeresPoliceChief
Art de Werk, who said a woman
was injured recently when she fell
into an unprotected drain in a
shopping center. Methis the poor
mans drug andfrankly the Central
Valley is an impoverished geo-
graphic area.
Authorities say the science in-
volved in creating the chemical
compound continues to evolve, in-
cluding an easier recipe called
Shake and Bake that is available
on the Internet. Last month, an
Oklahoma woman was arrested as
she walked around a WalMart
store for six hours before she
was noticed mixing ingredients
for Shake and Bake.
In one of the recent attacks by
meth users, Aubrey Ragina Mail-
loux received a nine-month sen-
tence in Bakersfield Tuesday for
stabbing her 6-week-old infant in
the back and cutting her along her
abdomen, jaw and neck during a
binge. The baby survived.
Its not illegal because we dont
want people to feel better. Its ille-
gal because it makes good people
do crazy things, said Maillouxs
defense attorney, Mark Anthony
Raimondo.
In Oklahoma, authorities
charged Lyndsey Fiddler with sec-
ond-degree manslaughter after an
aunt foundher infant daughter ina
washing machine thudding off bal-
ance in the spin cycle. The aunt
told authorities that Fiddler had
been up for three days using meth.
In Albuquerque, N.M., last
month Liehsa Henderson, high on
meth, claimed to be God and told
police God wanted her son to die
after allegedly stabbing himin the
neck with a screwdriver. The boy
survived.
Murders no surprise in Calif., meth capital of U.S.
National Drug Intelligence
Center survey says drug is
top cause of violent crimes.
By TRACIE CONE and
GOSIA WOZNIACKA
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Police investigators gather outside the Silver Lake Apartment unit where four people were found
shot to death in Fresno, Calif. on Jan. 16.
AP PHOTO
In this photo, Isaiah Echeverria, 3 and his sister, Aliyah Echever-
ria, 17 months old, are shown.
Once people
who are on meth
become psychot-
ic, they are very
dangerous.
Were talking
about very ex-
treme alter-
ations of normal
brain function.
Once someone
becomes trig-
gered to vio-
lence, there
arent any limits
or boundaries.
Dr. Alex Stalcup
Meth researcher
LOTTERY
SUMMARY
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 6-0-9
Monday: 2-4-4
Tuesday: 6-7-7
Wednesday: 3-1-3
Thursday: 3-4-2
Friday: 2-5-0
Saturday: 1-1-6
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 8-6-4-0
Monday: 6-0-5-2
Tuesday: 1-3-0-4
Wednesday: 0-9-9-2
Thursday: 4-6-6-2
Friday: 7-7-1-6
Saturday: 2-1-5-0
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 3-9-1-4-6
Monday: 4-4-4-1-1
Tuesday: 4-1-4-8-9
Wednesday: 7-3-7-7-7
Thursday: 3-7-3-2-2
Friday: 5-6-8-3-2
Saturday: 9-0-9-3-5
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 07-08-12-15-25
Monday: 06-08-13-17-24
Tuesday: 06-12-20-25-28
Wednesday: 03-09-22-25-28
Thursday: 06-08-09-11-21
Friday: 10-15-19-24-27
Saturday: 04-08-14-20-25
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 3-5-9
Monday: 1-8-9
Tuesday: 3-2-5
Wednesday: 1-9-8
Thursday: 1-0-8
Friday: 5-9-0
Saturday: 7-1-4
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 1-4-7-2
Monday: 9-1-1-6
Tuesday: 9-4-9-6
Wednesday: 2-2-7-6 (2-6-7-6,
double draw)
Thursday: 9-4-7-0
Friday: 4-5-8-3
Saturday: 9-3-3-9
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 3-0-7-5-0
Monday: 7-6-6-1-1
Tuesday: 7-8-4-0-1
Wednesday: 3-1-9-4-2
Thursday: 9-9-3-8-6
Friday: 5-1-5-4-2
Saturday: 4-8-1-0-9
Cash 5
Sunday: 06-09-21-23-25
Monday: 12-18-19-25-40
Tuesday: 03-23-39-40-41
Wednesday: 13-25-34-35-43
Thursday: 14-30-31-33-36
Friday: 05-09-38-41-43
Saturday: 08-09-12-26-43
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 19-20-22-31-38-48
Thursday: 09-19-22-25-37-49
Powerball
Wednesday: 06-29-34-44-50
powerball: 28
Saturday: 12-24-43-44-45
powerball: 07
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 03-15-31-36-53
Megaball: 27
Megaplier: 02
Friday: 01-09-28-38-47
Megaball: 08
Megaplier: 02
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 3A

LOCAL
timesleader.com
HANOVER TWP.
Task Force makes arrests
The Luzerne County Drug Task
Force arrested two men Friday night
after a two month
investigation of heroin
trafficking in several
municipalities.
Dexter Jr. Yard,
23, of Mark Drive,
Hanover Township, a
member of the G-
Stone Crip gang, and
Donovan David Ar-
nold, 21, of Carey Avenue, Wilkes-
Barre, face a number of drug-related
charges.
Police said the two men were taken
into custody in the McDonalds parking
lot on the Sans Souci Parkway. Police
seized 70 bags of heroin stamped with
the brand Silver Hummer, more than
$2,400 in cash, two cell phones and a
BMW automobile. A handgun was later
recovered in the investigation.
Yard and Arnold were charged with
possession with intent to deliver a
controlled substance, possession of a
controlled substance and conspiracy to
deliver heroin. Yard also was charged
with delivery of a controlled substance.
The two men were arraigned by
District Judge James Dixon in Hazle
Township. Yard was committed to the
Luzerne County Correctional Facility
for lack of $75,000 bail. Arnold was
committed to the county prison for
lack of $50,000 bail.
Edwardsville police and the Kingston
police narcotics unit assisted in the
investigation.
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Senators to attend address
U.S. Sens. Bob Casey, D-Scranton,
and Pat Toomey, R-Zionsville, will sit
together during President Obamas
State of the Union address on Tuesday.
Pennsylvanians want their law-
makers to work to-
gether to solve prob-
lems, Casey said.
Over the past year,
Senator Toomey and I
have collaborated on a
host of issues impor-
tant to our constitu-
ents. I look forward to
sitting next to Senator
Toomey at this years
State of the Union
address and to contin-
uing our work on
behalf of the Com-
monwealth in the
spirit of bipartisan-
ship throughout the
year.
Toomey said he, too was pleased to
sit with his colleague from Pennsylva-
nia.
As the second session of the 112th
Congress begins, sitting next to each
other is a small but worthwhile step
toward setting a civil and cooperative
tone for the challenging work ahead of
us, Toomey said.
HARRISBURG
Schools compete in trial
Beginning Monday, seven schools in
Luzerne County will compete in dis-
trict and regional levels of the State-
wide Mock Trial Competition spon-
sored by the Pennsylvania Bar Associ-
ation Young Lawyers Division: Dallas
High School, Hanover Area Jr./Sr.
High School, Hazleton Area High
School, Holy Redeemer, MMI Prepara-
tory School, Pittston Area Senior High
School and Wyoming Seminary Prepar-
atory School.
Pennsylvanias mock trial program,
now in its 29th year, is one of the large-
st in the nation. The competition be-
gins Monday.
The winning team of the state cham-
pionship will represent Pennsylvania in
the national mock trial finals to be held
May 3-6 in Albuquerque, N.M.
NEWPORT TOWNSHIP
Group plans improvements
The Newport Township Community
Organization will hold a meeting on
Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Guardian
Elder Care Center in the Sheatown
section of the township. The group is
involved in a number of community
improvement projects including a recy-
cling program, cleaning up illegal
dumpsites and publishing a community
newsletter. All township residents are
invited to attend the meeting and join
the effort to improve quality of life in
the community.
I N B R I E F
Yard
Casey
Toomey
Two Republicans fromMountain Top
announced their intent Saturday to un-
seat incumbent Democrats in the Penn-
sylvania House of Representatives.
Rick Arnold, a Rice Township home
builder, will seek the GOP nomination
to take on Gerald Mullery, D-Newport
Township, in the 119th District. Pete
Mailloux, a Wright Township medical
equipment dealer, wants to challenge
EddieDayPashinski, D-Wilkes-Barre, in
the 121st District.
Both candidates said Saturday that
bringing jobs back to Northeastern
Pennsylvania would be their chief goal
as legislators.
Mailloux said his top three priorities
as a state representative would be jobs,
jobs and jobs, while Arnold held his
campaign announcement in the Crest-
wood Industrial Park to highlight shut-
tered plants that once provided jobs for
area workers but which nowstand emp-
ty.
Ima home builder whos hanging on
in one of the hardest economies in the
countrys history, Arnold said. I cant
stand by and do nothing I feel like ev-
ery day were not doing something in
this community and this area to help is
squandered time.
STATE HOUSE They are running for right to challenge Democratic incumbents Mullery, Pashinski in fall
Republicans announce candidacies
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
Mailloux
See CANDIDATES, Page 4A
20 1 2
ELECTION
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Rick Arnold announced he is candidate for state representative at the sight of
the former Foster Wheeler in the Crestwood Industrial Park.
WILKES-BARRE Despite snowy
conditions on Saturday, Meyers High
School was filled with the sights and
sounds of students gathered for the13th
annual Martin Luther King Jr. Speech
and Debate Tournament.
Although 35 schools had planned to
attend the compe-
tition, only four
schools were able
to attend because
of the weather con-
ditions.
Ron Woznock,
Wilkes-Barre, an
alumni of Meyers
and tournament
director, said that
despite the limited
number of schools
attending, the
event was truly a
success in regard
to both competi-
tion and the cele-
bration of the life
of Martin Luther
King Jr.
"Dr. King was
not only a wonderful civil rights leader,
but a great orator," said Woznock, "and
we feel it is very appropriate to dedicate
this event to his legacy."
Woznock, a 2008 graduate of Meyers,
was a member of the speech and debate
team throughout the four years of his
Area high
schools
honor King
with debate
Only four schools attended the
tournament due to the snowy
conditions.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
"Dr. King was
not only a
wonderful civ-
il rights lead-
er, but a great
orator, and we
feel it is very
appropriate to
dedicate this
event to his
legacy."
Ron Woznock
Tournament director
See SPEECH, Page 6A
WILKES-BARRE More than 1,000
people packed up their sleds and tobog-
gans and came out to enjoy the snow-
packedfunat theCubScouts 5thAnnual
Winter Fun Day in Kirby Park on Satur-
day.
The popular event was organized by
the local Two Mountains District of the
Boy Scouts of America and Scouts from
throughout the region were represent-
ed.
This is our fifth year and the re-
sponsehas beenunbelievable, saidTwo
Mountains Chairman John Sepcoski.
AccordingtoSepcoski, more than650
Cub Scouts from local packs pre-regis-
tered for the all-star day event along
with parents and 120 volunteers.
The event featured a number of fun
stations dotted across the white ex-
panse of the park, such as paintball
shooting, fire starting and tug-of-war, as
well as a number of activities that cen-
teredonteambuilding, leadership train-
ing and problem solving.
And a tasty lunch of hot dogs, chicken
noodle soup and hot chocolate was pro-
vided under the pavilion.
Organizers said the older Boy Scouts
assume leadership roles in conducting
the winter event as youth leading
youth, andas a creative way tobuildlife
skills while providing fun and instruc-
tional environment for the younger
WI NTER F UN
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Bennett Yermal, Brad Fenwick and Noah Kendra try their skills at the paintball slingshot during Winter Fun Day
with the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts in Kirby Park on Saturday. Below, Ian McCue, 8, Dominick Morton, 7, Mark
Hutsko, 9, and Billy Jesso, 7, (not pictured) of Troop 693, Harveys Lake, win their snowshoeing event.
Scouts enjoy snow
The popular event was organized by
the local Two Mountains District of
the Boy Scouts of America.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
See SCOUTS, Page 11A
JENKINS TOWNSHIP Even as the
floodwaters that sunk his River Road
print shop 6 feet deep and destroyed all
his presses, Independent Graphics Pres-
ident and owner Lou Ciampi Jr. said he
knew his business would come back.
I dont know that we ever thought
that there was anything to do but come
back, in some way shape or form,
Ciampi said.
And within three days of the flood,
and with a lot of help from both friends
and competitors, the company was, in a
way, back in business.
Diamond Industries President Hal
Flack offered the print shop office space
in a Wyoming building just across the
Eighth Street Bridge from Independent
Graphics, and one of the companys
competitors, Zorgo Printing Service of
Pittston, offered to loan equipment to
Independent Graphics, allowing the
company to reprint jobs still stored in
salvagedcomputers andfill nearly all its
pre-flood orders.
We had the space available, we had
the equipment available, Zorgo owner
George Zorgo said. AndwhenI sawthe
height of the flood here, I called Mr.
Ciampi and said, do you need space?
Do you need equipment? We can help.
We basically made the decision that
we were going to come back and once
we came back we were going to be bet-
ter than ever, Ciampi said. From that
Monday (after the flood) we were tak-
ing orders and shipping product, and
through that we were able to keep our
market share. Improudto say we didnt
lose any clients because of the flood.
Through flood insurance, Independ-
ent Graphics was able to clean out its
River Roadheadquarters andrebuildof-
fice space inside, moving back in No-
vember, and to purchase new machin-
ery. That building nowhouses the com-
panys offices and plate-making equip-
ment, thoughpresses are beingkept out
of the flood plain at the Wyoming Dia-
mond Manufacturing Building.
Within the next year Ciampi said he
hopes to have all operations back under
one roof, ideallyat a buildingnearbybut
out of the flood plain.
In the meantime, he said he wants to
thank those who helped his company
through the flood, and will host a ban-
quet inFebruary tosay thankyoutoem-
ployees, clients and other companies
who pitched in.
Zorgo said the aid he provided was
theleast hecoulddo, andthat it has dee-
pened the relationship between the two
companies. The Pittston print shop is
now leasing some office space at Inde-
pendent Graphics.
Independent Graphics will host banquet in appreciation for help
AMANDA HRYCYNA/ FOR TIMES LEADER
Lou Ciampi, owner of Independent
Graphics in Jenkins Township.
Jenkins Twp. facility was destroyed
by flooding, but returned to
business with assistance.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
Experience Fine Italian Cuisine
Extensive Wine List
Full Dessert Menu
Open For Lunch Mon.-Fri.
Dinner Mon.-Sat.
It li C i i
A Taste
o Tuscany
Open For Lun
Dinner Mon
one public square, wilkes-barre
570.208.1252
www.cafetoscanarestaurant.com
Cafe
Toscana
For
Special
Oers,
Visit Our
Website
7
3
5
0
0
1
at participating locations with this coupon. 1 coupon per customer
Expires 2/29/12
3 DONUTS
FOR
$1.00
1 - 12 oz.
COFFEE &
DONUT
$1.00
16 oz. COFFEE
99
CURRYS
DONUTS

ing me, theyre attacking every


person who dreams of a better fu-
ture. Hes attacking you, he told
supporters, the closest he came
to mentioning the nights pri-
mary winners name.
Already, Romney and a group
that supports himwere on the air
in Florida with a significant tele-
visionadcampaign, morethan$7
million combined to date. Aides
to the former Massachusetts gov-
ernor had once dared hope that
Florida would seal his nomina-
tion if South Carolina didnt
first but that strategyappeared
to vanish along with the once-for-
midable lead he held in pre-pri-
mary polls.
Returns from 30 percent of the
states precincts showed Gin-
grich gaining 41 percent of the
vote, to 26 percent for Romney.
Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick
Santorum and Texas Rep. Ron
Paul trailed badly. Santorum had
18 percent and Paul 13 percent.
Exit polling showed Gingrich,
the former House speaker, lead-
ing by a wide margin among the
states heavy population of con-
servatives, tea party supporters
and born-again Christians.
For the first time all year, Rom-
ney trailed among voters who
said they cared most about pick-
ing a candidate who could defeat
President BarackObama this fall.
Gingrich was ahead of the field
for those voters support.
As the first Southern primary,
South Carolina has been a prov-
ing ground for Republican presi-
dential hopefuls in recent years.
Since Ronald Reagan in 1980,
every Republican contender who
won the primary has gone on to
capture the partys nomination.
Romney swept into South Car-
olina11days agoas thefavoriteaf-
ter being pronounced the winner
of the lead-off Iowa caucuses,
then cruising to victory in New
Hampshires first-in-the-nation
primary.
But in the sometimes-surreal
week that followed, he was
stripped of his Iowa triumph
GOP officials there now say San-
torumnarrowlywonwhile for-
mer Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman
dropped out and endorsed Rom-
ney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry
quit and backed Gingrich.
Romney respondedawkwardly
to questions about releasing his
income taxreturns, andabout his
investments in the Cayman Is-
lands. Gingrich, the former
speaker of the House, benefited
from two well-received debate
performances while grappling
with allegations by an ex-wife
that he had once asked her for an
open marriage so he could keep
his mistress.
By primary eve, Romney was
speculating openly about a leng-
thy battle for the nomination
rather than the quick knockout
that had seemed within his grasp
only days earlier.
There were 25 Republican Na-
tional Convention delegates at
stake inSouthCarolina, but polit-
ical momentumwasthereal prize
with the race to pick an opponent
to Obama still in its early stages.
In all, more than $12 million
was spent ontelevisionads bythe
candidates and their allies in
South Carolina, much of it on at-
tacks designed to degrade the
support of rivals.
Interviews with voters as they
left polling places showed nearly
half saying their top priority was
findinga candidatewhocouldde-
feat Obamainthefall, followedby
wishes for experience, strong
moral character and true conser-
vatism.
In a state with 9.9 percent un-
employment, concern about the
economy was high, and almost
one-third of those voting report-
ed a household member had lost
a job in the past three years.
Theexit poll was conductedfor
The Associated Press and the tel-
evision networks by Edison Re-
search as voters left polls at 35
randomly selected sites. The sur-
vey involved interviews with
1,577 voters and had a margin of
sampling error of plus or minus 4
percentage points.
Santorum announced shortly
after the polls closed that he
would open his campaign in Flor-
ida on Sunday.
Paul has saidhe intends to skip
the state and focus his efforts on
caucus contests in Nevada on
Feb. 4 and Missouri several days
later.
Santorum pinned his South
Carolina hopes on a heavy turn-
out inparts of the state withlarge
concentrations of social conser-
vatives, the voters who carried
him to his surprisingly strong
showing in Iowa.
Paul had a modest campaign
presence here after finishing
third in Iowa and second in New
Hampshire. His call to withdraw
U.S. troops from around the
world was a tough sell in a state
dotted with military installations
and home to many veterans.
Romneys stumbles beganeven
before his New Hampshire pri-
mary victory, when he told one
audience that he hadworriedear-
lier in his career about the possi-
bility of being laid off.
He gave a somewhat rambling,
noncommittal response in a de-
bateinMyrtleBeachlast Monday
when asked if he would release
his tax returns before the pri-
mary. The following day, he told
reporters that becausemost of his
earnings come frominvestments,
he paid about 15 percent of his in-
come in taxes, roughly half the
rate paid by millions of middle-
class wage-earners. A day later,
aides confirmed that some of his
millions are invested in the Cay-
man Islands, although they said
he did not use the offshore ac-
counts as a tax haven.
Asked again at a debate in
North Charleston on Thursday
about releasing his taxes, his an-
swer was anything but succinct
and the audience appeared to
boo.
Gingrich benefited froma shift
in strategy that recalled his ap-
proach when he briefly soared to
the top of the polls in Iowa. At
mid-week he began airing a tele-
vision commercial that dropped
all references to Romney and his
other rivals, and contended that
he was the only Republican who
could defeat Obama.
It featured several seconds
fromthe first debate in which the
audience cheered as he accused
Obama of having put more Amer-
icans on food stamps than any
other president.
Nor did Gingrich flinch when
ex-wife Marianne said in an inter-
viewonABCthat he hadbeenun-
faithful for years before their di-
vorce in 1999, and asked him for
an open marriage.
Asked about the accusation in
the opening moments of the sec-
ond debate of the week, he un-
leashed an attack on ABCand de-
bate host CNN and accused the
liberal news media of trying to
help Obama by attacking Repub-
licans. His ex-wifes account, he
said, was untrue.
GINGRICH
Continued from Page 1A
AP PHOTO
Republican presidential candidate and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich speaks during a Repub-
lican presidential primary night rally Saturday in Columbia, S.C. Callista Gingrich looks on at right.
Gingrich
Romney
Santorum
Paul
AP
Gingrich wins S.C.
Newt Gingrich surged to
victory in South Carolina,
while Mitt Romney took
second place.
40.7%
26.5
17.7
13.4
1,397 of 2,136 precincts 65%
255,728 votes cast
Arnold said he would fight to
lower Pennsylvanias corporate
tax rate and reduce cumber-
some regulations to spur busi-
ness growth. Mailloux said he
also supports reducing govern-
ment regulation of business and
would work with local residents
and community leaders to iden-
tify methods of improving the
region.
Mailloux said greater Wilkes-
Barre has excellent amenities to
attract companies to the region,
like access to
major high-
ways and rail-
roads, an air-
port and con-
struction-ready
real estate, but
he said many
have lost pride
in and hope for
the area.
Weve got to
find a way to
bring our prod-
ucts to the
world, and why
arent we doing
it? Mailloux
questioned.
My goals are
to go to Harris-
burg, and to
bring back the
resources that
we need.
Both candidates will run in
districts whose borders were
significantly altered by redis-
tricting in 2011. The 119th Dis-
trict branched further into
southern Luzerne County, pick-
ing up several communities out-
side Hazleton, while the 121st
added six new municipalities,
including Maillouxs home com-
munity of Wright Township.
Mailloux said the chance to
run in Wilkes-Barre was a major
factor in his decision to join the
race, while Arnold said repre-
senting the diverse interests of
his far-reaching district will be a
challenge he will embrace.
Now it crosses into the Ha-
zleton area and the composition
of that part of the district will be
different, Arnold said. It will
be a lot more diverse and I think
the needs of the communities
will be different, and I think it
takes a different type of legisla-
tor to take on all those different
needs.
Arnold wouldnt say if he
thought the adjustment of dis-
trict lines would help him in his
second campaign against Mul-
lery, who beat Arnold by about
1,350 votes in the 2010 election.
Right now, Im just focused
on the primary, he said.
CANDIDATES
Continued from Page 3A
Age: 49
Resides: Rice Township
Occupation: Home builder
Education: Graduate of Crestwood
High School, some college
Political Experience: Ran as the
GOP candidate in the 2010 race in
the 119th state house district, lost
to Democrat Gerald Mullery
Community Affiliations: Served
on boards of the Wilkes-Barre
Family YMCA, the Luzerne County
Builders Association and the
Pennsylvania Builders Association;
involved with the North Branch
Land Trust
Family: Wife Rita; 3 sons, one
deceased
RI CK ARNOL D
Age: 59
Resides: Fairview Township
Occupation: Durable medical
equipment dealer, company owner
Education: B.A. in English from
Kings College, M.S. in Health Care
Administration from Kings Col-
lege
Political Experience: Served 6
years as a Fairview Township
supervisor
Community Affiliations: Served
on boards for Luzerne County
Children and Youth Services,
North East Hospital and Education
Authority and Geisinger Wyoming
Valley
Family: Wife Cynthia; two sons
PETE MAI L LOUX
Arnold said he
would fight to
lower Penn-
sylvanias
corporate tax
rate and re-
duce cum-
bersome reg-
ulations to
spur business
growth. Mail-
loux said he
also supports
reducing gov-
ernment regu-
lation of busi-
ness.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 5A
N E W S
7
3
5
1
0
3
PLAINS TWP. Township
police reported the following:
Sarah E. Findora, 27, of
51 Govier St., Wilkes-Barre
was charged with criminal
attempt to commit theft from
a motor vehicle and public
drunkenness Thursday morn-
ing after she entered a Chev-
rolet minivan that did not
belong to her at the Wood-
lands Inn and Resort on state
Route 315. She was arraigned
and committed to the Lu-
zerne County Correctional
Facility for lack of $1,000 bail.
Two men face charges
after fighting inside the
Woodlands Inn and Resort
early Friday morning. Police
responded to a report of dis-
orderly males in the parking
lot at 1:24 a.m. Michael Cos-
tanza,19, no address provided,
will be charged with disorder-
ly conduct and underage
drinking. Woodlands security
used a pepper spray on him.
Gavin Williams, 19, of East
Stroudsburg, will be charged
with providing a false identifi-
cation to a law enforcement
officer, harassment, disorderly
conduct and underage drink-
ing.
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following:
Jessica Azaizeh reported
Friday morning the wind-
shield of her 2000 Ford Focus
was smashed while it was
parked in her driveway at 34
S. Fulton St.
Ruth Twyman reported
Friday her vehicle was en-
tered while it was parked at
66 S. Meade St. and the turn
signal and wiper control lever
was snapped and hanging
from the steering column.
Asmar Crawford, 19, was
charged with public drunk-
enness and disorderly con-
duct after a reported disturb-
ance Friday at 355 S. Main St.
Crawford was arrested and
transported to police head-
quarters where he was held
until he was sober.
Raymond Reilly was
charged with public drunk-
enness Thursday after an
officer found him intoxicated
on Parkin Street. Reilly was
arrested and transported to
police headquarters where he
was released into the custody
of a sober adult.
POLICE BLOTTER
C M Y K
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
1000 Dunham Drive
Dunmore, PA
www.nawarhorse.com
570.346.2453 (BIKE)
NORTH AMERICAN
WARHORSE
7
3
2
4
0
5
7
3
4
7
1
4
7
3
5
2
0
9
tenure there. Now a senior at
The University of Scranton, he
believes his experience on the
team helped prepare him for his
college career.
Meyers Junior Laura St. Preux,
also said the event was a great
opportunity to "push the limits"
and challenge herself in regard to
public speaking. She said that al-
though this is her first competi-
tion, she thoroughly enjoyed
competing in the category of
Declamation, (the interpretation
of a non-original speech) and
looks forward to future competi-
tions.
Sabrina Robertson, a sopho-
more, also competing in the cate-
gory of Declamation, said she en-
joyed not only participating, but
getting to interact with students
fromother high schools. She said
all the participants work hard not
only on the day of the competi-
tion, but in preparation for their
event.
Junior Alexis Brown, compet-
ed as a debater and was very ex-
cited to have reached the final
round. Brown, smiling, said that
she chose debate because she
"likes to argue."
Participants took part in a va-
riety of events including debate,
declamation, oratory, poetry,
dramatic interpretation, and ex-
temporaneous speaking. Some of
the events are rehearsed and
some require "on the spot" prep-
aration. All require students to
understand the art of presenta-
tion and articulation.
"It was a pleasure toonce again
host this event and a chance to
observe young people who have
become quite accomplished
speakers and communicators. It
is alsoa great opportunity tohon-
or the work of Dr. King," said
Ruth Borland, a local attorney
and coordinator of the event."
The overall winner of the
event was Baptist Bible High
School, Harrisburg. Alexis
Brown, Meyers won in the cate-
gory of Lincoln Douglas debate.
HolyRedeemersTom Caffrey
won the dramatic performance-
category.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Meyers Alexis Brown debates Caroline Parrish of Brandywine at
Meyers.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Meyers High School freshman Emily Welles leads off the team
debate against Baptist Bible school on Saturday.
SPEECH
Continued from Page 3A
The first significant snow fall
of the New Year blanketed the
region Saturday and brought
out road crews and sledders.
Forecasters were on the mark
when they called for between 3
and 6 inches of snow, with most
of it falling in the early morning
hours.
According to the National
Weather Service in Bingham-
ton, N.Y., total accumulations
ranged from 3.1 inches in Du-
ryea to 6 inches in Nanticoke.
Wilkes-Barre recorded 4.5 inch-
es.
The snowwill stick around to-
day as temperatures remain in
the lower 30s under a partly sun-
ny sky.
But the weather service fore-
cast a mix of freezing rain and
rain for late tonight and into
Monday morning, setting up a
messy start to the work week.
The mixed bag of precipita-
tion is expected to wash away
the snow. The chance of precip-
itation is 50 percent overnight
and increases to 80 percent on
Monday. Temperatures will rise
into the upper 40s throughout
the day.
The fresh snow drew children
and families to Kirby Park in
Wilkes-Barre. Dozens rode
down the Wyoming Valley Lev-
ee on tubes, toboggans, snow-
boards, saucers and even a few
purloined cafeteria trays.
We saw snow this morning,
so we borrowed some dining
services trays and decided to go
sledding here, said Kings Col-
lege student Will Speede, of
NewMilford, Conn., after taking
a run down the dike with fellow
students Christine Guarino and
Michael Deegan.
Kurtis Nordmark, 8, of Bear
Creek, said he was happy to fi-
nally use his sled in a thus-far
dry winter.
Its not the best because
theres not been a lot of snow
days, but this is good, Nord-
mark said.
The Cub Scouts also held
their annual Winter Fun Day at
Kirby Park Saturday, and many
Scouts took time out from the
days other festivities to take a
few runs down the levee.
Its fun, and its actually a lot
easier because you can drag
sleds, rather than carrying
heavy backpacks up and down
the dike, 11-year-old Scott Field
of Noxen said.
PennDOT prepared for the
storm, loading plow trucks with
salt and anti-skid materials. The
major interstates of 80, 81, 84
and 380 were reported clear and
wet Saturday.
Winter finally arrives in NEPA
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Jeff Kinney of Wilkes-Barres dogs Nekko, 10 months, and Shi, a year-old, pull Olivia Waszkiewicz
on a sled at the Hollenback Dog Park.
Kaden Conklin,
6, catches a ride
to the hill at
Kirby Park with
his mom Erin
Conklin on Sat-
urday morning.
Between 3 and 6 inches of
snow blanketed the region for
the first time this season.
By MATT HUGHES
and JERRY LYNOTT
mhughes@timesleader.com
jlynott@timesleader.com
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 7A
N A T I O N & W O R L D
7
3
3
3
5
8
Look in THE TIMES LEADERfor todays valuable inserts from these advertisers:
Some inserts, at the advertisers request, only appear in selected neighborhoods. If you would like to receive an insert that you do not currently receive, please call the advertiser.
FURNITURE KING
PHILIPSBURG, ST. MAARTEN
Youngster ends voyage
L
aura Dekker set a steady foot
aboard a dock in St. Maarten on
Saturday, ending a yearlong voyage
aboard a sailboat named Guppy that
apparently made her the youngest
person ever to sail alone around the
globe, though her trip was interrupted
at several points.
Dozens of people jumped and cheer-
ed as Dekker waved, wept and then
walked across the dock accompanied
by her mother, father, sister and grand-
parents, who had greeted her at sea
earlier.
Dekker arrived in St. Maarten after
struggling against high seas and heavy
winds on a final, 41-day leg from Cape
Town, South Africa.
RENO, NEV.
Weather helps firefighters
Rain and snow helped firefighters
surround a brush fire that destroyed 29
homes and forced thousands to flee
near Reno, leading officials to declare
the blaze contained early Saturday and
lift all remaining evacuations.
Fueled by hurricane force winds, the
blaze burned nearly 3,200 acres with
flames as high as 40 feet. The break in
the weather for firefighters arrived
with calmer winds on Friday, allowing
crews to gain the upper hand on a
blaze Gov. Brian Sandoval described as
horrendous.
Authorities say an extremely re-
morseful elderly man admitted to
accidentally starting the fire Thursday
when he improperly discarded fireplace
ashes at his home south of town.
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN
Karzai holds peace talks
Afghan President Hamid Karzai said
Saturday that he personally held peace
talks recently with the insurgent fac-
tion Hizb-i-Islami, appearing to assert
his own role in a U.S.-led bid for nego-
tiations to end the countrys decade-
long war.
Karzai made the announcement
hours before he met with American
special representative Marc Grossman
to discuss progress and plans for bring-
ing the Taliban insurgency into formal
talks for the first time.
Karzais statement was a reminder
that any negotiations to end Afghan-
istans war will be more complex than
just talking to the Talibans Pakistan-
based leadership, headed by Mullah
Mohammed Omar. The two other main
insurgent factions in the country have
their own leaders and agendas.
BEIRUT
String of explosions deadly
A string of explosions struck a police
truck transporting prisoners in a tense
area of northwestern Syria on Saturday,
killing at least 14 people, state media
and an opposition group said. Govern-
ment troops also battled defectors in
the north in fighting that left 10 people
dead.
The 10-month uprising against Syr-
ian President Bashar Assad began with
largely peaceful anti-government pro-
tests, but has turned increasingly mil-
itarized and chaotic in recent months
as more frustrated regime opponents
and army defectors arm themselves
and fight back against government
forces.
The official SANA news agency said
the ambush of the police truck oc-
curred on the Idlib-Ariha highway, an
area near the Turkish border that has
witnessed intense fighting with army
defectors recently. SANA blamed the
attack on terrorists.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
A flashmob with a moving message
A couple dances during a flashmob in
pouring rain and snow in front of the
Hofburg palace in Vienna, Austria, on
Saturday. The flashmob was organized
by one of Viennas leading dancing
schools to promote waste separation.
WASHINGTON Vilified by the Re-
publicans who want his job, President
Barack Obama will stand before the na-
tion Tuesday night determined to frame
the election-year debate on his terms,
promising his State of the Union ad-
dress will outline a lasting economic
recovery that will work for everyone,
not just a wealthy few.
As his most powerful chance to make
a case for a second term, the prime-
time speech carries enormous political
stakes for the Democratic incumbent
who presides over a country divided
about his performance and pessimistic
about the nations direction. He will try
to offer a stark contrast with his oppo-
nents by offering a vision of fairness
and opportunity for everyone.
In a preview Saturday, Obama said in
a video to supporters
that the speech will be
an economic blueprint
built around manufac-
turing, energy, educa-
tion and American val-
ues.
He is expected to
announce ideas to
make college more affordable and to
address the housing crisis still hamper-
ing the economy three years into his
term, people familiar with the speech
said. Obama will also propose fresh
ideas to ensure that the wealthy pay
more in taxes, reiterating what he con-
siders a matter of basic fairness, the
officials said.
His policy proposals will be less im-
portant than what Obama hopes they
all add up to: a narrative of renewed
American security with him at the cen-
ter, leading the fight.
We can go in two directions, Oba-
ma said in the campaign video. One is
toward less opportunity and less fair-
ness. Or we can fight for where I think
we need to go: building an economy
that works for everyone, not just a
wealthy few.
That line of argument is intended to
tap directly into concerns of voters who
think America has become a nation of
income inequality, with rules rigged to
help the rich. The degree to which Oba-
ma or his eventual Republican oppo-
nent can better connect with millions of
hurting Americans is expected to deter-
mine Novembers presidential election.
Obama released his video hours
ahead of the South Carolina primary,
where Republican candidates fought in
the latest fierce contest to become his
general election rival.
STATE OF UNI ON President will address the nation on Tuesday night
Obama to focus on jobs
By BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent
Obama
BAGHDADIraq Prime Min-
ister Nouri al-Malikissecurityser-
vices have locked up more than
1,000 members of other political
parties over the past several
months, detaining many of them
in secret locations with no access
to legal counsel and using brutal
torturetoextract confessions, his
chief political rival has charged.
Ayad Allawi, the secular Shiite
Muslimleaderof themainlySunni
Muslim Iraqiya bloc in parlia-
ment, who served as prime minis-
ter of thefirst Iraqi government af-
ter the Americans toppled Sad-
dam Hussein,
has laid out his
allegations in
written submis-
sionstoIraqssu-
preme judicial
council. Allawi,
whose bloc is
part of al-Mali-
kis coalition
government, de-
manded
Wednesday that
the prime minis-
ter grant the de-
tainees legal
counsel and due
process.
Some of the
confessions ob-
tainedunder du-
resswereintendedtoimplicateAl-
lawi in a supposed plot to foment
violent unrest aroundthecountry,
Allawi charged in a formal com-
plaint to President Jalal Talabani
earlier this month.
Information has reached us
that isbeyonddoubt regardingthe
brutal torture of our detainees in
an attempt to extract false confes-
sions from them, confessions re-
ferring to the general secretary
himself, Allawi wrote Talabani.
They are being made to confess
that hehasorderedarmeddemon-
strators onto the streets to carry
out violence.
Inarecent interviewinIrbil, the
capital of Iraqs autonomous Kur-
dish region, Allawi said that Iraqi-
ya leaders knew from our own
sources that they are being
tortured in prisons and detention
camps one of themhadhis legs
brokenandtheyvebeendenied
access to their families, access to
their lawyers.
He said that 42 members of his
political party, the Iraqi National
Accord, hadbeendetained: Their
wives, brothers and sisters have
been flooding our offices.
Iraq PM
accused of
detaining
opponents
Security services have locked
up more than 1,000 members
of other political parties.
By ROY GUTMAN, SAHAR ISSA
and LAITH HAMMOUDI
McClatchy Newspapers
Allawi, whose
bloc is part of
al-Malikis
coalition gov-
ernment,
demanded
Wednesday
that the
prime minis-
ter grant the
detainees
legal counsel
and due proc-
ess.
HARTFORD, Conn. Several strug-
gling Indian-run casinos hit by the re-
cession and new competition are trying
to renegotiate their debt.
Keith Foley, an analyst at Moodys
Investors Service, recently told inves-
tors that the parent company of the
Mohegan Sun in Connecticut and Mo-
hegan Sun at Pocono Downs faces a
wall of debt due early this year.
Foxwoods Resort Casino, also in Con-
necticut, seeks to restructure debt, and
the Mescalero Apache tribe restruc-
tured $200 million in bonds last year
for casino resort property in New Mex-
ico.
Peter Kulick, a Lansing, Mich., tax
and gaming lawyer, said Indian-run ca-
sinos expanded rapidly because they
provide money for the tribes. He says
the businesses survived economic
downturns in the 1970s and 1980s and
were seen as immune to recessions.
He says that was not the case in the
recent recession.
Indian casinos face wall of debt
Parent company of Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs in Plains Township hit
by recession, new competition.
By STEPHEN SINGER
AP Business Writer
Foxwoods Resort Casino seeks to res-
tructure debt, and the Mescalero
Apache tribe restructured $200 million
in bonds last year.
GIGLIO, ItalyDivers plumbingthe
capsized Costa Concordias murky
depths pulled out the body of a woman
in a life vest Saturday, while scuba-div-
ing police swam through the captains
cabin to retrieve a safe and documents
belonging to the man who abandoned
the cruise liner after it was gashed by a
rocky reef on the Tuscan coast.
Hoping for a miracle or at least for
the recovery of bodies from the ship --
relatives of some of the 20 missing ap-
pealed to survivors of the Jan. 13 ship-
wreck to offer details that could help
divers reach loved ones while it is still
possible to search the luxury liner. The
craft is perched precariously on a rocky
ledge of seabed near Giglio island.
We are asking the 4,000 persons who
were on board to give any information
they can about any of the persons still
missing, said Alain Litzler, a French-
manwhois thefather of missingpassen-
ger Mylene Litzler. The death toll rose
to at least 12 Saturday after a body was
extracted from a passageway near a
gathering point for evacuation by life-
boats in the rear of the vessel, Coast
Guard Cmdr. Filippo Marini said.
Search of Italian cruise ship uncovers 12th body and captains documents, safe
AP PHOTO
A man rests in
the port of the
Tuscan island
of Giglio, Italy,
facing the
grounded
cruise ship
Costa Concor-
dia Saturday.
The craft is
perched precar-
iously on a
rocky ledge of
seabed near
Giglio island.
By FRANCES DEMILIO
and TRISHA THOMAS
Associated Press
TIME DRAGS ON FOR SKI WEEK JUDGES
AP PHOTO
G
abriella Bitzin, left, and Marion McKuzins, get ready to judge the annual Aspen Gay Ski Week costume
contest, on Friday in Aspen, Colo.
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
K

PAGE 10A SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
Funeral Lunches
starting at $
7.95
www.omarscastleinn.com 675-0804
Memorial Highway, Dallas
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
ST.M ARYS
M ONUM ENTCO.
M onum ents-M arkers-Lettering
975 S.M AIN ST.HAN O VER TW P.
829-8138
N EXT TO SO LO M O N S CREEK
Deeply Missed by
Wife Pat and Family
Remember me with
smiles and laughter
For thats the way
Ill remember you-
If you can only remember
me with tears,
Then dont remember
me at all.
1947 - 2011
In Loving Memory
John F. Walters
CAPECE Joanne, funeral services
9:15 a.m. Monday in the George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 211 West
Main Street, Glen Lyon. Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. in Holy
Spirit Parish/St. Adalberts
Church, Glen Lyon. Friends may
call 5 to 8 p.m. today.
CAPOZZA Peter, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday in the Victor M. Ferri
Funeral Home, 522 Fallon St., Old
Forge. Mass of Christian Burial at
10 a.m. in St. Mary of the Assump-
tion Church at Prince of Peace
Parish, Old Forge. Friends may
call 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Mon-
day.
DEFIORE Agnes, funeral services
9 a.m. Monday in the Graziano
Funeral Home. Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Joseph
Marello Parish (St. Roccos R.C.
Church), Pittston.
ELMY James Sr., memorial ser-
vice noon Monday in the First
Presbyterian Church, Nanticoke.
Friends may call 11 a.m. until time
of service.
GILDEA Michael, funeral services
3:30 p.m. today in the Harold C.
Snowdon Home for Funerals Inc.,
420 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston.
Friends may call 1:30 p.m. until
time of service.
JONES Kenyon, funeral 11 a.m.
Tuesday in the Howell-Lussi
Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming
Avenue, West Pittston. Friends
may call 6 to 9 p.m. Monday
MARYKWAS Emily, funeral 9:30
a.m. Monday in the Simon S.
Russin Funeral Home, 136 Maffett
St., Plains Township. Office of
Christian Burial with Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. in The Holy
Assumption of Saint Mary Byzan-
tine Catholic Church, Wilkes-
Barre. Friends may call 5:30 to 8
p.m. today.
NADOLNY Elizabeth, funeral
services 9 a.m. Tuesday in the
Simon S. Russin Funeral Home
136 Maffett St., Plains Township.
Divine Liturgy and Requiem
Services at 9:30 a.m. in Ss. Peter
and Paul Ukrainian Catholic
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Mon-
day.
STANCAVAGE Stanley Sr., funeral
8:45 a.m. Monday in the Thomas
P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517
N. Main St., Old Forge. Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church,
Nativity of Our Lord Parish,
Duryea. Friends may call 4 to 7
p.m. today.
WALSH Mollie, celebration of
Mollies life 8:30 a.m. Monday in
McLaughlins The Family Funeral
Service, 142 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass at
9:30 a.m. in the Church of Saint
Mary of the Immaculate Concep-
tion. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today.
WILCHESKI Katherine, funeral
procession 9:30 a.m. Monday at
Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zer-
bey Ave., Kingston, to Divine
Liturgy at St. Marys Byzantine
Church at 10 a.m. Procession to
Mt. Olivet Cemetery and repast
following at Luzerne Knights of
Columbus. Friends may call 2 to 4
and 7 to 9 p.m. today.
FUNERALS
RICHARD B. COSGROVE, 87,
of Pittston, passed away at home
on Saturday, January 21, 2012.
Funeral arrangements are
pendingfromthe Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home, 251WilliamStreet,
Pittston.
LILLIAN PESTA, of Ashley,
died Saturday morning, Jan. 21,
2012, in Mercy Special Care Hospi-
tal, Nanticoke.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Lehman Family
Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Full obituary
will appear in Mondays edition.
WILLIAM HILGERT, 92, of
Scranton, passed away Friday eve-
ning, January20, 2012, at Kingston
Commons Nursing Home, King-
ston. He was the husband of Mary
Agnes King Schmalz.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Gubbiotti Funer-
al Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exe-
ter.
DOLORES M. RITZER, 70, of
Temple Apartments, Edwards-
ville, died Thursday, January 19,
2012, at Hospice Community Care
Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre. Do-
lores was born in New Jersey on
November 12, 1941. She was the
daughter of the late James and Pa-
tricia (Judge) Lewis. Dolores was
previously employed as a Vice
President for BRI Coverage inNew
York City. She was very active in
the Temple Apartments activities
department. She enjoyed playing
bingo andcalling out the numbers.
Surviving are her daughter Jennif-
er Warrelmann and her husband
Kurt, Harveys Lake; grandchil-
dren, Nicole and Randy, Harveys
Lake; great-granddaughter, Savan-
nah.
Private funeral services were
held fromthe George A. Strish Inc.
Funeral Home, 105 North Main
Street, Ashley. Interment will be
held at the convenience of the fam-
ily. There are no public calling
hours.
THOMAS DANIEL SHOT-
WELL SR., age 84, a lifelong resi-
dent of Avoca, died Friday at Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center. He is survived by his five
children, Thomas Shotwell Jr., of
Madison Township, Patrick Shot-
well and wife, Debbie, of Avoca,
Catherine Polak of Duryea, Mary
Ann Zeller of Glendale and Wil-
liam Shotwell of Avoca; his two
brothers, Leroy Shotwell and wife,
Stella, of Scranton, and Kenneth
Shotwell and wife, Betty, of Du-
ryea; his four sisters, Caroline
Kishel of Exeter, Leona Gnall of
Avoca, Isabel Collins andhusband,
Kenneth, of Pittston and Ruth
Dushok of Avoca; nine grandchil-
dren; 11 great-grandchildren.
Funeral services have been
scheduledfor Tuesday at 10 a.m. at
the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral
Home Inc., 517 North Main Street,
Old Forge. Relatives and friends
may pay their respects on Monday
from 5 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home.
E
dward D. Garner, 77, a resident of
Quakertown since 1990, and for-
merly of Chalfont, passed away on
Tuesday, January 17, 2012, at his
home.
Edwardwas thehusbandof thelate
Janice Garner.
He was borninAbington, Pa., a son
of the late Enos and Edith Garner.
Retiring in December of 2009, Ed-
ward was employed with Tinius Ol-
sen. Hewas alsoapart-timeemployee
at Del Val College.
From 1977 until 1981, Edward
coached football with the Lenape Val-
ley Indians.
He was a member of the Portu-
guese Water Dog Kennel Club. He
was also a proud member of the Du-
blin Dinner Club.
He was preceded in death by a
brother and four sisters.
Edwardis survivedby three daugh-
ters, Janell Garner of Otto, N.C., Jen-
nifer Garner Ziemba and her hus-
band, Gene, of Dallas, and Julie Gar-
ner and her husband, Luis, Alvarado
of Buckingham, and two sons, David
of Buffalo, N.Y. and Darrell and his
wife, Robyn, of Telford. He is also sur-
vived by eight grandchildren and a
brother, George Greenig.
Edwards Memorial Service will
be at 11 a.m. on Friday, January 27,
2012 at the Shelly Funeral Home,
Easton and Kellers Church roads,
Plumsteadville, Pa. Family will re-
ceive friends from10 to11a.m. Friday
at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contri-
butions may be made to the Bucks
County SPCA, PO Box 277, Lahaska,
PA18931.
To send condolences to the family,
please visit www.shellyfuneralhome-
s.com.
Edward D.
Garner
January 17, 2012
M
arie McHugh, 99, of the Miners
Mills section of Wilkes-Barre,
died Saturday morning at Little
Flower Manor, Wilkes-Barre.
Born in Pittston, she was the
daughter of the late William and
Agnes (Marion) Golden.
Marie was a graduate of West
Pittston High School and complet-
ed a Post Graduate Course at St.
Johns Business School, Pittston.
She was employed as a Librarians
Aide for the Wilkes-Barre Area
School District until her retirement.
Marie was a member of the Miners
Mills Community Club, Wilkes-
Barre Democratic Committee
Woman, Past President of the Min-
ers Mills American Legion Auxilia-
ry and was the Honorary Grand
Marshall of the Wilkes-Barre St. Pa-
tricks DayParadein1998. Shewas a
member of Blessed Sacrament
Church, Miners Mills, and the Altar
andRosarySocietyandwas current-
ly a member of St. Benedicts
Church, Parsons.
Marie will be dearly missed and
remembered for her hospitality and
friendship to her family and many
friends whose lives she touched.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, John (Jack) McHugh, on
July 31, 1955, brothers, Richard and
William Golden and sister Jose-
phine Spagnola.
Surviving are her six daughters
and sons-in-law, Maureen Umphred
and her husband, Mark, Miners
Mills; Anne Yale and her husband,
Earl, Millersville, Md.; Mary Ellen
Jordan and her husband, David, La-
flin;, Patricia Crahall and her hus-
band, Adam, Dallas; Margaret Tor-
bik and her husband, Tom, Moosic,
and Jacqueline Boyle and her hus-
band, Michael, Miners Mills; 16
grandchildren; 15 great-grandchil-
dren; nephews and a niece.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday in St.
Benedicts Church, Parsons. Friends
are invited to go directly to church.
Interment will be inSt. Marys Cem-
etery, Hanover Township.
Friends may call Monday from 4
to 8 p.m. at the Corcoran Funeral
Home, Inc., 20 South Main Street,
Plains.
Memorial donations may be
made to Little Flower Manor, 200
South Meade Street, Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18702, St. Benedicts Church,
155 Austin Ave., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18705 or to the Luzerne County
SPCA, 524 East Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18702.
Onlinecondolences maybemade
at www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
Marie McHugh
January 21, 2012
Whenyouwereborn, weheldyou
in our arms and just kept smiling at
you. You always smiled back. Your
eyes wide open and full of love. You
were such a sweet, beautiful baby
boy. We wanted you to grow up and
become your own person.
An angel has left this earth and
gone home to his place in heaven.
T
homas JustinSkaff III, of Hanov-
er Township, passedaway onJa-
nuary 19, 2012 at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre on
January 29, 1968, to his proud and
loving parents, Thomas and Mary
(Mazza) Skaff.
Tommy graduated from Meyers
High School in1986. He was an out-
standing football player and all-
around athlete; achieving recogni-
tion for the most receptions in a sin-
gle season and also named a Foot-
ball All Scholastic in 1985. Upon
graduation, he attended Blooms-
burg University on a football schol-
arship.
Tommy worked as a sales repre-
sentative, finance manager and gen-
eral manager for various local auto-
mobile dealerships.
Through the years, golfing be-
came a sport that he loved and at
which he excelled. He was a devot-
ed fan of the Dallas Cowboys,
whether they were winning or los-
ing, he always had Their Back. So
symbolic of who Tommy was.
Tommy was a beautiful personin-
side and out. He was a wonderful
son, father, brother, grandson and
nephew, and a true friend to all who
were privileged enough to really get
to know him. He never had an un-
kind word for anyone. He was sim-
ply perfect. His love of family was
unsurpassed; in Tommys own
word: He loved his two beautiful
daughters to Infinity and Beyond.
What a wonderful sense of humor
he had. He could always put a smile
on your face.
Preceding him in death were his
paternal grandparents, Thomas and
Nellie Staff; maternal grandfather
Frank Mazza; his uncle: Paul Mazza
Sr.; his aunts, Lucille Thomas and
Loretta Skaff.
Surviving, in addition to his par-
ents, are his beloveddaughters, Gia-
na and Isabella Skaff; devoted sister
Samantha Krochmaluk andher hus-
band, John; grandmother Elsie
Mazza; godmother and aunt Flo-
rence Mazza and her husband,
Craig; uncle Frank Mazza and his
wife, Linda; uncle John Thomas;
godson and nephew Dalton Kroch-
maluk; niece Mia Krochmaluk; sev-
eral cousins.
In his voice we heard acceptance
and in his presence we shared love.
Inhis memory, we will discover that
love lasts forever. He was too dearly
loved to ever be forgotten. We love
you, Tommy.
Funeral services will be private
and held at the convenience of the
family.
If desired, memorial donations
may be made to the Lymphoma and
Leukemia Society, 961 Marcon
Blvd., Suite 452, Allentown, PA
18109.
Onlinecondolences maybemade
at www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Thomas Justin Skaff III
January 19, 2012
M
atushka Eleanor Kosko Krell,
85, of Wilkes-Barre, peacefully
fell asleep in the Lord on Thursday
evening, January 19, 2012 at Little
Flower Manor, Wilkes-Barre.
Born February 7, 1926, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was the daughter of the
late Joseph and Olga Zevan Kosko
and wife of the Reverend Father
Adam Jacob Krell.
She was preceded in death by her
late husband, the Reverend Father
Adam Jacob Krell, and son David
Adam Krell.
Matushka Eleanor graduated
from Plains Memorial High School,
Plains Township, Class of 1943.
With her late husband Father
Adam, Matushka Eleanor served in
numerous Orthodox parishes in
Pennsylvania, including: St. Alexan-
der Nevsky Cathedral, Allison Park,
Pennsylvania; St. Michael Church,
Portage, Pennsylvania; St. Nicholas
Church, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania;
Holy Ascension Church, Lykens,
Pennsylvania; and Saint Tikhons
Monastery Church in South Ca-
naan, Pennsylvania.
Prior to retiring, she enjoyed
working at the business office at
Cove Haven Resort, Lakeville,
Pennsylvania; and as a member of
the Crime Watch Unit of the Wilkes-
Barre Police Department, Wilkes-
Barre. In addition, she volunteered
for many years at Geisinger Wyom-
ing Valley Medical Center, Plains
Township.
She is survived by her loving chil-
dren, son, Michael Adam and
daughter-in-law, Ruth, Hawley,
Pennsylvania; daughter Deborah
Krell Mills and son-in-law, David
Charles Mills, Wilkes-Barre; sisters
Vera, and husband, Joseph Teddick,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and Lor-
raine Danilack, Brick, New Jersey;
grandson, Jonathan David Krell,
Harrisburg; great-grandchildren
Elijah, Zirah and Kiana; and nieces
and nephews.
Visitation will begin at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, January 24, at Holy Resur-
rection Cathedral, 591 North Main
Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania,
with the celebration of the Panikhi-
da at 6:30 p.m.
A funeral service will be held in
Holy Resurrection Cathedral, 591
North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre,
Pennsylvania, on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 25, at 9:30 a.m. with the His
Grace, Bishop Tikhon, Diocese of
Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsyl-
vania, officiating. The celebrationof
the Panikhida will be heldat noonat
Saint Tikhons Monastery Church,
South Canaan, Pennsylvania. Inter-
ment will be in Saint Tikhons Cem-
etery, South Canaan, Pennsylvania.
Those wishing to remember Ma-
tushka in a special way may make
contributions in her memory to Ho-
ly Resurrection Cathedral, 591
North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral arrangements are under
the direction of Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40 South Main Street,
Plains, PA18705.
Matushka Eleanor Kosko Krell
January 19, 2012
RONALD J. HONIS, 68, of Ha-
zleton, passed away Saturday
morning, January 21, 2012, at Ha-
zleton General Hospital following
a three-year illness. Surviving are
his wife of the past 42 years, the
former Donna Bobbie; two daugh-
ters, Brenda Honis, Tresckow, and
Cheryl Honis Pocono and her hus-
band, David, and their children,
Carley and Connor.
All services will be held pri-
vately at the convenience of the
family. Harman Funeral Homes &
Crematory Inc. (East), 669 W. But-
ler Drive, Drums, is assisting the
family with the arrangements. On-
line condolences can be entered
and more information is available
at www.harmanfuneral.com.
Reynold Joseph Kosek Jr., age 64,
of Ormond Beach, Florida, died on
Tuesday, January 17, 2012 at his
home. He had waged a long and in-
credibly courageous battle against
cancer.
Reynold was born in Wilkes-
Barre. He was predeceased by his
mother, Martha Hotstutler, and his
father, Reynold Joseph Kosek Sr.
He is survived by his dearly be-
lovedwife of almost 20years, Janine
Records Kosek of Ormond Beach;
brothers, Malcolm (Barbara) and
Michael (JoAnn), all of Wilkes-
Barre; his dear cousin, Dawn Mas-
trodonato (Ron) of The Villages at
Lady Lake, Fla.; brother-in-lawJohn
Records (Glena) of Petaluma, Calif.;
and nieces, Sarah Kosek of Wilkes-
Barre, Elizabeth Records of Corval-
lis, Ore., and Rosemary Records of
Ft. Collins, Col.
Reynold received his college edu-
cation at West Virginia University.
Followinghis graduationin1968, he
served with honor as a first lieuten-
ant in the United States Army. He
then earned a Masters in Library
Science (M.L.S.) at the State Uni-
versity of New York at Albany in
1971, followedby a lawdegree (J.D.)
in 1975 at the University of North
Carolina School of Law. He became
a member of the state bars of Cali-
fornia and Pennsylvania and fol-
lowed his father (an attorney for the
State of Pennsylvania) and his pat-
ernal grandfather (a mayor of
Wilkes-Barre and a judge) into the
legal profession.
Reynold began his career in the
legal profession and legal education
at the Law Center Library of the
University of Southern California in
Los Angeles, where he served as the
Head Public Services Librarian. In
1977, Reynold was hired to serve as
the Reference Librarian at Mercer.
For the next decade, he served in
progressively more responsible po-
sitions inthe LawLibrary, including
the role of Acting Director.
By1987, Reynoldhadattainedthe
rank of full Professor of Law. For 28
consecutive years, until his retire-
ment in 2010, Reynold was selected
by graduating classes to be one of
four hooders in the annual Senior
Class Hooding Ceremony. On five
different occasions, Reynold re-
ceived the Distinguished Faculty
Teaching Award that is determined
by the vote of eachgraduating class.
When Reynold retired in 2010, the
Distinguished Faculty Teaching
Award was given its final and per-
manent name: The Reynold J. Ko-
sek Jr. Excellence in Teaching
Award. At the 2010 Law School
graduation ceremony, Reynold was
the first recipient of the newly-
named award.
One of Reynolds younger col-
leagues recently wrote that Rey-
nold was a teacher of special timbre
. He certainly was that, but he al-
so was something more. He was a
man of honor in an era when honor
is given short shrift by far too many
people. He said little about the aca-
demic issues of the day, but whenhe
did speak, his words were delivered
withcourtesy andintellectual preci-
sion, and they left an echo of true
wisdom. His life was a reminder
that the traditional virtues of hard
work, trustworthiness, and the ful-
fillment of professional and person-
al responsibilities mean as much
perhaps more in this fast-
paced, high-tech world as they ever
have. Reynold Joseph Kosek Jr. was
a legend, and the legend lives.
A memorial service for Rey-
nold will be held at 1 p.m. on
Saturday, January 28, 2012 at the
Haigh-Black Funeral Home, 167
Vining Ct., Ormond Beach, Florida
32176. The family will greet friends
at the funeral home following the
service.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests that donations be made for
indigent patient care to Vitas Hos-
pice, 2381MasonAvenue, Suite100,
Daytona Beach, Florida 32117. Rey-
nold and his family were very grate-
ful for the excellent care providedto
him by Vitas Hospice.
Reynold Joseph Kosek Jr.
January 17, 2012
R
icky Duane LaRue, also known
as Gonzo, 32, of Pittston, died
unexpectedly Thursday, January19,
2012, at home.
Born in Ransom, he was son to
Ricky and Donna Segeda LaRue Sr.,
of Ransom. He attended local
schools in Abington. He was a faith-
ful father to his three loving daugh-
ters and was nicknamed Mr.
Mom.
Ricky lovedto cook andbarbecue
at the Ransom Creek while swim-
ming with his little girls, go fishing,
but most of all he loved spending
time with his family.
Ricky was preceded in death by
his maternal grandparents Michael
and Alice Segeda, and brother Jus-
tin LaRue.
Surviving Ricky, in addition to
his parents, are his daughters, Har-
ley, Miranda and Megan LaRue, at
home; sisters, Alice Henry and hus-
band, John, Ransom; Ricci Lynn La-
Rue and life partner, Michael Su-
prick, Ransom; Karen La Coe and
husband, Chris, Ransom; brother
David, Ransom; paternal grandpar-
ents, Duane and Betty LaRue, Ran-
som; fiance Megan Mikulka, at
home; and several aunts, uncles,
nieces and nephews.
There will be no calling hours
and funeral services will be at the
convenience of the family. AMemo-
rial Service will be scheduled at a
later date to remember Ricky.
Arrangements are by the Yanaitis
Funeral Home, Plains Township.
Condolences can be sent to the fam-
ily at www.yanaitisfuneralhome-
.com.
Ricky D. LaRue
January 19, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 2A
R
aymond J. Migatulski, 77, of
Kearny, N.J., formerly of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away peace-
fully at home on Monday, Jan. 9,
2012, after a long courageous bat-
tle with cancer.
Ray proudly served in the U.S.
Army during the Korean War. He
was a tool-and-die maker for Uni-
versal in Irvington, N.J. Ray was a
member of the NRA, the Elks of
Lacey Townshp and the Catholic
War Veterans.
Ray was the beloved husband of
Joan (nee Harland); devoted fa-
ther of Marla and husband, Robert
Check, and stepson, Scott Boyle.
He is also survived by a large ex-
tended family.
Ray was predeceased by a step-
daughter, Michele Boyle; parents,
Margaret and Paul Migatulski; sis-
ter, Dorothy Gill; brother, Paul Mi-
gatulski; and sister, Rita Schap-
pert.
The funeral was conducted
from Mulligan Funeral
Home, Harrison, N.J., on Jan. 13.
Raymond J.
Migatulski
January 9, 2012
E
lizabeth Betty L. Crahall, 88,
formerly of Courtdale, died
Thursday morning, January19, 2012,
at St. Lukes Villa, Wilkes-Barre.
Born in Pringle, she was the
daughter of the late Nicholas and
Mary (Sapar) Hornack.
She was a graduate of Pringle
High School, Class of 1941, and was a
homemaker all her life.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Frank D. Crahall, on July
22, 2005, sisters, Anna Figler, Mary
EdfordandHelenHornack; brothers,
Paul Hornack and Edward Hornack.
Surviving are her brothers, Nicho-
las, Trucksville, and John; sister,
Margaret Christ, Prescott, Ariz.; sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
In2003, FrankandBetty establish-
ed the Crahall Foundation.
The Foundation provides annual
endowed scholarships to qualified
students at Luzerne County Com-
munity College, Kings College,
Wilkes University, Misericordia Uni-
versity and Penn State University,
Wilkes-Barre Campus.
Private funeral arrangements
were held at Corcoran Funeral Home
Inc., Plains Township.
Elizabeth Betty
L. Crahall
January 19, 2012
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 11A

N E W S
In-house therapy provided by
AWARD WINNING Therapists!
(570) 586-2222
www.caregiversamerica.com
E
x
c
e
l
l
e
n
c
e
U
n
d
e
r
O
n
e
R
o
o
f
Recipient of Best Practices Award
For Therapy Program
Spacious Private Accommodations
Supportive Caring Help with Daily Needs
Restaurant-Style Dining
Engaging Social and Recreational Activities
Local Transportation Available
700 Northampton St. Kingston, PA 18704
(570) 283-2336
Bridge to Rediscovery Dementia Unit
Lordy, Lordy
Look Whos 40!
Happy
Birthday
Paul
150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
I like the 49ers at
home 27 - 21. I
like the Patriots
at home too...35
- 14. In the third
place game this
Wednesday..I will
take the Giants
over the Ravens
28 to 24.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
03 Dyna Wide Glide
Excellent condition
- garage kept!
Golden Anniversary
- silver/black. New
Tires. Extras.
19,000 miles.
Must Sell!
$10,000.
570-639-2539
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique
show winner.
Factory spot
lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
506 Administrative/
Clerical
DATA ENTRY
FILE CLERKS
25 Openings!
Wilkes-Barre. Data
Entry, Must have
Microsoft Office.
$10.50/hour. Call
ChoiceOne Staffing
(724) 452-5800
522 Education/
Training
The Northwest Area
SD is accepting
applications for the
following positions:
Part-Time Cleaner
(5 hours/day)
Varsity Assistant
Softball Coach
Deadline:
February 3, 2012
Salary: As per
terms of current
Collective Bargain-
ing Agreement
Please submit a
cover letter of inter-
est, resume, and
clearances, to the
attention of:
Dr. Ron Grevera,
Superintendent,
Northwest Area
School District
243 Thorne Hill Rd.
Shickshinny, PA
18655. E.O.E.
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CDL-A Driver:
VAN & FLATBED
(FB: $500 Sign-
On)
Very New Trucks
Benefits after
30 days
Great miles & pay
Dependable
hometime
Start right away!
Hiring New CDL
Grads, too
866-863-4111
drivewith
western.com
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers
YARD DRIVERS
Premier Transporta-
tion is seeking a full-
time Yard Drivers,
2nd Shift, for ware-
house operations in
Wilkes-Barre, PA.
Monday-Friday,
2pm start time.
Requires Class-A
CDL and 2 years
tractor-trailer
experience.
$14/hour
$1000 longevity
bonus
Health insurance,
401K, vacation &
holiday pay, and
direct deposit.
Please apply
on-line at:
http://www.premier
transportation.com/
recruiting/
YardDriverApp.pdf
or call Ken Phillips
at: 815-508-9858.
EOE
545 Marketing/
Product
BATH FITTER
The #1 bathroom
remodeler in the
country, is looking
for mature, ener-
getic professionals
to represent our
company in the
Wyoming Valley Mall.
Must be results
driven & enthusias-
tic. Answer general
questions, no sales
experience required
but a positive atti-
tude is a must! Part-
time, weekends a
must. Flexible
schedule. Hourly
wage plus bonuses!
If you feel this is the
opportunity for you,
call Marcie
(570) 762-4872.
Hurry only 2
positions available,
Interviews being
held next week!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
548 Medical/Health
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT
TECHNICIAN
Prior experience
delivering &
instructing on Med-
ical Equipment &
Supplies. Full time
position, requires
some on call.
Must be detail ori-
ented, good verbal
& written skills a
must. Resumes to
info@caregivers
america.com or
674-8500.
548 Medical/Health
Lakeside Nursing
Center is looking for:
R.N.s for Full Time
7am-3 pm
R.N.s every other
weekend 7am-3pm
C.N.A.s for Part
Time 3pm-11pm
PLEASE APPLY IN
PERSON
245 Old Lake Road
Dallas, PA 18612.
Call (570) 639-1885
for directions.
E.O.E.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
548 Medical/Health
Community Home
Supervisor
Full Time to work
with individuals with
intellectual disabili-
ties in a community
home in the Nuan-
gola area. Supervi-
sory Experience is
necessary, paid
training is provided.
Valid drivers license
is required. For
information or appli-
cation, call IMPACT
SYSTEMS, Inc. at
(570) 829-3671
Drug free work-
place
EOE
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
FULL TIME
TECHNICIAN
We need a reliable
professional who
will efficiently
screen patients for
their visit and per-
form patient testing.
Ideal candidate will
be a friendly, calm
person who will
constantly strive to
do accurate work.
Experience a plus.
Extensive on the job
training will be pro-
vided
APPLY ONLINE:
www.icare
specialists.com
SUBMIT RESUME:
HR Dept.
703 Rutter Ave.
Kingston, PA 18704
Fax: 570-287-2434
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
COUNTER SALES
Peirce-Phelps, Inc.,
Americas fastest
growing HVAC
leader has an
IDEAL Counter
Sales position in our
Wilkes-Barre, PA
store.
The position is for a
self-driven, highly
motivated individual
with great customer
service skills. Duties
include cross-refer-
encing service parts
and compressors,
sale of supplies and
equipment, tele-
marketing and other
store functions. The
ideal candidate will
have good comput-
er skills, a strong
work ethic and
HVAC and or whole-
sale experience.
Excellent telephone,
organizational and
customer relation
skills are required.
We offer a competi-
tive compensation
& attractive compa-
ny benefits pack-
age, tuition reim-
bursement & 401(k)
retirement plan.
Please submit
resumes to:
Peirce-Phelps, Inc.
Email:
swb@peirce.com
EOE
No phone calls
please
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
IN HOME CLOSERS
ARE YOU:
A professional,
one-call, in-the-
home closer?
Getting enough
qualified, confirmed
leads?
On pace to earn
$150K+ this year?
WE OFFER:
Highest commis-
sions in our indus-
try!
Preset, qualified,
confirmed leads!
401K, Health,
Bonuses, Contests,
Trips!
Continued training
programs!
WE NEED:
2 TOP closers for
our Pennsylvania
office
In order to be
considered for the
positions listed
Contact Mike at
1-800-777-6292
815 Dogs
SHIH-TZU MIX PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $400
570-250-9690
FORTY FORT
Available March 1
2nd floor, spacious,
well maintained, 2
bedroom, 2 bath, in
convenient nice
neighborhood.
Large living/dining
area, large eat in
kitchen with w/d
hookup. Front
porch, screened
back porch. Great
closet/storage
space,w/w carpet-
ing, central air, off
street parking.
$900/month plus
utilities. Call 570-
510-4778 from
9am-5pm for an
appointment.
HUGHESTOWN
Immaculate 4 room,
2 bedroom, 1 bath
2nd floor apartment
overlooking park.
Washer/dryer
hookup. Stove &
fridge included. No
pets. Non smoking.
$550/month + utili-
ties & security. Call
(570) 457-2227
950 Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
3 bedrooms. Large
kitchen, living room
and dining room.
Basement. Yard.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Gas heat. New
carpeting. $635/
month + security &
utilities. Some pets
ok. 908-392-2494
HARRISBURG State Rep.
Bill DeWeeses lawyer has coined
a nickname for the corruption
trial that starts Monday in Dau-
phin County court: pettygate.
The only thing not petty
about this prosecution is the cost
that the attorney generals office
engaged in to bring it, said Wil-
liam Costopoulos, a seasoned
Harrisburg defense attorney.
In many ways, it will echo the
courtroom showdowns that pre-
ceded it. The 2010 bonusgate
trial focused in part on the use of
public money to reward employ-
ees of the House Democratic cau-
cus for campaign work illegally
done on state time. Last years
computergate trial revolved
around a scheme within the
House GOP caucus to develop
customized software at tax-
payers expense to gain an illicit
electoral edge.
Judged by the results, those
cases were anything but petty.
In the Democratic case, 10 peo-
ple connected to the House Dem-
ocratic caucus were convicted or
pleaded guilty, including former
whip Michael Veon of Beaver
County, who is serving a six- to
14-year state prisonterm. Most of
the nine GOP defendants who
were convicted or pleaded guilty,
including former House Speaker
John Perzel of Philadelphia, are
awaiting sentencing.
The state attorney generals
case alleges that DeWeese simi-
larly broke the law by using pub-
lic resources for electioneering.
Its mostly about people and
the use of their time, said Nils
Frederiksen, spokesman for the
attorney generals office. I dont
think well have difficulty ex-
plaining that to the seven-wom-
an, five-man jury.
Yet some aspects of this case
set it apart from the others.
DeWeese, 61, will be the first
sitting legislator to stand trial in
the five-year-old investigation.
He will be tried alone now that
his erstwhile co-defendant, Sha-
ronRodavich, a former aide inhis
district office, has pleaded guilty
to reduced charges in exchange
for agreeing to testify against
him.
The scrappy Greene County
lawmaker has spent much of his
35-year House career in leader-
ship, includinga two-year stint as
House speaker. His longer tenure
as Democratic floor leader in-
cluded the 2001-2007 period that
is the focus of the state probe
when Veon was the caucus No. 2
leader yet prosecutors did not
charge DeWeese until late 2009,
more than a year after the main
group of Democratic defendants.
DeWeese has vocally criticized
the investigation launched
and directed by Republican Tom
Corbett until he was sworn in as
governor last year as political
grandstanding by Corbett and
his cronies.
Of the 25people arrestedinthe
investigation, two Democratic
defendants were acquitted and
prosecutors dropped the charges
against one GOP defendant. The
only defendants whose cases
have not been resolved are De-
Weese and Democratic former
Rep. Stephen Stetler of York
County, whose trial is slated for
later this year.
The prosecutions case is built
upon a grand jury report that
cites testimony from numerous
former DeWeese staffers who
saidthere was little or nodivision
between their legislative and
campaign responsibilities.
Former aide Kevin Sidella, tes-
tifying before the grand jury un-
der a grant of immunity, said fun-
draising was an integral part of
his duties, andthat whenheques-
tioned the propriety of his politi-
cal duties, DeWeese responded
that our saving grace is that ev-
eryone does it. DeWeeses for-
mer chief of staff, Mike Manzo,
also has agreed to testify against
his ex-boss under a plea deal with
prosecutors.
The only thing political about
this case is that we chargeda poli-
tician with committing a crime,
Frederiksensaid. For us its not a
political case. Its a theft, conspir-
acy and conflict of interest case.
Costopoulos maintains that
prosecutors are trying to make
mountains out of molehills.
DeWeese delegated day-to-day
responsibility for the hundreds of
caucus employees, Costopoulos
said. He believed that any cam-
paign work they did was done on
their own time, using vacation
days or comp time, and expected
them to file the appropriate pa-
perwork to document that time,
he said.
Bill DeWeese was not a hands-
on guy, his lawyer said. If those
beneath him failed him, that fail-
ing is not a crime that he perpe-
trated.
VI EWI NG HARRI SBURG He refers to hearings for state rep. as pettygate
DeWeeses attorney blasts trial
By PETER JACKSON
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
The state at-
torney generals
office alleges
that state Rep.
Bill DeWeese,
D-Greene, broke
the law by using
public resources
for electioneer-
ing. DeWeese is
shown here being
interviewed in
2006.
Wilkes Universitys Polish
Room Committee presented two
Wilkes University students with
scholarships on Saturday night,
which not only helped pay their
tuition but also celebrated their
Polish heritage.
Justin Balint, Drums, a senior
pharmacy/Spanish major, and
LaurenPara, Jenkins Township, a
sophomore pharmacy major,
were awarded two separate
scholarships onSaturday night at
the 62nd annual Kosciuszko Ball
at the Woodlands Inn and Resort.
Balint was presented with a
$3,000 scholarship fromthe com-
mittee and Para received a $1,000
Judianne Stanitski Scholarship,
donated by Frank and Monica
Stanitski. Both have maintained
perfect averages during their col-
lege careers and both have dem-
onstrated financial need.
Nine applications were re-
ceived for the scholarships and
were reviewed by a panel of judg-
es.
It is an honor to consistently
support students of Polish de-
scent who attend Wilkes, said
Bernadine Tarasek, president of
the Polish Room Committee.
Tarasek said the committee
works hard to keep the Polish
heritage alive.
Tarasek said some members of
the committee also worked hard
on the dance floor while practic-
ingfor thePolonaise. Shesaidthe
Woodlands was nice enough to
lend them a room to practice the
traditional Polish dance.
Every aspect of the event, in-
cluding music provided by the
George Tarasek Orchestra, the
Polonaise dance and the present-
ation of the scholarships, high-
lighted the committees desire to
preserve the Polish heritage in
the local community.
The ball is a tribute to Gen.
Thaddeus Kosciuszko, who
fought for America in the Revolu-
tionary War and was committed
to democratic principles. He was
granted American citizenship
and was a national hero both in
the United States and Poland.
Polish students get aid
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Bob and Lois Mlinar dance Saturday at the 62nd annual Kosciusz-
ko Ball at the Woodlands on Saturday.
Two from county who attend
Wilkes receive scholarships at
62nd annual Kosciuszko Ball.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
Scouts.
"We want to get the kids out-
side to enjoy the season," said
Sepcoski. "Were putting the out-
ing inScouting."
Boy Scout officials said there
are more than2,500boys of all ag-
es from Northeastern Pennsylva-
niacurrentlyactiveinTwoMoun-
tains 43 troops, and the skills
learned during their Scouting ex-
perience help them throughout
the course of their lives.
"Itsnoaccident that somanyof
our astronauts, congressmenand
business leaders were Scouts,"
added Sepcoski. "Scouting pro-
vides thema solidfoundation."
SCOUTS
Continued from Page 3A
The event featured a number of
"fun stations" dotted across
the white expanse of the park.
C M Y K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
7
3
5
0
5
2
Somebrought candles, whileoth-
ers held up their smart phones to
take photos of the scene. The
moodwas somber, withnochant-
ing or shouting.
Drove by students at the Joe
statue, Jay Paterno tweeted.
Just told my Dad about all the
love & support -- inspiring him.
The final days of Paternos
Penn State career were easily the
toughest in his 61 years with the
university and46seasons as head
football coach.
Sandusky, a longtime defen-
sive coordinator who was on Pa-
ternos staff during two national
title seasons, was arrested Nov. 5
and ultimately charged with sex-
ually abusing a total of 10 boys
over 15 years. His arrest sparked
outrage not just locally but across
the nation and there were wide-
spread calls for Paterno to quit.
Paterno announced late on
Nov. 9 that he would retire at the
end of the season, but just hours
later he was told over
the phone by board
vice chairman John
Surma that he had
been terminated as
coach. By that point, a
crowd of students and
mediawereoutsidethe
Paterno home. When
news spread that Pa-
terno had been
dumped, there was
rioting in State Col-
lege.
Police on Saturday evening
had barricaded off the block
where Paterno lives, and a police
car was stationed about 50 yards
from his home. Several people
had gathered in the living room
of the house. No one was outside,
other than reporters and photog-
raphers stationed there.
Trustees said this week they
pushed Paterno out in part be-
cause he faileda moral responsib-
ility to report an allegation made
in 2002 against Sandusky to au-
thorities outside the university.
They also felt he had challenged
their authorityandthat, as aprac-
tical matter, with all the media in
town and attention to the Sand-
usky case, he could no longer run
the team.
Paterno testified before the
grand jury investigating Sandus-
ky that he had relayed to his boss-
es an accusation that came from
graduate assistant Mike McQue-
ary, who said he saw Sandusky
abusing a boy in the showers of
the Penn State football building.
Paterno told the Post that he
didnt know how to handle the
charge, but a day after McQueary
visited him, he spoke
to the athletic direc-
tor and the adminis-
trator with oversight
over the campus po-
lice.
Wick Sollers, Pa-
ternos lawyer, called
the boards com-
ments this week self-
serving and unsup-
ported by the facts.
Paterno fully report-
ed what he knew to
the people responsible for cam-
pus investigations, Sollers said.
He did what he thought was
right withthe informationhe had
at the time, Sollers said.
Sandusky says he is innocent
and is out on bail, awaiting trial.
The back and forth between
Paternos representative and the
board reflects a trend in recent
weeks, during which Penn State
alumni and especially former
players, including Hall of Fame
running back Franco Harris
have questioned the trustees ac-
tions and accused them of failing
to give Paterno a chance to de-
fend himself.
Three recent town halls, in
Pittsburgh, suburban Philadel-
phia and New York City, seemed
to do little to calm the situation
and dozens of candidates have
now expressed interest in run-
ning for the board, a volunteer
position that typically attracts
much less interest.
While everyone involved has
said the focus should be on Sand-
uskys accusers and their ordeals,
the abuse scandal put a sour end-
ing on Paternos sterling career.
Paterno won 409 games and took
the Nittany Lions to 37 bowl
games and those two national
championships, the last in the
1986 season. More than 250 of
theplayers hecoachedwent onto
the NFL.
With his thick glasses, rolled
up khakis and white socks, Pater-
no was synonymous with Penn
State and was seen in many ways
as the archetypal football coach,
maintaining throughout his ca-
reer that it was important not just
to win but win with integrity.
PATERNO
Continued from Page 1A
In this photo taken with a fisheye lens, some of the about 200 students and townspeople who gathered around a statue of former
Penn State football coach Joe Paterno outside Beaver Stadium on Saturday. The mood was somber, with no chanting or shouting.
David Marselles, a senior at
Penn State from Allentown.
AP PHOTOS
Candles and
other mementos
that were placed
near a statue of
former Penn
State football
coach Joe Pa-
terno outside
Beaver Stadium
in State College
on Saturday.
Paternos doc-
tors say the
former coachs
condition has
become serious
after he experi-
enced complica-
tions from lung
cancer in recent
days.
Police on Saturday
evening had barri-
caded off the
block where Pa-
terno lives. Sever-
al people had
gathered in the
living room of the
house.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 13A
C L I C K
PENGUIN AWARENESS
DAY FOR CHILDREN
KINGSTON SENIOR CENTER
POLISH FESTIVAL
POLISH FESTIVAL FOR
NANTICOKE SENIORS
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Timmy Jasnoski, left, Rohan Joseph at Penguin Aware-
ness Day at Building Blocks Learning Center, Plains
Township
CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
David and Norma Johnson, Ted Androkavitz and Loretta Chmura
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Florence Haas, left, and Ann Rinehamer
Tyler Jasnoski, left, and Maddy Fox
Louise Stuart, left, and Marie Williamson
Shirley Batogowski, left, and Bernie Macijczak
Elise Segall and Anthony Kolodziej
Jean Spindler, director, and Jack Granahan
Carol and Don Tischler
Trenton Faux, left, and David Butry
Millie Papciak, left, and Marcia Young
Ed and Joan Kaminski
Valerie Huntzinger, left, Wendy Scavone and Zubeen
Saeed
Helen Pliska, left, and Carol Michalek
Janet Smith and Chester Lubecki
C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
and several cities in Pennsylva-
nia, to week-long stays in San
Antonio; Reno, Nev., New Or-
leans, Denver, and Phoenix.
Mayor Tom Leighton, mean-
while, racked up travel-related
charges totaling $14,720; City
Administrator Marie McCor-
mick, $12,030 and former city
administrator J.J. Murphy
$12,318.
None of the trips by council
were ever publicly approved at
council meetings.
They didnt have to be.
The money came from a
from a $10,000 line item for
travel thats included in each
years budget, which means no
public vote was required.
There also was no vote re-
quired to approve the hotel and
conference fees charged to
credit cards held by Leighton,
McCormick or Murphy.
Activists riled
The lack of public disclosure
riled city resident Joseph Wiel-
gosz, who along with Charlotte
Raup obtained the credit card
statements earlier this year
through a request filed under
the states Right to Know Act.
Raup and Wielgosz said they
expected to find some ques-
tionable charges, but were
stunned by the amount of trav-
el-related expenses on the
cards.
The people dont know
about this. This is outrageous,
Raup said. I see people every
day who are working so hard
and struggling. They should
not have to fork out money for
people to travel all over.
They travel more than the
governor, Wielgosz said.
These people are living it up
on our money. Its ridiculous.
Current Councilman Bill
Barrett and former council
members Kathy Kane and Tony
Thomas, who took part in most
of the trips, adamantly defend-
ed the travel, most of which
was to conventions held by the
National League of Cities and
Pennsylvania League of Cities.
Barrett, Thomas and Kane
said information they picked
up at the conventions led to nu-
merous worthwhile projects
and has resulted in cost savings
that far outweigh the cost of
the excursions. Thomas and
Kane, who now serves as city
controller, left council in De-
cember.
Leighton, who primarily
took short trips to Philadelphia
and Washington D.C., said his
travel involved numerous
meetings with legislators and
11 flag memorial that was held
in Kirby Park in 2004. The flags
were sold after the display end-
ed, generating about $74,000
the city donated to various
charities.
In 2010, the city obtained
playground equipment at vir-
tually no cost that was installed
in the Iron Triangle section.
Ideas for both projects came
from National League of Cities
conventions, Thomas said.
Barrett cited several exam-
ples of projects he learned
about at conventions, includ-
ing a prescription drug dis-
count card and a water and
sewer line protection insurance
program offered to city resi-
dents.
The prescription discount
card is available to any city resi-
dent who does not have pre-
scription coverage. It entitles
them to a 25 percent discount
on all prescriptions purchased
at CVS pharmacies, he said.
I just got a report on it. Our
residents have saved over
$10,000, Barrett said.
The sewer and water line
protection plan provides insur-
ance to cover the cost if there is
a malfunction within the lines.
About 2,000 households have
signed up for the program, he
said. The city, which gets a
small administration fee,
earned roughly $10,000 off that
program this year, he said.
Wielgosz and Raup ques-
tioned if information on those
projects could have been ob-
tained in other ways. Many or-
ganizations now offer seminars
through video conferencing,
they noted.
Anything you can learn, you
can learn on the Internet.
There is nothing they learned
that they could not have
learned here, Raup said.
They also questioned why so
many council members, plus
the controller, needed to attend
the conventions.
I was a union president.
When I sent someone on a trip,
I sent one person who came
back and discussed with every-
one else what they learned,
Wielgosz said.
Barrett, Kane and Thomas
acknowledged the city could
send fewer people, but said
they would miss out on a lot of
information because they
could not possibly attend all
the seminars, many of which
are going on simultaneously.
None of us would go to the
same seminar. Wed split up.
One would go to public safety,
one would go to public works,
Thomas said.
Council Chairman Mike
Merritt has never taken any
trips, but said he believes the
conferences are worthwhile.
Council members have brought
back information that has
saved the city money, he said.
But Merritt said he under-
stands concerns that are being
raised, and suggested it may be
time for council to revisit how
many people should attend.
Im not saying cut it alto-
gether, but does it need to be
three? Maybe two is the num-
ber. Times are tough. We need
to watch spending where we
can, Merritt said.
Barrett said he also under-
stands the concerns, but he
thinks it would be a mistake to
eliminate the conferences.
I can understand why it
would be questioned, but to
not take advantage of these op-
portunities, I think we would
be remiss. The alternative is to
stay in Wilkes-Barre, dont be-
long to organizations, dont
learn anything new or bring
anything back and stay stag-
nant, he said.
2004 to a high of $16,945 in
2007. Expenditures in the oth-
er years ranged from roughly
$6,500 to $9,700.
The actual cost of the trips
was likely significantly higher,
however, as the figures do not
include the cost of airfare,
meals or ground transporta-
tion, which were not charged
on the cards. Council members
and other officials paid those
fees up front and were later re-
imbursed by the city, Ryan
said.
The Times Leader filed a
Right-to-Know request seeking
receipts submitted by council
members for reimbursement of
travel expenses. The request,
which is pending, could not
reasonably be filled by the city
within the several-day time
frame prior to the publication
of this story.
A review of available records
through June 2011, which were
provided to the Times Leader
by Wielgosz and Raup, showed
Barrett, Kane, Thomas and for-
mer controller Bernie Menge-
ringhausen traveled to conven-
tions an average of two to four
times per year.
The four attended the 2008
National League of Cities con-
vention in Orlando, as well as
NLC conventions held in 2006
in Reno, Nev.; 2007 in New Or-
leans; 2009 in San Antonio;
2010 in Denver and 2011 in
Phoenix. A fifth person, Shirley
Morio-Vitanovec, now a former
council member, also attended
the 2008 Orlando convention,
Ryan said.
Council members were free
to take their spouse with them,
but the city paid only for the
council member, Ryan said. All
expenses for spouses, such as
airfare and meals, were their
personal responsibility.
Constituents benefit
Barrett said he understands
people might be skeptical of
the benefits the city gets, but
hes convinced the cost of the
conventions are far outweighed
by the savings the city sees as a
result of what members learn.
A lot of people picture these
as if we are going on some sort
of vacation. It is not like that,
Barrett said.
Barrett, Kane and Thomas
said they spent their days at-
tending numerous seminars
and meetings that allowed
them to interact with officials
from across the nation, gaining
valuable information on howto
address problems all cities face.
They also cited numerous
projects that came out of the
conventions that benefited city
residents.
Thomas was the key person
behind the Healing Fields 9/
other government officials that
helped him obtain funding for
multiple projects that have im-
proved the city.
Most of the time I was get-
ting funding and going down
and making presentations,
Leighton said. Grant money
does not fall in your lap. You
need to really sell the project.
You go down and lobby for the
money.
The bulk of the travel-related
charges on McCormicks card
appear to be for seminars and
training for other city employ-
ees, according to notations on
the statements.
Most of Leightons and Mur-
phys charges relate to meet-
ings in Philadelphia and Wash-
ington, D.C. with various offi-
cials regarding projects within
the city, including the Wi-Fi
system, Intermodal Transpor-
tation Center and the Coal
Street renovation project.
Ryan personally charged a to-
tal of $1,915 in hotel charges to
Virginia Beach from 2004 to
2010. The trips were for annual
training so that he could retain
his master certification as a
city clerk, he said.
Cost/Benefit ratio
Raup and Wielgosz said they
understand some travel is nec-
essary, but they questioned
whether the cost of some of the
trips particularly those taken
by council members to out-of-
state conventions -- out-
weighed the benefits, particu-
larly given the financial strug-
gles the city is facing.
We pay a 3-percent earned
income tax. If you take away
this credit card nonsense, may-
be wed only be paying 1 per-
cent, Wielgosz said. This
whole administration is about
spend, spend, spend, yet you
dont have a decent road to
drive on.
Areviewof Ryans credit card
statements show the total
amount spent on hotels and
conference/membership fees
ranged from a low of $4,059 in
WILKES-BARRE SLEPT HERE
Research: Terrie Morgan-Besecker, Graphic: Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
Pa.
D.C.
La.
Texas
Colo. Va.
Fla.
Nev.
Ind.
N.Y.
Wis.
$29,733
$17,352
$7,589
$5,116
$4,921
$3,589
$3,320
$2,714 $2,083
$1,718
$1,138
Credit card expenditures for lodging of city
ofcials in the last seven years, by state. Not
shown: Rhode Island, $830; Maryland, $427;
North Carolina, $352; West Virginia, $88
TOTAL: $85,766
Ariz.
$4,792
COSTS
Continued from Page 1A
We pay a 3-percent
earned income tax. If
you take away this
credit card nonsense,
maybe wed only be
paying 1 percent. This
whole administration is
about spend, spend,
spend, yet you dont
have a decent road to
drive on.
Joseph Wielgosz
Wilkes-Barre resident
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
Mayor Tom Leighton
Best Western Wilkes-Barre Pa $37
Hilton Washington DC $3,540
Marriott Philadelphia Pa $1,762
Embassy Washington DC $911
Doubletree New York NY $208
Providence Providence RI $430
Renaissance Philadelphia Pa $1,419
Hilton Washington DC $1,939
U.S. Conf. Of Mayors $4,225
Pa. League Of Cities $250
Tom Leighton total $14,720
Jim Ryan (pays for council/other ofcials)
Hershey Lodge Hershey Pa $2,173
Embassy Washington DC $1,141
Crowne Plaza RI $400
Quality Inn Va Beach Va $372
Embassy Indianapolis Ind $2,083
Westin Embassy Washington DC $2,691
Residence Inns Charlotte NC $352
Va Beach Resort Va Beach Va $463
Omni Pittsburgh Pa $1,297
Silver Legacy Reno Nev $2,714
Holiday Inn Md $98
Jurys Hotel Washington DC $658
Marriott Washington DC $3,910
Shippensburg Shippensburg Pa $404
Hilton New Orleans La $7,589
Holiday Inn Va Beach Va $501
Wyndham Gettysburg Pa $1,458
Marriott Orlando Fla $3,320
Annapolis Annapolis Md $329
Marriott Lancaster Pa $954
Sheraton Ocean Front Va Beach Va $583
Marriott San Antonio Texas $5,116
Bethlehem Hotel Bethlehem Pa $1,178
Hyatt Denver Colo $4,921
Sheraton Hotel Erie Pa $1,645
Sheraton Hotel Phoenix Ariz $4,792
National League of Cities $16,590
Pa. League of Cities $6,409
Jim Ryan total $74,139
Marie McCormick
Best Western Wilkes-Barre Pa $475
Wingate Inn Allentown Pa $4,000
Hampton Inn Charlestown W Va $88
Pa Assc Twnship Enola Pa $875
Holiday Inn Washington DC $386
Hampton Inn Quakertown Pa $273
Radisson Hotel Camp Hill Pa $235
Resort At Split Rock Pa $232
Country Inn 7 Suites Lancaster Pa $516
Hotel Hershey Hershey Pa $487
The Inn At Nicholas Clark Summit Pa $184
Holiday Inn Harrisburg Pa $662
Courtyard Marriott Bensalem Pa $618
Holiday Inn York Pa $1,407
Marriott Lancaster Pa $256
Hilton Washington DC $1,195
Travelocity .Com $35
Travelworld $105
Marie McCormick total $12,030
J.J. Murphy
Best Western Hotel Wilkes-Barre Pa $805
Courtyard Marriott Philadelphia Pa $2,784
Embassy Suites Tip New York NY $1,110
Hilton Harrisburg Pa $507
Holiday Inn Pittsburgh Pa $677
Hyatt Hotel Washington DC $981
Knights Inn Altoona Pa $52
Marriott Arlington Va $1,419
Marriott New York NY $399
Marriott Philadelphia Pa $1,353
Renaissance Hotel Philadelphia Pa $389
Residence Inns Philadelphia Pa $175
Residence Inns Pittsburgh Pa $445
Towne Place Suites New Yorktown Va $251
Wyndham Hotel Milwaukee Wis $538
Amer. Soc. for Pub. Admin. $434
J.J. Murphy total $12,318
CITY CREDIT CARDS
These are total Wilkes-Barre City credit card
charges for hotel and conference fees from
2004 through 2011.
NOTE: Some totals are for conferences held at
the same hotel multiple years.
The $10,000 budgeted annually for
Wilkes-Barre city council travel ex-
penses far exceeds the amount sever-
al other third class cities dedicate to
travel, officials in the communities
said.
A poll of officials in Hazleton,
Scranton, Nanticoke and York re-
vealed the cities provide either noth-
ing or only a nominal amount, rang-
ing from $50 to $250 for use by the
entire council.
That money can be used to pay
conference fees, but in most cities,
any other costs associatedwithtravel
are up to the individual council mem-
bers, the officials said.
Wilkes-Barre City Council has
come under fire from residents Jo-
seph Wielgosz and Charlotte Raup,
who are questioning howmuch bene-
fit the city has gotten fromnumerous
conventions attended by council
members.
The city paid a total of $74,139 in
hotel/conference fees from 2004 to
2011, the bulk of which was for travel
to conventions held by the National
League of Cities and Pennsylvania
League of Cities, according to a re-
view of city credit card statements of
City Clerk Jim Ryan.
The total does not include other
expenses, such as airfare, meals and
ground transportation, that council
members pay up front and are later
reimbursed.
Councilman Bill Barrett and Kathy
Kane, who left council in December
to become controller, say the city has
benefited from numerous projects
that they learned about by attending
the conventions.
Officials in York, Nanticoke and
Scranton said that, while they agree
such conferences can be helpful, they
cant justify paying for travel given
thetight financial constraints their ci-
ties face.
That seems high, Dianna
Thompson, clerk for York City Coun-
cil said when told of Wilkes-Barres
travel budget. Ive beenhere15 years
and weve never had that much for
travel.
Thompsonsaidher council typical-
ly budgets a total of $500to$1,000for
travel to be divided among its five
council members, but the allotment
was cut from this years budget.
Even when the money is there, the
city typically sends one or two coun-
cil members to a seminar, not four, as
Wilkes-Barre has done.
The training is valuable, but
whether each person needs to go, Im
not so sure, Thompson said. You
need to look at the financial state of
your municipality If your constitu-
ents are looking at a tax increase be-
causeyouhavefivemembers goingto
training, when in reality you could
just send two and have them come
back with a report, I think they could
possibly trim that.
ThompsonsaidYorkalsoonly pays
for conference and registration fees
for council members.
Lodging, with occasional excep-
tions, is not covered, nor is mileageor
meals. Council members typically
only take day trips to seminars that
are nearby. The city has never paid
airfare for a council member to travel
out-of-state, as far as she could recall.
In Scranton, council President Ja-
net Evans saidthe city didnot budget
any money for travel for council, but
it did provide $250 for Mayor Chris
Dougherty to utilize for conferences.
Hazleton also provides no travel
funds for council, while Nanticoke
has set aside $50.
ScrantonandNanticokearebothin
distressed city status. Evans and Hol-
ly Cirko, administrator for Nanti-
coke, said the financial difficulties
would make it difficult to justify
spending money on travel.
We are a distressed city that suf-
fers from a myriad of significant fi-
nancial problems, Evans said.
Council members are not prohibited
from attending seminars, however,
we have to prioritize in this financial
climate. Anyone who wishes to at-
tend a function can do it at their own
expense.
Cirko said Nanticoke has placed its
priority on budgeting money for
training of employees in individual
departments, such as fire and police.
My councils message has always
been, if we are going to budget what
little discretionary money we have,
they want to send employees, she
said.
Told of the policies of other cities,
Barrett said thats their prerogative.
He remains convinced that Wilkes-
Barre is getting its value out its mem-
bership to the National League of Ci-
ties andthe conferences the organiza-
tion sponsors.
There are lot of cities that dont
belong (to the NLC). I think they are
missing something, Barrett said.
Poll: W-B travel fees very high
Officials of other third-class
cities say they are provided with
nothing or a nominal amount.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Former city council-
man Tony Thomas and former controller
Bernie Mengeringhausen were among
four city officials who attended a taxpayer-
funded trip to a convention in Phoenix in
November, despite the fact both men had
only one month left in office.
Thomas term on council ended Dec. 31,
while Mengeringhausen retired. Despite
that, they still attended the National
League of Cities convention held in Phoe-
nix from Nov. 9-12.
The trip, also attended by council mem-
ber Bill Barrett and former councilwoman
Kathy Kane, cost taxpayers a total of
$6,103 -- $4,791 for hotel and conference
fees and $1,311 in airfare, according to
figures supplied by City Clerk Jim Ryan.
The junket was among numerous tax-
payer-funded trips that Thomas, Barrett,
Kane and Mengeringhausen have taken to
National League of Cities conferences
dating back to 2006, according to a review
of Ryans credit card statements.
The trips have been criticized by city
residents Joseph Wielgosz and Charlotte
Raup, who have questioned how much the
city benefited from the conventions. Wiel-
gosz was particularly disturbed to learn
Thomas and Mengeringhausen had gone
on the Phoenix trip.
They just sponged off the city for one
extra vacation, Wielgosz said. Its non-
sense.
Thomas defended his decision to attend
the convention. Although hes no longer
on council, he continues to live in the city
and plans to volunteer his time to help
council members and other city officials in
any way he can, he said.
Thomas said he brought back valuable
information on several important issues,
including towing contracts, centralizing
police department records and alternative
fuel sources for city vehicles.
The information I brought back (from
the convention) and the
knowledge I have, I can
share with new council
members. Its not like Im
a ghost. Im not leaving.
Wielgosz said that
information could easily
have been gathered by
other council members
who took the trip.
What does it matter if
he learned anything?
Isnt this something
other council members
could have brought back
to the people? he said.
Mengeringhausen did
not return phone messages left at his
home over several days seeking comment.
All payment of bills in the city must be
approved by the controller. Kane took
over that position from Mengeringhausen
in January, but she will not have any say
in whether to pay charges related to the
Phoenix trip because they appeared on the
December credit card statement of Ryans
card, which was due Dec. 29 and has been
paid, Ryan said.
Kane and Barrett declined to comment
on whether they believed it was appropri-
ate for Thomas and Mengeringhausen to
have attended the conference, saying the
matter was a personal choice of the two
men.
I can see why people would question it,
but I cant speak for them, Barrett said.
Mayor Tom Leighton, in a statement
issued through city spokesman Drew
McLaughlin, said it is up to Thomas and
Mengeringhausen to explain their ratio-
nale for the trip.
City council is a distinct and separate
branch of municipal government that
controls their own budget and expendi-
tures from it, Leighton said in the state-
ment. The administration has no author-
ity to reject how they allocate money for
travel of anything else.
2 took trip with month left in office
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
Thomas
Mengeringhausen
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012
I
dont know about you other
folks my age, but when I was
growing up I was haunted by a
sound that came from our living-
room console radio every week.
It was more frightening than the
wailing 9 p.m. Wilkes-Barre curfew,
whose violators were surely sent to
reform school. Even the creaking
door of Inner Sanctum was down-
right inviting compared to this hor-
rible noise.
It was and I shudder to say it
even today the single scariest
thing I ever heard on a radio back
in those dark and cold winter eve-
nings of 60 years ago and more.
First youd hear a low rumbling.
Then a foghorn, sounding mon-
strously human, would intone, very
deeply, beeeeee ohhhhhhh.
I really didnt know quite what
body odor (the explanation came
via the announcer) was, but it sure
sounded like a terrible thing to
have. Of course, we were quickly
told, you could avoid this life-de-
stroying scourge by using Lifebuoy
soap every day.
Radio was full of neat sounds,
especially the commercials. Hey,
why not crank up the old Silvertone
in the back of your memory and see
how many of these slogans and
jingles you can identify by their
product?
1. A song: Who put eight great
tomatoes in that little bitty can?
2. Accompanied by a cannon
blast, this cereal was said to be
shot from guns.
3. A song: Clotheslines are for
the birds.
4. Johnny the bellhop crying out
Call for
5. This product always hits the
spot and costs only a nickel.
6. This still-popular item gives
you go power.
7. A song: Wash your duds in
8. If you want the smile of
health, buy
9. Smear this stuff on your hair
and you will have a tough time
keeping all the girls away.
10. Its the champagne of bottled
beers.
Now, write out your answers. Ill
go listen to a tape of The Lone
Ranger while Im waiting
Hi yo Whats this? Youre fin-
ished already. OK, heres the scoop.
1. Contadina did this magic act
with tomato paste; 2. Quaker Puffed
Wheat and Puffed Rice were a real
blast; 3. The next line was The
Westinghouse clothes dryer, thats
for you.; 4. Johnny was looking for
Philip Morris, who happened to
be a cigarette; 5. Besides hitting the
spot, Pepsi Cola gave you 12 full
ounces, thats a lot nickel, nickel,
nickel etc.; 6. Cheerios cereal,
today regarded as a healthy prod-
uct, originally sold itself as if it
were a pep pill; 7. Through much of
the 20th century, Super Suds brave-
ly stepped up to fight dirt; 8. Sal
Hepatica was not only a laxative
but a cold remedy and God only
knows what else; 9. Remember Get
Wildroot Cream Oil, Charlie?; 10.
Miller beer today sponsors football
and uses a more folksy approach.
You know, those old radio people
were clever. Because there was just
one sponsor per show an audience
identified that sponsor and his jin-
gles and slogans with the program.
So if you thought of Jack Benny,
you thought of Lucky Strike ciga-
rettes. Of course, living in our en-
lightened day, Ive long since clear-
ed that kind of ancient history from
my brain .
Hey, gotta run; its almost time
for Sky King. But first I think Ill
drive over to the store. I have this
sudden strange craving for Peter
Pan peanut butter.
TOM MOONEY
R E M E M B E R W H E N
Remember the
memorable
radio pitch?
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist.
Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
D
r. David Greenwald practices oncology
and internal medicine at Medical Oncol-
ogy Associates in Kingston. Greenwald, 66, is
a graduate of Kingston High School and Tem-
ple University Medical School where he was
board certified in oncology and internal med-
icine. He and his wife have six children: Ra-
chel, Hannah, Sarah, Naomi, Zachary and
Nate. They have five grandchildren and live in
Kingston.
You graduated from medical
school more than 40 years ago
and the field has changed dra-
matically since that time. What
was it that inspired you to be-
come a doctor back then? I al-
ready had a great interest in sci-
enceandI hadageneral feeling
of wanting to help people and
care for them. Back in the 70s
there was a sub-specialty that
was emerging for new medicine
and it was exciting to learn
about cancer as part of that.
Harrisons Textbook of Medi-
cine did not have a section on
cancer, so I wanted to learn
more about the disease and help
those diagnosed with it.
Today, what doyoulookforward
to the most in the work that you
do?It goes back tothepeople. The
patients keep me energized. Every
patient is different. Whether I see
five patients or 40 patients in 10
hours, all of their stories and the
challenges are different.
When you get a chance to enjoy
some free time, what do you like
to do? I am forever learning how
to play golf. Its kind of an ongoing
joke that I amstill learning after all
these years. I love being a grandfa-
ther, too. My family is very impor-
tant as is my volunteer community
work. Again it goes back to helping
others inside and outside of work.
Favorite music? Anything from
the60s andmydaughter, Naomi, is
trying to launch her music career.
Favorite books or authors?
Pretty much the collective works
of Pat Conroy, Daniel Silva, John
Sanford and John Grisham.
Favorite place you would like to
vacation or have visited? We
have been going to Nantucket for
over 30 years. I have a painting in
my office that captures our home
there perfectly. Its by far and away
our favorite spot to visit.
Favorite sports teams? Duke
basketball and Penn State foot-
ball.
What is your proudest profes-
MEET DR. DAVID GREENWALD
CLARK VAN ORDEN/
THE TIMES LEADER
See GREENWALD, Page 12B
I
n 2000, Ken Carey and Jack Walker opened the
Tipsy Turtle Market Street Pub in Jenkins
Township. The two friends Carey from Exe-
ter and Walker from Duryea had each worked in
many different areas of the food service business.
Jack and I were dishwashers, food servers, cooks
and bartenders going back to when we were like 13
years old, Carey said. We had done every position
and had knowledge of what it might take to run a
successful business. Jack even had his own food ser-
vice company.
The Tipsy Turtle achieved a reputa-
tion as a nice place to eat, but Ken said
he knew that it would take strenuous,
hard work to take the eatery to the next
level.
In May of 2004 I was putting in mas-
sive hours and feeling good about every-
thing, Carey said. Then it happened.
I just felt this lump on my neck and
had no idea what it was, Carey said. I
saw my physician and he wanted me to
be admitted to General Hospital.
I had testicular cancer, Carey said.
Treatment and support
Once Ken was admitted he was soon
in the care of Dr. David Greenwald.
(He) told me he could cure it right
there and it would take a series of treat-
ments.
The timing was pivotal as Carey had
20 pounds of cancer throughout his
body and if it went undiagnosed it could
have been much worse.
Carey wasnt unfamiliar with the con-
sequences of serious illness. In the sum-
mer of 1990, the year he graduated from
Wyoming Area High School, Careys
mother Concetta Carey succumbed to a
battle with leukemia and died at the age
of 46.
Jump forwardto 2004. Carey beganre-
ceiving a regimen of chemotherapy
drugs through four 21-day cycles. He re-
ceived three different chemotherapy
drugs intravenously three hours a day
for the first five days of each cycle. He
would then be monitored and treated for
any bad side effects or conditions result-
ing from the treatment over the next
couple of weeks.
I would start to feel great by day18 or
19 and be ready to do things like shop,
Carey said. But then it would be time to
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Ken Carey, co-owner of the Tipsy Turtle restaurants, recently battled testicular cancer.
PAYING IT FORWARD
How can I not be grateful for the experience I went through?
It brought me to where I am today.
Ken Carey
Business owners successful fight against cancer helps him help others
See FORWARD, Page 11B
By JOHN GORDON
jgordon@timesleader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
Legal Problem?
Problem Solved.
718-4900
575 Pierce Street, Kingston, Pa.
www.PyrahStevens.com
288-9311
601 Market St., Kingston, PA
2012 PHILADELPHIA FLOWER SHOW
FLOWERS OF HAWAII
Wednesday - March 7
th
Cost - $69 Bus and admission
8 DAY SPRINGIRELANDTOUR
April 23
rd
thru 30
th
Dublin, Killarney, Connemara, Ring of Kerry
Cost - $1,995pp
WALT DISNEY WORLD
August 8
th
- 13
th
Cost $599pp Children $299
Includes: Bus, Air, Disneys All Star Music Resort, Transfers
OASIS OF THE SEAS, ROYAL CARIBBEAN
September 15
th
- 22
nd
Western Caribbean: Labadee, Falmouth, Cozumel
From- $1,399pp Includes: Bus, Air, Cruise andTax
The Independence
You Value. The
Peace Of Mind
Youve Been
Missing.
Fully Remodeled
Newly Furnished
Rates Starting At $1,200
Per Month
Locally Owned And
Operated
120 Martz Manor
Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2730
Visit Our Website At www.plymouth-manor.com
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, January 21st
11:00am-2:00pm and
Sunday, January 22nd
12:00 Noon-3:00pm
Light refreshments served
Humphreys
Shoe Sale!
UP TO
50
%
OFF
158 MEMORIAL HWY. SHAVERTOWN
1-800-49-SHOES
DISCONTINUED
ON CLEARANCE
Hours: Mon. & Sat. 10-5:30pm
Tues.-Thurs. 10am-8:30pm Sun. 12-4pm
Students in third through fifth grades at Schuyler Avenue Elementary School recently participated in a
fitness competition as part of their physical education classes with physical education teacher Mario
Cella. In promoting wellness at the school, all of Cellas classes include cardiovascular, flexibility, strength
and agility exercises. Activities include distance and speed running, stretch and flexibility routines and
daily jump rope activities. Fifth-grade finalists (top), from left, first row, are Zoe Goleach, Brooke Hellyer,
Kailey Fowler, Amineh Al-Hawa, Jonathan Trojan and Chance Ezad. Second row: Paul Seasock, Elizabeth
Ruda, Keylei Sahonick, Mia Krochmaluk, Makayla Potsko, Ruddy Diaz and Damon Knouse. Fourth-grade
finalists (middle), from left, first row, are David Luff, Conner Miller, Kylee Laudenslager, Ronald Scarpelli
and Kirsten Mylott. Second row: Alanna Balbach, Danayah Lopez, Joesph Lombardo, Brandon Goble, Sam
McNeill, Emma Slivinski and Jessica Krulikowski. Third-grade finalists (bottom), from left, first row, are
Ashton Hozempa, Madison Dennis, Emily Eddy, Muhannad Abuelhawa, Cody Rinehimer and Lylah Lopez.
Second row: Alieu Jallow, Jordan Diggs, Steven Barber, Tianna Brunson, Amaryllis Chicallo, Kenly Gola-
noski, Eva Whitesell and Nasir Shelton.
Schuyler Avenue Elementary students excel at fitness competition
James M. Coughlin High School
The following students were omitted
fromthe James M. Coughlin High
School first quarter Honor Roll that
was published on page 2B on Jan. 15.
Grade12: Highest Honors: Julia
Montanez, Alexander Zuppo. High
Honors: Samantha Bitzer, Nola Carsil-
lo, Rebecca Emmert, Tatiana Kessler,
Sarah Lasoski, Anthony Nestor,
Kristen Rostkowski, Mitchell Stepp,
Eric Yakabovicz. Honors: Ryne Clark,
Mary Corcoran, Danielle Define,
Nicholas Gardner, Christopher Gold-
en, Kwaniqua Harris, Tyler Hoffman,
Eligh Lasiewicki, Jennilee Lefkoski,
Benjamin Lenkofsky, Brittany Maza,
Corey McNulty, Tiffany Miller, Victoria
Pando, Kyle Poray, Brandon Salsman,
Margaret Seiwell, Marissa Smith,
Stephen Stavish, Carla Tenorio, Brian
Thomas, Theodore Wampole.
Grade11: Highest Honors: Steven
Himlin. High Honors: Aaron Strait,
Kaitlyn Waskiewicz, Ryan Javick,
Edward Ciprich, Mujahid Chesson,
Michaelena Kowalczyk. Honors:
Steven Cook, Karynn Krouchick, Ryan
Redwood, Gerald Ryan, WilliamSabol
, Kimberly Salas, Jennifer Sosa,
Michael Tudda Jr., Veronica Velasco,
Bryan Wylie
Grade10: High Honors: Paula Al-
mendarez, Nicholas Cotillo, Bruce
Panattieri, Kathleen Pascual, Felicia
Rey, Morgan White. Honors: Jazmine
Barreto, Ingrid Da Costa, Nicholas
Fazio, Morgyn King, Vitaliy Kostak,
Emily Kowalski, Jonathan Mazeika,
Christopher Nardone, Kevin Uzialko,
Kayleigh Wardle.
Grade 9: Honors: Anthony Gennusa,
Sydney Hendrick, September Myers,
Jennifer Owens, Justin Reiser, Rayne
Shaffer.
HONOR ROLL
Wyoming Area High School
Vito Quaglia, principal, Wyoming
Area High School, recently
announced the students who
qualified for the Honor Roll for
the first marking period ending.
Grade 7: High Honors: Erin Ains-
worth, David Alberigi III, Austin
Alder, Grace Angelella, Collin
Barletta, Andrew Bartoli, Jo-
seph Bender, Madison Beppler,
Julia Bonomo, Bryan Bowser,
Victoria Braccini, Lydia Bugel-
holl, Peter Butera, Robert But-
win, Morgan Coolbaugh, Dante
Deluca, Louis Dominick, Kara
Dooner, Evan Esposito, Angela
Fanelli, Lindsey Feeney, Kimber-
ly Ferrara, Lea Getz, Aaron
Herrera, Stephen Homza, Jessi-
ca Hopkins, Rachel Johnson,
Dylan Kostak, Morgan Mas-
lousky, Keely Matthews, Nina
Minnelli, Leah Moore, Madison
Mulhern, Kyle Musto, Anthony
Nardell, Kristen Nossavage,
Makaila OReilly, Julia Patts,
Mackenzie Pegg, Grace Pepe,
Megan Pitcavage, Alex Robbins,
Laura Sachaczenski, Anthony
Saitta, Christina Sakalas, Sarah
Shemanski, Ryan Shuleski,
Shelby Stanford, Eden Stella,
Evan Stravinski, Katrina Stravin-
ski, Evelyn Urban, Emily Uritz,
Ashley Vikara, Ryan Webb,
Katie Wolfgang, Ryan Wrubel.
Honors: Nikolas Athmann,
Kathryn Augustine, Kendrick
Beyer, Albert Blannett, III, Mi-
chael Bonita, Matthew Booth,
Kyle Carr, Morgan Chesna,
Christopher Chipolis, Ethan
Crake, Alexis Crossley, Dominic
Dempsey, Michael Denardi, Ariel
DePietro, Ashley Donovan,
Matthew Hindmarsh, Miranda
Jones, Cole Keating, Joshua
Kopcza, Jessica Kupiec, Noah
Lafratte, Aaron Lee, Brenden
Lee, Jason Mapes, Joseph
Mikoliczyk IV, Kara Moscatelli,
Walker Regis, Albert Sciandra
III, Grace Scrobola, Justin
Smith, Tristan Sokach-Minnick,
Amy Troy, Tiffany Vincavage,
Michael Wall, Kelsey Young,
Kyle Zaboski.
Grade 8: High Honors: Robert
Acacio, Joseph Buczynski, Ryan
Burton, Matthew Carlson, Ste-
phanie Chihorek, Bryan Cumbo,
Katharyn Dymond, Grace Gober,
Alexis Harris, Laura Heinzlmeir,
Kelsey Kasisky, Hannah Kla-
proth, Mikayla Klimas, Zachary
Lagrue, Ashley Lamoreaux,
Cassandra Lockhart, Maria
Marstell, Megan Mattioli, Victo-
ria Mattioli, Michael Murphy,
Ryan Murphy, Heather Name-
tko, Lauren Perry, Victoria
Remley, Samantha Sepko, Jen-
nie Skursky, Rachel Solano,
Ryan Songaila, Jessica Sorick,
Krystina Stanczyk, Justin Stein-
berger, Kelly Sypulski, Morgan
Tarnalicki, Anna Thomas, Nico
Vasquez, Daniela Vigueras, Eric
Whyte, Nicole Wright, Megan
Wysocki. Honors: Bree Bed-
narski, Mackenzie Bilbow, Lisa
Billotti, Georgia Calimeres, Ian
Chandler, Kelly Clarke, Matthew
Dovidas, Taryn Gates, Patrick
Heck, Samantha Holcomb,
Lindsey Klinges, Cory Lescav-
age, Emily Menta, Theresa
Mitten, Austin Rought, Anthony
Shaver, Stephanie Sokach,
Alexandra Traglia, Claudia
Waltz, Kayla Wedlock.
Grade 9: High Honors: Amy Lynn
Alder, Julia Banas, Marcyssa
Brown, Cecelia Chisdock, Car-
lane Costello, Emily Endres,
Destini Esposito, Chaslyn Facci-
ponti, Dominick Forlenza, Niko-
las Gushka, Matthew Harding,
Hannah Johnston, Olivia Ka-
tulka, Nicole Kolessar, Caitlyn
Kraynak, Amber Kuharchik,
Geneva Laviska, Anthony Len-
kaitis, Melissa Mazzitelli, Justin
Palovchak, Victoria Pennington,
Mia Ashley Perrino, Rachel
Polacheck, Jude Polit-Moran,
Carrie Pozaic, Sara Romanow-
ski, Julianna Scappaticci, Haley
Stackhouse, Brittany Thomas,
Francesca Trottini, Peter Urban
II, Samantha Williams. Honors:
Madeleine Ambruso, Mariah
Bronsburg, Danielle Bulger,
Mark Chervenitski Jr., Nina
Cruz, Myiah Custer, Juliana
DeNardi, Joshua Donvito, Abi-
gail Gibbs, Holly Green, Cordell
Gresh, Raymond Hopkins, Tan-
ner Johnson, Alexa Malloy,
Maria Marcum, John Mar-
ianacci, Evan Musto, Nine Owen,
Mark Paluski, Emma Ramage,
Joseph Roach, Abigail
Schwerdtman, Zachary Scrobo-
la, Nikki Sellitto, Victoria Sidari,
Lauren Sokirka, Zachary Syp-
niewski, Olivia White, Emily
Wolfgang.
Grade 10: High Honors: Drew
Bednarski, Emily Bellanco,
Amanda Bialy, Tyler Marie
Bonita, Brian Buckman, Cody
Colarusso, Nicole Cumbo, Mor-
gan DeAngelo, Jonathan Gam-
ble, Lisa Guido, Audrey Hieda-
cavage, Michaela Jurchak,
Ariana Keller, Courtney Melvin,
Austin Shission, Leo Skoronski,
Katherine Sokirka, Danielle
Spagnuolo, Gabrielle Spagnuo-
lo, Mari Elizabeth Taggart,
Abigail Thornton. Honors:
Britney Benkoski, Mallory Bo-
han, Kyle Borton, Stephanie
Brown, Rebecca Colwell, Jaclyn
DeNardi, Briana Eipper, Julia
Gober, Sara Justave, Nicholas
Leon, Evan Skene Campenni,
Noah Stavish, Felicia Turner,
Marissa Urban, Brittney Win-
sock, Brian Wisowaty.
Grade 1 1: High Honors: John
Bankus, Gabrielle Bohan, Megan
Bonomo, Victoria Brown, Grego-
ry Cajka, Michael Carey, Andrew
Coco, Glynnis Cowley, Nicholas
Dominick, Nicholas Esposito,
Rebecca Johnson, Casey Ka-
sisky, Ashley Klein, Emily Knee-
ream, Kaitlyn Kross, Samantha
Kudrako, Zachary Lanunziata,
Brittany Lemardy, Maria Mar-
ianacci, Nicholas OBrien, Mark
OHara, Abby Raieski, Angela
Raieski, Evan Rider, Brianna
Romiski, Stormy Ruiz, Courtney
Sadowski, Brittani Shearer,
Leslie Shumlas, Eric Smith,
Rachael Stark, Katie Tibus,
Hannah Troy, William Weiss, IV,
Devaney Wood. Honors: Ga-
brielle Alberigi, Samantha
Amos, Kelly Bauman, Mariah
Bellanco, Valerie Bott, Bartholo-
mew Chupka, April Davis, Trent
Grove, Michael Harding, Nicho-
las Heck, Alexandra Holtz, Paige
Hudock, Melissa Kazmerick,
Sherry Klaproth, Christina
Klinges, Alexander Krispin,
Cassandra Lescavage, Brandon
Lizza, Jessica Martin, Megan
Milunic, Zachary Mulhern,
Angel Olmstead, Dylan Pegg,
Andrew Schutz, Skhyler Scian-
dra, Emily Shemanski, Erik
Walkowiak, Tyler Wrubel, Jor-
dan Zezza.
Grade 12: High Honors: Trevor
Alder, Christina Argenio, Amber
Bolton, David Bonomo, Natha-
nael Brague, Lisa Chihorek,
Mary Dymond, Samantha
Evarts, Kimberly Golden, Jessi-
ca Hollister, Keri Irace, Jordan
Johnston, Nicholas Kaminski,
James Kelly, Theresa Kelly,
Leah Laneski, Emily Lukasav-
age, Nick Mazzone, Daniel
Newhart, James Pennington,
Sara Radzwilka, James Scrobo-
la, Jonathan Scrobola, Hannah
Shelley, Samantha Shiner,
Jacqueline Stash, Louis Vullo.
Honors: Alexandra Amico, John
Barcelon, Nicholas Bartoli,
Brittany Bender, Jason Berti,
Morgan Bilbow, Stacey Blannett,
Stephanie Blannett, Kyle Bro-
gan, Lauryn Chromey, Angela
Coco, Danielle Confletti, Sarah
Crake, Alyssa Crawford, Peter
Dimick, Nicole Donley, Davide
Fanelli, Allison Golden, William
Gray III, Morgan Kane, Colin
Kirby, Michael Kohut III, Kelsey
Kovaleski, Sarah Kuharchik,
Justin Langdon, Kyle Lanun-
ziata, Emily Letoski, Ashley
Lombardo, Robert Phillips,
Brina Platt, Kendra Radle, Hay-
ley Reeves, Shannon Ritts,
Adam Romanowski, James
Rose Jr., Catlyn Smith, Riley
Thomas, Kristy Voychuk, Erin
Weida, Dorianna Williams.
HONOR ROLL
The Dallas High School Guidance
Department recently featured Joseph
Stachnik as a presenter for the career
of game art and game design. At the
presentation, from left: Magdalena
Fannick, student; Stachnik; and Mi-
chael Stachnik, student.
Dallas students learn about
game art/design career
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 3B
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
Free hearing evaluation and consultation Free demonstration of our most advanced hearing aid technology
Trial-period and nancing options available
Park Ofce Bldg.
400 Third Ave. Suite 109
Kingston, PA
(570) 714-2656
1132 Twin Stacks Drive
Memorial Highway
Dallas, PA
(570) 675-8113 www.afamilyhearingcenter.com
Zeigler - Asby Audiology
Family
Hearing Centers
This year, resolve to hear better
Experience ReSound Alera, a platform of hearing aids that provide
superior sound quality and personalized settings that ensure your comfort
throughout the day. Youll be amazed at how ReSound Alera automatically
adjusts to your changing listening environments.
Exceptionally rich sound
Full awareness of the individual sounds around you
Improved ability to locate where sounds are coming from
Clear sound and complete comfort when using the phone or listening to music
Better understand speech, even in noisy environments
Whistle-free sound, whether youre on the phone, or hugging someone
A truly wireless hearing aid that connects you directly
to your TV, cell phone and other audio devices
Schedule an appointment during our January Open House event!
Carpenter Dental
1086 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort
www.carpenterdental.com
570-331-0909
A Healthy New
Years Resolution
Should Start
With A Smile
scholarship exam 02.04.12
Take the Test
270.2160 | wyomingseminary.org/takethetest
For students entering 5
th
10
th
grade
ALL JUNK CARS &
TRUCKS WANTED
VITO & GINO
288-8995
Forty Fort
Highest Prices Paid In Cash.
Free Pickup. Call Anytime.
OLDPHOTOS
Copied &Restored
January Price Reduction
Non copyrighted images only.
www.lyonsphoto.com
(570) 824-0906
WE ACCEPT THE FOLLOWING
INSURANCE CARRIERS:
Blue Cross Blue Shield Geisinger Medicare
Davis Vision VSP VBA NVA Eyemed
Aetna Health America
United Healthcare Chip
35 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville 714-3937
Lab On
Premises
Accepting
New Patients
Dr. Nicole Schwartz
50% OFF FRAMES
Some Restrictions Apply. See Store For Details.
Expires February 17, 2012
ON NEW TAX PREP CLIENTS ON NEW TAX PREP CLIENTS R .Jacob Z agrapan ,In c.
E -F ile
For A n A ppoin tm en t,C all
570-825-4388
156 South Pennsylvania Blvd.
W ilkesBarre
35
%
35
%
35
%
DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT
across from Holy Redeemer
THE
THE THE
TAX MAN
TAX MAN TAX MAN
WEDDING SALE
www.TuxedoJunction.com
VISIT OUR
WEBSITE FOR A
FREE COLOR
SWATCH
WE ARE THE FIRST IN
THIS AREA
TO OFFER THIS SERVICE
TUXEDO JUNCTION
56 West End Rd.
(Near Carey Ave. Bridge)
Hanover Twp., PA 18706
570-829-4999
Largest Selection & Showroom in NEPA
FREE GROOMS TUX RENTAL
OR
FREE 2 PIECE SUIT (to own)
With 5 Paid Rentals See Store For Details
Only
$
99
95
Only
$
89
95
Only
$
109
95 Reg. Price $189.95 Reg. Price $169.95 Reg. Price $149.95
Includes:
Coat - Pants - Shirt
Any Backless Vest - Bow Tie
Shoes - Studs & Cuffs
Includes:
Designer Coat - Pants - Shirt
Full Back Vest - Any Tie
Shoes - Studs & Cuffs
Includes:
EVERYTHING
Ralph Lauren - Perry Ellis
Bill Blass - ALL Exclusive
from our Executive Collection
Plus Tax Plus Tax Plus Tax
SAVE $60 - $80 OFF ALL
Wedding Tuxedos
Sale ends 2/29/12 - Prices valid for any 2012 wedding
NEED BRACES?
190 welles street forty fort, pa 18704
(570) 287-8700
braceplaceorthodontics.com
no interest payments
most insurance accepted
no referral needed
dr. penny mericle
dr. samantha abod
NEED BRACES?
How long do I have to wait before I can fle for
Social Security Disability Benefts?
Call for a Free Consult: 570-822-8290
ZABRESKY LAW OFFICES
69 Public Square Wilkes-Barre
Not even one day. You can
fle for Social Security
Disability Benefts on the
very same day that you
become disabled.
Attorney Zabresky R.N. JD
258 Charles Street Luzerne 288-5337
Lunch: Mon. - Fri. 11am - 2pm
Dinner: Mon. - Thurs. 4pm - 9pm Fri. & Sat. 4pm - 10pm
Open for LUNCH DAILY Monday - Friday
11:00am - 2:00pm - Homemade Daily Features
Monday & Tuesday
Special
1
lb.
Lobster Tail Dinner
$
29
95
includes
choice of
2 sides
From February to April, the
RSVP Volunteer Program of
the Area Agency on Aging for
Luzerne and Wyoming Coun-
ties will assist seniors and low
income individuals with sim-
ple income tax forms.
The volunteers are qualified
to give assistance to senior ci-
tizens and individuals with in-
come under $49,000 with sim-
ple federal and state income
tax.
All federal income tax forms
will be e-filed.
This service is free of charge,
but by appointment only.
Sites:
Kingston Senior Center
680 Wyoming Avenue, King-
ston
Every Monday
Call 287-1102
Pittston Senior Center
441 N. Main St, Pittston
Every Monday 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Call 655-5561
Osterhout Free Library
71 South Franklin Street,
Wilkes-Barre
Every Wednesday 9 a.m.-2
p.m.
Call 822-1159 ext. 3539
Mohegan Sun Casino-Club-
house
1280 Route 315, Plains
Township
Every Tuesday 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Call 822-1159 ext. 3539
Luzerne County Communi-
ty College
Educational Conference
Center Room 114
1333 Prospect Street, Nanti-
coke
Every Wednesday 9 a.m.-2
p.m.
Call 822-1159 ext. 3539
Greater Wilkes-Barre Asso-
ciation for the Blind
1825 Wyoming Ave., Exeter
Every Thursday
Call 822-1159 ext. 3539
Income tax assistance offered to senior citizens
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O C C A S I O N S
B
rian and Mary Kay Konefal Bu-
keavich, Edwardsville, announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Rebecca Mae Bukeavich, to Jeremy
David Gordon, son of Rae Ayers,
Sweet Valley, and Gerald Flash and
Faye Gordon, Lovelton.
The bride-to-be is the granddaught-
er of Sally Konefal, Edwardsville, and
Carolyn Yatko, Delaware.
She is a 2007 graduate of Pennsylva-
nia State University and is employed
as the human resources manager by
Huntsville Executive Search, Dallas.
The prospective groom is the grand-
son of Shirley Ayers and Eugene Gor-
don, both of Dallas.
He graduated from Tunkhannock
High School in1998 and is employed
by Jack Williams Tire & Auto, Moos-
ic.
A September 2012 wedding is
planned at the Hayfield House at
Pennsylvania State University, Leh-
man. The couple resides in Harding.
Gordon, Bukeavich
J
ohnandDorothyCoulter, Mountain
Top, Pa., areproudtoannouncethe
engagement their daughter, Nicole
Coulter, toJoshua Sorber, sonof Gary
andJoAnnSorber, Shickshinny, Pa.
Nicoleis a1998graduateof Crest-
woodHighSchool, MountainTop, Pa.,
andearneda Bachelor of Arts degreein
financefromPennStateUniversityin
2003.
Joshua is a1994graduateof North-
west Area HighSchool, Shickshinny,
Pa., anda 2006graduateof East
StroudsburgUniversity, earninga Bach-
elor of Sciencedegreeineducation.
Theybothworkandresideinthe
area.
ThecoupleplantowedMay18, 2012,
inMountainTop, Pa.
Coulter, Sorber
B
rianAbrahamandJennifer Dreabit,
alongwiththeir families, wouldlike
toannouncetheir engagement and
upcomingmarriage.
Thebride-to-beis thedaughter of
Paul andJoAnneDreabit, Pittston.
Jennifer is thegranddaughter of Joseph
andHedyWilczewski, Warrior Run;
SophieDreabit, Plains Township; and
thelateGeorgeDreabit.
Jennifer is a 2001graduateof Seton
Catholic HighSchool andearneda
bachelors degreeinnursingfromMary-
woodUniversityin2005. Sheis employ-
edas a registerednursebyMoses Taylor
Hospital inthefamilybirthingsuites.
Theprospectivegroomis thesonof
GeorgeandDeborahAbraham, Moun-
tainTop. Brianis thegrandsonof Ge-
orgeandJoanAbrahamandAlbert and
Alma Griffin, all of Wilkes-Barre.
Brianis a1998graduateof Crestwood
HighSchool. Heis employedas a driver
for WardTransport andLogistics.
Thecouplewill exchangevows on
April 21, 2012, at SS. Peter andPaul
Church, Plains Township.
Abraham, Dreabit
M
aryElizabethPlytageandSamuel
JosephAlberola, together with
their families, announcetheir engage-
ment andupcomingwedding.
Thebride-to-beis thedaughter of
Albert Plytage, West Nanticoke, and
KatherineMalek, Gulfport, Fla. Sheis
thegranddaughter of Albert andMary
Plytage, Plymouth, andFrancis and
MaryMalek, Hanover Township.
Theprospectivegroomis thesonof
AnnmarieAlberola, HunlockCreek. He
is thegrandsonof thelateSamuel and
TessieAlberola, HunlockCreek.
MaryBethis a 2003graduateof
NanticokeArea HighSchool. Sheat-
tendedBloomsburgUniversity, where
sheearneda degreeinmedical imaging.
MaryBethworks as a radiologic tech-
nologist at Wilkes-BarreGeneral Hospi-
tal.
Samuel is a 2001graduateof Nanti-
cokeArea HighSchool. Samuel works
at Cornell IronWorks, MountainTop.
Thecouplewill exchangevows on
May19, 2012, at Exhaltationof theHoly
Cross Church, Hanover Township.
Alberola, Plytage
M
ichele Lynn Zalno and Brian
Bogdon announce their engage-
ment.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Len and Sharyn Zalno, Harrison City,
Pa.
Michele is a graduate of Penn Traf-
ford High School and earned her
bachelors degree from St. Francis
University and her Master of Busi-
ness Administration degree from
Wilkes University. She is employed
by West Chester University in the
admissions department.
The prospective groom is the son
of Joseph and Christine Bogdon,
Hunlock Creek, Pa.
He is a graduate of Lake-Lehman
High School and earned his degree
from Luzerne County Community
College. He is employed as a tech-
nician for Horizon Services.
Michele and Brian are planning an
April 14, 2012, wedding at St. Barba-
ras Church, Harrison City, Pa.
Zalno, Bogdon
J
essica Ann Cieplik and Edward
Wayne Sidlowe, together with
their families, announce their en-
gagement and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter
of David and Donna Cieplik, Dor-
rance. She is the granddaughter of
Frances Tatara, Nanticoke; the late
John Tatara; and the late Louis
and Anna Cieplik.
The prospective groom is the
son of Robert Sidlowe, Emmaus,
Pa., and Kelly Browning, Frierson,
La. He is the grandson of Dorothy
Sidlowe, Franklin, Tenn.; the late
Edward Sidlowe; and Wayne and
Charlotte Browning, Coushatta,
La.
The bride-to-be is a 2001 gradu-
ate of Crestwood High School. She
earned a Bachelor of Business
Administration degree from Tem-
ple University and is pursuing a
Master of Business Administration
degree at DeSales University in
Center Valley, Pa. She is employed
by Dun and Bradstreet in Center
Valley as a project manager.
The prospective groom is a 2002
graduate of Marple Newtown High
School, Newtown Square, Pa. He
earned a Bachelor of Science de-
gree in business administration
from Kutztown University. He is
employed by Kimberton Whole
Foods, Ottsville, Pa., as the assist-
ant store manager.
A September, 2012, wedding is
planned at the Barn at Boones
Dam in Bloomsburg. The couple
resides in Springtown, Pa., with
their two greyhounds, Gunner and
Maynard.
Sidlowe, Cieplik
D
r. Sara Dorman and Nicholas
Lauri, Kingston, together with
their families, announce their engage-
ment and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
John and Nancy Dorman, Larksville.
Sara is the granddaughter of Fred and
Martha Dorman, Swoyersville, and
the late Raymond and Elizabeth
Vanyo.
The prospective groom is the son
of Francis and Kathleen Lauri, Larks-
ville. Nicholas is the grandson of
Delphine Bienick and the late Ber-
nard Bienick, Lynwood, and the late
Francis and Theresa Lauri.
Sara is a 2002 graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School; a 2006
graduate of Kings College; and a
2010 graduate of the University of
Pennsylvania School of Veterinary
Medicine. She is employed as a veter-
inarian at Plains Animal Hospital,
Plains Township.
Nicholas is a 2002 graduate of
Wyoming Valley West High School
and a 2012 graduate of Misericordia
University. Nicholas is employed as a
therapeutic support staff member
with Community Counseling Ser-
vices, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple will exchange vows in
May, 2012.
Lauri, Dorman
A
driann Ferro and Anthony Deck-
er, together with their families,
announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
David and Patricia Harrison, Ply-
mouth, and Harry Ferro, Ashley. She
is the granddaughter of Patrick and
Lyla Stone, Plymouth, and the late
Anthony and Caroline Ferro.
Adriann is a 2003 graduate of Bish-
op OReilly High School, Kingston,
and a 2005 graduate of Luzerne
County Community College. She is
employed in the financial aid office at
Luzerne County Community College.
The prospective groom is the son
of Tony and Paula Decker, Plymouth.
He is the grandson of Eleanor Decker
and the late Frank Decker, Kingston,
and Joseph Falcone and the late Ame-
lia Falcone, Wilkes-Barre.
Anthony is a 2001 graduate of
Wyoming Valley West High School.
He earned his bachelors degree from
Kutztown University and his masters
degree in elementary education from
Bloomsburg University. He is employ-
ed by Patterson-UTI Drilling Compa-
ny.
The couple will exchange vows on
June 9, 2012, at All Saints Parish,
Plymouth.
Ferro, Decker
K
ylie Rosengrant and Eric Fisher,
together with their families,
announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Rick Rosengrant, Tunkhannock, and
Lori Hardik, Noxen.
The prospective groom is the son
of Donald Fisher and the late Laurie
Fisher, Milton, Pa.
Kylie is a 2002 graduate of Tunk-
hannock High School and a 2006
graduate of Kings College, where she
earned a bachelors degree in biology.
She also earned a masters degree in
educational development and strate-
gy from Wilkes University. Kylie is
employed at Dallas Middle School.
Eric is a 2002 graduate of Milton
High School and a 2006 graduate of
Penn State University, where he
earned a bachelors degree in electri-
cal engineering. He also earned a
masters degree in business adminis-
tration from Northeastern University.
Eric is employed at Procter & Gam-
ble in Mehoopany.
The couple will exchange vows in
the presence of family and friends in
June, 2012, at Tunkhannock United
Methodist Church.
Rosengrant, Fisher
F
rancis J. Wallace,
Plains Township,
celebrated his 90th
birthday on Jan. 13.
He was honored at a
reception with fam-
ily and friends.
Mr. Wallace is a
retired postal worker and World War
II veteran. He was active in numerous
sports, church and community events
throughout the Wyoming Valley.
Mr. Wallace was married to his
wife of 64 years, Ann, who passed
away in September of 2010.
He has four children, five grand-
children and five great-grandchildren.
Francis Wallace
celebrates 90th birthday
A
lison K. Ostrum and Francis Jude
Schappert were united in mar-
riage on June 25, 2011, at SS. Peter
and Paul Ukrainian Catholic Church,
Plymouth, by the Rev. Roman Pe-
tryshak.
The bride is the daughter of John
and Mickie Ostrum, Wilkes-Barre.
She is the granddaughter of Helene
Sirak and the late Michael Sirak and
the late John and Mary Ostrum.
The groom is the son of Jean and
Francis Jude Schappert Jr., Hanover
Township. He is the grandson of Jean
Schappert and the late Francis Jude
Schappert Sr. and Eleanor Wozniak
and the late John Wozniak.
Given in marriage by her father,
the bride chose her best friend, Katie
Guesto, as maid of honor. Brides-
maids were Ashlee Susko, Ashley
Ciavarella, Verena Austermuhl,
friends of the bride, and Larissa Ban-
non, niece of the groom. Flower girl
was McKenzie Bannon, niece of the
groom.
The groom chose his best friend,
Matthew Murphy, as best man.
Groomsmen were Matthew Mill,
Michael Lynch, Eric Balakier, friends
of the groom, and Joshua Sirak, cou-
sin of the bride. Ring bearer was
Hunter Wesolowski, friend of the
bride.
An evening cocktail hour and re-
ception were held at Sand Springs
Country Club, Drums. The bride was
honored at a shower given by her
aunt Helene Skopek at The Gallery at
Pierce Plaza, Kingston. Parents of the
groom hosted a rehearsal dinner at
Leggios Italian Restorante, Plains
Township.
The bride is a 2005 graduate of
Meyers High School and earned a
Bachelor of Science degree in educa-
tion from Misericordia University in
2009. She is employed by the Hazle-
ton Area School District, where she
teaches early intervention in Pittston.
The groom is a 2004 graduate of
Hanover Area High School and
earned a Master of Business Adminis-
tration degree in human resources
from Misericordia University in 2010.
He is employed by Kraft Foods, Ha-
nover Township.
The couple honeymooned in Ha-
waii to the islands of Maui and Oahu.
They reside in Hanover Township.
Schappert, Ostrum
A
manda Anderson and Scott Kulah
were united in marriage on Sept. 17,
2011, at Lazy Brook Park in Tunkhan-
nock. District Justice John J. Hovan
officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Roland
and Laura Anderson, Tunkhannock. She
is the granddaughter of Ralph and Joan
Anderson, Tunkhannock.
The groom is the son of Gary Kulah,
Meshoppen, and Tina Tkach, Wilkes-
Barre.
The bride was escorted down the aisle
and given in marriage by her father. She
chose her sister, Janine Anderson, as her
matron of honor. Bridesmaids were
Lauren Razawich, Heather Deminski,
Marianne Smith, Amy Dickerson and
Amy Iobst. The flower girl was Heidi
Belle Dowd, niece of the bride.
The groom chose Chris Kulah as his
best man. Groomsmen were Ben Beebe,
Mike Peters, Nathan Meals, Carl Worrell
and Shawn Hulsizer. Michael Schuster
was the ring bearer.
The bride is a 2001 graduate of Tunk-
hannock High School and earned a
Bachelor of Science in Business Admin-
istration degree from Kutztown Uni-
versity in 2005. She is employed by the
Zullo Investment Group of Wells Fargo
Advisors in Scranton.
The groom is a 2000 graduate of Elk
Lake High School and earned a bache-
lors degree in journalism from Lock
Haven University in 2005. He is employ-
ed at Procter & Gamble, Tunkhannock.
Scott and Amandas home was flooded
one week before the wedding. Despite
this catastrophe, they decided to focus
on their love for one another and pro-
ceed with the wedding.
The couple honeymooned in San
Juan, St. Thomas and Grand Turk. They
reside in Tunkhannock.
Anderson, Kulah
D
r. Michelle Lorraine Pribula and Dr.
Steven Michael Zerbe were married,
Sept. 24, 2011, at St. Daniels Lutheran
Church, Robesonia, Pa.
The bride is the daughter of Lori
Ungvarsky, Wilkes-Barre, and Thomas
Pribula, Wapwallopen.
Michelle is a graduate of James M.
Coughlin High School and Wilkes Uni-
versity, where she graduated magna
cum laude, earning a Doctor of Pharma-
cy degree. She works as a pharmacist
with the Weis Pharmacy in Lancaster.
Michelle is the granddaughter of Rose
Ungvarsky and the late Elmer Ung-
varsky, Wilkes-Barre, and Dorothy Prib-
ula and the late Thomas Pribula Sr.,
Exeter.
The groom is the son of Michael and
Susie Zerbe, Robesonia.
Steve is a graduate of Conrad-Weiser
High School and Wilkes University,
where he earned a Doctor of Pharmacy
degree. He works as a pharmacist at
Mikes Pharmacy in Myerstown.
Steve is the grandson of Vernon and
Patsy Bright and Joe and Rose Zerbe,
Robesonia.
The bride was given away in marriage
by her parents. Lauren Bachkowsky and
Jenna Strzelecki were maids of honor.
Nicole Marconi, Amy Kroll, Stacy Lyons
and Ashlee Bright were bridesmaids.
Gregory Brizek and Andrew Bright
were best men. Anthony Lee, Adam
Krupka, Andreas Chandra and Matthew
Armstrong were groomsmen.
The bride was honored with a bridal
shower given by her mother and ma-
ternal grandmother at Appletree Ter-
race, Dallas. The grooms parents hosted
a rehearsal dinner at Toscani, West
Lawn.
Following a reception at The Berk-
shire Country Club, Reading, the couple
honeymooned in Hawaii. They reside in
Wernersville, Pa., with their dog, Oscar.
Pribula, Zerbe
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 5B
O C C A S I O N S
The Times Leader allows you to
decide how your wedding notice
reads, with a few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in
Sundays People section, with
black-and-white photos, free of
charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to
edit announcements that exceed
that word count. Announcements
must be typed or submitted via
www.timesleader.com. (Click on
the "people" tab, then weddings
and follow the instructions from
there.) Submissions must include
a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We
do not run first-year anniversary
announcements or announce-
ments of weddings that took place
more than a year ago. (Wedding
photographers often can supply
you with a black-and-white proof
in advance of other album pho-
tographs.)
All other social announcements
must be typed and include a day-
time contact phone number.
Announcements of births at local
hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements
with local connections also are
accepted. Photos are only accept-
ed with baptism, dedication or
other religious-ceremony an-
nouncements but not birth an-
nouncements.
Engagement announcements
must be submitted at least one
month before the wedding date to
guarantee publication and must
include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement an-
nouncements once the wedding
has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are
published free of charge at the
10th wedding anniversary and
subsequent five-year milestones.
Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times
Leader or mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to
Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or
e-mailed to people@timeslead-
er.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
A
my Marie Buydos and David
Grabinski were united in holy
matrimony on Oct. 8, 2011, at Holy
Trinity Church, Nanticoke, by the
Rev. James R. Nash.
The bride is the daughter of Joseph
and Ellen Buydos, Alden. She is the
granddaughter of the late Anthony
and Rebecca Szychowski, Alden, and
Josephine Buydos and the late Joseph
Buydos, Korn Krest.
The groom is the son of John and
Debbie Albanese and Edward Grabin-
ski, all of Nanticoke. He is the grand-
son of Florence Tomko and the late
Edward Tomko, Hanover Township;
the late Edward and Cecelia Grabin-
ski; and Regina Albanese and the late
John Albanese, all of Nanticoke.
The bride was escorted down the
aisle by her father and given in mar-
riage by her parents. Amy chose her
sister, Kelly Roke, as her matron of
honor. Bridesmaids were Michelle
Han and Holly Curtis, cousins of the
bride, and Amber Silveri and Heather
Conrad, friends of the bride. Junior
bridesmaid was Olivia Allen, daugh-
ter of the groom. Flower girls were
Cassidy Roke and Addison Han,
nieces of the bride, and Emily Gra-
binski, niece of the groom.
David chose his brother, Edward
Grabinski, as best man. Groomsmen
were John Albanese, brother of the
groom, and Dustin Nork, David Yoka-
vonis and Jeffery Michalek, friends of
the groom. Junior groomsman was
Tyler Grabinski, nephew of the
groom. Ring bearer was Ryan Roke,
nephew of the bride.
Scripture readings were given by
Ken Han, cousin of the bride, and
Nicole Tieso, cousin of the groom.
Prayer of the Faithful was offered by
Holly Curtis, cousin of the bride.
Offertory gifts were presented by
RoseAnn Szychowski and Marie
Tronieri, aunts of the bride.
Family and friends attended a
bridal shower, hosted by the brides
mother, on Aug. 7, 2011, at the Irem
Country Club, Dallas. The grooms
parents hosted a rehearsal dinner at
the Alden Manor on the eve of the
wedding. An evening cocktail hour,
followed by a night of dinner and
dancing, was held at The Apple Tree
Terrace, Newberry Estates, Dallas.
Amy is a 1999 graduate of Greater
Nanticoke Area High School. She
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in business administration in 2005; a
masters degree in organizational
management in 2007; and a Bachelor
of Science degree in accounting in
2011, all from Misericordia Universi-
ty. She is employed as a senior prod-
uct specialist for Blue Cross of North-
eastern Pennsylvania, Wilkes-Barre.
David is a 1998 graduate of Greater
Nanticoke Area High School. He is
employed as a sales professional for
Ken Wallaces Valley Chevrolet,
Wilkes-Barre, and is the owner and
operator of Big Woodys Tree Service
and Landscaping, LLC.
The couple honeymooned in Aru-
ba. They reside at Harveys Lake.
Buydos, Grabinski
D
ante Gerald
Insalaco was
baptized on Sept. 25
at St. Frances X.
Cabrini Church,
Wyoming. The Rev.
Vinny Dang perform-
ed the ceremony.
Dante Gerald is the son of Kimberly
and Carmen Insalaco Jr., Dallas.
He is the grandson of Lois and Rick
Connors, Wyoming; Paul Brooks; Hard-
ing, and the late Gerri and Carmen
Insalaco Sr.
Dante has an older brother Carmen
Anthony.
Godparents are Cari Ann and Jamie
Machulsky, Shavertown.
A dinner was held at Leggios in his
honor.
Dante G. Insalaco baptized
Nesbitt Womens and Childrens Center
at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
Owens, Beth Ann and Stephen Harris,
Hanover Township, a daughter, Jan. 3.
Stout, Nancy K. and Westley, Forty Fort, a
daughter, Jan. 3.
Pavlick, Kimberly and David Williams,
Edwardsville, a daughter, Jan. 4.
May, Kimberly and Edward Nafus, Nanti-
coke, a son, Jan. 4.
Stettinger, Krystal and Charles J. Smith,
Pittston, a daughter, Jan. 4.
Kovitch, Carrie and James, Wyoming, a
son, Jan. 5.
Martin, Susie and Jay Endler, Hanover
Township, a son, Jan. 5.
Kyttle, Sheila and Robert, Exeter, a daugh-
ter, Jan. 6.
Rasmus, Dandra and John Bieble Jr.,
Nanticoke, a daughter, Jan. 6.
Laughter, Heather and Ryan, Swoyersville,
a son, Jan. 7.
Fisher, Dionne and James, Wilkes-Barre, a
daughter, Jan. 7.
Bronson, Richele and Todd Roe, Hunlock
Creek, a son, Jan. 8.
Brosius, Bridgett and Matthew Miko-
laichik, Dallas, a son, Jan. 8.
Kaminski, Andrea and George Margitish,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, Jan. 10.
Shea, Katie and Jeffrey Stebbins, Wilkes-
Barre, a son, Jan. 1 1.
Holena, Gina, Nanticoke, a daughter, Jan.
1 1.
Umbra, Jacqueline and Joseph, Wilkes-
Barre, a son, Jan. 1 1.
Menzies, Jennifer and Zachary Kokinda,
Hazleton, twin son and daughter, Jan. 12.
Mondulick, Stacey and Joshua Burns,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Jan. 14.
Kostelnik, Kimberly and Christopher,
Shavertown, a son, Jan. 15.
Phillips, Maria and Isaiah Locklear, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, Jan. 15.
ODonnell, Jennifer and Brian, Dallas, a
daughter, Jan. 15.
Selner, Janette and Brandon Weaver,
Larksville, a daughter, Jan. 16.
Shone, Stephanie and Thomas, Shaver-
town, a son, Jan. 17.
BIRTHS
Albion College, Albion, Mich.
Paige Narins, Kingston.
Bucknell University, Lewisburg
Kate Bowen, Kingston; Edward Dal Santo,
Kingston; Robert Duffy, Kingston; Leigh
Hillman, Dallas; McKenzie Kelly, Dallas;
Matthew Lamore, Mountain Top; Tho-
mas Lisofsky, Wilkes-Barre; Rachael
Litchman, Harveys Lake; Jeffrey Ma-
drak, Meshoppen; Michael Mattei, Pitt-
ston; Hannah Roman, Mountain Top;
Amanda Ruppert, Mountain Top; Kirby
Thomas, Tunkhannock; Amanda Thomp-
son, Dallas; Elizabeth Yale, Drums.
Curry College, Milton, Mass.
Carley Bonacci, Sugarloaf, and Yasmeen
Rifai, Dallas.
Duke University, Durham, N.C.
Rebecca Anne Richards, Hanover Town-
ship.
Mount St. Marys University,
Emmitsburg, Md.
Diane Bojarcik, Swoyersville; Allison Spen-
cer, Dallas; Jacob Nichols, Tunkhannock.
Quinnipiac University, Hamden, Conn.
Lauren Zimniski, Dallas.
Thaddeus Stevens College of
Technology, Lancaster
Andrew Dunn, Mountain Top, and Michael
Kimmel, Freeland.
OUT-OF-TOWN DEANS LISTS
Lackawanna College Police Academy,
Scranton
Sara B. Chmielewski, Wilkes-Barre; Yeeny
L. Knollmayr, Pittston; Donald T. Macrae
III, Duryea; Raul Ortiz, Wilkes-Barre; and
Bernard R. Posten, Exeter.
Lebanon Valley College, Annville
Brian Kerns, Kingston, Bachelor of Music
degree in music recording technology.
Lycoming College, Williamsport
Samantha Clasen, Benton, Bachelor of
Arts degree in Spanish and psychology,
cum laude.
OUT-OF-TOWN GRADUATES
TheWilkes-BarreGeneral Nurses Alumni enjoyedaholiday
partyonDec. 13at theRiver Grille, Plains Township. Forty-four
alumni, guestsandfriends attendedtheevent. Entertainment
was providedbyDamienthemagician. Thegroupalsodonated
toys totheU.S. MarineCorps Toys For Tots campaign. At the
toypresentation, fromleft, areNancyDwyer, president, Nurses
Alumni; PatriciaSimon; SandyCasarella; VirginiaOrlowski;
Corporal Weiss, MarineCorp; BarbaraMcAfee; BettieAnn
Morgan; andCorporal Bowman, MarineCorps.
W-B General Nurses Alumni hold holiday party
Delta Kappa Gamma, Alpha Ro chapter, held its annual
holiday party at Appletree Terrace, Newberry Estates, Dallas.
An induction of new members took place after the buffet.
Some of the participants, fromleft, first row: KimSocash,
co-president; Jill Yurko, new member; Julie Schraub, new
member; and Shirley Breymeier, co-president. Second row:
Maryann Jesse, corresponding secretary; Karen Mertz, trea-
surer; Sue Young, sponsor; Sharon Hartshorne, sponsor; Deb
Monahan, vice president; and Louise Roberts, recording
secretary. Also attending was Laurie Ayre, sponsor.
Alpha Ro chapter celebrates holiday with party
GiannaDeGraba, Dallas, asophomoreat PennStateWilkes-
BarrereceivedtheIreneThomas Memorial Awardsponsored
byArts at Hayfield, anonprofit, communityarts support orga-
nizationbasedat PennStateWilkes-Barre. Theawardis given
toanacademicallyaccomplishedstudent whohas demon-
stratedcommitment tothearts. DeGrabais aDeans List stu-
dent whoseartisticinterestsincludedance, theater andper-
formingarts. Sheis co-founder of Dallas HighSchools first
danceteamandis astudent at theJoanHarris Center for the
GiftedandTalented, whereshestudies ballet, tapandjazz. She
has wonnumerous danceawards fromStars ontheRise
competitions inTannersvilleandNewJersey. DeGrabahas
performedat theLittleTheater of Wilkes-Barrefor sixyears
andhas beenstudyingvocal for sixyears withHollyMajor. She
is majoringincommunications andis amember of theFour
Seasons ClubandTHON. At theawardpresentation, fromleft:
MaryReddy, co-chair, IreneThomas Memorial Award; Linda
Major, chair, IreneThomas Memorial Award; GiannaDeGraba;
LisaDeGraba, mother; andJoeDeGraba, father.
Penn State W-B student earns arts award
Wilkes-Barre Academy recently received a 2011 charitable
grant from The Baltimore Life Companies. The grant was
available to a nonprofit company to enhance programming.
The school will use the money to expand their Smartboard
technology programs. At the check presentation, from left:
Janice Huntzinger, director of education, Wilkes-Barre
Academy; Debbie Cooper, director, Small Wonders; Linda
Somoga, director, Small Wonders/Back Mountain; Angie
Rodkey, representative, The Baltimore Life Companies; and
Ambria Kramer, assistant director, Wilkes-Barre Academy.
Academy to use grant for technology programs
All eight members of the Misericordia University December 2011 medical imaging graduating class recently passed the
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists national certification examination in radiography to maintain the programs
100-percent pass rate. Members of the graduating class in medical imaging, from left, first row: Angelo Luongo, Dunmore;
Kristen Gedon, Lock Haven; Mellisa Makos, Nanticoke; and James Polson, Pittsgrove, N.J. Second row: Megan Notaro,
McAdoo; Brittney Kelly, Franklin, N.J.; and Kindra White, Scott Township. Third row: Paula Pate-Schloder, associate profes-
sor; Lynn Blazaskie, clinical instructor; Dr. Elaine Halesey, professor and department chairperson; Lorie Zelna, associate
professor; Gina Capitano, assistant professor; and Adele Philippedes, Montrose.
Imaging students from Misericordia pass certification exam
PPL Electric Utilities recently sponsored a Take Action
At Home Community Forum at Heights-Murray Elementary
School. The program assists families to think, talk and take
action about energy. The forum helped students, parents
and the community to learn how to save money on utility
bills and have an energy efficient home. Some of the par-
ticipants, from left: Kevin Sickle, science coordinator;
Rhonda Lambert and Tiffany Foland, PPL Utilities; Robert
Makaravage, assistant principal; and Hal Gabriel, principal.
PPL holds forum to urge energy consciousness
Solomon/Plains Junior High School commemorated the
birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King by having students read
the biography of Dr. King and recite poetry exemplifying
the many accomplishments, goals and ideals of his life.
Some of the participants in the school-wide event, from
left, are Zachary Banaszek; Mindy Heffron, student council
adviser and facilitator of the celebration; Haley Dumont;
Belinda Tabron, assistant principal; John Woloski, principal;
and Wayne Waslasky, staff member.
Students learn about Martin Luther King
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Packages Include:
Wedding Toast & Bar Package
Custom Wedding Cake
25% off Wedding Invitations
Table Linens and Napkins
Illuminated, Elevated Bridal Table
Overnight Accommodations for the Bridal Couple
Discounted Hotel Rooms for Guests
Complete with Complimentary Breakfast
Referrals for Wedding Vendors
Easy Payment Plans
And So Much More
GENETTI
Weddings
For the Bride
that wants
it all...
Your Dream Wedding
Comes Complete With:
~ Formal White Glove Service
~ Professional Wedding Coordinator to guide
your entire affair
~ Professional Piano Player for Cocktail Hour
~ Sheer White Linen Curtains, Draping
& Uplighting
~ Lush Floral Centerpieces for Each Guest Table
~ White or Ivory Chair Covers with choice of
Colored Sash
~ Champagne Toast
~ Premium Bar Package w/ Martini Bar,
Handcrafted Beer & Signature Drinks
~ Fondant or Buttercream Wedding Cake
~ A Complimentary Hotel Room for Bride
and Groom
~ Discount Hotel Rooms for Out Of Town
Guests in our newly renovated rooms
~ Coat Check Attendant Available,
BathroomAttendant & Valet Parking
Attendants Available Upon Request
~ Photo Opportunities with Rolls Royce-
Please request in advance
www.oysterwedding.com
Call Lindsay at 570-820-8505
For An Appointment Today
www.genetti.com
Call Lindsay at 570-820-8505 For An Appointment Today
He Asked...You Said Yes
Let Us Handle
The Rest
The upscale and modern wedding youve
always dreamed of with the name
you can trust.
Genettis & Oyster Restaurant Proudly Present
NEPAs Platinum Wedding
We Do Elegant and Affordable
Weddings Every Bride Deserves
the wedding of her dreams. With
our complete packages, exceptional
service and newly renovated hotel, we
will truly make your wedding an
exceptional affair.
Join us on
Monday, January 23rd 10A.M. to 8P.M.
Buy any one footlong sub, & get one free
with the purchase of a 21 oz. drink!
Free sub is of equal or lesser value.
Premium subs Excluded
2230 San Souci PKWY (Near Gerritys).
Hanover, PA18706
570-606-3795
Open Monday Friday 7am-10pm Saturday 8am-10pm Sunday 8am-9pm
Grand Opening!
Come
celebrate
with us!
7
3
5
1
5
1
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 7B
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
The LEO Club at Wilkes-Barre Academy collected toys during the month of December to present to the
local U.S. Marine Corps for its Toys For Tots program. Some of the participants, from left, are Zoe Stepan-
ski, Victoria Stack, Joshua Schrepfer, Corporal Weiss, Gabby Serratore, Sergeant Pepin, Nick James, Ian
Barchock and Samantha Stashik.
W-B Academy students help with Toys for Tots effort
Seven MMI Preparatory School students were recognized as the Best of the Best during an assembly
program held at the school. The purpose of the program is to provide each student with the opportunity
to explore varied subject areas not typically studied in the classroom. Each student in grades 7 through
12 makes at least one appearance in an assembly program each school year. Students in grades eight, 10
and 12 make their presentations in the first semester of the school year and students in grades seven,
nine and 11 will complete their assemblies in the spring semester. Best of the Best winners, from left:
Andrew Haber, grade 8; Sarah Jamack, grade 10; Charlie Karchner, grade 10; James Harley Gliem, grade
12, Overall Best; Will Bower, grade 8; Antonia Diener, grade 12; and Robert James Kupsho, grade 10.
Best of the Best students recognized at MMI
Luzerne County Community
College dental assisting students
recently elected officers for the
SADAA to serve for the 2011-12
academic year. New officers,
from left: Bernae Evans, Blooms-
burg, student representative;
Helen Bunnell, Millville, student
representative; Alexandra Marti-
nez, Bloomsburg, president; and
Donna Lepkoski, adviser, SADDA,
and professor, dental assisting.
Student American Dental
Assisting Association
officers elected at LCCC
The Wyoming Valley Montessori School recently received a donation of $3,000 from Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs as a sponsorship for the annual Hearts for Montessori Casino Night to be held on March
3 at the F.M. Kirby Center. The gala supports financial aid for students to attend Montessori. For more
information on the event, contact Lynn Klein, admissions director, at lynn@wvms.org or 570-288-3708.
At the check presentation, from left: Leslie LauBach; Lynn Klein; Bobby Soper, president and chief exec-
utive officer, Mohegan Sun; Robyn Jones; Dennis Puhalla, head of school; Frank Barletta; Jeff Kile; Joe
Werner and Kawel LauBach.
Mohegan Sun makes donation to Montessori School
Members of the Bear Creek/Buck Township Lions Club recently distributed Hickory Farm gift boxes
and doughnuts to disabled veterans at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Some of
the participants, from left, are Gail Andrews, Al Sofranko, Ted Carl, Frank Jones, John Mack, Betsy
Kresge, Willard Kresge and John Yencha, president, Lions Club.
Bear Creek/Buck Township Lions bring gifts to veterans
The Irem Shrine Legion of Honor and the Irem Shrine Clown Unit recently held their annual Christ-
mas party. Donations were made to the U.S. Marine Corps Toys For Tots campaign at the party. King-
ston Lodge 395 F&M also participated in the project. At the presentation, from left, are: Marine Staff
Sgt. Nelson; Brian Hospodar, second vice commander, Irem LOH; William Hearst, commander, Irem
LOH; Mark D. Metler, potentate, Irem Shrine; James Austin, first vice commander, Irem LOH; Eugene R.
Lazarus II, PC, adj., Irem LOH; and Marine Staff Sgt. Vasquez.
Shriners host Christmas party, support Toys for Tots
A team of seventh- and eighth-
grade students from St. Jude
School recently participated in
the Young Scholars Competition
at Scranton Preparatory School.
Students from18 public and
private schools competed in the
event. Preliminary rounds con-
sisted of questions on math,
literature, history, current events,
grammar, spelling, science and
general knowledge. The top nine
teams advanced to the third
round and the top three teams
from that round advanced to the
finals. The St. Jude team was
awarded third place in that com-
petition. From left, are team
members Christian Koshinski,
Tom Williams, Erica Stuccio and
Julia Foust and Principal Jeanne
Rossi.
St. Jude students take third
place at Scholars Competition
The Greater Hazleton Health Alliance (Hazleton General Hospital, Hazleton Health and Wellness
Center and Alliance Medical Group) recently held a non-perishable food drive to assist Catholic Social
Services of Hazleton in replenishing food at its community food bank. Some of the participants, from
left: Veeta Polchin, Hazleton General Hospital; Megan Caputo, Alliance Medical Group; Jenni Hinderer,
Hazleton Health and Wellness Center; Rich Saullo, United Way of Greater Hazleton Inc.; and Paul
Kowalczyk, Catholic Social Services of Hazleton.
Health Alliances food drive assists Catholic Social Services of Hazelton
The Wilkes-Barre Verizon Telecom Pioneers 7 recently presented checks to the Max and Lorraine
Foundation and Wyoming Valley Habitat for Humanity. The Pioneers is a nonprofit organization of
retired and active members of Verizon Communications. At the check presentation, from left: Mary
Ann Bellanca, Pioneer; Kate Button, Max and Lorraine Foundation; Nancy Karpovich, president, Tele-
com Pioneers; Dawn Hapeman, administrator, Wyoming Valley Habitat for Humanity; and Jean Mi-
kush, Pioneer.
Telecom Pioneers support Habitat, Max and Lorraine Foundation
Members of the Dallas Kiwanis
Club and the Dallas and Lake-
Lehman Key Clubs recently par-
ticipated in the Salvation Armys
annual red kettle Christmas fund
drive. The club members manned
a kettle and rang bells at Tho-
mas Food Markets in Dallas and
Shavertown. Some of the partici-
pants, from left: Susan Dobash,
Dallas Kiwanis; Ashley Grayson,
Dallas Key Club; and Jordan
Nichol, Dallas Key Club.
Dallas Kiwanis members
help with kettle drive
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
7
3
4
7
3
9
7
2
7
9
3
2
7
3
3
7
1
1
7
2
0
4
9
1
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 9B
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
To ensure accurate publi-
cation, your information must
be typed or computer-generat-
ed. Include your childs name,
age and birthday, parents,
grandparents and great-grand-
parents names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
their ages.
Dont forget to include a day-
time contact phone number.
We cannot return photos
submitted for publication in
community news, including
birthday photos, occasions
photos and all publicity photos.
Please do not submit precious
or original professional pho-
tographs that require return
because such photos can be-
come damaged, or occasionally
lost, in the production process.
Send to: Times Leader Birth-
days, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18711-0250.
GUIDELINES
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Ryan Scott Castle, son of Bernie
and Michele Castle, Parsons, is
celebrating his 13th birthday
today, Jan. 22. Ryan is a grand-
son of Elaine Snyder, Parsons;
the late Edward Snyder; Agnes
Castle, Sugar Notch; and the late
Bernard Castle. He has a brother,
Kyle, 8.
Ryan S. Castle
Tyler Montgomery Reeves, son of
Ronald and Katie-Ann Reeves,
Germany, is celebrating his third
birthday today, Jan. 22. Tyler is a
grandson of Travis Watson, Ply-
mouth; Karen Watson, Ashley;
Arthur Reeves, Nicholson; and
Betsy Reeves, Missouri. He is a
great-grandson of Bessie Dough-
ton, Edwardsville; Betsy Goodrich,
North Carolina; Helen Reeves,
Frackville; and Barbara and Ri-
chard Gale, Georgia. Tyler has a
sister, Zoey, 6.
Tyler M. Reeves
Aubrey Florence and Mia Grace
Sperrazza, twin daughters of Alex
and Jennifer Davies Sperrazza,
are celebrating their fourth birth-
days today, Jan. 21. Mia and Au-
brey are the granddaughters of
Joseph and Carolyn Sperrazza,
Bear Creek, and David and Della
Davies, Wilkes-Barre. They are the
great-granddaughters of Florence
Jones, Wilkes-Barre. Aubrey and
Mia have a brother, Samuel, 6
months.
Aubrey F. and
Mia G. Sperrazza
Brandon Joseph Bienias, son of
Carl and Jane Bienias, Hanover
Township, is celebrating his sev-
enth birthday today, Jan. 22.
Brandon is a grandson of Joseph
and Dorothy Namey, Sugar Notch;
Marian Bienias, Hanover Township;
and the late Carl Bienias. He has
two brothers, Carl Bienias and
Peter Blasi, and two sisters, Holly
Bienias and Catherine Blasi.
Brandon J. Bienias
Briauna Robinson, daughter of
Lloyd Robinson and Wendy Rob-
inson, is celebrating her 12th birth-
day today, Jan. 22. Briauna has
three sisters, Jessica, 22, McKayla,
19, and Tawnee, 16.
Briauna Robinson
LUZERNECOUNTY: Cathol-
ic schools will celebrate Cathol-
ic Schools Week Jan. 29-Feb. 5
with a variety of activities, in-
cluding open houses for pro-
spective students.
The Catholic Schools Week
theme, Faith, Academics, Ser-
vice, emphasizes an education
that is academically excellent
and spiritually sound.
The Diocese of Scranton
sponsors Holy Redeemer High
School, Wilkes-Barre, and ele-
mentary schools Good Shep-
herd Academy, Kingston; Holy
Family Academy, Hazleton; Ho-
ly Rosary School, Duryea; St.
Jude School, Mountain Top; St.
Nicholas-St. Mary School,
Wilkes-Barre; and Wyoming Ar-
ea Catholic, Exeter.
All schools are planning in-
school activities throughout the
week and the elementary
schools areholdingopenhouses
to give prospective students an
opportunity to tour the schools,
meet teachers and learn how to
register. The elementary
schools offer classes for stu-
dents in pre-school through
eighth grade.
Open houses scheduled for
Jan. 29 include Good Shepherd,
1:30-3p.m.; St. Jude, 1-3p.m.; St.
Nicholas-St. Mary, 1-3 p.m.; and
Wyoming Area Catholic, noon-2
p.m. Holy Family Academy will
hold its open house 5-7 p.m. Feb
3. Holy Rosary School, still in a
temporary location due to Sep-
tembers flooding, will hold an
open house at a later date.
Families are encouraged to
register by March 2 to ensure
placement. Tuition assistance
applications are also available.
Catholic schools
plan activities
Jan. 29-Feb. 5
Today
MOOSIC: Polish Womens Alliance
of America, District XIV, councils
40 and 44, 2 p.m. at Grandes
Family Restaurant, Birney Ave-
nue. All PWAA members are
asked to attend to make plans
for the District XIV Bal Polonaise
scheduled for April 14.
NANTICOKE: West Side Play-
ground Association of Nanticoke,
2 p.m. in the Club Room. Election
of officers, member solicitation
and annual dues collection are
on the agenda. Food and re-
freshments will be served. Wom-
en of the Ladies Auxiliary are
invited.
Monday
PLYMOUTH: The Plymouth Cam-
brian Club, 7 p.m. at the First
Welsh Baptist Church. Megan
Landmesser will preside. All
members are encouraged to
attend and new members are
welcome. The board meeting will
begin at 6:30 p.m. and all offi-
cers are asked to be present.
Plans for the May Tea and the
Labor Day Welsh Festival will be
discussed. Members are asked to
bring a small dessert to share
for refreshment.
MEETINGS
Members of the Pennsylvania State Police Forensic Science Unit stationed at Troop P, Wyoming,
recently conducted an evidence-gathering class for the students in the Law Enforcement/Police Sci-
ence program at West Side Career and Technology Center. The members also critiqued the students
recent crime scene investigations. Participants, from left, first row, are Robert Arnold, Allisah Fuches,
Heather Kennedy, Chris Osborn and Shawn Davis. Second row: Emily Mansilla, Lyndsey Fuches, Sajion
Edmonds, Melissa Troy and Rebecca Green. Third row: Dylan Williams, Cassie Hivish, Dave Eyland, Cor-
poral Chris Wilson, Trooper James Shubzda, Jia Torres, Mark Davis and Daniel Pierce.
Law Enforcement/Police Science students learn about gathering evidence
Wilkes-Barre Academy recently announced the High Honor Roll for the first quarter of the 2011-2012
school year. Members of the High Honor Roll, from left, first row, are Reed Karaska, Anna Rose Breznay,
Olivia Zablocky, Gabrielle Serratore, Jenna Poor, Megan Purcell, Bailey Flannery, Billy Weiss, Oliver
Dunstone and Olivia Evans. Second row: Siddhi Nadkarni, Michela Torbik, Anna Weiss, Olivia Greer,
Angela Malinovitch, Samarth Desai, Josh Schrepfer, Paul Jason and Dominic Marchese. Third row:
Victoria Atkinson, Katelyn Vols, Adam Rinehimer, Matthew Parsons, Julia Insalaco, Alyssa Reed, Philip
Webb, Biagio DApollonio, Mary Strunk, Ian Barchock and Raymond Wychock. Also on the High Honor
Roll are Josh Villarosa and Nicholas James.
Students achieve high honors at W-B Academy
C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
C A L L 714-6460 T O D AY!
w w w .pin n aclerehabilitation .n et
M ostIn su ran cesA ccepted .
M ostIn su ran cesD o N O T R equ ire A R eferral
P inna cle R eh a b ilita tion A s s ocia tes
520 Third A venu e K ings to n
K . B rid get B arno PT
K evin M . B a rno , M P T K . B ridgetB a rno , P T
Sha ro n M a rra nca , M P T H a l G la tz, M P T M a ria H a ll, P TA
D O YO U H AV E K N E E A R T H R IT IS?
W E D O N T N E E D M IR A C L E S!
Allofourtherap istshave over
15 yearsexp erience treating yourp roblem s
B e able to w alk an d clim b stairspain free!
O u r experthan ds-on treatm en tw illim prove you r
m obility,in crease you r stren gth an d decrease you r pain . K evin M . B arno M PT
K . B rid get B arno PT
JANNEY MONTGOMERY SCOTT LLC
PROFESSIONAL MONEY MANAGEMENT
kkleinman@janney.com | www.KeithRKleinman.com
Janney Montgomery Scott LLC | Member NYSE FINRA SIPC
KEITH R. KLEINMAN
First Vice President / Wealth Management
570.283.8140 | 800.643.5021
270 Pierce Street, Ste 108 | Kingston, PA 18704
570.963.9203 | 800.638.4417
72 Glenmaura Natl Blvd | Scranton, PA 18507
JANNEY HAS BEEN SERVING INVESTORS
FOR NEARLY 180 YEARS.
JANNEY HOLDS THE SECOND OLDEST MEMBERSHIP
ON THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.
EXCHANGE TRADED FUNDS | BONDS
MUTUAL FUNDS | CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT | EQUITIES
INVESTOR ALERT!
Have You Lost Money Investing in Stocks, Mutual
Funds, Variable Annuities or Other Investments?
YOU MAY BE ABLE TO GET
YOUR MONEY BACK!!!
Its not too late to recoup
your losses from 2008!!!
Many individuals have lost money in their investment
or retirement accounts because of nancial advisor
misconduct and negligence. If you lost money after
purchasing stocks, a variable annuity, mutual funds,
or other investments call to discuss your rights.
CONTACT US NOWAT THE
LAW OFFICE OF ADAM GREEN
215-462-3330
Stop PayingHighTax Prep Fees
50%OFFLast Years TAXPREPFees
Stop PayingHighTax Prep Fees
50%OFFLast Years TAXPREPFees
I will prepare your tax returns for 1/2 the price you paid last year!
Individual and small businesses welcome.
E-ling included/20 + years experience.
*Offer only for rst time clients. Minimum charge $60.00.
Daves
tax service
open 7 days a week
596 N. Main Street, W-B
570-822-5005
The 60th annual Pearl Harbor observance dinner and meeting was recently held at the Kingston American Legion Post 395. President
Frank Long gave a presentation on Pearl Harbor and a special thank you was given to the Ladies Auxiliary and Carol Kolc for their donations
and volunteerism. At the dinner, from left, first row, are Johnny Larkin, Frank Steinberg, Phillip Allabaugh, Frances Moreck, Bernie Shinko,
Frank Long, Marty Flannery, Paul Martin, Mike Favata, Barbara Mangan and Louis Wiernusz. Second row: Bill Barnes, Leo Kaslavage, John
Hettes, Sid Williams, Chuck Paulick, Walter Barteld, Richard Adams, Charles Bloom, Tom OLeary, John Schultz, George Handzo, Dean Brown
and Tom OLeary III.
Pearl Harbor anniversary observed at Kingston Legion Post
The Luzerne County Constables Association Chapter 40 recently held its annual Oath of Office ceremony in the Luzerne County Cour-
thouse rotunda. The Oath of Office was administered by Luzerne County Judge of Common Pleas William H. Amesbury. At the ceremony,
from left, first row: Al Cumberland, Nanticoke; Ken Holley, Wilkes-Barre; Larry Karis, Kingston; Joe Walters, Nanticoke; Judge Amesbury; Ed
Holleran, Pittston; Fred Pierantoni, Dupont; and Ron Kile, Nanticoke. Second row: Dan Marinelli, Plains Township; Manny Rodriguez, Allen-
town; Jim Martin, Wilkes-Barre; Gina Marsicano, Wilkes-Barre; Joe Yosh, Larksville; Pat Martin, Wilkes-Barre; Jack Rudeski, Hanover Town-
ship; Rose Krakowski, Ashley; Wes Deaton, Mountain Top; John Roskos, Hazleton; Glen Hosko, Pittston; Sal Alaimo, Yatesville; George Hutter,
Bear Creek; and Tom Collis, Wilkes-Barre. Third row: Harry Vivian, Dallas; Steve Wychilla, Plains Township; William Dickson, Edwardsville; Chris
Capasso, Freeland; Dwight Nichols, Mountain Top; Phil Leco, Wilkes-Barre; Paul Brooks, Harding; James Steer, Duryea; and John Jones,
Wilkes-Barre.
Luzerne County Constables Association Chapter 40 holds oath of office ceremony
The Ladies Auxiliary from the V.F.W. post in Dupont recently
made a donation to the Dupont Lions Club. At the check presenta-
tion, from left, are Bart Brek, president, Dupont Lions Club, and
Peggy Best, Ladies Auxiliary.
Ladies Auxiliary donates to Dupont Lions Club
Members of the U.S. Coast Guard Veterans Association recently held their annual Christmas party at the Irem Country Club. Any Coast
Guard veteran interested in more information should contact Neil Morrison at 570-288-6817. At the party, from left, first row, Frank Moran.
Second row: Nick Punko, Bill Shaffer, Link Lindquest, George Fetchko and Wil Toole. Third row: Chester Kulesa, Tom Betsko, Jack Sidorek, Bob
Youngblood, Tom Brody, Bill Corcoran, Jim Law and Ed Domzalski. Fourth row: Ed Johnson, Ray Sobota, Neil Morrison, Walter Nestorick,
Bruce Semans, Ron Scovell and Joe Keglovits.
Irem Country Club site of U.S. Coast Guard Veterans Association Christmas party
The GFWC-West Side recently met for a holiday gathering at Can-
teen 900, 900 Rutter Avenue, Forty Fort. Club members donated
new, unwrapped toys to the U.S. Marine Corps Toys For Tots cam-
paign. Some of the participants with the toys, from left: Jackie Cor-
bett, club president; Diedre Kaminski, event co-chairwoman; and
Marge Gushka, event co-chairwoman.
GFWC-West Side donate items to Toys for Tots
On Jan. 8, the Sunday Church School children of St. John the
Baptist Orthodox Church, Edwardsville, performed at the Annual
Yolka. They acted in a play to St. Herman of Alaska and recited
poems and sang Christmas carols. Ivan and Vladimir Gingo played
Christmas songs on their clarinet and saxophone and St. Nicholas
the Wonderworker made a surprise visit and gave everyone candy.
First row, from left: Ryan Dho, Grace Browne, Max Gingo, and Adam
Dho. Second row: Vladimir Gingo and James Browne. Third row:
Michael Browne, Ivan Gingo, Kyle Puterbaugh, and Sarah Browne.
Sunday School children perform at Yolka
Dallas area businesses recently provided holiday gifts to resi-
dents at the Meadows Nursing Center. Businesses included Hart-
man Insurance Company, Back Mountain Chiropractic Center, Na-
has and Donahue Orthodontics and Mary Kay Beauty. At the center,
from left, first row, are residents Gertrude Stull and Ruth Searfoss.
Second row: Patricia Besermin, independent beauty consultant,
Mary Kay, and Nancy Space.
Businesses provide gifts to Meadows residents
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 11B
P E O P L E
O ffering Q u ality I n Perso nal C are
M ead ow s C om plex 200 L ak e Street D allas 675-9336
Th e M eado w s M ano r Th e M eado w s M ano r
E.O.E.
2
4
0
3
5
3
NEED A NEW ROOF?
GILROY CONSTRUCTION
829-0239
Call Now For Free Estimates!
We offer the BEST Prices in Town!
We ALSO DO FLAT & RUBBER ROOFS
NO PAYMENT UNTIL
JOB IS 100%COMPLETE
LICENSED & INSURED
Ofce Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Fridays Drive-Thru and Pittston Branch Open Until 6pm Sat 9am-Noon
Wyoming Ofce
377 Wyoming Ave.
Wyoming
Kingston Ofce
570 Market St.
Kingston
Hanover Twp. Ofce
1460 Sans Souci Pkwy.
Hanover Twp.
Pittston Branch
(Inside Quinns Market)
401 Kennedy Blvd.
Pittston
RECEIVE EXTRA
ENTRYTICKETS BY
OPENINGA
SAVINGS ACCOUNT
SUPERSONIC ACCOUNT
CD ACCOUNT
IRA ACCOUNT
OR
APPLY FOR A
VEHICLE LOAN
MORTGAGE
Drawing Feb. 3rd, 2012
220011222 NNEWWWW MMOOODDEEELLSSSS
UUPP TTOO 100066%% FFINNNAANNCCIINNG (IINNNCLUUUDDEEESS TTTAAXX AAANNDD TTAAGGGSS)
220000066 ttoo 220011 UUUSSEEEDD MMMMOODDDEELLLSS
NEW MEMBERS
OPENING AN ACCOUNT
DURING THIS
TIME WILL PICK
A FOOTBALL
AND WIN UP TO $500
* Some Restrictions Apply
AAAAAA
llll
lllll
MMMM
eeee
mmmmmmm
bbbbb
eeeee
rrrrr
ssssss
EEEEEE
nnnn
ttttt
eeeee
rrrr
TTT
ooooo
WWWWWWW
iiii
nnnnnn
AAAAA
BBBBBB
iiii
gggggg
GGGGG
aaa
mmmmm
eeeee
PPPPP
aaaaaa
rrrrr
tttt
yyyyy
OOOOOO
rrrr
JJJ
eee
rrrr
sssss
eeeee
yyyyy
!!!!!!
Celebrating 36 Years in Business
198 S. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre
822-2168
DINE IN OR PICK UP ONLY
2 Large Pizzas
1 Dozen Wings
$
24
99
Play Off Special
TODAYS SPECIALS
$
4
99
Dinner
Ziti or Spaghetti
Served with bread
and soup or salad
Lots of Pasta Nite
start the next 21-day cycle
again.
The cycles were repeatedthree
more times. Carey was admitted
to the hospital during one stint
for three days as a result of feel-
ing ill from the chemotherapy.
Carey was grateful for the sup-
port he received during his time
in the hospital. He said that his
brother, David Jr., and sisters,
Cathy and Connie, were con-
stantly at the hospital.
When they were not at his bed-
side, two of his friends, Stephen
Kolbeck and John Stoss, would
manage the Market Street Tipsy
Turtle for Ken while Jack Walker
ran the Swoyersville location.
Carey said his best friends
since grade school, Jerry Cegelka
and Angelo Alfano, would fall
asleep at his bedside.
The two of them spent time
away fromwork to visit me. They
are dear friends.
Carey ended the 84-day treat-
ment as a new person ready to
get on with life. He had beaten
the disease.
Helping others
After his treatment, life contin-
ued to improve for Carey.
On March 31, 2008 Careys
birthday they opened a sec-
ond Tipsy Turtle on Owens
Street in Swoyersville. The part-
ners then renovated the Market
Street location to match the
Owens Street Pub.
In 2007 he met his future wife,
Kari, who was working at the
Tipsy Turtle. Yes, its Kari Ca-
rey, Ken said with a grin.
Carey said he became very sen-
sitive to the plights of so many
people who were being treated at
the same time. He spoke of two
people who lost their fights dur-
ing that time.
One person who died was my
friends aunt. That was hard, Ca-
rey said. But I think what was
hardest was watching my father,
David Sr., go through this with
me after what happened to my
mother.
Carey said the experience of
battling cancer gave him a per-
spective that led him back to the
doctor who treated him.
Dr. David Greenwald along
with Dr. Bruce Saidman and the
staff at Medical Oncology Associ-
ates in Kingston had set up a pro-
gram called the Patient Prescrip-
tion Assistance Fund that helps
patients pay for pain and nausea
FORWARD
Continued from Page 1B
See FORWARD, Page 12B
C M Y K
PAGE 12B SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
P E O P L E
2
7
3
5
7
1
Frank A. Berman, D.D.S.
-.:. --: ,/-.
517 Pierce Street, Pierce Plaza, Kingston
Phone 570-718-6000
www.frankberman.com
Frank A. Berman D.D.S.
InLroducing 6HonLhSniles-a conservaLive, less expensive,
and highly eecLive way using clear braces Lo genLly
sLraighLen LeeLh in an average Line o only 6 nonLhs
FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION
AlLernaLive LreaLnenL or Sleep Apnea aLienLs who are
C A inLoleranL wiLh I0A Approved 0ral Appliance
AHAZIhC JeeLh 8leaching ResulLs
CosneLic and Ceneral 0enLisLry or Lhe LnLire Ianily
Snile Hakeovers
CerLiied Lunineers 0enLisL
bniLed Concordia rovider.
0elLa 0enLal rovider
HosL oLher insurances accepLed
www.aetna.com
For a free quote call
David Piavis
Licensed Insurance Agent
570-868-6775
davidpiavis@insphereis.com
Aetna Advantage Plans for individuals, families and the Self-
Employed are underwritten by AetnaLife Insurance Company (Aetna)
directly and/or through an out-of-state blanket tract and Aetna Health
Inc.In some states, individuals may qualify as a business group of one
and may be eligible for guaranteed issue, small group health plans.
Think you may be
overpaying for health
insurance?
We can help you fnd out!
Aetna Advantage Plans for Individuals,
Families and the Self-Employed
Whether you have:
Just left your previous employers group plan
Picked up coverage through COBRA, or
Simply became exasperated with your
current insurers rates and service
We can help you fnd an Aetna health
insurance plan that meets your health care
needs and your budget.
We think youre going to like Aetnas value.
Let us help you fnd the right mix of
coverage and cost for you and your family.
As a health insurance broker, its our business
to know whats out there in the marketplace.
We do the research and can steer you to plans
that meet your needs much like a Human
Resources department does for its company.
Aetna Advantage Plans offers a broad range
of plan types and premium payments. We
can give you the help you need so you can
choose the one thats best for your situation.
Valuable features available:
Coverage for gynecology visits,
mammograms and child immuzinations
No referrals needed to visit specialists for
covered services
Nationwide network of doctors and hospitals
Flexible Family coverage options, including
child-only coverage
Find out more
Give us a call. We can help you get an insurance
quote (price estimate) and compare plans.
610 Nanticoke Street, Hanover Twp.
825-9720
LUCAS FARMS
Open 7 Days a Week 9am-5pm
10lb. POTATOES
2
99
BAG
Stove & Feed
Corn
By the Bag or Ton!
ALL APPLES ON SALE
89

LB.
2lb. COOKING ONIONS
69

BAG
89

BUNCH
CELERY
STRAWBERRIES
2
49
LB.
4lb. ORANGES
2
50
BAG
LEMONS
4/
99

CABBAGE
29

LB.
Ginos is Your Headquarters for
Childrens Shoes!
We carry a complete line of
Stride Rite Pedipeds & More
plus all Name Brand sneakers
Mens, Womens and Childrens Shoes & Sneakers in all Colors and Styles
GINOS SHOE STORE
Route 309, Dallas, PA - Call 675-2029
Open 7 Days a Week
Also in Mountaintop 474-6051
$
5.00 OFF
Any Pair of Baby Shoes
with this ad only - exp. 2-29-12
Celebrating 36 Years in Business
198 S. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre
822-2168
DINE IN OR PICK UP ONLY
TODAYS SPECIAL
$
11
95
over choice of pasta
served with bread
and soup or salad
Dinner
Veal Picata
FOR A LIMITED TIME
UNLIMITED SOUP, SALAD & BREADSTICKS
FRIDAYS & SUNDAYS
11 AM TILL 5PM
ANY OF OUR HOMEMADE SOUPS
Plus:
Garden Fresh House Salad or Caesar Salad
& Oven Warmed Bread Sticks
or:
Fish & Chips, Shrimp & Chips, Clam Strips
& Chips or Chicken & Chips
$
6
99
only
WATERFRONT
304 KENNEDY BLVD.
PITTSTON
654-6883
GIANT POUND BRAZILIAN
LOBSTER TAIL DINNER
$
19.99
Served w/ French Fries & Cole Slaw
7
3
4
6
1
0
sional moment? Every day is
my proudest moment. The cre-
ation of the Patient Prescription
Assistance Fund at Medical On-
cology Associates is a huge part
of every day. The fund was start-
ed eight years ago so that can-
cer patients couldpurchasepain
and nausea medications, anti-
biotics and possibly chemother-
apy drugs as well. The funds are
offered by patients, past pa-
tients, patients families, friends
and our staff. Ken Carey, who
owns the Tipsy Turtle Restau-
rants in Swoyersville and Jen-
kins Township, is the leader of
the pack with the events he has
organizedtoraisemoneyfor the
fund.
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
John Gordon writes about area
people for the Meet feature. Reach
him at 970-7229.
medications as well as antibiotics
and possibly chemotherapy
drugs. The fund also helps pa-
tients travel to the destinations
needed to receive treatment.
Dr. Greenwald cut out the
middle man. He started the fund
in 2005 and every cent goes to-
ward the patients, Carey said.
When I knew he was doing this
it motivated me to raise money
for the fund.
Carey decided to form his own
charity called
Make Life
Count. He orga-
nized softball
games, raffles,
an annual golf
tournament
and a variety of
other benefits
to raise money
for cancer pa-
tients. During
the last seven
years his char-
ity has raised
over $127,000 that goes com-
pletely to the assistance fund.
He has been the major con-
tributor as his efforts have been
incredible, said Greenwald. Its
a wonderful feeling to be able to
tell a patient not to worry and
that we can get the drugs or help
you need.
Greenwald praised Carey for
raising the money with friends,
co-employees and family.
Its different than just writing
out a check, Greenwald said.
He makes it happen. He works
hard at running the events to
raise money.
For Carey, the challenge to
save his life has defined how he
has lived since.
How can I not be grateful for
the experience I went through?
he said. It brought me to where I
am today.
FORWARD
Continued from Page 11B
Carey said the
experience of
battling can-
cer gave him
a perspective
that led him
back to the
doctor who
treated him.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 13B
OVER
20 0
VEH ICL ES
AVAIL AB L E
290 M U N D Y S TR EET, W IL K ES - B AR R E AT TH E W YOM IN G VAL L EY M AL L CAL L 30 1- CAR S
B U Y B U Y
N ATIO N W ID E N ATIO N W ID E
A N D S AV E A N D S AV E
TH O U S A N D S ! TH O U S A N D S !
n a tion w id e c a rs a le s .n e t
CH ECK OU T OU R FU L L IN VEN TOR Y
OF B OTH L OCATION S AT
M on d a y- Frid a y 9a m - 8 p m S a tu rd a y 9a m - 5p m
*PRICES + TAX & TAGS. ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
OFFERS END 1/31/12. **UP TO 63 MONTHS WITH BANK APPROVAL.
Ou r
Volu m e
S a ve s You
$$$
Eve ryd a y!
FIN AN CIN G
AS L OW AS
1.9
%
AP R
YO UR SAT ISFAC T IO N IS O UR G UARANT EE. YO UR SAT ISFAC T IO N IS O UR G UARANT EE.
#18446, Alloys, P W , P L , K eyless
N OW
$
23,98 9
*
N OW
$
18 ,58 8
*
#18437, P . W in d ows, P . L ocks,
CD , RearAir
N OW
$
16,542
*
2 011 JEEP LIBERTY
SP ORT 4 X 4
2 009 DODGE
GRAND CARAV AN
#18441, Alloys, 3rd Row,
RearAir, 4x4, Au to
N OW
$
26,78 5
*
2 011 NISSAN
P ATHFINDER SV
#18391, V6, Alloys,
P . W in d ows, K eylessEn try #18439, Alloys, P W , P L , CD , K eyless
N OW
$
19,638
*
2 011 M ITSUBISHI
ENDEAV OR AW D
#18414, Alloys, CD , K eyless, P W , P L
N OW
$
12,350
*
2 010 M ITSUBISHI
GALANT ES
#18432, L eather, S u n roof, H. S eats, S yn c S tereo
N OW
$
21,98 6
*
2 010 FORD FLEX
SEL
Alloys, K eylessEn try, P . S eat, All New
D esign , 4 To Choose F rom
N OW
$
25,48 8
*
2 011 JEEP GRAND
CHEROK EEAW D
AM ERICAS NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE AM ERICAS NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
TH ER E S N O W O R R I ES W I TH N ATI O N W I D E!
TH ER E S N O W O R R I ES W I TH N ATI O N W I D E! T H ER E S N O W O R R I ES W I T H N A T I O N W I D E!
VEH ICL ES
IN AL L
P R ICE
R AN GES
2 010 FORD F150
CREW CAB 4 X 4
P W , P L , Au to, Air
CAR S
TR U CK S
CON VER TIB L ES
S U VS
VAN S
2 006 FORD
FREESTAR SE
#18436A, P W , P L , CD , 7 P assen ger,
ONL Y 36,000 M IL ES !!!
N OW
$
9,525
*
M ANAGERS SPECIAL!
#18404, Au to, P . W in d ows, P . L ocks, K eylessEn try
2 010 TOYOTA COROLLA S
$
13,993
*
Alloys, K eylessEn try, Rem ain d erofF actory
W arran ty, 4 To Choose F rom
2 011 HYUNDAISANTA FEAW D
$
20 ,955
*
#18438, L eather, Alloys, RearS p oiler, P W , P L
2 010 DODGEAV ENGER R/T
$
14,68 8
*
#18491, P W , P L , CD , Au to, K eyless
2 011 DODGE AV ENGER EX P RESS
$
13,992
*
#18458, L eather, S u n roof, S yn c, H. S eats
2 011 FORD ESCAP E LIM ITED
$
23,998
*
#18371, S u n roof, K eyless, P W , P L , CD
2 010 HYUNDAIELANTRA GLS
$
12,98 8
*
#18421, Au to, P . W in d ows,
P . L ocks, CD , K eylessEn try
2 010 V OLK SW AGEN JETTA
$
14,98 7
*
#18344, Au to, Alloys, P . W in d ows, P . L ocks
2 010 CHEV Y COBALT LT
$
12,998
*
#18418, Au to, P . W in d ows, K eylessEn try, CD
2 010 K IA FORTE EX
$
13,390
*
#18734, P W , P L , CD , K eyless
2 010 HYUNDAISONATA GLS
$
13,792
*
#18470, AW D , P W , P L , CD , Au to
2 011 TOYOTA RAV 4
$
20 ,965
*
#18443, 7 P assen ger, P wrRearL iftgate
2 011 DODGE DURANGO CREW 4 X 4
$
27,914
*
#18383, L eather, M oon roof, Alloys, P . S eat, Au to, On ly29K M iles
2 008 HONDA ACCORD EX L
$
17,8 99
*
YOU CANT M ISSW ITH P RICES LIK ETHIS!
2 011 CHEV Y
EQUINOX LTAW D
#18240, L ow M iles, Alloys, P owerTop , CD , Au tom atic
2 010 CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONV ERTIBLETOURING
$
15,765
*
P W , P W , CD , Au to, K eyless
2 011 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS
#18420, P W , P L , CD , Au to, K eyless
2 010 NISSAN V ERSA S
$
11,8 8 8
*
Au to, P . W in d ows, P . L ocks,
2 To Choose F rom
2 010 HONDA CIV IC LX SEDAN
$
14,975
*
#18461, 4x4, Au to, Alloys, P W , P L
2 010 NISSAN X TERRA
$
19,955
*
S P ECIAL FL EET P U R CH AS E
N OW
$
15,999
*
10 TO CHOOSE FROM
N OW
$
24,755
*
2 011 FORD TAURUS
SEL -BLACK /BLACK
#18332, Alloys, P W , P L , CD , S yn c
N OW
$
19,8 75
*
**
C M Y K
PAGE 14B SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 15B
F E A T U R E S
Attending college here is
Only $84 per credit hour
Its the best value for a
quality education.
A Savings that will undeniably
Make it happen....
Get the credit you deserve
in only 12 weeks at the
Wilkes-Barre Corporate
Learning Center.
Take classes and easily
transfer credits to 4-year
colleges & universities.
CCollege
1.800.377.LCCC | LUZERNE.edu | FOLLOW US ON
Wilkes-Barre
Area
Register nowfor
Spring classes.
Courses lists and
application are
online at luzerne.edu
Classes begin February 6th
CORPORATE LEARNING CENTER 570.822.6156

Bu yingGoldJewelry
D ia m onds,Pla tinu m ,
Pu reS ilver,S terling,
Indu stria l & Coin S ilver
A ntiqu eJewelry(Brok en OK)
Dental Gold,Gold Filled
Eyeglasses,Etc.
K IN G T U T S
G O L D R E PA IR H U T
824-4150
322 N. PENN A VE. W -B
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7
2
9
7
3
1
7
3
0
9
6
8
50% O F F
H O UR S : M o n. -S a t. 10:00 a m -5:00 pm
63 4 M a rke tS tre e t Kings to n, PA 18 704 ( 570) 28 7-2777
W inter Sh oes,
Cloth ing &
A ccessories
DALLAS: Misericordia Uni-
versity will hold an informa-
tion session for students in-
terested in learning about the
new Physician Assistant pro-
gram at 6 p.m. Thursday in
Room 206 of the Hafey-
McCormick Science Building.
The program is now accept-
ing applications from graduate
students looking to enter the
physician assistant field who
already hold a bachelors de-
gree and meet other entrance
requirements. The five-year
combined Bachelor of Science
in Medical Science and Master
of Science in Physician Assist-
ant Studies is also open to
freshmen undergraduate stu-
dents as a 3+2-year course of
study. The program is offered
through the College of Arts
and Sciences and was recently
approved by the Pennsylvania
Department of Education.
Classes will begin for the fall
2012 semester.
Faculty members and repre-
sentatives from the financial
aid department will be avail-
able to answer questions
about the program and admis-
sions requirements.
Reservations are encouraged
but not required. For informa-
tion, call Darci Brown at 570-
674-3061, or email her at
dbrown@misericordia.edu.
Additional information can be
found at www.misericor-
dia.edu/pa.
FREELAND: MMI Prepara-
tory School is holding a Vis-
itation Night 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Families can learn more about
an MMI education for stu-
dents in grades six through
eight in its middle school and
nine through 12 in the prep
school.
The event will include pre-
sentations by members of the
administration and tours of
the school. Information about
the schools curriculum, fi-
nancial aid and extracurricular
activities also will be avail-
able. Light refreshments will
be served.
Registration is required and
participants should arrive
before 6 p.m. on Tuesday. To
register, or for more informa-
tion, contact Aprilaurie Whit-
ley, director of admissions and
financial aid, at 570-636-1108,
or visit www.mmiprep.org.
LEHMAN TWP.: A four-
student team from the Penn
State Wilkes-Barre Business
Department will travel to
State College in March to
compete in the Second Annual
Smeal College of Business
Case Competition presented
by Kohls.
Led by instructor of busi-
ness, Terry Clemente, the
Penn State Wilkes-Barre
Wilkes-Bears team will be
represented by sophomore
Adam Supey, Dallas, account-
ing; junior Amy Scafella, Dal-
las, business administration;
sophomore Justin Seliga, Nan-
ticoke, accounting; and sopho-
more Ceili Jones, Wilkes-
Barre, business administra-
tion.
The Smeal Case Competi-
tion is an undergraduate com-
petition that challenges stu-
dents knowledge, problem-
solving abilities and teamwork
skills to solve realistic busi-
ness problems in a demanding
24-hour format. This year, 16
teams have been chosen from
a pool of 40 team applications
to compete at the event. Four
finalists will vie for the Smeal
Case Cup and a $5,000 shop-
ping spree at Kohls.
WEST PITTSTON: Valley
Lodge No. 499, Free & Accept-
ed Masons, West Pittston, will
present up to three $500
scholarships in memory of
Brother Casimir J. Dylo. Kaz
was a Past Master of Valley
Lodge and was well known for
his leadership abilities, in-
struction in Masonic Educa-
tion, service to country and
role as a loving father and
husband.
The scholarships are avail-
able to senior students at
Wyoming Area and Pittston
Area High Schools. Students
must have a family member
with Masonic affiliation. A
third $500 scholarship may
also be awarded to a child or
grandchild of a member of
Valley Lodge No. 499.
Students who qualify and
are interested in applying
should contact the guidance
offices at Wyoming Area or
Pittston Area High Schools.
Lodge members should con-
tact the lodge secretary.
Deadline for applications is
March 30.
IN BRIEF
Installation ceremonies for the 2012 officers and board members of the Wilkes-Barre Barbershop
Harmony Society were recently held at R & D Memories, Hanover Township. Upcoming programs
include Singing Valentines 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 14. For more information call 709-3716, 696-3385 or
287-2476. The chorus is rehearsing for its 60th annual concert on April 21 at Wyoming Area High
School, Exeter. The group maintains an open membership for men who enjoy singing a cappella.
Rehearsals are held 7 p.m. Monday in the Brooks Estate Community Center, Wesley Village Campus,
Pittston. Newly installed officers and guests, from left, first row: Phillip Brown, program vice presi-
dent, and Barbara Brown, Shavertown; Lou Volpetti, president, and Millie Volpetti, Pittston; Marian
Petro, Trucksville; William A. Zdancewicz, marketing and public relations vice president, Edwardsville.
Second row: Ralph Gillespie, music and performance vice president, Wilkes-Barre; Jarrett Roan, chap-
ter development vice president, Shavertown; Deborah Cargill, Harrisburg; Drew Smith, immediate
past president, and Mary Smith, West Pittston; and Philip R. Tuhy, treasurer, Wilkes-Barre.
W-B Barbershop Harmony Society installs officers, board members
The Reginas of Kings College recently held its annual Christmas
party. Entertainment was provided by the Drew Smith Barbershop
Quartet. Gifts were collected for the Gabriel House. Reginas are
asked to bring their penny auction donations to the meeting at 7
p.m. Feb. 8 in the Campus Ministry Center Building at the corner of
Jackson and North Franklin streets, Wilkes-Barre. Regina officers
at the party, from left, first row: Eileen Eustice, president; the Rev.
Charles Kociolek, moderator; Regina Hrichison, corresponding
secretary; and Maureen Finnerty, vice president. Second row: Carol
McNulty, treasurer; Gloria Flynn, recording secretary; and Dolores
McGeehan, financial secretary. Also in attendance, was Peggy
James, ways and means.
Barbershop Quartet performs for Reginas
The Dallas High School
Guidance Department recently
featured Career Spotlight
Speakers Diane and Steve
Thompson. The Thompsons
spoke to the students about
the engineering profession. At
the presentation, from left, are
student Jesse Adams and
Diane and Steve Thompson.
Dallas High students
learn about the
engineering profession
Catherine Fahey, a sophomore operatic performance major at
the University of Connecticut and a resident of Nanticoke, recently
performed in a Christmas concert at St. Adalberts Church in Glen
Lyon. She was accompanied by Donna Repotski Walters on the
church organ. Fahey sang a number of Christmas pieces followed
by a sing-a-long. Dr. Cailin Manson, one of Faheys professors, also
performed a vocal piece. The Newport Township Community Orga-
nization sponsored the concert and provided refreshments in the
church hall after the event. Some of the participants, from left:
Fahey; Tom Kashatus, president, Newport Township Community
Organization; and Heidi Selecky Jarecki, member, Newport Town-
ship Community Organization and event organizer.
Operatic performance student gives concert
The Sister Regina Kelly Memorial Garden at Misericordia University
in Dallas recently received an award fromthe Pennsylvania Horticul-
tural Society. The award is based on plant variety, design, use of space
and horticultural practices. The garden at Misericordia features plants
mentioned in Shakespeares works and is a setting for study and rest.
The garden has been adopted by the Back Mountain Bloomers Gar-
den Club as their community project. They tend the garden fromApril
to November. Drew Becher, president of The Pennsylvania Horticultu-
ral Society, presented the award to representatives of the Back Moun-
tain Bloomers and Misericordia University at the Society headquar-
ters in Philadelphia. The representatives fromthe Sister Regina Kelly
Garden were also among those who were honored at a reception
hosted by Pennsylvanias First Lady, Susan Corbett, to pay tribute to
community efforts to keep Pennsylvania beautiful. At the award pre-
sentation, fromleft, first row: Dr. Agnes Cardoni, originator of the
project; Barbara Soyka; Joanne Bittner, Back Mountain Bloomers;
Barbara Merdiushev, director of major gifts and planned giving, Miser-
icordia University. Second row: Becher.
Misericordia garden earns horticulture award
C M Y K
PAGE 16B SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
7
2
4
7
6
4
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012
timesleader.com
T
hey didnt quite understand what
they were watching, didnt know
when to cheer, didnt realize the
magnitude of the moment.
All Wilkes-Barre/Scranton fans were
sure about was they loved it when this
curious sport of hockey first came to
town.
That was 1,000 games ago.
Ever since then, its been a hockey
town.
Through the years, its been pretty
well-known throughout the league just
how successful its been, Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton Penguins sniper Colin
McDonald said. Theres just so much
tradition here. Im proud to be part of
this.
This was Steve Barrouks vision.
Hes the hopeless dreamer who was
sure hockey would work here when he
served as president of the Wilkes-Barre
Chamber of Commerce back in the
1990s.
I spent time in Pittsburgh, which is
a blue-collar town, Barrouk, now
semi-retired, said on a Friday night
when the franchise celebrated its long-
evity. This is a blue-collar town. We
like hard-working guys who are phys-
ical and dont mind getting rough.
It was a rough sell for awhile, this
idea to bring an unfamiliar sport into
an area that didnt even have an arena
to host it.
A referendum to build one was voted
down by the tax-paying public. Our
fearless leaders built one anyway.
They were snubbed by the New York
Rangers while trying to pitch the possi-
bility of landing an AHL franchise. So
they landed the top minor league affil-
iate of the Pittsburgh Penguins.
Similar to the teams the Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton Penguins puts on
home ice, the franchises founders
never stopped trying.
Until the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Penguins played to a packed house in
their home opener on Nov. 13, 1999.
I was excited, said Dennis Bonvie,
the big name and big enforcer on that
first Wilkes-Barre/Scranton team. I
said, This has the potential to be
something. You got a buzz about it.
Most of the buzzing was in Jeff Bar-
retts head.
Rough first night
Hes the former team president and
current CEO of the SWB Penguins who
watched in horror as traffic jammed up
on Interstate 81, 500 fans bought tick-
ets to seats that werent available, Bon-
vie was booted from the game minutes
in and the Zamboni broke down.
It was a bit of a cluster, Barrett
now says with a laugh. Its was every-
ones first event. People had no idea
what they were getting. People didnt
know the game.
They were cheering for icing and
offside (calls).
But the applause never stopped.
After nine consecutive playoff ap-
pearances and three Calder Cup Final
berths, area fans remain fervent over
their Penguins.
So much of it was a psychological
boost, said Kevin Blaum, a former
Pennsylvania state representative who
helped make a push for the first puck
drop in Northeastern Pennsylvania.
The excitement surrounding the
team hasnt slipped much. Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton is currently 10th over-
all among the 30 AHL teams in the
leagues attendance standings and
stands fourth in the 15-team Eastern
Conference, averaging 5,533 fans.
One of the things that makes
Wilkes-Barre a great place is the tradi-
tion and history and culture thats
here, current WBS Penguins coach
John Hynes said.
Its become a way of life in North-
eastern Pennsylvania developed over
1,000 games. But it really started right
with the first one.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Dream going
strong 1,000
games later
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
the geographic separation, these
franchises have quite a history
with each other.
You knowthere are a
lot of memories, former
Giants quarterback Phil
Simms said of the rival-
ry. They went from
maybe the greatest to
the worst in lots of ways.
The games were awe-
some.
It could shape up as an awe-
some weekend. Certainly an in-
triguing one.
NewEngland (14-3) hasnt won
mores defense.
Howjuicy.
Theyve got a lot of guys over
there that are very
explosive, said Reed,
the Ravens star safe-
ty. Obviously, they
score a lot of points,
and weve all seen
that. Its going to be
an all-day affair for
our defense.
The other championship affair
tonight is at Candlestick Park,
where the NewYork Giants and
San Francisco 49ers have played
some memorable games, regular
season and postseason. Despite
No complaining about these
championship matchups: prolific
offense vs. stingy defense, or old
foes renewing a storied rivalry.
Whichever suits your prefer-
ence, the NFL has it this weekend.
When the NewEngland Patriots
host the Baltimore Ravens this
afternoon for the AFCtitle, four
players who have come to repre-
sent the highest levels of achieve-
ment will be on each side of the
ball. TomBrady, seeking a fifth
start in a Super Bowl, and Wes
Welker on NewEnglands offense,
Ray Lewis and Ed Reed on Balti-
THE ROAD TO SUPER BOWL XLVI
BALTIMORE
at NEWENGLAND
TV: 3 p.m. CBS, WYOU-22
OPENING LINE: Patriots
by 7
1
2
LAST MEETING: Patriots
beat Ravens 23-20 OT, Oct.
17, 2010
N.Y. GIANTS
at SAN FRANCISCO
TV: 6:30 p.m. FOX-56
OPENING LINE: 49ers by 1
LAST MEETING: 49ers
beat Giants 27-20, Nov. 13,
2011
Classic NFL
AP PHOTOS
Quarterback TomBrady is trying to advance to his fifth Super Bowl with the Patriots, but New England
faces a tough Baltimore defense in the AFC Championship Game.
Baltimore signal-caller Joe Flacco will attempt to pace the Ravens offense past New England and into
Super Bowl XLVI. Its his teams stingy D that will be the focus of this afternoons contest.
San Francisco QB Alex Smith led the 49ers to a stunning win over the New Orleans Saints last weekend
and has his teamfacing the Giants for the first time in the playoffs since after the 2002 season.
Eli Manning and the Giants are trying to reach the Super Bowl for the first time since knocking off the
Patriots in Super Bowl XLII. They will have to get past the San Francisco 49ers first.
An intriguing day of games awaits
By BARRY WILNER
AP Pro Football Writer
See CLASSIC, Page 8C
WILKES-BARRE If Round 2
andaboxingreferencemight be
appropriate is like Round1that
was played Saturday night, then
get ready for another rumble
next month.
Blood, a head bandage and
some jawing and shoving after
the final bell, er buzzer.
And this was
basketball, the
game to decide
the Wyoming
Valley Confer-
ence Division III
boys first-half ti-
tle to be exact,
where Meyers
outlasted its city rival GAR54-48
to get the crown.
I cant wait, said Meyers for-
wardRasheedMoore, whohadto
change his jersey and have his
head wrapped after suffering a
bloody gash over his right eye in
the third quarter. Scratches, bat-
tle wounds, but Ill be fine andthe
team is looking forward to it.
For the record, the next meet-
ing is Feb. 17 at GAR. Also for the
record, Meyers finished 7-0 in the
first-half season and improved to
13-2 overall. GARfinished6-1and
suffered its first loss to drop to
14-1.
As the teams lined up for the
postgame handshake, GARs Sha-
liek Powell and Meyers Fabian
Smith exchanged some heated
words. Then Powell said some-
thing to Meyers Eugene Lewis,
H S B OY S B A S K E T B A L L
Round 1,
division
goes to
Mohawks
Intense battle between city
rivals sees Meyers hold off
late charge by Grenadiers.
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
See MEYERS, Page 6C
54
MEYERS
48
GAR
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Jack
Cooley scored 17 points and
grabbed 10 rebounds Saturday
nightasNotreDameupsetNo.1Sy-
racuse 67-58 and
handed the Or-
ange their first
loss after 20
straight victo-
ries.
Fans stormed
the court after
the Irishs rous-
ingvictory. It was
the eighth time
Notre Dame has
beaten a No. 1
team that ties
for fourth-most
all-time, with
North Carolina
having the most
with12.
The Orange
(20-1, 7-1) played without starting
centerFabMelo, whodidnotmake
the trip and will not play Monday
against Cincinnati.
Without Melointhe middle, the
6-foot-9, 248-pound Cooley was a
C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
Irish can
top-ranked
Orange
Notre Dame picks up fourth
all-time win versus a No. 1
team in the country.
By RICK GANO
AP Sports Writer
67
NOTRE DAME
58
SYRACUSE
See IRISH, Page 10C
MO R E I N S I D E
NFC: Giants, 49ers
evoke echoes of
1990. 8C
AFC: Offense vs.
defense for
Ravens, Pats. 9C
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S C O R E B O A R D
CAMPS
Electric City Baseball & Softball
Academy Winter Hitting League
for baseball and softball players
will be held at Connell Park begin-
ning on Feb. 5. Each session meets
for four consecutive Sundays. Cost
is $125 per player. For more in-
formation, call 878-8483 or visit
www.electriccitybaseball.com.
LEAGUES
Dupont Girls Softball is starting a
new rec league. ASA softball, no
boundary restrictions, open to all
girls ages 7-17, teams or towns
interested in joining a local rec
league. Minimal local travel pos-
sible. For more information call
Bob at 570-881-8744.
MEETINGS
GAR Soccer Booster Club will be
holding a meeting Monday Jan. 23
at 7 p.m. at Mags Halftime Pub on
Moyallen Street in Wilkes-Barre.
Wyoming Valley West Wrestling
Booster Club will hold its meeting
Monday Jan. 23 at 7:30 p.m. at the
middle school. Horses for the night
at the races on Saturday Jan. 28
can be dropped off at this time. All
parents are encouraged to attend.
The Crestwood Football Booster
Club will hold its next meeting on
Thursday Feb. 2 at 7 p.m. at Kings
Restaurante. Any questions, please
call Melanie at 606-4223.
REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS
Kingston/Forty Fort Little League
will hold registrations for all base-
ball and softball divisions on Tues-
day, Jan. 24 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
at the Kingston VFW, across the
street from Thomas Market. A
copy of a birth certificate for all
new players and copies of three
current proofs of residency are
required. Interested managers and
coaches should bring a copy of a
drivers license and must apply at
this registration. Visit
www.eteamz.com/kbsi for regis-
tration and medical release forms,
fees, and fundraising information.
For any additional questions, call
331-4817 or 714-4035.
Maximum Impact Sports Training
will be having spring softball travel
team tryouts for ages 12, 14 and 16
today, Jan. 28 and Feb. 4 from 3-5
p.m. Those looking to register
must call 822-1134.
Moosic Mets Baseball will be holding
winter tryouts late in January or
early February summer/fall teams.
Online registration is now being
taken for ages 8 and up. For more
information and to register online,
visit www.moosicmets.net.
Mountain Top Area Little League
will be holding registrations for
both baseball and softball on
Saturday, Jan 28 from10 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., Feb. 4 from10 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., Feb. 16 from 5:30 p.m.
to 7 p.m. and Feb. 25 from1 p.m. to
3:30 p.m. All registrations will take
place at the Crestwood High
School. Baseball and softball
programs for boys and girls ages 6
through 16 and participants must
turn 6 by April 30. For additional
dates, fees or information, call
Terry at 823-7949 or visit
www.mountaintoparealittleleague-
.com.
Northeast Bearcats U18 College
Showcase Team is looking for a
couple players to complete their
roster of 10-11 players for summer
college showcase exposure events.
For more information and/or a
private tryout, call Mark at 704-
7603.
Pittston Township Little League will
hold registrations for the up-
coming 2012 season on the follow-
ing dates: Jan. 24, 26, 31, and Feb.
2. Registration will take place at
the Pittston Township Municipal
Building from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. each
day. Fee is $50 per player and $75
per family. Little League Divisions
include: Little League, Girls Soft-
ball, and Junior/Senior Little
League. All new players must
provide a copy of birth certificate
and proof of residency. T-Ball
players must be age 5 by May 1.
Questions can be directed to Art at
570-635-6996.
Plymouth Little League will be
holding signups TODAY from 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday Feb. 4
from1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Ply-
mouth Boro Building, Saturday
Feb. 18 from1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and
Saturday Feb. 25 from1 p.m. to 3
p.m. at Plymouth Hose Co. #1,
Gaylord Ave. A copy of birth certif-
icate and copies of three current
proofs of residency must be
brought as these are required.
Registration fees are $35 per
player or $50 per family. For more
information please contact Mike
Spece at 570-328-4612.
Wyoming Valley Vipers Travel
Softball Organization is looking
for a few more girls for its 10 and
under team. Pitching is a plus.
Contact Doug at 570-240-6893 or
Ed at 570-417-1119.
Valley Regional Girls Softball
League is holding registrations for
girls who are between the ages of
5 and 18 as of Jan. 1 who want to
play recreational softball. Regis-
trations are underway for the 7U,
10U, 13U and 18U divisions. For
registration forms, contact John
Podlesney at 570-233-4520 or
e-mail jpodlesney@yahoo.com.
Returning players should be re-
ceiving a registration form via
e-mail. Registration fee is $50 for
one girl with a discount for a
second from the same family.
There are no fundraisers. All
practices and games are held at
the Freedom Park softball complex
in Drums.
Plains Little League will be holding
registration for players 4 years of
age and older at the Plains Amei-
can Legion. Dates and times are as
follows: Wednesday Feb. 1, 6-8 p.m.;
Sunday Feb. 12, 1-3 p.m. Interested
volunteers/coaches must have
their drivers license/photo ID at
registration. Kill Saturday
Hanover Little League will be hold-
ing registration for the 2012 sea-
son on Jan. 31 from 6-8 p.m., Feb.
13 from 6-8 p.m. and Feb. 25 from
10 a.m. until 12 p.m. in the cafeteria
at the Hanover Area High School.
All children residing in Warrior
Run, Sugar Notch and Hanover
Twp., excluding Preston and New-
town, ages 4-16 as of April 30, 2012
are eligible to play. Registration
costs are $45 per player (4-12) or
$75 per family of two or more.
Cost for Junior/Senior League
ages (13-16) is $65 per player. All
new players are required to bring a
copy of their birth certificate for
age verification purposes. Any
questions, e-mail hanovera-
reall@yahoo.com.
UPCOMING EVENTS
Crestwood Comets Football Ban-
quet will be held Sunday Jan. 29
from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Best
Western Genetti Hotel and Confer-
ence Center at 77 East Market St.
in Wilkes-Barre in the Empress
Embassy Ballroom.
Misericordia Baseball will host a hot
stove session Friday Feb. 24, from
7-9 p.m. Hitting and pitching pre-
sentations followed by Q&A and
open discussion. Light refresh-
ments provided. All are welcome;
RSVP by 2/22 to abennett@miser-
icordia.edu.
The Lady Patriot Basketball Boost-
er Club is having a Parent &
Friends Night Out at the Red Mill
on Friday Jan. 27 from 6-8 p.m.
The team coaches will be the guest
bartenders. There will be chances
to win gift baskets, a 50/50 raffle,
and tickets will be sold to win a
32-inch flat screen. Tickets for the
TV are $5 each or 3 for $10.
Hanover Area Quarterback Club will
be hosting their end of year ban-
quet on Sunday Jan. 29 from 5-8
p.m. at the high school cafeteria.
Reservations must be made by
Jan. 27. For more information,
please call Sharon at 510-9190.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
NFL
Favorite Points Underdog
AFC Championship
PATRIOTS 7 Ravens
NFC Championship
49ERS 2 Giants
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
Celtics NL WIZARDS
CLIPPERS NL Raptors
HEAT [9] Bucks
NETS 5.5 Bobcats
LAKERS 5.5 Pacers
[]-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a va-
riety of reasons, with the prime factor being an
injury. Whenagameis insideacircle, thereis limited
wagering. The line could move a fewpoints in either
direction, depending on the severity (probable,
questionable, doubtful, out) of the injury.
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
MIAMI-FLORIDA 3.5 NC State
INDIANA 15 Penn St
ILLINOIS PK Wisconsin
DEPAUL PK S Florida
YOUNGSTOWN
ST
2.5 Wisc-Green Bay
CLEVELAND ST 5 Wisconsin-Milw
MINNESOTA 5.5 Northwestern
VIRGINIA 8 Virginia Tech
NORTHERN IOWA 8.5 Drake
LOYOLA-MD 12.5 St. Peters
Fairfield 9.5 MARIST
NC-GREENS-
BORO
5 Samford
RIDER 10.5 Canisius
MANHATTAN 10 Niagara
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
PENGUINS -$165/
+$145
Capitals
Bruins -$125/
+$105
FLYERS
DUCKS -$155/
+$135
Avalanche
Home Teams in Capital Letters
AME RI C A S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the Heat - Bucks circle is for Miami guard
Dwyane Wade (doubtful).
NO LINE REPORT: On the NBA board, there is no line on the Celtics - Wizards
game due to Boston guard Rajon Rondo (questionable); there is no line on the
Clippers - Raptors game due to Los Angeles guard Chris Paul (questionable).
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
HS SWIMMING
Ray Wills Invitational at Wyoming Valley West, 11
a.m.
MONDAY, JAN. 23
BOYS BASKETBALL
Scranton Prep at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at North Pocono, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at West Scranton, 7:15 p.m.
WVC Division I First-Half Title Game
Hazleton Area vs. Wyoming Valley West, 7 p.m. at
Berwick
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Abington Heights at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15
p.m.
Lake-Lehman at Susquehanna, 7 p.m.
Berwick at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m.
Mid Valley at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Cedar Crest at Wilkes, 6 p.m.
PSU Hazleton at Valley Forge, 8 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSU Hazleton at Valley Forge, 6 p.m.
Luzerne CCC at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
Misericordia at Marywood, 7 p.m.
Cedar Crest at Wilkes, 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, JAN 24
BOYS BASKETBALL
Dallas at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Pittston Area at Scranton, 7:15 p.m.
HS BOWLING
Hazleton Area at Berwick, 3 p.m.
HS RIFLE
Berwick at East Stroudsburg North, 4 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Wyoming Valley West at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Berwick at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Lake Lehman, 4:30 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Hanover Area, 4:30 p.m.
Valley View at Delaware Valley, 4:30 p.m.
Elk Lake/Wallenpaupack at West Scranton, 4:30
p.m.
Scranton at Tunkhannock, 4:30 p.m.
Abington Heights at Scranton Prep, 7 p.m.
HS WRESTLING (all matches 7 p.m.)
Berwick at Pittston Area
Coughlin at Crestwood
Wyoming Area at Nanticoke
Honesdale at Meyers
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 25
BOYS BASKETBALL
Williamsport at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
WVC first half playoffs
Jim Thorpe at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Nanticoke at Dunmore, 4 p.m.
Meyers at Wyoming Area, 4 p.m.
Pittston Area at Coughlin, 4:30 p.m.
HS WRESTLING (all matches 7 p.m.)
Crestwood at Berwick
Coughlin at Hazleton Area
Hanover Area at GAR
Dallas at Lake-Lehman
Pittston Area at Tunkhannock
Wyoming Area at Nanticoke
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSU Schuylkill at PSU Hazleton, 8 p.m.
Stevens at Luzerne CCC, 8 p.m.
Misericordia at Kings, 8 p.m.
PSU Wilkes-Barre at PSU Worthington, 8 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Eastern at Wilkes, 6 p.m.
Misericordia at Kings, 6 p.m.
PSU Scranton at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 6 p.m.
PSU Schuylkill at PSU Hazleton, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY, JAN. 26
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Crestwood at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m.
Dallas at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m.
Hanover Area at GAR, 7:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Coughlin, 7:15 p.m.
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m.
Northwest at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Berwick, 7:15 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m.
Valley View at Pittston Area, 4 p.m.
Towanda at Tunkhannock, 4:30 p.m.
HS BOWLING
Pope John Paul II at Hazleton Area, 3 p.m.
HS RIFLE
Berwick at Bethlehem Freedom, 4 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Meyers at Nanticoke, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Lycoming at Kings, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 27
BOYS BASKETBALL
Coughlin at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m.
Berwick at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Dallas, 7:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m.
Pittston Area at Tunkhannock, 7:15 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m.
GAR at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Northwest, 7:15 p.m.
Meyers at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Wyoming Valley West at Berwick, 7 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSUGreater Allegheny at PSUWilkes-Barre, 8p.m.
PSU Fayette at PSU Hazleton, 8 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSUGreater Allegheny at PSUWilkes-Barre, 6p.m.
PSU Fayette at PSU Hazleton, 6 p.m.
COLLEGE SWIMMING
Misericordia at Messiah, 6 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN. 28
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Moravian Academy at MMI Prep, 3:15 p.m.
Allentown Central Catholic at Holy Redeemer, 4:15
p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Berwick at Allentown Duals, 9 a.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Gilman Duals
Tunkhannock at Husky Duals
Crestwood at Garden Spot Tournament
Hanover Area at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Dallas, 7 p.m.
Pittston Area at Hazleton Area, 7 p.m.
Blue Ridge at GAR, 7 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Hazleton Area at Tamaqua, noon
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Delaware at Luzerne CCC, 3 p.m.
PSU Greater Allegheny at PSU Hazleton, 3 p.m.
Wilkes at Delaware Valley, 3 p.m.
PSU Fayette at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 3 p.m.
FDU-Florham at Misericordia, 3 p.m.
DeSales at Kings, 3 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Delaware CCC at Luzerne CCC, 1 p.m.
PSU Greater Allegheny at PSU Hazleton, 1 p.m.
DeSales at Kings 1 p.m.
FDU-Florham at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
Wilkes at Delaware Valley, 1 p.m.
PSU Fayette at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE SWIMMING
Elizabethtown at Kings, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Yeshiva Tri-Meet
Gettysburg at Wilkes, 11 a.m.
Kings at Scranton, 1 p.m.
W H A T S O N T V
(All times Eastern)
EXTREME SPORTS
3:30 p.m.
NBC Winter Dew Tour, Pantech Invitational, at
Killington, Vt.
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo Champions, fi-
nal round, at George, South Africa (same-day tape)
4 p.m.
TGCPGATour, Humana Challenge, final round,
at La Quinta, Calif.
7:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric
Championship, final round, at Kaupulehu-Kona, Ha-
waii
NFL
3 p.m.
CBS Playoffs, AFC Championship game, Balti-
more at New England
6:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, NFC Championship game, N.Y.
Giants at San Francisco
NBA
6 p.m.
YES Charlotte at New Jersey
NHL
12:30 p.m.
NBC Washington at Pittsburgh
3 p.m.
CSN Boston at Philadelphia
SOCCER
10:30 a.m.
FOX Premier League, Manchester United at Ar-
senal
TENNIS
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, round of 16, at Mel-
bourne, Australia
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, round of 16, at Mel-
bourne, Australia
MEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
BTN Penn State at Indiana
WQMY, YES North Carolina State at Miami
2 p.m.
BTN Wisconsin at Illinois
4 p.m.
BTN Northwestern at Minnesota
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m.
FSN, PLUS Texas Tech at Iowa St.
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Iowa at Penn St.
4:30 p.m.
FSN, PLUS Colorado at Arizona
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Louisville at Georgetown
6 p.m.
BTN Minnesota at Nebraska
6:30 p.m.
FSN, PLUS Washington St. at California
8:30 p.m.
FSN, PLUS Memphis at UAB
COLLEGE WRESTLING
9 p.m.
BTN Iowa at Penn State
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA Fined Utah F Derrick Favors $25,000 for
throwing a ball into the stands during Thursdays
game against Dallas.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL Fined Montreal DP.K. Subban $2,500 for a
dangerous trip on Pittsburgh F Chris Kunitz during
Fridays game.
BOSTON BRUINS Recalled D Steven Kampfer
from Providence (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS Assigned RW Mattias
Tedenby to Albany (AHL).
WINNIPEG JETS Assigned D Derek Meech to
St. Johns (AHL). Recalled F Patrice Cormier from
St. Johns.
ECHL
ECHL Suspended Chicago LW Devin DiDio-
meteandCincinnati FDanEves onegameandfined
them undisclosed amounts and fined Wheeling F
Ryan Schnell an undisclosed amount for their ac-
tions during Fridays games.
COLLEGE
TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN Suspended mens
basketball GKieondre Arkwright, GNick Weiermill-
er, F Ruben Cabrera, F Earl Jefferson and G Neo
Sanchez one game for violating team rules.
H O C K E Y
National Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers............... 46 30 12 4 64 129 96
Philadelphia ................ 46 28 14 4 60 154 134
Pittsburgh .................... 47 26 17 4 56 145 122
New Jersey ................. 47 26 19 2 54 128 134
N.Y. Islanders.............. 46 19 21 6 44 112 136
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston.......................... 45 30 13 2 62 162 92
Ottawa.......................... 50 27 17 6 60 154 153
Toronto ........................ 47 23 19 5 51 144 144
Montreal....................... 48 18 21 9 45 123 132
Buffalo.......................... 48 19 24 5 43 117 148
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida.......................... 47 22 15 10 54 120 133
Washington................. 46 25 19 2 52 128 130
Winnipeg...................... 48 22 20 6 50 123 138
Carolina ....................... 50 17 24 9 43 128 158
Tampa Bay................... 46 19 23 4 42 128 160
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit .......................... 48 32 15 1 65 155 109
St. Louis....................... 47 29 12 6 64 121 96
Chicago........................ 48 29 13 6 64 159 136
Nashville...................... 47 27 16 4 58 128 123
Columbus .................... 47 13 28 6 32 112 155
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver ................... 48 29 15 4 62 155 120
Colorado...................... 48 25 21 2 52 124 137
Minnesota.................... 47 22 18 7 51 107 122
Calgary ........................ 48 22 20 6 50 114 134
Edmonton.................... 46 17 25 4 38 116 132
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose...................... 45 26 14 5 57 129 108
Los Angeles ................ 48 23 15 10 56 106 107
Dallas ........................... 46 24 20 2 50 123 131
Phoenix........................ 48 21 19 8 50 124 128
Anaheim ...................... 46 17 22 7 41 121 141
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 5, Montreal 4, SO
Carolina 3, Washington 0
Tampa Bay 2, Dallas 1
Chicago 3, Florida 1
Saturday's Games
Detroit 3, Columbus 2, SO
Florida 4, Winnipeg 3, SO
N.Y. Rangers 3, Boston 2, OT
Philadelphia 4, New Jersey 1
Vancouver 4, San Jose 3
Anaheim 2, Ottawa 1
Montreal 3, Toronto 1
N.Y. Islanders 2, Carolina 1, OT
St. Louis 4, Buffalo 2
Chicago at Nashville, late
Tampa Bay at Phoenix, late
Dallas at Minnesota, late
Calgary at Edmonton, late
Colorado at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
Washington at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Carolina, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
American Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
St. Johns .............. 40 23 11 5 1 52 137 122
Worcester.............. 39 20 12 3 4 47 107 100
Portland ................. 42 21 16 2 3 47 119 131
Manchester ........... 43 22 19 0 2 46 111 120
Providence............ 43 18 20 2 3 41 96 122
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Hershey................. 41 24 10 4 3 55 157 123
Penguins.............. 41 24 12 1 4 53 131 117
Norfolk ................... 42 25 14 1 2 53 151 122
Syracuse............... 39 18 16 3 2 41 128 129
Binghamton........... 43 17 24 1 1 36 112 134
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Connecticut........... 42 19 15 3 5 46 127 129
Adirondack............ 40 21 17 1 1 44 117 114
Bridgeport ............. 41 20 17 3 1 44 115 120
Albany.................... 41 18 15 5 3 44 106 126
Springfield............. 40 18 19 1 2 39 118 124
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Charlotte................ 42 24 14 2 2 52 121 110
Milwaukee ............. 38 22 14 1 1 46 114 99
Chicago................. 41 21 16 1 3 46 118 112
Peoria .................... 42 20 19 2 1 43 122 123
Rockford................ 42 17 21 1 3 38 126 146
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto.................. 42 22 15 3 2 49 118 105
Rochester.............. 41 18 15 5 3 44 117 123
Hamilton ................ 40 18 17 1 4 41 99 120
Grand Rapids........ 40 16 16 4 4 40 125 130
Lake Erie............... 42 18 21 2 1 39 98 117
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Oklahoma City...... 43 27 11 2 3 59 127 97
Houston................. 40 21 9 3 7 52 110 102
Abbotsford ............ 41 24 14 3 0 51 102 98
San Antonio .......... 41 21 18 2 0 44 97 112
Texas..................... 40 19 18 1 2 41 121 120
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Saturday's Games
Toronto 7, Hamilton 2
Norfolk 5, Connecticut 4, SO
Rochester 4, Grand Rapids 3, SO
Bridgeport 2, Adirondack 1
Manchester 5, Hershey 4
Portland 5, St. Johns 2
Albany 5, Springfield 2
Worcester 3, Providence 2, OT
Penguins 6, Syracuse 2
Oklahoma City 3, Lake Erie 1
San Antonio 5, Peoria 1
Rockford 3, Chicago 2
Houston at Texas, late
Charlotte at Abbotsford, late
Today's Games
St. Johns at Worcester, 3 p.m.
Penguins at Syracuse, 3 p.m.
Springfield at Providence, 4:05 p.m.
Manchester at Hershey, 5 p.m.
Adirondack at Binghamton, 5:05 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 6:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Rockford, 6:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Milwaukee at Peoria, 11 a.m.
Hamilton at Lake Erie, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Chicago at Abbotsford, 10 p.m.
B A S K E T B A L L
National Basketball
Association
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia................... 11 5 .688
New York ....................... 6 9 .400 4
1
2
Boston ............................ 5 9 .357 5
New Jersey.................... 4 12 .250 7
Toronto........................... 4 12 .250 7
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Orlando........................... 11 4 .733
Miami .............................. 11 4 .733
Atlanta............................. 12 5 .706
Charlotte ........................ 3 13 .188 8
1
2
Washington.................... 2 13 .133 9
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago......................... 15 3 .833
Indiana .......................... 10 4 .714 3
Cleveland...................... 6 9 .400 7
1
2
Milwaukee..................... 5 9 .357 8
Detroit ........................... 4 13 .235 10
1
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis ........................ 9 6 .600
San Antonio ................... 10 7 .588
Dallas.............................. 10 7 .588
Houston.......................... 9 7 .563
1
2
New Orleans.................. 3 13 .188 6
1
2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City................. 13 3 .813
Denver.............................. 11 5 .688 2
Utah .................................. 9 5 .643 3
Portland............................ 9 7 .563 4
Minnesota ........................ 7 8 .467 5
1
2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers.................. 8 5 .615
L.A. Lakers..................... 10 7 .588
Phoenix .......................... 6 9 .400 3
Sacramento ................... 6 11 .353 4
Golden State.................. 5 10 .333 4
Friday's Games
Portland 94, Toronto 84
Denver 108, Washington 104
Philadelphia 90, Atlanta 76
Phoenix 79, Boston 71
Chicago 114, Cleveland 75
Memphis 98, Detroit 81
Milwaukee 100, New York 86
Orlando 92, L.A. Lakers 80
Sacramento 88, San Antonio 86
Indiana 94, Golden State 91
Minnesota 101, L.A. Clippers 98
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 121, Cleveland 94
Detroit 94, Portland 91
Miami 113, Philadelphia 92
Denver 119, New York 114, 2OT
Chicago 95, Charlotte 89
Houston 105, San Antonio 102
Dallas 83, New Orleans 81
Memphis 128, Sacramento 95
Oklahoma City 84, New Jersey 74
Minnesota at Utah, late
Today's Games
Boston at Washington, 1 p.m.
Toronto at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Charlotte at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Milwaukee at Miami, 6 p.m.
Indiana at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
NCAA Men
Top 25 Fared
Saturday
1. Syracuse (20-1) lost to Notre Dame 67-58. Next:
at Cincinnati, Monday.
2. Kentucky (19-1) beat Alabama 77-71. Next: at Ge-
orgia, Tuesday.
3. Baylor (17-2) lost to No. 5 Missouri 89-88. Next: at
Oklahoma, Tuesday.
4. Duke (16-3) lost to Florida State 76-73. Next: at
Maryland, Wednesday.
5. Missouri (18-1) beat No. 3 Baylor 89-88. Next: vs.
Texas Tech, Saturday.
6. Ohio State (16-3) at Nebraska. Next: vs. Penn
State, Wednesday.
7. Kansas (16-3) beat Texas 69-66. Next: vs. Texas
A&M, Monday.
8. North Carolina (16-3) did not play. Next: vs. N.C.
State, Thursday.
9. Michigan State (16-4) beat Purdue 83-58. Next:
vs. Minnesota, Wednesday.
10. Georgetown (16-3) beat Rutgers 52-50. Next: at
Pittsburgh, Saturday.
11. Indiana (15-4) did not play. Next: vs. Penn State,
Sunday.
12. Murray State (19-0) at SIU-Edwardsville. Next:
vs. Eastern Illinois, Saturday.
13. UConn(14-5) lost toTennessee60-57. Next: vs.
Notre Dame, Sunday, Jan. 29.
14. UNLV (17-3) vs. New Mexico. Next: at Boise
State, Wednesday.
15. Virginia (15-2) did not play. Next: vs. Virginia
Tech, Sunday.
16. San Diego State (16-2) vs. Air Force. Next: at
Colorado State, Saturday.
17. Florida (15-4) beat LSU 76-64. Next: at Missis-
sippi, Thursday.
18. Mississippi State (16-4) beat Vanderbilt 78-77,
OT. Next: vs. LSU, Wednesday.
19. Creighton (18-2) beat Indiana State 75-49. Next:
at Drake, Wednesday.
20. Michigan (15-5) lost to Arkansas 66-64. Next: at
Purdue, Tuesday.
21. Marquette (16-4) beat Providence 79-72. Next:
vs. South Florida, Tuesday.
22. Illinois (15-4) did not play. Next: vs. Wisconsin,
Sunday.
23. Louisville (14-5) at Pittsburgh. Next: vs. Villano-
va, Wednesday.
24. Saint Marys (Cal) (18-2) at Santa Clara. Next: at
Loyola Marymount, Thursday.
25. Kansas State(14-4) beat OklahomaState66-58.
Next: at Texas Tech, Wednesday.
Saturday's Major Scores
EAST
American U. 67, Army 55
Bucknell 75, Holy Cross 41
Colgate 65, Navy 54, OT
Columbia 61, Cornell 56
Delaware 77, Georgia St. 74, 2OT
Drexel 71, Northeastern 53
George Washington 60, Charlotte 52
Georgetown 52, Rutgers 50
Harvard 54, Dartmouth 38
LIU 73, Wagner 66
La Salle 80, Rhode Island 66
Marquette 79, Providence 72
NJIT 58, Texas-Pan American 57
Penn 84, Saint Josephs 80
Quinnipiac 78, Bryant 71, OT
Robert Morris 81, Monmouth (NJ) 73, OT
Sacred Heart 62, CCSU 61
St. Bonaventure 95, Fordham 51
St. Francis (NY) 79, Mount St. Marys 60
St. Francis (Pa.) 69, Fairleigh Dickinson 63
Stony Brook 58, Maine 52
Temple 73, Maryland 60
Villanova 79, St. Johns 76, OT
Wake Forest 71, Boston College 56
West Virginia 77, Cincinnati 74, OT
Yale 73, Brown 60
SOUTH
Alcorn St. 61, Alabama St. 60
Appalachian St. 84, W. Carolina 72
Auburn 63, South Carolina 52
Bethune-Cookman 60, Delaware St. 59
Campbell 80, VMI 73
Charleston Southern 77, Winthrop 66
Clemson 64, Georgia Tech 62
Coastal Carolina 82, Radford 62
Coppin St. 77, NC Central 57
Davidson 80, The Citadel 51
Elon 88, Chattanooga 87
FAU 66, FIU 64
Florida 76, LSU 64
Florida A&M 68, Md.-Eastern Shore 63
Florida St. 76, Duke 73
George Mason 72, Towson 60
Georgia Southern 64, Coll. of Charleston 58
Hofstra 71, James Madison 69
Jacksonville 66, Kennesaw St. 50
Kentucky 77, Alabama 71
Liberty 84, High Point 78
Lipscomb 73, ETSU 65
Memphis 63, SMU 45
Mercer 69, North Florida 58
Mississippi 66, Georgia 63
Mississippi St. 78, Vanderbilt 77, OT
Morehead St. 62, UT-Martin 56
NC A&T 62, Morgan St. 61
Nicholls St. 55, SE Louisiana 53
Norfolk St. 80, Hampton 75
Northwestern St. 64, McNeese St. 61
SC-Upstate 79, Belmont 78
Savannah St. 83, SC State 53
Southern Miss. 67, Marshall 63
Southern U. 75, Alabama A&M 69, OT
Tennessee 60, UConn 57
Tulane 66, UTEP 58
UCF 48, UAB 41
UMass 79, Richmond 68
UNC Asheville 66, Presbyterian 58
UNC Wilmington 68, William & Mary 66
W. Kentucky 65, UALR 53
Wofford 79, Furman 72
MIDWEST
Akron 84, Kent St. 75
Austin Peay 76, E. Illinois 64
Buffalo 68, Bowling Green 66
Butler 63, Loyola of Chicago 57
Chicago St. 98, Houston Baptist 95, OT
Creighton 75, Indiana St. 49
Dayton 87, Xavier 72
Detroit 69, Wright St. 53
E. Michigan 41, Toledo 38
Michigan St. 83, Purdue 58
Notre Dame 67, Syracuse 58
Ohio 69, Miami (Ohio) 65
Saint Louis 68, Duquesne 41
Valparaiso 60, Ill.-Chicago 55
W. Michigan 64, Cent. Michigan 61
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 66, Michigan 64
Iowa St. 76, Texas Tech 52
Kansas 69, Texas 66
Kansas St. 66, Oklahoma St. 58
Lamar 92, Cent. Arkansas 78
MVSU 81, Prairie View 57
Missouri 89, Baylor 88
Oral Roberts 93, Oakland 86
TCU 54, Boise St. 52
Texas A&M 81, Oklahoma 75, OT
Texas Southern 69, Ark.-Pine Bluff 55
Texas-Arlington 63, Stephen F. Austin 54
Tulsa 70, Rice 46
UTSA 80, Texas St. 75
FAR WEST
Colorado 64, Arizona 63
Gonzaga 77, San Diego 60
Oregon 75, UCLA 68
San Francisco 72, Portland 71
Utah 64, Arizona St. 43
Washington 76, Stanford 63
Washington St. 77, California 75
Wyoming 70, Colorado St. 51
NCAA Women
Women's Top 25 Fared
Saturday
1. Baylor (18-0) vs. No. 23Kansas State. Next: at Ok-
lahoma, Thursday.
2. NotreDame(19-1) beat Villanova76-43. Next: vs.
No. 9 Tennessee, Monday.
3. UConn (16-2) at No. 21 DePaul. Next: at Syra-
cuse, Wednesday.
4. Stanford (17-1) beat Washington 65-47. Next: vs.
California, Saturday.
5. Duke (15-2) did not play. Next: vs. No. 8 Mary-
land, Sunday.
6. Kentucky (17-2) did not play. Next: vs. Florida,
Sunday.
7. Rutgers (16-3) beat South Florida 72-66. Next:
vs. No. 21 DePaul, Tuesday.
8. Maryland (18-1) did not play. Next: at No. 5 Duke,
Sunday.
9. Tennessee (14-4) did not play. Next: at No. 2
Notre Dame, Monday.
10. Ohio State (18-1) did not play. Next: vs. Illinois,
Sunday.
11. Miami (16-3) didnot play. Next: vs. VirginiaTech,
Monday.
12. Green Bay (17-0) beat Cleveland State 80-58.
Next: at Butler, Thursday.
13. Purdue (16-3) did not play. Next: vs. Michigan
State, Monday.
14. Texas A&M(12-4) at Kansas. Next: at Oklahoma
State, Tuesday.
15. Georgia (15-4) did not play. Next: at Mississippi,
Sunday.
16. Delaware (15-1) did not play. Next: vs. Drexel,
Sunday.
17. Texas Tech (14-3) did not play. Next: at Iowa
State, Sunday.
18. Louisville (15-4) did not play. Next: at No. 19 Ge-
orgetown, Sunday.
19. Georgetown (15-4) did not play. Next: vs. No. 18
Louisville, Sunday.
20. Nebraska(15-3) didnot play. Next: vs. Minneso-
ta, Sunday.
21. DePaul (14-4) vs. No. 3Connecticut. Next: at No.
7 Rutgers, Tuesday.
22. Penn State (14-4) did not play. Next: vs. Iowa,
Sunday.
23. Kansas State (13-4) at No. 1Baylor. Next: vs. Io-
wa State, Wednesday.
24. North Carolina (13-5) did not play. Next: at N.C.
State, Sunday.
25. Vanderbilt (14-4) did not play. Next: vs. South
Carolina, Sunday.
T E N N I S
Australian Open
Saturday Results
Singles
Men
Third Round
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (6), France, def. Frederico Gil,
Portugal, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2.
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Nicolas Mahut,
France, 6-0, 6-1, 6-1.
David Ferrer (5), Spain, def. Juan Ignacio Chela
(27), Argentina, 7-5, 6-2, 6-1.
Richard Gasquet (17), France, def. Janko Tipsarev-
ic (9), Serbia, 6-3, 6-3, 6-1.
Kei Nishikori (24), Japan, def. Julien Benneteau,
France, 4-6, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Gael Monfils
(14), France, 6-2, 7-5, 5-7, 1-6, 6-4.
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Michael Llodra,
France, 6-4, 6-2, 6-0.
Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Milos Raonic (23),
Canada, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-3.
Women
Third Round
Petra Kvitova (2), Czech Republic, def. Maria Kiri-
lenko (27), Russia, 6-0, 1-0, retired.
Sara Errani, Italy, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania,
6-7 (6), 6-0, 6-2.
Maria Sharapova (4), Russia, def. Angelique Ker-
ber (30), Germany, 6-1, 6-2.
Ana Ivanovic (21), Serbia, def. Vania King, United
States, 6-3, 6-4.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Vera Zvonareva
(7), Russia, 7-6 (7), 6-1.
Zheng Jie, China, def. Marion Bartoli (9), France,
6-3, 6-3.
SabineLisicki (14), Germany, def. SvetlanaKuznet-
sova (18), Russia, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Serena Williams (12), United States, def. Greta Arn,
Hungary, 6-1, 6-1.
Doubles
Men
Second Round
Mariusz FyrstenbergandMarcinMatkowski (6), Po-
land, def. Pablo Andujar and Guillermo Garcia-Lo-
pez, Spain, 6-3, 7-5.
Ricardo Mello and Joao Souza, Brazil, def. Victor
Hanescu, Romania, and Olivier Rochus, Belgium,
6-4, 6-4.
Frantisek Cermak, Czech Republic, and Filip Pola-
sek (11), Slovakia, def. Mikhail Elgin and Alexander
Kudryavtsev, Russia, 4-6, 6-4, 7-5.
Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Daniel Nestor (2), Cana-
da, def. Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah,
Colombia, 7-6 (0), 6-2.
Mahesh Bhupathi and Rohan Bopanna (4), India,
def. CarstenBall, Australia, andTreat ConradHuey,
Philippines, 6-2, 6-2.
Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, and Jean-Julien
Rojer (8), Curacao, def. Philipp Marx, Germany,
and Adil Shamasdin, Canada, 7-6 (8), 6-4.
Women
Second Round
Jarmila Gajdosova, Australia, and Bethanie Mattek-
Sands (12), United States, def. Dominika Cibulko-
va, Slovakia, and Jill Craybas, United States, 5-7,
6-3, 6-3.
Sania Mirza, India, and Elena Vesnina (6), Russia,
def. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, and Alberta
Brianti, Italy, 7-5, 7-5.
Irina-Camelia Begu and Monica Niculescu, Roma-
nia, def. Natalie Grandin, South Africa, and Vladimi-
ra Uhlirova (9), Czech Republic, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3.
AndreaHlavackovaandLucieHradecka(7), Czech
Republic, def. Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic,
and Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, 7-5, 6-3.
Rika Fujiwara and Ayumi Morita, Japan, def. Iveta
Benesova and Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (10),
Czech Republic, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.
Gisela Dulko, Argentina, and Flavia Pennetta (4),
Italy, def. Silvia Soler-Espinosa and Carla Suarez
Navarro, Spain, 6-2, 6-2.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and Agnieszka
Radwanska (8), Poland, def. Tamira Paszek, Aus-
tria, and Jasmin Woehr, Germany, 6-0, 6-0.
Petra Martic, Croatia, and Kristina Mladenovic,
France, def. HsiehSu-wei, Taiwan, andGalinaVos-
koboeva (14), Kazakhstan, 6-7 (1), 7-5, 6-3.
Alla Kudryavtseva and Ekaterina Makarova, Rus-
sia, def. Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and Kata-
rina Srebotnik (1), Slovenia, 3-2 retired.
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
Jan. 27
At Northern Quest Casino, Airway Heights, Wash.
(ESPN), Ruslan Provodnikov vs. David Torres, 10,
junior welterweights;Ji-Hoon Kim vs. Yakubu Ami-
du, 10, lightweights.
Jan. 28
At Turning Stone, Verona, N.Y., Brian Minto vs. To-
ny Grano, 10, NABF heavyweight title eliminator.
At Springfield, Mo., Cory Spinks vs. Sechew Po-
well, 12, IBF junior middleweight title eliminator.
Feb. 3
At Texas Station Casino, Las Vegas (ESPN2), Edi-
son Miranda vs. Isaac Chilemba, 10, light heavy-
weights.
Feb. 4
At Frankfurt, Germany, Yoan Pablo Hernandez vs.
Steve Cunningham, 12, for Hernandezs IBF crui-
serweight title.
Mixed
First Round
Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, and Bernard Tomic, Aus-
tralia, def. Ashleigh Barty and Benjamin Mitchell,
Australia, 6-1, 6-3.
Elena Vesnina, Russia, and Leander Paes (5), In-
dia, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, and
Max Mirnyi, Belarus, 6-2, 7-5.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, and Horia
Tecau (8), Romania, def. Lucie Hradecka and Fran-
tisek Cermak, Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-3, 10-6 tie-
break.
Vladimira Uhlirova, Czech Republic, and Scott Lip-
sky, United States, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia,
and Juan Sebastian Cabal, Colombia, 7-6 (4), 7-5.
Liezel Huber, United States, and Colin Fleming, Bri-
tain, def. Raquel Kops-Jones and Eric Butorac,
United States, 7-5, 6-2.
Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, and Andy Ram,
Israel, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, and
Christopher Kas, Germany, 4-6, 6-3, 10-5 tiebreak.
Legends Doubles
Round Robin
Guy Forget and Henri Leconte, France, def. Darren
Cahill and Richard Fromberg, Australia, 6-1, 6-4.
Mansour Bahrami, Iran, and Cedric Pioline, France,
def. Pat Cash, Australia, and Goran Ivanisevic,
Croatia, 2-6, 6-2, 13-11 tiebreak.
WHEELING, W.Va. The owners of the Wheeling
Nailers hope to sell the ECHL team for something in
the mid-six figures within two months.
The Intelligencer says co-owner Jim Brooks dis-
cussed the sale Thursday at WesBanco Arena.
Brooks says he has until March to find newowners
or the team will go dark at the end of the season.
Thesellingpricewill beless thanthe$1.2millionhe
and brother Rob paid nine years ago.
He says thats a deliberate attempt to keep the Nail-
ers in the Ohio Valley.
The Nailers began play in Wheeling in 1992.
The teamis currently the affiliate of the NHLs Pitts-
burgh Penguins and Montreal Canadiens, and in turn
the AHLs Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins and Ha-
milton Bulldogs.
Brooks says the sale has nothingtodowithfinances
or perceived tensions with local officials.
He says the brothers just dont have the time.
They also own the AHLs Adiron-
dack Phantoms and are build-
ing a new arena in Allentown,
where the Phantoms are expect-
ed to relocate from their current
home in New York.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 3C
PENGUINS SUNDAY
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
Jan. 10
at Norfolk
W, 3-2
Jan. 14
at St. Johns
W, 6-4
Jan. 15
at St. Johns
W, 4-3
Saturday
Syracuse
7:05 p.m.
Friday
Manchester
W, 4-1
L A S T F I V E G A M E S
Today
at Syracuse
3 p.m.
Wednesday
Providence
7:05 p.m.
Jan. 27
at Connticut
7 p.m.
Feb. 3
Hershey
7:05 p.m.
Jan. 28
at Bingmton
7:05 p.m.
N E X T F I V E G A M E S
SCOTT MUNROE
Penguins Goalie
Guess who chose their all-time
great by the paint scheme on their
helmet? Well, its obviously a goalten-
der, and since Brad Thiessen already
took his turn at Fantasy GM earlier
this season, that leaves one choice
Scott Munroe.
Munroe was the second Penguin to
choose a goaltender as his all-time
great. Zach Sill was the first when he
chose former Montreal great Ken
Dryden. Who did Munroe choose?
Heres a hint: think Eagle.
Munroe rounded out his team with a
few former teammates from his days
with Philadelphia, an enforcer from
the new era, and he picked his power-
play specialist with his top forward
and defenseman in mind. Not a bad
strategy.
FORWARD Claude Giroux (Phila-
delphia), I played with him a little bit
in Philly. Hes an easy pick because
hes got so much talent its not even
funny.
DEFENSEMAN Shea Weber
(Nashville), Big guy, hard shot and a
Norris candidate every year.
GOALTENDER Pekka Rinne
(Nashville), I have to watch him every
time hes on television. Hes 6-5, but
hes so athletic and flexible. His arms
and legs make him look like hes eight
feet long. Hes one of my favorites
right now.
POWER PLAY SPECIALIST To-
mas Holmstrom (Detroit), If I have
Giroux and Webber, Ill take Holm-
strom in front of the net for sure.
PENALTY KILL SPECIALIST
Darroll Powe (Minnesota), Another
old teammate from Philly. He plays a
lot like Zach Sill fast, tough and a
good killer.
SHOOTOUT SPECIALIST Jussi
Jokinen (Carolina), I almost feel like
thats a big reason he gets contracts
every year, because hes great in
shootouts.
ENFORCER Brandon Prust (New
York Rangers), Hes a new-era type
he can play and fight. Plays a regular
shift and he can throw the knuckles,
too. Hes rounded out his game.
AGITATOR/PEST Ben Eager (Ed-
monton), Hes a pretty tough guy,
too, but hes fast, can hit and skate.
HEAD COACH Dan Bylsma (Pitts-
burgh), I like the way he runs a team.
Over the years Ive seen the way he
carries himself on the bench and now
I have some insight as to how he is in
the locker room. A really energetic
guy and really encouraging. It makes
it fun to play when you know your
coach has your back like that.
ALL-TIME GREAT Ed Belfour
(Chicago, San Jose, Dallas, Toronto,
Florida), Hes a guy I grew up watch-
ing and idolizing. I love the way he
played. His mask was iconic as well,
with the eagle painted on it. When I
became a goaltender, everyone
wanted Ed Belfours mask.
FANTASY GM
Ed Belfour
next night to give him six
points in his last four games.
Im starting to figure things
out and play a more offensive
role. Its nice to start produc-
ing a little bit, he said.
Its a familiar feeling to
Thompson, who posted 91
points (47 goals, 44 assists) in
78 games during his last two
years with the University of
New Hampshire.
The production came after
he spent his first two college
seasons on the third or fourth
lines, registering a mere 21
points in 62 games.
It was a struggle at times,
It looked like Paul Thomp-
son hit rock bottom.
Last November and Decem-
ber, the Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
ton Penguins winger went 14
games without a goal and was
a healthy scratch five times.
To top it off, he was sent to
the ECHL on Dec. 17 to play
with the Wheeling Nailers.
Its not the way the former
Hobey Baker finalist thought
his rookie season would turn
out.
When you go that long
without a goal, its going to
bother you a little bit,
Thompson said. Especially
when youre used to being a
guy that can put the puck in
the back of the net.
You almost feel like you
lost it.
But something happened to
Thompson, 23, during his
one-game stint in Wheeling.
He found it.
With the Nailers, Thompson
got to play top-line minutes
and saw plenty of time on the
power play. He finished the
game with a goal and an as-
sist, and headed back to
Wilkes-Barre with a renewed
sense of confidence.
And he achieved it by ap-
proaching the demotion to
Wheeling as a positive.
Thats something I learned
from the older guys on this
team, he said. Theres going
to be ups and downs, but
when youre down, you have
to learn from it. I took that
mindset to Wheeling and I
actually looked at it as an
exciting opportunity to get
some real playing time.
Despite a fresh outlook,
Thompson still didnt register
a goal in his first seven games
back from Wheeling.
But his play was improved.
Thompson put more shots on
net, he skated with confidence
and he created plays.
The pucks didnt go in
right away, but I started feel-
ing more confident on the
ice, Thompson said.
Most important, he caught
the eye of head coach John
Hynes.
Hynes said there was a dual
message he wanted to send to
Thompson with the Wheeling
demotion. He wanted Thomp-
son to experience playing
top-line minutes again and
give him a taste of what he
could earn with the Penguins.
He wasnt playing his best
hockey here and we wanted to
give him a chance to play in
some situations that he didnt
necessarily earn here. We
werent going to give it to him
here, he had to earn it, Hynes
said.
The second part of the
message was motivational.
Thompson had to rekindle his
work ethic and attention to
detail, Hynes said, in addition
to one other important ele-
ment.
He had to have a desire to
not just be here, but be an
impact player here. That was
important, Hynes said.
Thompson became an im-
pact player earlier this month
when he posted two assists
Jan. 7 in a game against Syra-
cuse. Three days later, he
recorded his first two-goal
game as a Penguin in a 3-2 win
at Norfolk.
Thompson added an assist
in the next game in St. Johns,
followed by another goal the
Thompson said of his first two
years with New Hampshire.
But it was beneficial in the
end.
Thompson sees a similarity
between the struggles he
endured early on in college
and the challenges he faced
this season with the Penguins.
Much of it, he said, had to do
with the adjustment to the pro
game.
It took a little longer than I
thought, but Im figuring
things out now, Thompson
said. Its a lot more structur-
ed here than in college hockey.
You have to build those good
habits.
Now Thompson can focus
on another building block
developing into a point pro-
ducer as a pro.
Thats what he was in
college and youre starting to
see that now, Hynes said. At
the beginning of the year he
didnt have enough drive in
his game to produce offense,
but thats part of being a new
player and progressing.
Ultimately, it came from
him to overcome that. He was
able to push through the
tough spots and his game is
continuing to elevate.
Penguins winger Paul Thompson went from Hobey Baker finalist to a stint in the ECHL.
Now, hes back in Wilkes-Barre and playing his best hockey as a pro.
Raising his game
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins right wing Paul Thompson brings the puck across the red line in a game against Manchester
on Friday night.
Penguins Wheeling farm team will go dark if not sold
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Mericles Kyle Drendall will move mountains if thats what it takes to create new jobs.
Moving the tough rock found throughout many local business parks is a daunting
challenge for most builders. Not for Mericle.
Kyle and our excavation team use the most modern drilling and GPS-equipped heavy
equipment to easily move even the toughest rock out of the way. Tey turn the worst
terrain into at, productive sites that are ready for new buildings and new jobs.
If you are thinking of new construction, call Mericle at 570.823.1100. We ll turn
mountains into molehills for you.
U:e ycur
SM/FIFHCNE
lc exp|cre cur
new weL:ilel
Ky|e Drencc||, Meric|e: cri||ing
civi:icn fcremcn, cri||: lhrcugh
rcck whi|e ccing :ile wcrk fcr
c new Lui|cing in CenlerFcinl
Ccmmerce & Ircce Fcrk Ec:l.
- Grccec, fcl 7.8 ccre :ile
- Frcpc:ec 58,000 SF cffce
- Ccn Le :uLcivicec
- /|| uli|ilie:
- Mccern cffce :pcce: cvci|cL|e
- 1,33 SF lc 7,44 SF
- C|c:: / fni:he:
- Mcny mecicc| lencnl:
- Gc: hecl, cir ccncilicnec
- Wel :prink|er
- Ccnvenienl pcrking
- ' mi|e frcm S.F. 30
- 37,32 SF cvci|cL|e
- Fcreign Ircce Zcne
- 334" lc 38" cei|ing:
- " reinfcrcec ccncrele fccr
- ,31 SF lc 21,085 SF
- Hc: 3,23 SF cffce
- 211" lc 33" cei|ing:
- " reinfcrcec ccncrele fccr
- Grccec, fcl 51.15 ccre :ile
- Frcpc:ec 282,000 SF Lui|cing
- Ccn Le expcncec lc 507,00 SF
- Lcrge lrci|er :lcrcge crec
- Shcrl/|cng lerm :lcrcge
- Wel/cry :prink|er
- /Lunccnl pcrking
- 1 mi|e frcm S.F. 30
- |cccing cccr:
- ESFF fre prcleclicn
- Cuick ccce:: lc l-81, l-47
- /mp|e lrci|er :lcrcge
- Energy effcienl I-Lcy |ighling
- Lcrge pcrking crec:
- Wel :prink|er
- Necr l-81 cnc l-47
- 3 |cccing cccr:, 1 crive-in
- Energy effcienl I-Lcy |ighling
- Wel :prink|er
- Cuick ccce:: lc l-81, l-47
350 N. Fennsy|von|o Avenue
Fenn 8us|ness Center, W||kes-8orre
EEnergy eff ff i cienll II LLc ||ig EE
345 Enterpr|se Woy [Force| 7A}
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork West, F|ttston Iownsh|p
275-287 CenterFo|nt 8ou|evord
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork Eost, Jenk|ns Iownsh|p
3 S l 2 08 S 3 | ci c c i i 3
201-221 keseorch Dr|ve
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork Eost, Jenk|ns Iownsh|p
- 8,523 SF cvci|cL|e
- Fcrmer lrcining cenler
- Exce||enl pcwer & le|eccm
- Nclurc| |ighl
- Exce||enl ccncilicn
- Kilchenelle & 5 lrcining rccm:
- /Lunccnl pcrking
- 5 minule: frcm l-81
225 Stewort kood
Honover Industr|o| Estotes, Honover Iownsh|p
5-11 E|mwood kood
Crestwood Industr|o| Fork, Wr|ght Iownsh|p
- ,427 SF lc 87,44 SF
- 30 lc 33 cei|ing:
- 13 |cccing cccr:
- Necr Wc|mcrl Supercenler
- Up lc 17,08 SF cvci|cL|e
- 30 lc 33 cei|ing:
- Lcccing cccr:, crive-in:
- Very cffcrccL|e |ec:e rcle:
1200 Sothers Dr|ve
Gr|mes Industr|o| Fork, F|ttston Iownsh|p
250 Enterpr|se Woy [Force| 13}
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork West, F|ttston Iownsh|p
- C|c:e lc l-81 cnc l-47
- Fermillec & cpprcvec
- /|| uli|ilie:
- Grecl |ccclicnl
Force| 1, Keystone Avenue
CenterFo|nt Commerce & Irode Fork Eost, Eost Jenk|ns Iownsh|p
BUI LDI NG READY S I TES OF F I CE
- Fermillec & cpprcvec
- Iwc fccr:
- C|c:e lc l-81 cnc l-47
- Grecl |ccclicnl
- 40,153 SF cvci|cL|e
- 302" lc 33 cei|ing:
- 3,10 SF mcin cffce
- 08 SF :hipping/receiving cffce
- Energy effcienl I-Lcy |ighling
- 14 |cccing cccr:, 1 crive-in
- " reinfcrcec ccncrele fccr
- Cuick ccce:: lc l-81, l-80
- Wel :prink|er
- " reinfcrcec ccncrele fccr
- C|c:e lc l-81 cnc l-47
- Lcrge pcrking crec:
- 8,521 SF cvci|cL|e
- lnc|uce: ,785 SF cffce
- 22" lc 28" cei|ing:
- 1 |cccing cccr in wcrehcu:e
570.823.1100
BROKERAGE DIVISION www.mericle.com/brokerage
For more information on the above properties, call Bob Besecker, Jim Hilsher, Bill Jones, or Dan Walsh.
Developing Pennsylvanias I-81 Corridor for 26 Years.
Visit our Web site to see hundreds
of buildings and sites from
1,000 SF to 1,000,000 SF
- 22,000 SF relci|/wcrehcu:e :pcce
- Shcwrccm, cffce:, :hcp crec
- 4 crive-in cccr:, 1 |cccing ccck
- For Ieose ... John kokosz
- 12,305 SF fcrmer culc cec|er:hip
- Shcwrccm, cffce:, gcrcge
- 2 ccre:, pcvec pcrking
- For So|e ... Steve 8orrouk
- 23. ccre:
- Fcrmer lcp:ci| Lu:ine::
- Cver 1,200 fl. cf river frcnlcge
- For So|e ... kon Kos|osky
- 4,34 SF relci|/cffce :pcce
- New|y rencvclec, fl. cei|ing:
- Cenlrc| |ccclicn, pcrking fcr 15 ccr:
- For Ieose ... 8ob Frodshom
122 305 05 SF f ll cc | hhi
2150 Sons Souc| Fkwy, Honover Iwp.
22 22 0000 00 SSFF ll i| i|// hh
101 N Wosh|ngton St., W||kes-8orre
- 23 23 cc ccre re::
Susquehonno Avenue, Wyom|ng
4 SF SF ll ii|/ |/ ffff
24 Mo|n Street, Do||os
- Iurnkey Lu:ine:: cppcrlunily
- 4,13 SF flne:: &enlerlcinmenl clr
- Lcunge + F/ |iucr |icen:e
- For So|e ... Dove Dor|s
LL ii l i
03 kt. , Moy0e|d
F LEX I NDUS TRI AL
N
E
W
!
10 We||es Street
Cross Vo||ey West Fro|ess|ono| 8u||d|ng, Forty Fort
N
E
W
!
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 5C
S P O R T S
WINTERBERG, Germany
The United States doubles luge
team of Christian Niccum and
Berwicks Jayson Terdiman
scored their best World Cup fin-
ish of the season Saturday.
"We got back to the basics of
just letting the sled run again
like last year (here)," said Terdi-
man, the back driver, to usaluge-
.org. "We wanted to get back to
our basic instincts of letting the
sled go and relaxing down the
track. The runs definitely could
have been worse. Were happy
with fifth place."
Niccum, of Woodinville,
Wash., and Terdiman picked up
speed consistently down the
945 meter long chute in both
heats as they try to work their
way into contention for the
World Championships three
weeks from now in Altenberg,
Germany.
The track saw top speeds ap-
proaching 80 miles per hour in
light snow.
"They say there are technical
tracks and there are gliding
tracks," Terdiman said. "We
have to turn every track into a
gliding track. Thats the way to
go fast. Christians basic way of
sliding is to let the sled run and
let thecurves dothework. Sowe
did."
The Americans registered a
combined time of 1:28.434.
They were 0.16 of a second from
the podium, andare eighthover-
all in the World Cup standings
with 228 points.
The 33-year-old Niccum, with
another birthday approaching
soon, is coming back gradually
from back surgery last spring.
"Altenberg is the big goal for
this year, recovering from back
surgery," Niccum said. "The big
focus is tobe ready for the World
Championships. Thats my big
thought process. I just went out
(today) to do what I always try
to do. I was prepared mentally
and physically."
Tobias Arlt and Tobias Wendl
of Germany claimed their third
World Cup win of the season to
taketheoverall leadinthestand-
ings.
The defending champions
timed 1 minute, 27.979 seconds
after two runs, finishing 0.177
ahead of Italys Christian Ober-
stolz and Patrick Gruber.
Two-time defending Olympic
champions Andres Linger and
WolfgangLinger of Austria were
third in 1:28.272.
Arlt andWendl leadthe stand-
ings by15points fromtheLinger
brothers after six of nine races.
OlympicchampionFelixLoch
led a German sweep of the sin-
gles race and closed in on the
overall title by winning his fifth
race of the season.
Loch was fastest in both runs
for a combined time of 1minute,
46.981 seconds. The 22-year-old
has a 145-point lead in the over-
all standings with three races re-
maining.
Ralf Palik was second in
1:47.219 and David Moeller
third in 1:47.240.
L U G E
Top-5 finish for Berwicks
Terdiman in Cup event
From staff, wire reports
DALLAS The last thing
Trevor Woodruff wanted to see
out of halftime was compla-
cency.
Misericordia had a three-
point lead at the break over
last-place Delaware Valley. But
overlooking the defending
Freedom Conference cham-
pions was a good way to erase
the momentum gained from
beating DeSales earlier in the
week.
I hope that no one thought
this was going to be easy,
Woodruff said of his thoughts
at halftime. Because theyre
way more talented than their
record.
The Cougars remained
locked up with the Aggies early
in the second half before pull-
ing away for a decisive 73-59
win at the Anderson Center.
Beating the Aggies capped
off a positive week for the Cou-
gars (11-6, 3-3 Freedom), who
rebounded from a pair of con-
ference road losses coming out
of the semester break.
Delaware Valley (2-14, 0-6)
pulled within 43-41 with 12
minutes to play before a 9-0 run
gave Misericordia some breath-
ing room the rest of the way.
Misericordia did plenty of
damage in the paint, a big rea-
son for the Cougars gaudy
31-of-52 (.596) shooting per-
centage.
Forwards Ethan Eichhorst
(21 points) and Steve Artzerou-
nian (20) accounted for much
of it, with both pulling down
eight rebounds apiece. Art-
zerounian finished 10-of-11 from
the floor.
I thought today we did a
particularly good job focusing
on throwing the ball inside,
Woodruff said. We started the
game, did a good of that, kind
of lost track of that and then
refocused in the second half.
Misericordia took a 34-31
lead into the locker room after
a free-flowing first half that saw
just four fouls called.
Eichhorst and Artzerounian
were joined in the scoring co-
lumn by Matt Greene and Cael
Evans, who each finished with
10 points.
The Cougars held the Aggies
to just 31 percent shooting for
the game.
DELAWARE VALLEY (59): Jernigan 4-9 1-2
13, Bollinger 4-16 2-3 11, Lewis 1-1 0-0 2,
Beckett 7-23 3-6 17, Donovan 2-8 0-0 6, Lee 1-1
0-0 2, Sullivan 1-6 0-0 3, Blango 0-1 0-0 0,
Connellan 0-0 0-0 0, Rodriguez 0-0 0-0 0, Sibel
0-1 0-0 0, Derr 2-6 0-0 5, Shaw 0-0 0-0 0. Totals
22-72 6-11 59.
MISERICORDIA (73): Greene 3-6 1-2 10,
Undersinger 1-3 0-0 3, Artzerounian 10-11 0-1
20, Eichhorst 9-16 2-4 21, Slanovec 2-5 1-2 5,
Busacca 1-5 0-0 2, Reilly 0-1 0-0 0, Melville 0-0
0-0 0, Sergio 0-0 0-0 0, Widdoss 0-0 0-0 0, Ware
1-1 0-0 2, Stone 0-0 0-0 0, Evans 4-4 2-4 10.
Totals 31-52 6-13 73.
Halftime Misericordia, 34-31
3-point field goals DVC 9-26 (Jernigan
4-8, Donovan 2-6, Derr 1-1, Sullivan 1-4, Bollinger
1-7); MU 5-12 (Greene 3-5, Eichhorst 1-2,
Undersinger 1-3, Slanovec 0-2)
Women win fourth straight
Delaware Valley spent the
first 12 minutes determined not
to let Misericordia take over
inside with Christine Marks. So
Tyann McDaniel did the early
damage instead.
The junior point guard
closed in on the school record
for career three-pointers and
outscored the Aggies by herself
in the first half in the Cougars
86-57 win Saturday at the An-
derson Center.
McDaniel finished with 22
points on 9-of-14 shooting. Her
four threes pulled her within
one of the programs all-time
mark. She scored 15 in the first
half to help Misericordia (8-7,
5-1 Freedom Conference) build
a 41-13 lead at the break.
Shes been waiting for some-
body to play a zone (defense)
all year, Cougars coach Tom
Griffith said with a laugh. So
she was pretty excited when
they came out in a zone. Her
eyes lit up.
Defensive attention was
again focused on Marks, who
hit a milestone of her own
earlier in the week, taking over
as the teams career scoring
leader.
Marks and fellow senior
Jesse Robinson were held
scoreless for much of the first
half, but the Cougars still led
20-6 during that stretch thanks
to McDaniels strong shooting.
When things eventually
opened up in the paint, Marks
wasted no time taking advan-
tage, finishing with a double-
double and posting game-highs
in points (29) and rebounds
(12).
Delaware Valley (11-6, 2-4)
missed all 10 threes in the
opening 20 minutes and hit just
four field goals in the half,
shooting 16 percent
The Cougars, meanwhile,
knocked down 6-of-11 from
behind the arc and shot 53.6
percent to build an insurmount-
able lead. They finished the
game at 50 percent from the
field.
That teams good. That
team has some big wins on
their resume this year, Griffith
said of the Aggies. If you had
told me wed be up 41-13 at
halftime, I probably would have
had a few choice words for
you.
DELAWARE VALLEY (57): Mirack 5-12 2-2
12, Soper 2-5 1-1 5, Coll 4-10 2-5 11, Barlow 2-3
4-4 8, Delcasale 3-11 2-2 8, Turowski 0-1 1-2 1,
Weil 2-6 0-0 6, Donohue 0-0 0-0 0, Shunkwiler
2-8 2-4 6. Totals 20-56 14-20 57.
MISERICORDIA (86): J. Robinson 3-7 2-5 8,
McDaniel 9-14 0-0 22, Seely 3-9 2-2 8, Drayton
2-2 0-1 4, Marks 8-16 12-14 29, Gough 0-0 0-0 0,
Sweeney 2-3 0-0 6, T. Robinson 0-0 0-0 0,
Greene 0-1 0-0 0, Sileo 3-6 0-0 7, Kessler 0-0 0-0
0, Smicherko 0-2 0-0 0, Oertner 0-1 0-0 0,
Massicotte 0-0 0-0 0, Brochetti 0-0 0-0 0, Hansen
0-0 0-0 0, ODell 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 31-62 16-22 86.
Halftime Misericordia, 41-13
3-point field goals DVC 3-18 (Weil 2-5,
Coll 1-5, Turowski 0-1, Shunkwiler 0-1, Mirack
0-3, Delcasale 0-3); MU 8-18 (McDaniel 4-8,
Sweeney 2-3, Sileo 1-2, Marks 1-3, J. Robinson
0-1, Smicherko 0-1)
C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Misericordias Chris Undersinger (12) tries to pass as Delaware Valleys Jay Donovan defends
during Saturdays Freedom Conference game in Dallas.
Cougars dominate paint
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
PURCHASE, N.Y. Katlin
Michaels connected on the
game-winning shot as time
expired and the Kings wom-
ens basketball team pulled out
an important Freedom Confer-
ence road victory over Manhat-
tanville, 51-49 on Saturday.
Michaels led Kings with 16
points, seven rebounds, and
two assists while Samantha
Simcox tallied 12 points.
For Manhattanville, Taylor
Wilson finished with 13 points
while Kelli Hyjek and Stepfanie
Vaiano chipped in with 11 and
10 points respectively.
FDU-Florham 57, Wilkes 49
Despite 15 points from
Megan Kazmerski, Wilkes was
unable to come away with a
home victory.
Whitney Connelly followed
Kazmerski with an 11 point
performance on the night.
For FDU-Florham, Kyra
Dayon netted 21 points while
recording nine rebounds and
seven steals.
MENS BASKETBALL
Wilkes 81, FDU-Florham 69
Matt Mullins continued his
fine shooting and finished with
a game-high 24 points as four
Colonels hit double figures in
an 81-69 win over FDU-Flor-
ham Saturday.
Jourdan Wilson followed
with 19 points, six rebounds
and three helpers while Paul
Huch added 13 points and four
rebounds. Kendall Hinze was
the fourth Colonel to reach
double figures, contributing
with 11 points and a game-high
eight rebounds.
Adam Katz led FDU with 18
points and three rebounds
while Ardell Roberts added 12
points. Mike Williamson
chipped in with 11 points.
Manhattanville 80, Kings 69
Host Manhattanville used a
balanced attack with four play-
ers scoring in double-figures to
post a victory in a Freedom
Conference matchup.
Tim OShea led the Mon-
archs with a career-high 22
points and four rebounds while
Kyle Stackhouse contributed
with 15 points, two assists, and
two steals.
Manhattanville was paced by
Armani Blackmon with 19
points and four rebounds. Jeff
Ventura followed with 17
points and Colin Campbell
netted 13 points.
SWIMMING
Kings drops two
Kings mens team dropped a
128-61 verdict to visiting Al-
bright College, while the wom-
en lost 119-71 to Albright.
Justin Weilert captured the
1,000-freestyle with a time of
11:19.66 while Kyle Newton
won the 100-breaststroke with
a time of 1:05.35 and was sec-
ond in the 100-freestyle at
51.62. The team of Mike Swee-
ney, Newton, Joe Westcoat and
Jack Harrington won the 200-
freestyle relay with a time of
1:40.50.
For the womens team, Patri-
cia Manning won the 100-
backstroke with a time of
1:18.41 and was third in the 200
individual medley at 2:23.95 in
a 119-71 loss to Albright.
Kim Brino won the 100-
butterfly with a time of 1:05.46
while the team of Brino, Shan-
non Johnson, Amanda Case
and Kathleen Kerr won the
200-freestyle with a time of
1:52.70.
Cougars swept by Scranton
Misericordias mens and
womens swim teams fell to
Scranton in a dual meet. The
men fell 173-89 while the wom-
en lost 142-120.
For the women, the team of
Bree Grzech, Beth Karmondy,
Brittany Luzik and Chelsea
Mixon won the 400 medley
relay with a time of 4:08.77
while Alex Taylor posted a win
in the 1,000 freestyle with a
time of 11:29.00. Jess Grant
followed with a victory in the
200 freestyle (2:03.16).
Adam Grzech captured the
only win for the mens squad,
winning the 100 freestyle with
a time of 49.56.
C O L L E G E R O U N D U P
Kings wins on
buzzer-beater
The Times Leader staff
As another spring training
draws near, we offer a bit of warm
news in the midst of this mild
winter: The Phillies should never
stink again.
To anyone not yet old enough
to legally consume an alcoholic
beverage, that might not seem
like such a big deal. All you have
are memories of a beautiful ball-
park overflowing with fans eager
to watch a team perpetually in
contention.
It has been a decade since the
Phillies last had a losing season
and a dozen years since they fin-
ished lower than third in the divi-
sion.
With Roy Halladay, Cliff Lee
and Cole Hamels at the top of the
starting rotation, there is every
reason to believe the teams
string of five straight National
League East titles will reach six
in 2012.
If youre old enough to remem-
ber DarrenDaultons last at-bat in
a Phillies uniform you know
things were not always this way.
And if youre old enough to re-
member Dick Selma and Woodie
Fryman, you knowthings used to
be the polar opposite for the Phil-
lies.
Eventually, of course, the Phil-
lies streak of division titles will
come to an end.
But there is no reason to worry
about windows closing or players
aging.
Sure, there will be a year or
maybe even two when the Phil-
lies do not make the playoffs, but
even that goal is going to become
more easily attainable with the
expanded playoff format.
High-payroll teams like the
Phillies will benefit most froman
additional wild-card team. The
proof is in the history.
Of the 24 teams that would
have qualified as a second wild
cardsince the turnof the century,
10 of them ranked in the top five
in the payroll department and 14
were in the top 10. All but five
ranked in the top half among
baseballs 30 teams.
You might also find it interest-
ing that the Phillies string of five
straight playoff appearances
would be seven if the two-team
wild-card system had been in
place in 2005 and 2006.
It really is fair now to compare
the Phillies to the New York Yan-
kees and Boston Red Sox.
Regardless of what happens on
the field this season, the Phillies
are going to lead the National
League inthe payroll department
for the second straight season.
Youd have been accused of
smoking AstroTurf if you
thought that possible 15 years
ago.
With all due respect to the suc-
cess of theMoneyball As, it is still
trumpedby the power of the high
payroll because the guys with the
best OBPs, OPSs, and WARs
want to be paid.
You know how many losing
seasons the Yankees and Red Sox
have had in the 21st century?
Think low. Guess zero.
They did not always make the
playoffs and they did not always
win the World Series, but they
went into every season with a
fighting chance, and thats the
way it should forever be for the
Phillies, too.
Perhaps an even better role
model for the Phillies than the
Yankees and Red Sox is the St.
Louis Cardinals, the premier
team in the National League
since the turn of the century.
Since Y2K, the Cardinals have
won six division titles, two wild-
card berths, and two World Se-
ries. They have missed the play-
offs just four times in that span
and had just one losing season.
Their payroll has never come
close to the roughly $175 million
the Phillies are likely to dole out
in 2012, but St. Louis has consis-
tently ranked among the top 10
and been either first or second
among NL Central teams.
M L B
Philadelphia
should be
competing
for a while
With expanded playoff format
and high payroll, Phils could
be premier N.L. club.
By BOB BROOKOVER
The Philadelphia Inquirer
DAVIE, Fla. New Miami
Dolphins coach Joe Philbin
stood at a lectern, swallowed
hard and began to talk about his
sons recent drowning. His wife
and their five surviving children
sat to the side with somber ex-
pressions reflecting a loss worse
than any game.
Moments later everyone was
laughing as Philbin joked about
his good fortune in becoming a
first-time head coach. He and his
family are counting on a bright
future to ease the pain of the re-
cent past, and his introductory
news conference Saturday was
part of the healing process.
All people suffer loss, said
Philbins wife, Diane. Whenyou
lose someone, its part of life, but
you have to be resilient. You
have to take the bad things and
difficult times and turn them in-
to good, and thats what we will
do. And well do it with the Mia-
mi Dolphin family.
Philbin, the
Green Bay
Packers offen-
sive coordina-
tor for the past
five years, said
hes eager to
lead the Dol-
phins back to
the top of the NFL. He noted
they havent been there since
1973, the year of their most re-
cent Super Bowl championship
season.
He also did a little math re-
garding his career. He has been
an assistant since1984 10,061
days, by his count and said
that gives him sufficient experi-
ence to succeed as a head coach.
I havealot of faithinwhat Im
capable of doing, he said. Ive
beenfortunate to work witha lot
of good people. Ive been fortu-
nate to be around winning pro-
grams, places where we devel-
oped players, we developed
men, we had good teams. Im
just confident well be able to
buildthesamethinghereinMia-
mi.
And then, 22 minutes into the
news conference, the subject
turned to his sons death.
Philbin interviewed with the
Dolphins for the first time Jan. 7.
The next day, the body of 21-
year-old Michael Philbin was re-
covered from an icy Wisconsin
river.
Youre heartbroken. Youre
devastated. Its hard to compre-
hend, Philbin said.
He spent a week away from
the Packers, drew comfort from
a funeral that included 68 family
members, then rejoined his
teamlast Sunday for its division-
al playoff loss to the New York
Giants.
Philbin said he went home
that night uncertain whether to
remain a candidate for the Dol-
phins job or whether the po-
sition was even still open.
I had no idea, he said. The
TV hadnt been on in our house
for a week.
N F L
Emotional Philbin takes over Dolphins
By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer
Philbin
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
KINGSTON Peter Borum
finished with a game-high 29
points to help Lake-Lehman to a
70-63 overtime victory over
Wyoming Seminary Saturday
night.
Christopher OConnor fol-
lowed with 17 points while
Kevin Bohan netted 11 points.
For the Blue Knights, Seth
Callahan had 19 points and
Jason Ellis contributed with 16
points. E.J. Flippen rounded out
the double-digit scorers with a
12 point performance for Semi-
nary.
LAKE-LEHMAN (70): Bohan 5 0-1 11, Hillman
0 0-0 0, James 2 3-4 8, Poepperling 1 0-0 2,
OConnor 6 5-8 17, Dizbon 1 0-1 3, Davenport 0
0-0 0, Borum 13 3-6 29. Totals 28 11-20 70.
WYOMING SEMINARY (63): Ellis 6 2-2 16,
Hwang 3 0-2 6, Flippen 6 0-1 12, Sedor 0 0-0 0,
Lefkowitz 1 0-0 2, Callahan 6 5-10 19, Barilla 2 4-4
8. Totals 24 11-18 63.
Lake-Lehman .............................. 9 16 20 14 11 70
Wyoming Seminary.................... 21 11 17 10 4 63
3-Point Field Goals LEH 3 (Bohan, James,
Dizbon); SEM 4 (Ellis 2, Callahan 2)
Holy Redeemer 74,
Hunter College H.S. 61
The Royals won the exhibi-
tion against the New York
school by knocking down nine
3-pointers.
Ryan DeRemer led Redeemer
with 15 points, including a trio
of 3s.
Mike Prociak contributed 14
points for the Royals, while
Shahael Wallace added 10 in the
victory.
HOLY REDEEMER (74): DeRemer 5 2-2 15,
Boutanos 0 4-7 4, Wallace 5 0-0 10, Kane 0 2-2 2,
Cavanaugh 3 0-0 9, Ell 3 0-0 8, Banas 2 2-2 7,
Morrison 1 0-0 2, Choman 1 1-2 3, Prociak 6 2-5
14. Totals 26 13-20 74.
HUNTER COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL (61):
Hamza 2 1-1 5, Kadeem 4 2-3 10, Fabien 3 0-0 7,
Carlos 2 0-0 4, Jonah 0 0-0 0, Alex 1 0-0 2, Peter 0
0-0 0, Kenny 2 0-0 6, Steven 4 0-0 11, Ari 5 1-2 16.
Totals 33 4-6 61.
Holy Redeemer ........................... 16 15 20 23 74
Hunter ........................................... 16 10 15 20 61
3-Point Field Goals HR 9 (DeRemer 3,
Cavanaugh 3, Ell 2, Banas); HCHS 11 (Fabien,
Kenny 2, Steven 3, Ari 5)
Hanover Area 60, Nanticoke 38
ShaQuille Rolle scored a
game-high 23 points to lead
Hanover Area to a victory over
visiting Nanticoke. Jake Barber
followed with 14 points.
For Nanticoke, Luke Casey
netted 20 points.
NANTICOKE (38): Yudichak 2 0-0 4, Zaykoski
1 0-0 2, Matulewski 3 2-2 8, Casey 9 2-4 20,
Valenti 0 1-2 1, Kairo 0 0-0 0, Bevan 1 0-0 3. Totals
16 5-8 38.
HANOVER AREA (60): Steve 1 0-0 2, Colon 4
0-3 8, Rolle 8 7-8 23, Barber 6 2-4 14, Bogart 3 0-0
8, Sharif 0 0-0 0, Bennett 0 1-2 1, Everetts 1 0-0 2,
Hoolick 0 0-0 0, Marcincavage 1 0-0 2. Totals 24
10-17 60.
Nanticoke...................................... 7 14 9 8 38
Hanover Area............................... 14 6 19 21 60
3-Point Field Goals NAN 1 (Bevan); HAN 2
(Bogart 2)
MMI 41, Weatherly 39
Alex VanHoekelen netted 10
points, including a three-pointer
as MMI was able to defeat
Weatherly on the road. George
Gera and Cory Rogers each
followed with nine points.
MMI (41): G. Gera 3 3-4 9, Kollar 2 2-3 6,
Rogers 3 1-2 9, Wenner 1 2-4 4, VanHoekelen 4
1-4 10, Marchetti 0 0-0 0, Karchner 1 1-2 3,
Kupsho 0 0-0 0. Totals 14 10-19 41.
WEATHERLY (39): Coll 1 0-0 2, L. Reiner 1 0-0
2, Stallone 3 2-3 8, J. Reiner 2 0-1 4, Haganey 2
3-6 7, Walton 5 1-2 11, Wollish 2 1-2 5. Totals 16
7-14 39.
MMI.................................................. 13 9 8 11 41
Weatherly........................................ 10 5 19 5 39
3-Point Field Goals MMI 3 (Rogers 2, VanHoe-
kelen)
H.S. WRESTLING
Blue Knights sweep tri-meet
Wyoming Seminary competed
in and won three duals at the
Mount Herman School in Mas-
sachusetts on Saturday.
The Blue Knights defeated
Mount Herman 69-9, Phillips
Andover 69-6 and Belmont Hill
74-0.
The team had 10 grapplers go
3-0 on the day with Danny Boy-
chuck (106), Logan May (113),
Tyler Ponte (120), Dom Malone
(126), Tyler Fraley (132), Ty
White (138), Eric Morris (170),
Matt Doggett (195), A.J. Viz-
carrondo (220) and Michael
Johnson (285) all not losing.
Seminarys Jack Walsh (145),
Sal Diaz (152), Ryan McMullan
(160) and Hunter Jones (126) all
posted two wins on the day.
H I G H S C H O O L R O U N D U P
Lehman tops Seminary boys in overtime
The Times Leader staff
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Joe Barber of Hanover Area collides with Nanticokes Joe Yud-
ichak (No. 11) of Nanticoke on a fast break during Saturdays game.
WILKES-BARRE TWP. In
one game, Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
ton Penguins defenseman Alex
Grant catapultedtotheteamlead
in power-play scoring.
A five-point night on the man
advantage has a
tendency to pro-
duce such a re-
sult.
Grant regis-
tered two goals
and three assists
as the Penguins
went 5-for-12 on
the power play
to defeat the Sy-
racuse Crunch
6-2 on Saturday
in front of a bois-
terous sellout
crowd. Coming
into the game
Grant had eight
power play
points. At the
conclusion, his five power play
points put him in the team lead
with 13.
The Penguins set season highs
for power play goals (5) and pow-
er play chances (12), while Grant
tied the team record with his five
power play points.
The Penguins have now won
five in a row, including two at
home, and improved their record
to 24-12-1-4 to remain tied with
Norfolk for second place in the
East Division with 53 points, two
behind Hershey.
Its awesome to be able to play
this well at home and get back-to-
back wins, Grant said. Its what
weve been trying to do for a while
now. Its good to give the sold-out
crowd a night like this.
Grant got the crowd roaring
when he blasted a slapshot from
the point for a power play goal at
11:46 of the first period.
Syracuse silenced the crowd 34
seconds later when former Pen-
guin Luca Caputi also connected
with a shot fromthe point to even
things up at 1.
Syracuse penalties gave the Pen-
guins five power plays in the first
period, and the generosity contin-
ued for the rest of the game.
The ref isnt going to give us
anything, youneedto drawthe pe-
nalties, center Ben Street said.
We were grooving pretty good on
the power play. Gain momentum
and be a positive factor every
time the refs armwent up and we
went on the power play, that was
our mentality.
Grant clearly bought into the
mentality on Saturday.
After the Crunch gained a 2-1
lead on a Patrick Maroon goal at
7:52, Syracuse goaltender Martin
Cousineau was called for delay of
game followed by a holding penal-
ty on defenseman Sean Zimmer-
manthat gavethePenguins 49sec-
onds with a two-man advantage.
Thirty seconds into the power
play, Bryan Lerg put home a re-
bound froma Geoff Walker shot to
even things up, 2-2. Grant earned
the second assist on the play.
With 1:31 remaining on the sec-
ond penalty to Zimmerman, the
Penguins power playstruckagain.
This time it was Street, who col-
lected a pass from Grant in the
neutral zone, split two Syracuse
defenders in the offensive zone
and placed a shot through the five-
hole to give the Penguins a 3-2
lead.
The goal was Streets fourth in
the last five games andgives hima
total of eight points in the span.
It was also the third power play
goal of the night for the Penguins,
and they werent finished yet.
Syracuse gave the Penguins four
more power play chances in the
third period, and they connected
ontwoof them. Walker put homea
rebound from a Grant slapshot to
make it 4-2. Later in the period,
Grant put another slapshot in the
back of the net to give the Pen-
guins a 5-2leadandtheir fifthpow-
er play goal.
He was clearly feeling it to-
night, Street said. Hes got a hard
shot and he can shoot it a million
miles an hour. He was getting
those through.
Hynes said the power play
clicked because they adhered to a
simple formula of winning face-
offs, gaining possession, getting
the pucktothe points andblasting
it on net.
Aside from the formula, Hynes
added that the raucous crowd
played a role as well.
Tonight was probably the best
atmosphere we had all year
long, he said. The players real-
ized that and fed off the energy of
the crowd.
The Penguins have nowscored
at least one power play goal in
seven straight games. While it
earned them the win on Satur-
day, Hynes said the team has to
improve, especially at even
strength, if they hope to beat the
Crunch tonight in a rematch in
Syracuse.
Syracuse is a good team and
we have to be better tomorrow,
Hynes said. We cant be the
same team. We have tobe better.
NOTES
Scott Munroe stopped 21 of
23 shots to win his fourth consec-
utive start.
Zach Sill scored the Pen-
guins only evenstrengthgoal late
in the third period. He now has
goals in back-to-back games.
Syracuse.................................................... 1 1 0 2
Penguins .................................................... 1 2 3 6
First PeriodScoring 1. WBS, Alex Grant 2 (Mor-
mina, McDonald) power play 11:46. SYR, Luca Ca-
puti 5 (Holland, Gordon) 12:10. Penalties SYR,
Zimmerman (boarding) 3:38; WBS, Chupp (tripping)
6:07; SYR, Kennedy (slashing) 9:14; SYR, Kurtz
(tripping) 11:10; SYR, Zimmerman (elbowing)
17:05; SYR, bench-served by Caputi (too many
men) 19:47.
Second PeriodScoring 3. SYR, Patrick Ma-
roon 20 (Sexton, Fraser) 7:52. 4. WBS, Bryan Lerg
17 (Walker, Grant) power play 12:39. 5. WBS, Ben
Street 15 (Grant, Strait) power play 14:00. Penalties
WBS, Strait (interference) 5:30; SYR, Cousineau
(delay of game) 10:58; SYR, Zimmerman (holding)
12:10; WBS, Rust (slashing) 16:15; SYR, MacMillan
(hooking) 17:51.
Third PeriodScoring 6. WBS, Geoff Walker
10 (Grant, Mormina) power play 8:48. 7. WBS, Alex
Grant 3(Lerg, McDonald) power play 14:15. 8. WBS,
Zach Sill 8 (Gibbons, DeFazio) 16:42. Penalties
SYR, McMillan (boarding) 4:56; WBS, McDonald
(high-sticking) 5:21; SYR, Schofield (tripping) 8:42;
SYR, Bodie (boarding) 13:07; SYR, McMillan (trip-
ping) 13:46.
Shots on goalSyracuse, 5-9-9-23; Penguins,
14-16-7-37
Power-play OpportunitiesSyracuse, 0 of 4;
Penguins, 5 of 12
GoaltendersSyracuse, Martin Cousineau 3-
1-0 (32 saves 37 shots); Penguins, Scott Munroe
8-3-2 (21-23)
StartersSyracuse, G Martin Cousineau, D
SeanZimmerman, DBryanRodney, LWLucaCapu-
ti, CPeter Holland, RWAndrewGordon; Penguins
G Scott Munroe, D Brian Strait, D Robert Bortuzzo,
LWPaul Thompson, CBen Street, RWColin McDo-
nald
Three Stars1. WBS, Alex Grant (two power
play goals, three power play assists); 2. WBS, Geoff
Walker (goal, assist); 3. WBS, Ben Street (goal)
RefereeKeith Kaval. LinesmenScott
Adams, Jim Harper.
Attendance8,172
P E N G U I N S
Pens power play clicks in rout
Wilkes-Barre scores five goals
with the man advantage to
defeat Syracuse on Saturday.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton right winger Geoff Walker, left, works behind the net as Syracuse goalkeeper
Martin Cousineau stands ready at Mohegan Sun Arena on Saturday night.
6
PENGUINS
2
CRUNCH
but the situation was defused
quickly before it could escalate.
I hate whenit ends like that,
Meyers coach Pat Toole said. It
ruins a good game.
No matter what happened, it
couldnt have ruined a tremen-
dous game by Lewis. The senior
forward scored a game-high 24
points and pulled down 17 re-
bounds. He was a rebound short
of a double-double by halftime
as the Mohawks brought a 27-21
lead into the locker room.
I thought Eugene was just a
monster on the boards, Toole
said of the Penn State football
recruit. It shows what a Divi-
sion I athlete is all about. And
RasheedMoore takes a heckof a
shot to the head, gets wrapped
up like a mummy andis begging
me to put him back in the
game.
Lewis and Moore were an un-
stoppable duo in the first half,
combining for all of Meyers
points. Moore finished with 18.
At the other end of the spec-
trumwas Smith, who scored his
lone point on a free throw with
10 seconds left that bumped the
lead to 54-46. His job was to
slowdown GARshooting guard
Darrell Crawford. He did just
that, holding Crawford to a lone
three-pointer and 10 points be-
low his average.
I hada lot of helpdefensively,
especially with himgoing under
screens and stuff like that,
Smith said. They do a good job
getting him off the ball and get-
ting him touches. My guys
bumped him off of screens and
helped me out a lot.
GAR never led, and Meyers
showed the first signs of pulling
away when Ryan Krawcenziuk
hit a three-pointer for a 38-26
lead at 1:44 of the third quarter.
The Grenadiers moved within
46-40 with 2:11 to play on a six-
point burst, but theyfailedtwice
on trips down court. Meyers
then went on its own 6-0 run to
put away the game.
GAR (48): Francis 5 3-4 13, Crawford 1 0-0 3,
Sharpe 4 1-2 11, Powell 3 1-2 7, Skrepenak 5 0-4
10, Ellis 1 1-2 4, Dempsey 0 0-0 0, John 0 0-0 0.
Totals 19 6-14 48.
MEYERS (54): Pape 1 0-0 3, Smith 0 1-4 1,
Krawczeniuk 1 4-5 7, Moore 6 5-7 18, Lewis 10 4-9
24, Szafran 0 0-0 0, Johnson 0 1-2 1. Totals 18 15-
27 54.
GAR ........................................... 7 14 9 18 48
Meyers....................................... 13 14 15 12 54
3-Point Field GoalsGAR4 (Crawford, Sharpe,
Ellis); MEY 3 (Pape, Krawczeniuk, Moore)
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Eugene Lewis of Meyers goes to the basket as Christian Skrepe-
nak of GAR defends during the first period of a game Saturday.
MEYERS
Continued from Page 1C
KAUPULEHU-KONA, Hawaii
Dan Forsman had six back-
ninebirdiesfor a7-under 65anda
two-stroke lead Saturday after
the second round of the Cham-
pions Tours season-openingMit-
subishi Electric Championship.
Forsman, a two-time winner
onthe 50-and-over tour, hada12-
under 132 total at Hualalai Re-
sort.
Brad Bryant had the days low
round, an 8-under 64, to match
2010championTomWatson(65)
and Jeff Sluman (66) at 10 under.
Forsman was back in the pack
after playing the front nine in 35.
He birdiedNos. 10 and11, moved
into a tie for first with birdies at
Nos. 13 and14, and pulled ahead
bysinkingan11-foot birdieputt at
the17th and hitting within 2 feet
onthefinal holetoset upanother
birdie.
The five-time PGA Tour win-
ner needed just 21 putts in his
round.
Bryant played a bogey-free
round, chipping in for two of his
eight birdies. His last winwas the
2007 U.S. Senior Open.
Watson also avoided bogeys
and eagled the 10th hole. At 62
years, 4 months, 18 days, he
would be the third-oldest winner
in Champions Tour history if he
pulls it off Sunday. Watson has
eight top-10 finishes in 11 previ-
ous starts in the event.
Michael Allen and Jay Haas
were tied for fifth, three shots
back. Defending champion John
Cook fired a 66 to share seventh
with Jay Don Blake, Denis Wat-
son, Loren Roberts and Bruce
Vaughan, whowastiedforfirst af-
ter the opening round with 2011
Player of the Year Tom Lehman.
Lehman was one of 12 players, in
afieldof 41, whodidnot breakpar
Saturday.
G O L F
Great back-nine gives
Forsman lead in Hawaii
The Associated Press
NEWYORKMilwaukee left-
fielderRyanBraunmaintainedhis
innocence, disputing allegations
that he took performance-en-
hancing substances when accept-
ing his National League MVP at
the Baseball Writers Awards Din-
ner at theNewYorkHiltononSat-
urday night.
"I always believed that a per-
sons character is revealed in
those moments of adversity," he
said. "I have so much respect for
the game of baseball. Everything
Ive done in my career has been
done with that appreciation in
mind."
Braun, who won the honors af-
ter hitting.332with33homeruns
and111RBI in the regular season,
also thanked the Players Associ-
ation for "supporting me, espe-
cially after everything Ive been
through the last couple of
months."
Brauntestedpositivefor elevat-
ed levels of testosterone in De-
cember. Hesappealingtheresults
this month but if Major League
Baseball deems that he was on
steroids, he could face a 50-game
suspension. It was the 89th an-
nual awards dinner, meant tohon-
or the biggest names in baseball.
"Sometimes in life, we all deal
with challenges we never expect-
ed," hesaid. "Wehaveanopportu-
nity to look at those challenges as
obstacles or opportunities and
Ive chosen to see every challenge
as an opportunity. This will be no
different."
NL MVP Braun maintains his innocence during awards dinner
By LAURA ALBANESE
Newsday
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 7C
AT PLAY
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
Dallas Jr. high cheers to 2nd-place
The Dallas Junior High Cheerleaders earned a second-place
trophy at the recent College Misericordia Cougar Challenge
Cheer Competition. The teamperformed a 90-second dance
and 60-second cheer. Pictured fromleft. Standing: Brooke
Faulls, captain; Angela Bendick, Jenny Sorber, coach; Brianna
Reinheimmer, Page Frederick. Sitting: Kaura Chavez, Court-
ney Powell, captain; Ashlie Alves.
Medical students donate to Friends of the Poor
An estimated 300 walkers, runners and tots recently took
part in the second annual TCMC Turkey Trot: 5K Walk/Run in
downtown Scranton. Organized by TCMCs class of 2014, the
community benefit raised nearly $5,000 and collected cloth-
ing and canned goods for Friends of the Poors annual
Thanksgiving dinner for senior citizens and other adults. Pre-
senting the check fromleft are second year medical students
Ashley Leberfinger, Ian Tafel, Allison Young, Megan Gooch,
Sister Ann Walsh, Johann Kolev, Daniel Benyo, Sean Wallace.
Dallas resident bags 10-pointer
Gerry Harteis of Dallas bagged a 10-point buck on the open-
ing day of rifle season. Gerry was hunting with his son-in-law,
grandchildren, and some of his close friends. Pictured (from
left): Gerry Harteis, grandchildren Christian Sypniewski, Gavin
Sypniewski, Ethan Sypniewski
Blue Knights recognize fall athlete award winners
Wyoming Seminary recently recognized athletes who received Most Valuable Player, Coaches
Awards and Gold Awards for the fall season.The recipients are pictured (fromleft) first row:
Kristian Stefanides, field hockey gold award; Ellie McDougal, field hockey gold award; Renata
ODonnell, girls cross country gold award; Alannah Trombetta, girls cross country Most Valua-
ble Runner; Emma Spath, girls tennis gold award. Second row: AshLeigh Sebia, field hockey
MVP, gold award; Ann Romanowski, field hockey MVP, gold award; Sheena Syal, girls tennis
gold award; Kristina Yannotta, girls cross country gold award; Jane Henry, girls tennis Blue
Knight Award; Maegan Coulter, girls tennis Coaches Award. Third row: Gordon Steward Kies-
ling, boys cross country Most Valuable Runner; Hyo BumShin, boys soccer gold award; Imaz
Athar, boys cross country Coaches Award; Frank Henry, Most Valuable Golfer; Henry Cornell,
boys soccer MVP; Jonathan Zirnheld, golf Coaches Award.
Cantolao U15 girls soccer team wins U18 tournament
The Cantolao USA U15 Girls Premiere Soccer recently teamtook first place in Lanco Field-
houses U18 pre-indoor cup tournament in East Petersburg last month winning four games,
not losing any and recording two shutouts.
Pictured fromleft: front row, captains Olivia Termini and Emily Schramm. Middle row, Abby
Wolfgang, Kalie Onukiavage, Gabby Termini, Sydney Emershaw, Rachael Velehoski, Olivia
Gregorio, and Nina Paoloni. Back row, head coach Hubert Herrera, Natalie Sulkowski, Shelby
Szoke, Missle Szmurlo, Bella Darbenzio, Josie Zapotosky, Bethany Carpenter.
WVCC women golfers hold tourney for breast cancer
The 11th Annual Isabelle McGuire Spohrer Memorial Rally For
A Cure Tournament recently held at the Wyoming Valley
Country Club raised over $4,500 for the Susan G. Komen
Foundation. Pictured (fromleft) first row: Marie Milhalos, Don-
na Long, winners; co-chairs Crystal Hritzik; granddaughters
Emily Bliss, Mary Margaret Bliss; runners-up Michelle Hazle-
ton, Sheila McFadden. Second row: George A. Spohrer, Jr.,
Polly Spohrer Bliss, Joan Spohrer, Attorney Jonathan Spohr-
er. Third row: Attorney George Spohrer, Sr., Rebecca Spohrer,
Caroline Spohrer.
U14 girls soccer team claims indoor tournament
The Wyoming Valley Soccer Club U14 girls teamrecently fin-
ished first in the Eastern Pennsylvania Youth Soccer Associ-
ation U15 girls Indoor State Cup. Teammembers are (from
left): first row, Maddie Mimnaugh, Megan Miller, Haley Gobla,
Nicole Cavanaugh, Joey Kress. Second row, coach Javier
Rodriguez, Tiffany Tubioli, Victoria Morrison, Lexi Gaetano,
Maddie Goodwin, SamMayers, Julia Adams.
Tennis team ends 11 ranked in top 10 in country
The mens 4.0 tennis teamfromKirby Park in Wilkes-Barre
finished 2011 ranked in the top ten amateur tennis teams in
America in the recently released year end rankings. The team
won the 2011 United States Tennis Association (USTA) Cham-
pionship for the Eastern Pennsylvania district and the Mid-
dlestates National Region with an undefeated match record.
Pictured (fromleft): Jeff Sirota, Jon Hand, Blake Bonser, Matt
Berger, Wes Woo, JimLandon, Fred Hockenbury (captain),
Marc Smulowitz, Brad Kurlancheek. Missing fromphoto are:
Steve Brand, Tony Bevevino, Doug Fawbush, JimHayes, Sal
Saraniti, Eric Fritzges, Bill Eydler (co-captain).
MVP Womelsdorf leads Rangers to tourney title
Alivia Womelsdorf earned MVP honors after scoring 33 points to lead Northwest Area to a
59-55 win over Benton in the championship of the 25th Annual Benton Tournament last
month. Sarah Shaffer added 13 points and was also selected to the all-tournament team,
while Christa Bosak chipped in with seven for the Lady Rangers. Fromleft, front row: Sa-
rah Shaffer, Christa Bosak, Deanna Gill, Maranda Koehn. Back row, coach Kyle Long, Brina
Sotelo, coach John Sotelo, Angel Rollo, Cassy Rupert, Faith Rierson, Alivia Womelsdorf,
Emily Buerger, Kelsey Yustat, coach Chris Piatt.
Royals JV squad claims PA Holiday Tournament
The Holy Redeemer girls junior varsity basketball teamre-
cently captured the Pittston Area Girls Holiday Tournament
defeating Pittston Area in the finals. Eric Lawson coaches
Royals. Pictured (fromleft): first row, Marnie Kusakavitch,
Melanie Kusakavitch, Devon Claherty, Krista Williams. Back
row: Marissa Durako, Nicole Slavoski, Sarah Warnagiris, Salina
Malacari, Julie Kosik. Missing fromthe photo is Kaalyn GIr-
man, Sara Mirra and Alexia Evans.
Youngster nabs
seven-pointer
Christian Sypniewski, 12,
bagged a 7-point buck during
the hunting season while out
with family. Photo fromleft:
first row, Gavin Sypniewski,
brother; Christian Sypniewski.
Second row: Gerry Harteis,
grandfather; Third row, Bob
Sypniewski, father; Ethan Syp-
niewski, brother.
C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
NFL SUNDAY
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
N E W Y O R K G I A N T S
Statistics after 2 games
COMP AVG TD INT
PASSING ATT COM PCT YARDS GAIN TD PCT INT PCT LONG RATE
E. Manning. 65 44 67.7 607 9.34 6 9.2 1 1.5 72t 121.8
TEAM.......... 65 44 67.7 607 9.34 6 9.2 1 1.5 72t 121.8
OPPO-
NENTS....... 87 50 57.5 463 5.32 2 2.3 1 1.1 21 75.0
RUSHING ATT YARDS AVG LONG TD
Bradshaw............................................................................... 26 126 4.8 30 0
Br. Jacobs.............................................................................. 23 114 5.0 34 1
E. Manning ............................................................................ 6 23 3.8 14 0
D.. Ware................................................................................. 3 4 1.3 4 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 58 267 4.6 34 1
OPPONENTS....................................................................... 44 211 4.8 29 0
RECEIVING NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
H. Nicks.................................................................................. 13 280 21.5 72t 4
Bradshaw............................................................................... 8 43 5.4 18 0
Cruz ........................................................................................ 7 102 14.6 22 0
Manningham.......................................................................... 7 99 14.1 27t 2
J. Ballard................................................................................. 3 33 11.0 17 0
Beckum.................................................................................. 3 29 9.7 12 0
Br. Jacobs.............................................................................. 2 8 4.0 4 0
D.. Ware................................................................................. 1 13 13.0 13 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 44 607 13.8 72t 6
OPPONENTS........................................................................ 50 463 9.3 21 2
INTERCEPTIONS NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
D. Grant .................................................................................. 1 0 0.0 0 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 1 0 0.0 0 0
OPPONENTS........................................................................ 1 12 12.0 12 0
SACKS NO.
Umenyiora.................................................................................................................................. 3.0
Boley........................................................................................................................................... 2.0
Bernard....................................................................................................................................... 1.0
TEAM.......................................................................................................................................... 6.0
OPPONENTS............................................................................................................................ 2.0
GROSS NET IN
PUNTING NO. YARDS AVG AVG 20 LONG BLK
Weatherford............................................................. 6 279 46.5 40.5 1 54 0
TEAM........................................................................ 6 279 46.5 40.5 1 54 0
OPPONENTS......................................................... 9 401 44.6 39.2 1 59 0
PUNT RETURNS NO. FC YARDS AVG LONG TD
Blackmon................................................................................... 5 2 28 5.6 12 0
TEAM ......................................................................................... 5 1 28 5.6 12 0
OPPONENTS........................................................................... 1 0 16 16.0 16 0
KICKOFF RETURNS NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
Jernigan............................................................................................ 1 27 27.0 27 0
D. Martin........................................................................................... 1 4 4.0 4 0
TEAM................................................................................................ 2 31 15.5 27 0
OPPONENTS.................................................................................. 8 192 24.0 27 0
OFF. DEF.
FUMBLES/RECOVERIES FUM REC. REC.
Blackburn........................................................................................................ 0 0 1
D. Grant ........................................................................................................... 0 0 1
A. Rolle............................................................................................................ 0 0 1
TEAM............................................................................................................... 0 0 3
OPPONENTS................................................................................................. 3 0 0
SCORE BY QUARTERS................................................................ 1 2 3 4 OT TOT
TEAM................................................................................................. 10 17 10 24 0 61
OPPONENTS................................................................................... 3 9 3 7 0 22
TOUCHDOWNS LONG
SCORING TOT RUS REC RET XP/XPA FG/FGA FG SAF PTS
H. Nicks......................... 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24
Tynes............................. 0 0 0 0 7 7 4 6 35 0 19
Manningham................. 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12
Br. Jacobs..................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
TEAM............................. 7 1 6 0 7 7 4 6 35 0 61
OPPONENTS............... 2 0 2 0 2 2 2 2 47 1 22
FIELD GOALS 1-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50+
Tynes ................................................................................................ 0-0 2-2 2-3 0-1 0-0
TEAM................................................................................................. 0-0 2-2 2-3 0-1 0-0
OPPONENTS.................................................................................. 0-0 0-0 1-1 1-1 0-0
S A N F R A N C I S C O 4 9 E R S
Statistics after 1 game
COMP AVG TD INT
PASSING ATT COM PCT YARDS GAIN TD PCT INT PCT LONG RATE
Ale. Smith .. 42 24 57.1 299 7.12 3 7.1 0 0.0 49t 103.2
TEAM.......... 42 24 57.1 299 7.12 3 7.1 0 0.0 49t 103.2
OPPO-
NENTS....... 63 40 63.5 462 7.33 4 6.3 2 3.2 66t 93.5
RUSHING ATT YARDS AVG LONG TD
Gore ....................................................................................... 13 89 6.8 42 0
Ale. Smith .............................................................................. 1 28 28.0 28t 1
K. Hunter................................................................................ 6 23 3.8 11 0
Ginn Jr. .................................................................................. 1 3 3.0 3 0
Anth. Dixon............................................................................ 1 0 0.0 0 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 22 143 6.5 42 1
OPPONENTS....................................................................... 14 37 2.6 7 0
RECEIVING NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
Ve. Davis................................................................................ 7 180 25.7 49t 2
Gore........................................................................................ 7 38 5.4 11 0
M. Crabtree............................................................................ 4 25 6.3 9 1
Ky. Williams ........................................................................... 2 12 6.0 6 0
Ginn Jr. ................................................................................... 1 11 11.0 11 0
K. Hunter ................................................................................ 1 13 13.0 13 0
Bru. Miller............................................................................... 1 16 16.0 16 0
Peelle...................................................................................... 1 4 4.0 4 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 24 299 12.5 49t 3
OPPONENTS........................................................................ 40 462 11.6 66t 4
INTERCEPTIONS NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
Ta. Brown............................................................................... 1 0 0.0 0 0
Goldson.................................................................................. 1 41 41.0 41 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 2 41 20.5 41 0
OPPONENTS........................................................................ 0 0 0.0 0 0
SACKS NO.
Brooks......................................................................................................................................... 1.0
Ald. Smith................................................................................................................................... 1.0
Ju. Smith .................................................................................................................................... 1.0
TEAM.......................................................................................................................................... 3.0
OPPONENTS............................................................................................................................ 4.0
GROSS NET IN
PUNTING NO. YARDS AVG AVG 20 LONG BLK
A. Lee....................................................................... 8 396 49.5 43.4 4 63 0
TEAM........................................................................ 8 396 49.5 43.4 4 63 0
OPPONENTS......................................................... 5 227 45.4 39.6 2 60 0
PUNT RETURNS NO. FC YARDS AVG LONG TD
Ginn Jr. ...................................................................................... 2 1 23 11.5 16 0
Ky. Williams............................................................................... 1 0 6 6.0 6 0
TEAM ......................................................................................... 3 1 29 9.7 16 0
OPPONENTS........................................................................... 3 1 29 9.7 13 0
KICKOFF RETURNS NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
K. Hunter .......................................................................................... 1 25 25.0 25 0
Ky. Williams ..................................................................................... 1 20 20.0 20 0
TEAM................................................................................................ 2 45 22.5 25 0
OPPONENTS.................................................................................. 5 59 11.8 22 0
OFF. DEF.
FUMBLES/RECOVERIES FUM REC. REC.
Costanzo......................................................................................................... 0 0 1
Gore................................................................................................................. 1 1 0
Co. Jones........................................................................................................ 0 0 1
Ale. Smith........................................................................................................ 2 1 0
P. Willis............................................................................................................ 0 0 1
TEAM............................................................................................................... 3 2 3
OPPONENTS................................................................................................. 3 0 1
SCORE BY QUARTERS .................................................................. 1 2 3 4 OT TOT
TEAM.................................................................................................... 14 3 3 16 0 36
OPPONENTS..................................................................................... 0 14 0 18 0 32
TOUCHDOWNS LONG
SCORING TOT RUS REC RET XP/XPA FG/FGA FG SAF PTS
Akers.............................. 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 41 0 12
Ve. Davis....................... 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12
M. Crabtree................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Ale. Smith...................... 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
TEAM............................. 4 1 3 0 3 3 3 3 41 0 36
OPPONENTS............... 4 0 4 0 3 3 1 1 48 0 32
FIELD GOALS 1-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50+
Akers................................................................................................. 0-0 1-1 1-1 1-1 0-0
TEAM................................................................................................. 0-0 1-1 1-1 1-1 0-0
OPPONENTS.................................................................................. 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-1 0-0
NEW YORK GIANTS VS. SAN FRANSISCO 49ERS
SAN FRANCISCO
The Giants boasted a phys-
ical, intimidating defense
with athletic linebackers
and stout linemen capable
of stifling the NFLs most
productive offenses. San
Francisco featured a high-
powered passing attack led
by an eventual Hall of Fame
quarterback in his prime
with receivers capable of
turningshort passesintobig
gains.
When the San Francisco
49ers host the NewYork Gi-
ants in the NFC champion-
shipgametodayfor ashot at
the Super Bowl, the match-
up conjures memories from
apreviouseraof thisgreat ri-
valry even if the roles are
somewhat reversed.
The elite quarterback
now is New Yorks Eli Man-
ning, who connects on big
plays to Hakeem Nicks and
Victor Cruzinasimilar fash-
iontohowJoeMontanaand
Jerry Rice did for the dom-
inant Niners in the1980s.
San Franciscos current
front seven led by relentless
defensive lineman Justin
Smith, rookie pass-rushing
specialist Aldon Smith and
fierce linebackers Patrick
Willis and NaVorro Bow-
man resembles that old Gi-
ants group featuring Hall of
Famers Lawrence Taylor
and Harry Carson.
And who could have pre-
dicted this surprising pair-
ing?
The Giants (11-7) toppled
defending champion Green
Bay 37-20 last Sunday when
everybody figured the road
to the Super Bowl would go
through Lambeau Field. In-
stead, NewYork is traveling
west toSanFranciscotoface
the upstart 49ers (14-3) in a
meeting of franchises with
so many fresh faces on the
big stage.
Jim Harbaughs mighty
men as he calls them
stunnedDrewBreesandthe
favored Saints 36-32 when
AlexSmithhit VernonDavis
for the game-winning 14-
yard touchdown with 9 sec-
onds remaining.
Smith knows both the
49ers andGiants showedits
anybodys game come play-
off time.
Lookat last week, I think
everybody thought the road
was going to go through
Lambeau. I thinkeverybody
assumed the NFC cham-
pionship game was going to
get played there and look
what happens, Smith said.
These teams at this point,
everybodys as good as each
other and its all going to
come down to howyou exe-
cuteonthat day. Wereall ca-
pable of beating each other,
thats for sure.
Smith and Manning each
orchestrated five fourth-
quarter comebacks during
the regular season, yet Man-
ningmissedina27-20lossat
San Francisco on Nov. 13
when Justin Smith batted
away his last-ditch pass at-
tempt onfourthdowninthe
waning moments.
This is about the NFC
championship. Its anoppor-
tunity to get this win and go
ontotheSuper Bowl, Man-
ning said. We played them
once before. We know
theyre a goodteam. Theres
no denying that. Theyre
playing great football.
Theyre playing with great
confidence. Its going to be
excitinggoingout there and
havinganothershot andsee-
ing what we can do.
Niners long snapper
Brian Jennings is the only
one left on either side from
San Franciscos last trip to
theplayoffsinJanuary2003,
when the 49ers rallied for a
stunning 39-38 comeback
victory against the Giants at
Candlestick Park. San Fran-
cisco also had beaten New
York during the regular sea-
son that year.
Its sold out for tonights
game with rain in the fore-
cast as the 49ers look for
their first trip to the NFCti-
tle game since the 1997 sea-
son. Former 49ers owner
Eddie DeBartolo Jr. will
serveashonorarycaptainaf-
ter team president and ne-
phew, Jed York, called him
immediately after beating
the Saints with the thought-
ful invite.
Fittingly, DeBartolo own-
ed the team from 1977-98,
when the 49ers won five Su-
per Bowls. Hewas affection-
ately known as Mr. D to
his players and coaches.
Theonlyother timethese
two franchises faced off in
the conference champion-
ship the game finished in
memorable fashion. OnJan.
20, 1991, Roger Craig fum-
bled with the 49ers leading
13-12 late in the fourth quar-
ter and the Giants went on
to win 15-13 to deny San
Franciscoa chance at a third
straight Super Bowl title.
NewYorkthenbeat theBills
to capture its second Super
Bowl.
These teams met six
times in the playoffs be-
tween the 1981 and 94 sea-
sons with the winner going
on to win the Super Bowl
four times.
There shouldnt be too
many elements of surprise
today considering how re-
cently they last played,
though Harbaugh is always
good for a fewtricks.
That first gamehas noth-
ingtodowithwhat happens
Sunday night, Giants safe-
ty Antrel Rolle said.
Davis had a career day
against New Orleans with
seven catches for 180 yards
the most yards receiving
by a tight end in a playoff
game so the Giants cer-
tainly will try to neutralize
him and put constant pres-
sure on a never-more-confi-
dent Smith.
Harbaugh has used the
phrase dont overcook it
with his players as a refer-
ence to sticking with what
got themthisfarinaremark-
able turnaround season.
Burnt meat, stale bread
doesnt taste real good,
Harbaugh said. Like to get
it just right. Not under-
cooked, not overcooked.
In the November game,
the 49ers won without rely-
ing on running back Frank
Gore, whose franchise-re-
cord streak of five straight
games with 100 yards rush-
ingendedwithakneeinjury
and his first career game
with zero yards.
Forget about it. Hesready
to roll this weekend.
These Giants, 49ers are mirror images of their old selves
The rivalry renewed
By JANIE McCAULEY
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
Giants QB Eli Manning (10) led his team to a playoff victory over the Falcons and
defensive end John Abraham (55) before beating the favored Green Bay Packers.
AP FILE PHOTO
San Francisco greats Joe Montana and Jerry Rice were key players in the teams
six playoff meetings with the Giants between the 1981 and 94 seasons.
AP PHOTO
The 49ers Patrick Willis (52) and Jus-
tin Smith (94) are two big pieces in the
teams defensive success this season.
AP FILE PHOTO
Former Giants linebacker Lawrence
Taylor was a force on the field for New
York during the 1986 season.
theAFCcrownsince2007, whenit
was unbeaten until the Giants
pulled off a shocker in the Super
Bowl. The Patriots last NFL title
came in January 2005.
Toget their fourthleaguecham-
pionship under coach Bill Belich-
ickandwithBradyat quarterback,
theyll need to have their offense
in high gear, which it has been
nearly all season. The Patriots
scored at least 27 points in all but
threegames andaveraged32.8, in-
cluding last weeks 45-10 rout of
Denver, their ninth straight victo-
ry.
But NewEnglanddidnt beat an
opponent that finishedwithawin-
ning record, and lost to its two
most difficult foes, Pittsburghand
the Giants.
Baltimore (13-4) most assured-
ly presents a difficult challenge,
with a defense that yielded 266
points, more thanonlytwoteams.
I think we have a lot of confi-
dence, we are a confident type
team, have a lot of good players
and they feed off each other, All-
Pro receiver Welker said. We feel
someone will step up and make a
play... andit makes it toughonde-
fenses.
I understand we are playing a
great football team this week and
havetobeontopof everything. No
mental errors, no bad mistakes,
knowing your job and taking care
of your business.
Brady usually does that, al-
though before the romp past Den-
ver, he and the Patriots had lost
three straight postseason games.
He is 4-0 in regular-season meet-
ingswiththeRavens, but lost their
only playoff matchup.
If heisnt at hisbest, it will bebe-
cause of Lewis, Reed and that
staunch Baltimore D. The Ravens
are as physical as anyone, and one
thing that historically has slowed
Brady has been when a defense
gets in his face, disrupts his
rhythm and hits him. Many
times.
Its more important that we
stop their whole offense, said
Reed, whom Belichick called the
greatest safetyhehasfacedduring
his coaching career. We cant fo-
cus on one particular player, be-
cause Brady doesnt. Brady
throws it to everybody. Ive been
sayingthat all week. Hell throwit
to an offensive lineman. Were
looking at everybody thats eligi-
ble thats going out on a route and
not going out on a route. Were
payingattentiontoeverybody. Ev-
erybodyhas aresponsibility. They
have 11guys on the field. We have
11guysonthefield. Everybodyhas
to do their responsibility.
The 11 guys on each side of the
ball at Candlestick Park for the
NFCchampionshipgame will car-
ry on a tradition of notable meet-
ings that dates back to when the
49ers (14-3) and Giants (11-7)
were dominating the conference
in the 1980s. Their only faceoff in
thetitlegamewasinJanuary1991,
when New York kicked five field
goals for a 15-13 victory, prevent-
ingSanFranciscofromgoingafter
athirdstraightSuperBowl trophy.
While its fun to conjure up me-
mories of Joe Montana, Jerry
Rice, Ronnie Lott, Lawrence Tay-
lor and Matt Bahr, this years par-
ticipants aremoreconcernedwith
addingtoawinninglegacy. This is
the 49ers first playoff appearance
since the 2002 season, when they
won a wild 39-38 wild-card game
against the Giants. New York, of
course, won it all four years ago.
Winning is what its all about
and it definitely makes coming to
work a lot better than hearing,
Whos going to be your newhead
coach or defensive coordinator?
All-Pro defensive tackle Justin
Smith said. Ill take this over the
other for sure.
No worries on the coaching
front after JimHarbaughmadehis
first year inchargeoneof themost
successful for any rookie coach.
Harbaugh doesnt have much of a
feel for Giants-49ers, though; he
didnt play for either team.
More appropriate, perhaps, is
the 27-20 win by the 49ers in No-
vember, a game decided only
when Smith blocked Eli Man-
nings last-minute pass deep in
San Francisco territory. It was the
latest installment of a grand rival-
ry.
Until today.
CLASSIC
Continued from Page 1C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 9C
NFL SUNDAY
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
BALTIMORE RAVENS VS. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
B A L T I M O R E R A V E N S
Statistics after 1 game
COMP AVG TD INT
PASSING ATT COM PCT YARDS GAIN TD PCT INT PCT LONG RATE
Flacco......... 27 14 51.9 176 6.52 2 7.4 0 0.0 30 97.1
TEAM.......... 27 14 51.9 176 6.52 2 7.4 0 0.0 30 97.1
OPPO-
NENTS....... 35 17 48.6 184 5.26 0 0.0 3 8.6 19 28.8
RUSHING ATT YARDS AVG LONG TD
R. Rice ................................................................................... 21 60 2.9 9 0
Ri. Williams............................................................................ 6 27 4.5 5 0
V. Leach................................................................................. 2 1 0.5 1 0
Flacco..................................................................................... 2 -1 -0.5 0 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 31 87 2.8 9 0
OPPONENTS....................................................................... 28 131 4.7 28 1
RECEIVING NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
Boldin...................................................................................... 4 73 18.3 28 1
R. Rice.................................................................................... 4 20 5.0 20 0
Pitta......................................................................................... 2 29 14.5 16 0
Dickson................................................................................... 1 14 14.0 14 0
L. Evans.................................................................................. 1 30 30.0 30 0
To. Smith................................................................................ 1 9 9.0 9 0
Kr. Wilson............................................................................... 1 1 1.0 1t 1
TEAM...................................................................................... 14 176 12.6 30 2
OPPONENTS........................................................................ 17 184 10.8 19 0
INTERCEPTIONS NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
L. Webb.................................................................................. 2 1 0.5 1 0
E. Reed .................................................................................. 1 0 0.0 0 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 3 1 0.3 1 0
OPPONENTS........................................................................ 0 0 0.0 0 0
SACKS NO.
TEAM.......................................................................................................................................... 0.0
OPPONENTS............................................................................................................................ 5.0
GROSS NET IN
PUNTING NO. YARDS AVG AVG 20 LONG BLK
Koch ......................................................................... 9 444 49.3 44.4 1 64 0
TEAM........................................................................ 9 444 49.3 44.4 1 64 0
OPPONENTS......................................................... 5 200 40.0 40.0 0 45 0
PUNT RETURNS NO. FC YARDS AVG LONG TD
TEAM ......................................................................................... 0 0 0 0.0 0 0
OPPONENTS........................................................................... 6 0 4 0.7 9 0
KICKOFF RETURNS NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
L. Webb............................................................................................ 1 25 25.0 25 0
TEAM................................................................................................ 1 25 25.0 25 0
OPPONENTS.................................................................................. 4 133 33.3 60 0
OFF. DEF.
FUMBLES/RECOVERIES FUM REC. REC.
Flacco.............................................................................................................. 1 0 0
Grubbs............................................................................................................. 0 2 0
McClellan ........................................................................................................ 0 1 0
R. Rice............................................................................................................. 1 0 0
Ji. Smith .......................................................................................................... 0 0 1
L. Webb........................................................................................................... 1 0 0
TEAM............................................................................................................... 3 3 1
OPPONENTS................................................................................................. 3 2 0
SCORE BY QUARTERS..................................................................... 1 2 3 4 OT TOT
TEAM...................................................................................................... 17 0 0 3 0 20
OPPONENTS ....................................................................................... 3 10 0 0 0 13
TOUCHDOWNS LONG
SCORING TOT RUS REC RET XP/XPA FG/FGA FG SAF PTS
Cundiff ........................... 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 48 0 8
Boldin............................. 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Kr. Wilson...................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
TEAM............................. 2 0 2 0 2 2 2 2 48 0 20
OPPONENTS............... 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 3 40 0 13
FIELD GOALS 1-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50+
Cundiff...............................................................................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
TEAM.................................................................................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
OPPONENTS..................................................................................
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
N E W E N G L A N D P A T R I O T S
Statistics after 1 game
COMP AVG TD INT
PASSING ATT COM PCT YARDS GAIN TD PCT INT PCT LONG RATE
Brady.......... 34 26 76.5 363 10.68 6 17.6 1 2.9 61t 137.6
TEAM.......... 34 26 76.5 363 10.68 6 17.6 1 2.9 61t 137.6
OPPO-
NENTS....... 26 9 34.6 136 5.23 0 0.0 0 0.0 41 52.7
RUSHING ATT YARDS AVG LONG TD
Hernandez............................................................................. 5 61 12.2 43 0
Green-Ellis............................................................................. 13 28 2.2 9 0
Woodhead............................................................................. 4 25 6.3 11 0
Ridley ..................................................................................... 4 21 5.3 11 0
Brady...................................................................................... 3 8 2.7 4 0
Polite ...................................................................................... 1 3 3.0 3 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 30 146 4.9 43 0
OPPONENTS....................................................................... 40 144 3.6 19 1
RECEIVING NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
R. Gronkowski ....................................................................... 10 145 14.5 28 3
Welker .................................................................................... 6 55 9.2 17 1
Hernandez ............................................................................. 4 55 13.8 20 1
D. Branch ............................................................................... 3 85 28.3 61t 1
Edelman ................................................................................. 1 11 11.0 11 0
Green-Ellis............................................................................. 1 8 8.0 8 0
Ridley...................................................................................... 1 4 4.0 4 0
TEAM...................................................................................... 26 363 14.0 61t 6
OPPONENTS........................................................................ 9 136 15.1 41 0
INTERCEPTIONS NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
TEAM...................................................................................... 0 0 0.0 0 0
OPPONENTS........................................................................ 1 17 17.0 17 0
SACKS NO.
Ninkovich.................................................................................................................................... 1.5
Wilfork......................................................................................................................................... 1.5
Sh. Ellis....................................................................................................................................... 1.0
B. Spikes .................................................................................................................................... 1.0
TEAM.......................................................................................................................................... 5.0
OPPONENTS............................................................................................................................ 0.0
GROSS NET IN
PUNTING NO. YARDS AVG AVG 20 LONG BLK
Mesko....................................................................... 2 78 39.0 39.0 2 40 0
Brady........................................................................ 1 48 48.0 48.0 1 48 0
TEAM........................................................................ 3 126 42.0 42.0 3 48 0
OPPONENTS......................................................... 7 272 38.9 34.9 1 44 0
PUNT RETURNS NO. FC YARDS AVG LONG TD
Edelman..................................................................................... 2 1 28 14.0 15 0
TEAM ......................................................................................... 2 4 28 14.0 15 0
OPPONENTS........................................................................... 0 0 0 0.0 0 0
KICKOFF RETURNS NO. YARDS AVG LONG TD
Woodhead ....................................................................................... 1 28 28.0 28 0
TEAM................................................................................................ 1 28 28.0 28 0
OPPONENTS.................................................................................. 4 68 17.0 25 0
OFF. DEF.
FUMBLES/RECOVERIES FUM REC. REC.
Ridley............................................................................................................... 1 0 0
B. Spikes......................................................................................................... 0 0 1
TEAM............................................................................................................... 1 0 1
OPPONENTS................................................................................................. 2 1 1
SCORE BY QUARTERS..................................................................... 1 2 3 4 OT TOT
TEAM...................................................................................................... 14 21 7 3 0 45
OPPONENTS ....................................................................................... 0 7 3 0 0 10
TOUCHDOWNS LONG
SCORING TOT RUS REC RET XP/XPA FG/FGA FG SAF PTS
R. Gronkowski .............. 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18
Gostkowski ................... 0 0 0 0 6 6 1 1 20 0 9
D. Branch ...................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Hernandez..................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Welker ........................... 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
TEAM............................. 6 0 6 0 6 6 1 1 20 0 45
OPPONENTS............... 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 41 0 10
FIELD GOALS 1-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50+
Gostkowski .......................................................................................
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
TEAM.................................................................................................
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
OPPONENTS..................................................................................
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
STATE COLLEGE Big Ten
coaches might want to make sure
they watch the AFC Champion-
ship game this afternoon.
The man who oversees the
high-powered New England of-
fense is headed to Happy Valley.
New Nittany Lions coach Bill
OBriens staff is starting to think
up schemes for a team that has
struggled at times with the ball
the last two seasons.
Were studying a playbook
and we will run the NewEngland
offense, offensive line coach
Mac McWhorter pronounced
this week in a phone interview,
echoing OBriens intentions.
Of course, the results may not
be comparable. After all, Patriots
star quarterback Tom Brady isnt
eligible to suit up in blue and
white hes a Michigan man,
anyway. Theres no tight end like
Rob Gronkowski to rumble down
the seam and bowl over a safety
for a first down.
Two weeks into OBriens ten-
ure, the newregime at PennState
has barely gotten to know their
players. Its January, two months
out from spring practice and
more than eight months fromthe
season opener.
OBrien hasnt been around ex-
cept for an eight-hour spurt last
Sunday. Hes spendingthe bulkof
his time in Foxborough, Mass.,
fulfilling his role as the Patriots
offensive coordinator andprepar-
ingfor the AFCtitle game against
Baltimore. He speaks nightly
with his Penn State staff, too.
The primary topic of conversa-
tion is recruiting its crunch
time in terms of solidifying the
verbal commitments of high
school seniors who initially de-
cided on Penn State under for-
mer coach Joe Paterno. He also
has to draw new interest from
other prospects. Recruits can
start sealing their commitments
in writing on Feb. 1.
In that respect, Penn State as-
sistants hope the OBrien-led Pa-
triots offense impresses recruits
through the playoffs.
The offense is flexible enough
to do whatever we need to do
based on the talent we have
here, McWhorter said. The
base of what well do is what you
saw (in the 45-10 win over the
Broncos) last week and what
youll see on Sunday.
Penn State has reportedly lost
four verbal commitments and
gained two since the program
was thrown into turmoil two
months ago. State authorities fil-
ed child sex abuse charges
against retired assistant coach
Jerry Sandusky, who has main-
tained his innocence. Paterno
was ousted in the scandals after-
math.
OBrien was hired Jan. 6 and
brought in veteran assistants like
McWhorter and Stan Hixon to
help him in his first head-coach-
ing job. The three had previously
worked together at Georgia Tech
under head coach George OLe-
ary.
Hixon, a 32-year coaching vet-
eran, arrived in Happy Valley af-
ter spending the last two season
coachingreceivers for the Buffalo
Bills. Hixon will also coach wide-
outs at Penn State, while OBrien
is expected to call his own plays.
The offense will need a smart
quarterbackwhocanreaddefens-
es and make decisions at the line
of scrimmage, Hixon said.
Penn State starter Matt
McGloin, who missed the 30-14
loss Jan. 2 in the TicketCity Bowl
to Houston because of a concus-
sion, was fine and ready to go,
Hixon added, though he declined
to speak about the status of the
other quarterbacks on the roster,
including backup Rob Bolden.
But theres still plenty of time
to sort that out, especially since
the new staff is still settling into
their new offices at the spacious
Lasch Football Building.
PSUs O-line coach says team will run New England offense
Fans can catch a glimpse of
Lions potential offense today
in AFC Championship game.
By GENARO C. ARMAS
AP Sports Writer
youcanreallymeasurewhereyoure
at. You cant take plays off against
those guys. You cant take things for
granted when youre out there
against them. Youhave tosee where
theyre at on every play because
theyre guys who change the game.
Anddont forget Suggs. Heledthe
AFC with14 sacks, and, with Lewis
and Reed, were picked as Pro Bowl
starters this season.
The Ravens have a very attack-
ing type defense, Welker said.
Theyre very physical. They run to
the football really well. They rush
well, cover well, tackle well across
the board. They have a lot of great
players and a lot of playmakers.
But they havent faced a passing
attackwiththeweaponsthePatriots
have. Welker led the NFL with 122
catches and 1,569 yards receiving.
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. Tom
BradyandtheNewEnglandPatriots
made it to the AFC Championship
game with a high-powered offense
that piled up points and yards.
RayLewis andtheBaltimoreRav-
ens got there with a hard-hitting de-
fense that made it a major challenge
for opponents to move the ball.
On Sunday, one of those teams
will advance to the Super Bowl be-
cause, most likely, of what they do
best.
Weve got our hands full this
week, Lewis said. You watched
what theydidlast weekagainst Den-
ver, just the way they came out and
ran their offense, howefficient (Bra-
dy) was, howmany different receiv-
ers he hit with the ball. I think their
offense, period, is playing at a very
high level.
Fromstart to finish, Brady picked
apart the Denver defense in a 45-10
divisional playoff win.
The Patriots (14-3) needed five
plays to score on their first series on
Bradys 7-yardpass toWes Welker. It
took them seven plays to reach the
end zone on their second series on
Bradys 10-yard pass to Rob Gron-
kowski. By halftime, Brady had
thrown five of his six touchdown
passes.
He had plenty of time to survey
the field as the Broncos put little
pressure on him. The Ravens dont
plan to let that happen.
You dont want him back there
just like, Oh, werejust goingtoplay
catch today, Baltimore linebacker
Terrell Suggs said. You dont want
himto zone in, get in his zone, so to
say. SoI thinkpressureisgoingtobe
crucial, but its always crucial. But,
particularly when you are playing
these type of quarterbacks, its piv-
otal.
Bradys regular seasonwas excep-
tional, even by his lofty standards.
He threw for 5,235 yards, second
most in NFL history, with 39 touch-
down passes, 12 interceptions and
the leagues third best quarterback
rating of 105.6, behind only Aaron
Rodgers and DrewBrees.
The Patriots, with Welker and
Gronkowski doing most of the dam-
age, were second in the NFL with
428 yards per game and third with
an average of 32.1points.
Its a very clever offense, Balti-
more coach John Harbaugh said.
Its well put together.
Just like the Ravens defense.
Baltimore(13-4)allowedthethird
fewest average yards, 288.9, and
points, 16.6, this season. It had four
takeaways in last Sundays 20-13 di-
visional playoff win over the Hous-
tonTexans, thelast byEdReedwith
1:51left. Lewis had a team-high sev-
en tackles.
Theyre great players. Ive played
against both those guys quite a few
times, Brady said. You always en-
joygoingupagainstthebestbecause
Gronkowski was fifth with 90 catch-
esandset anNFLrecordof17touch-
downcatchesbyatightend. AndAa-
ron Hernandez, a tight end who of-
tenlines upat widereceiver andhad
a 43-yard run out of the backfield
against Denver, was14th with 79 re-
ceptions.
They are not your typical of-
fense, Ravens linebacker Jarret
Johnson said. Theyll give you a
personnel group and line up no-
where close to what you think they
are going to do. You just have to roll
withit andknowwhats comingand
adapt to it.
Thats why communication in
thesegames is sovital andnot going
crazy and overthinking things
just getting lined up and playing
because you can get anything. You
dont know what youre going to
get.
Thelast playoff gamebetweenthe
teams two years ago was a huge sur-
prise with the Ravens offense dom-
inating.
RayRicescoredonan83-yardrun
on the first offensive play and Brady
threw two interceptions and lost a
fumble in the first quarter. The Rav-
ens took a 24-0 lead into the second
and won 33-14.
We dont really care too much
about whats happened in the past.
Weve won some, weve lost some,
but right now this team is focused
withtheRavens, PatriotscoachBill
Belichick said. Thats really all that
matters. I dont think some game
that happened two years ago or five
years ago or anything else, I dont
thinkthat really has aneffect onthis
game.
A contrast in styles
High-scoring
Pats host the
stingy Ravens
By HOWARD ULMAN
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski and quarterback Tom Brady (12) will try to lead their unconventional
offense against a stifling Ravens defense.
AP PHOTO
Linebacker Ray Lewis and the rest of the hard-hitting Ravens defense will be dealing with a potent New
England offense this afternoon in the AFC Championship game.
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.
Louisiana Techs Lennon Creer
scored on a 9-yard run with 47
seconds remaining, giving the
West a 24-17 victory Saturday in
the 87th East-West Shrine all-star
game.
Quarterbacks Chandler Har-
nish of Northern Illinois and Tyl-
er Hansen of Colorado had short
TD runs for the West, which ral-
lied from an early 10-0 deficit at
Tropicana Field.
Missouri Western States Greg
Zuerlein kicked a field goal that
made it 17-17 early in the fourth
quarter, setting the stage for Har-
nish to lead the winning drive in
the closing minutes.
Michigan States B.J. Cunning-
ham and Miamis LaRon Byrd
caught touchdown passes for the
East, which also got an early field
goal from Georgias Blair Walsh.
Tennessee-Chattanoogas B.J.
Coleman teamed with Tennessee
Techs Tim Benford on a 28-yard
pass play to set up Walshs field
goal on Easts opening posses-
sion of the game. His 21-yard
completion to Cunningham, who
broke a tackle and continued into
the end zone, made it 10-0.
While most of the players who
will be selected early in the NFL
draft will be in Mobile, Ala., for
next weeks Senior Bowl, the pro-
spects in the East-West game
were hoping to impress and en-
hance their chances of being se-
lected in the later rounds and
winding up in NFL training
camps as undrafted free agents.
Coleman started for the East
and was followed by Southern
Mississippis Austin Davis and
Floridas John Brantley. Harnish
started for the West and scored
on a 1-yard run that finished a 19-
play, 80-yard drive. Less than five
minutes later Hansen ran 3 yards
for a short-lived 14-10 advantage.
Davis tossed a 3-yard TD pass
to Byrd to put the East ahead 17-
14 at the half.
Former Oregon quarterback
Joey Harrington and one-time
Kansas State kicker Martin Gra-
matica were honored at halftime
as the latest inductees into the
East-West Shrine Hall of Fame.
Tennessee running back Tauren
Poole, whogained15yards onthe
first play from scrimmage, re-
ceived the Pat Tillman Award
presented to the player demon-
strating service, character and
sportsmanship.
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
AP PHOTO
West running back Lennon Creer (5) gets past East defender
Christian Thompson (33) for the game-winning touchdown.
Late TD gives West win in 87th Shrine game
Louisiana Techs Creer found
pay dirt on 9-yard run to
produce dramatic ending.
By FRED GOODALL
AP Sports Writer
SOUTHBEND, Ind. Skylar
Diggins scored20points, Deve-
reauxPeters added19andNo. 2
Notre Dame routedVillanova
76-43Saturday for its16thstraight
victory.
Notre Dame (19-1) remained
unbeatenat 7-0inthe BigEast,
andwonits fourthstraight game
by more than20points. The Irishs
national championshipteamwon
its first 23games in2000-01.
Rachel Roberts scored14for
Villanova (12-7, 2-4), whichhad20
turnovers.
Villanova coachHarry Perretta
was not withthe teambecause of
a deathinthe family. Ateam
spokesmansaidPerretta attended
a funeral Saturday andwould
returntopractice Sunday. Assist-
ant coachJoe Mullaney ranthe
teaminhis absence.
The Irishwill host No. 9Ten-
nessee onMonday night.
No. 4Stanford65, Washington
47
STANFORD, Calif. Nnem-
kadi Ogwumike scored17points,
Chiney Ogwumike had15points
and11rebounds andStanford
pickedupanother victory at
home.
Taylor Greenfieldcame off the
benchtoscore12points andspark
a late rally for the Cardinal (17-1,
8-0Pac-12), whowontheir 73rd
consecutive home game and65th
straight against a conference
opponent.
Jazmine Davis scored16points
for the Huskies (10-7, 2-5), who
lost their12thstraight against
Stanford. Mercedes Wetmore
added11points.
Nneka Ogwumike movedinto
fifthplace onStanfords career
scoringlist with2,082points. She
is five points shy of movinginto
fourth.
No. 7Rutgers72,
SouthFlorida66
TAMPA, Fla. April Sykes had
23points and10rebounds, Khadi-
jahRushdanscored16points and
No. 7Rutgers beat SouthFlorida
72-66onSaturday night.
Monique Oliver finishedwith
14points for the Scarlet Knights
(16-3, 5-1), whohada six-game
winningstreaksnappedTuesday
ina 62-57BigEast loss toSt.
Johns.
No. 12Wisc.-GreenBay80,
ClevelandState58
GREENBAY, Wis. Julie
Wojta scored12points andWis-
consin-GreenBay set a school
recordby improvingto17-0.
SarahEichler, Lydia Bauer and
Stephanie Sensionalsoscored12
apiece for the Phoenix(7-0Hori-
zonLeague). GreenBay hasnt
lost a regular-seasongame since a
63-60setbackat Marquette on
Dec. 12, 2010.
The Phoenixhadjust twoturn-
overs andshot 47percent inbuild-
inga 43-23halftime lead. Honesty
KingledClevelandState (8-10,
3-4) with19points.
W O M E N S B A S K E T B A L L
No. 2 ND
wins 16th
in a row
with rout
The Associated Press
major force for Notre Dame (12-8,
4-3)andtheIrishwontherebound
battle 38-25.
Melohadstartedall 20of theOr-
anges first games, was their lead-
ingrebounder with5.7a game, av-
eraged7.2pointsandthreeblocks.
School officials gave no explana-
tion why the talented center did
not make the trip. C.J. Fair started
for the Orange.
James Southerland scored 15
points for Syracuse, which shot
just 34 percent and had its lowest
scoring game of the season. Scott
Martin added 13 for Notre Dame,
which hit 50 percent of its field-
goal attempts.
Southerlands 3-pointer with
53.9 seconds left brought the Or-
ange to within 62-56 before the
Irish held on as Jerian Grant sank
four free throws inthe final 32sec-
onds.
It was the first time the Irish
have beaten a top-ranked team
since 1987 when they defeated
North Carolina, also in South
Bend. One of the Irishs most dra-
matic victories over a No. 1 came
in 1974, when they stopped
UCLAs 88-game winning streak
by 71-70.
Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim
was denied his 877th career victo-
ry, which would have put him in
sole possession of fourth place
among Division I mens coaches.
Notre Dame led in the first half
by as many as18 andwas up35-23
at the half, shooting 54.4 percent
and holding the Orange to 2.6 (8-
for-18). Syracuse was only 4-of-13
fromthe 3-point line and was bea-
ten on the boards 20-13 as Notre
Dame seemed to be half step
quicker.
Syracuse got off to a better sec-
ond-half start and whittled the
lead to eight less than three min-
utes in. But Martin hit another 3-
pointer for the Irish as the shot
clockwas windingdownandCoo-
ley benefiting from Melos ab-
sencebulledhiswayinfor alay-
uptorestoretheleadto12. Cooley
then dropped in two free throws
and Martin again sank a 3-pointer
andtheIrishwererollingwitha17-
point lead.
The Orange then went on a 9-2
run and Kris Josephs 3-pointer
made it a10-point game with 7:43
togo. Syracuseagaincut it toeight
before Cooley roared down the
court for a dunkwithjust over five
minutes left.
Triches three-point play with
2:24 left cut it to seven as the Or-
ange made a final run.
Pat Connaughton, inserted into
theIrishstartinglineup, hadapair
of 3s in the early going and Notre
Dame bolted to an11-2 lead.
Notre Dame kept up the long-
range accuracy, making four of its
first six attempts. And when Eric
Atkins grabbed a rebound and
went the length of the floor for a
layup, theIrishwereup21-10asthe
fans at Purcell Pavilion went wild.
And without Melo in the mid-
dle, the Irish were all over the
boards with an early 13-4 advan-
tage.
Atkins picked up his third foul
with9:04left, but JerianGrants 3-
pointer gave the Irisha two-touch-
down lead at 28-14.
The Orange missed 14 of their
first 19 field-goal attempts and
nothing was falling. TomKnights
left-handed shot in the lane dou-
bledthescore, puttingtheIrishup
32-16.
Alex Dragicevichs 3-pointer as
the shot clock was running down
put the Irishup35-18with1:12left
in the half. Dion Waiters then re-
sponded with a pair of quick 3-
pointers toget theOrangetowith-
in12at theendof afrustratingfirst
half. The23pointsrepresentedthe
Oranges lowest-scoringhalf of the
season.
IRISH
Continued fromPage 1C
DURHAM, N.C. Michael
Snaer hit a 3-pointer as time
expired and Florida State beat
No. 4 Duke 76-73 on Saturday,
snapping Dukes 45-game home-
court winning streak.
With the game tied, Luke
Loucks sprinted up the middle
of the court before zipping a
pass over to Snaer on the right
side in front of the FSU bench.
Snaer quickly launched a shot
that dropped cleanly through
the net, stunning the once-
rowdy crowd at Cameron In-
door Stadium and sending the
Seminoles bench spilling onto
the court in celebration.
Snaer scored 14 points
including a banked-in 3 to beat
the buzzer on the final play of
the first half and the Semi-
noles (13-6, 4-1 Atlantic Coast
Conference) won their fourth
straight game. Austin Rivers
had 19 points and tied the game
on a driving basket with 4.9
seconds left for the Blue Devils
(16-3, 4-1).
No. 2 Kentucky 77,
Alabama 71
LEXINGTON, Ky. Darius
Miller hit four free throws in
the final minute and freshmen
Marquis Teague and Anthony
Davis each added two more as
No. 2 Kentucky edged Alabama
for its nations best 47th
straight home victory.
Kentucky (19-1, 5-0 South-
eastern Conference) led the
entire second half, but Alaba-
mas Trevor Releford scored all
17 of his points in the second
half to keep the Crimson Tide
(13-6, 2-3) close until the end.
Terrence Jones, who finished
with 15 points, made Ken-
tuckys final field goal with 6:57
left, but the Wildcats hit 23 of
29 second-half free throw at-
tempts including all eight in
the final minute in a game
that featured 45 fouls.
Doron Lamb had 14 points
and freshman Michael Kidd-
Gilchrist added 13 for the Wild-
cats, who scored their final 15
points from the free-throw line.
JaMychal Green had 22
points and 12 rebounds and
Trevor Lacey added 10 points
for Alabama, which lost its
third in a row.
No. 5 Missouri 89,
No. 3 Baylor 88
WACO, Texas Ricardo
Ratliffe scored a career-high 27
points and Missouri held on for
the big road win.
Ratliffe had a big two-handed
slam dunk midway through the
second half when he scored six
points in an 8-0 spurt that put
the Tigers (18-1, 5-1 Big 12) up
68-58. Missouri still had a 10-
point lead with 3:07 left but
didnt score again until Ratliffes
two free throws with a minute
left.
Missouri had to make 10 of 12
free throws in the final minute
for the victory. Marcus Den-
mons free throw with 4 seconds
left made it 89-85 before Brady
Heslip hit a 3-pointer for Baylor
(17-2, 4-2), which has lost two
in a row after a 17-0 start.
No. 6 Ohio St. 79, Nebraska
45
LINCOLN, Neb. William
Buford scored 15 points, Jared
Sullinger and Deshaun Thomas
had 14 apiece, and sixth-ranked
Ohio State blew out Nebraska
for the second time this month
with a 79-45 victory Saturday
night.
No. 7 Kansas 69, Texas 66
AUSTIN, Texas Jeff With-
ey made a layup and free throw
with 37 seconds left to give
Kansas the lead, and the Jay-
hawks survived another tough
fight with Texas.
Witheys three-point play put
Kansas up 68-66 and Thomas
Robinson made a free throw
with 8 seconds left. Texas
JCovan Brown got off a 3-point-
er with 2 seconds left but it
bounced off the rim. Brown also
missed with 15 seconds left.
Tyshawn Taylor scored 22
points and Robinson finished
with 17 points and eight re-
bounds for Kansas (16-3, 6-0).
The Jayhawks have won nine in
a row and are the only Big 12
team still undefeated in confer-
ence play.
Brown scored 24 points for
the Longhorns (12-7, 2-4), who
have lost three in a row and
absorbed their first home loss
of the season.
No. 9 Michigan State 83,
Purdue 58
EAST LANSING, Mich.
Freshman Branden Dawson
scored 14 points to help Michi-
gan State pull away for the easy
victory.
The Spartans (16-4, 5-2)
moved into a tie for the Big Ten
lead by stopping their second
two-game skid this season.
The Boilermakers (14-6, 4-3)
have lost three of their last five
games.
The Spartans led by seven at
halftime and built a 23-point
lead midway through the sec-
ond half.
No. 10 Georgetown 52,
Rutgers 50
WASHINGTON Otto
Porter scored the final six
points, including two free
throws with 8.5 seconds left,
lifting Georgetown to the win.
Harry Sims led Georgetown
(16-3, 6-2 Big East) with 12
points, 10 rebounds and two
assists. He made 8 of 13 free
throws, part of a 25-of-36 effort
from the line for the Hoyas.
Mike Poole made a long
2-pointer with 2 seconds left on
the shot clock and Eli Carter
made a 3-pointer to extend
Rutgers lead to 50-45 with 2:35
left.
Tennessee 60,
No. 13 Connecticut 57
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Jar-
nell Stokes had 16 points and 12
rebounds in his first start, and
Tennessee hit 7 of 10 free-throw
attempts in the final minute to
secure the win.
The Volunteers (9-10) led by
10 points with 3:15 remaining in
the second half and had a 55-48
lead when the Huskies Jeremy
Lamb sank a 3-pointer with 37
seconds left. Lamb then fouled
Trae Golden, who hit one of his
two free throws before Shabazz
Napier hit a 3 to cut the Vols
lead to 56-54 with 23 seconds to
go.
No. 17 Florida 76, LSU 64
GAINESVILLE, Fla. Erik
Murphy scored 15 points and
No. 17 Florida beat LSU 76-64
Saturday night to extend its
home win streak to 16 games.
The Gators (15-4, 3-1 South-
eastern Conference) had five
players in double figures, a
balanced effort that helped
them overcome an off shooting
night from 3-point range.
No. 18 Mississippi St. 78,
Vanderbilt 77, OT
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Dee
Bost scored on a layup with
51.8 seconds left in overtime,
and No. 18 Mississippi State
edged Vanderbilt 78-77 Sat-
urday night, snapping the Com-
modores eight-game winning
streak.
The Bulldogs (16-4, 3-2
Southeastern Conference) won
in Memorial Gym for the first
time since 2004 and snapped
their own three-game skid in
Nashville. They appeared head-
ed toward another loss after
trailing 39-28 at halftime.
No. 19 Creighton 75,
Indiana State 49
OMAHA, Neb. Doug
McDermott had 12 points and
Creighton cruised to its eighth
consecutive victory.
The Bluejays (18-2) improved
to 8-1 in the Missouri Valley
Conference in front of 17,411
the sixth-largest crowd in
school history.
Indiana State (11-9, 2-7) lost
its third straight and seventh in
nine games after a 9-2 start to
the season. .
Arkansas 66,
No. 20 Michigan 64
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. BJ
Young scored 15 points and
Arkansas hit its first 11 shots
while remaining undefeated in
Bud Walton Arena this season.
Trey Burke missed a 3-point-
er at the buzzer, giving the
Razorbacks (14-5) their second
victory over a ranked opponent
at home, following a win over
then-No. 15 Mississippi State on
Jan. 7.
No. 23 Louisville 73,
Pittsburgh 62
PITTSBURGH Kyle Kuric
scored 21 points in his return
from an ankle injury to lead No.
23 Louisville to a 73-62 victory
over struggling Pittsburgh on
Saturday night.
Chane Behanan added a
career-high 19 points for the
Cardinals (15-5, 3-4 Big East),
who took control during an 11-2
run midway through the second
half to send the Panthers (11-9,
0-7) to their eighth straight
loss.
No. 25 Kansas State 66,
Oklahoma State 58
STILLWATER, Okla.
Freshman Angel Rodriguez
scored 14 points in his second
start, Jamar Samuels added 12
points and 12 rebounds and
Kansas State snapped an 11-
game losing streak at Gallagher-
Iba Arena.
M E N S C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
Florida State shocks No. 4 Duke
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Florida States Michael Snaer (21) and Ian Miller celebrate Snaers game-winning basket against
Duke on Saturday in Durham, N.C. Florida State won 76-73.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 11C
S P O R T S
ALL JUNK CARS &
TRUCKS WANTED
VITO & GINO
288-8995
Forty Fort
Highest Prices Paid In Cash.
Free Pickup. Call Anytime.
(570) 288-2514 Business
(570) 709-7798 Cell
jerryBuschJr@aol.com
Each Ofce is Independently Owned And Operated.
Jerry Busch, Jr.
BUYING OR SELLING
REAL ESTATE
Experienced, Knowledgeable
Working for You...
Full Service Ofce
Great Exposure
GERALD L. BUSCH REAL ESTATE, INC.
670 NORTH RIVER ST PLAINS, PA 18705
(570) 208-1282
HTTP://RIVERGRILLENEPA.COM/
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/THERIVERGRILLE
CHAMPIONSHIP SUNDAY
JANUARY 22
ND
FREE PIZZAANDBUFFALO
BITE BUFFET ALL DAY
ALL DAY - $1.50 MILLER LITE
&$2 COORS LIGHT PINTS
MILLER LITE CHEERLEADERS
NOCOVER!!!
AFC CHAMPIONSHIP
3:00PM
VS.
Patriots Ravens
NFC CHAMPIONSHIP
6:30PM
VS.
GIANTS 49ers
MELBOURNE, Australia
Just before she walked on court,
Greta Arn said she was looking
forwardtothe privilege of play-
ing her first match against Sere-
na Williams. Some privilege.
The 13-time Grand Slam
champion overpowered Arn 6-1,
6-1in 59 minutes on Saturday for
her 17th straight win at the Aus-
tralian Open.
Arn double-faulted twice to
end the match. As the players
shook hands at the net, Williams
looked briefly taken aback and
smiled.
I told her it was an honor to
playagainst you, the 32-year-old
Arn said. And she told me, Oh,
you are so sweet. Ima big fan of
hers. Shes the real No. 1.
Williams, who racked up her
501st career match win, is hop-
ing to become the second wom-
an over age 30 to win the Austra-
lian title in the Open era.
Vania Kings loss to Ana Iva-
novic left Williams as the only
American player left in either
singles draw. John Isner lost Fri-
day, the last Americanmantoex-
it.
Coming off an injury-ravaged
18 months, Williams is seeded
12th in Melbourne. She hasnt
held the top ranking since 2010,
the year she won the last of her
Grand Slam titles.
Because of her ranking, Wil-
liams cant take the No. 1 spot
withawinat Melbourne. Howev-
er, No. 2 Petra Kvitova, No. 3 Vic-
toria Azarenka and No. 4 Maria
Sharapova could walk away with
the top ranking if they win the
tournament.
Sharapova and Kvitova joined
Williams in advancing to the
fourth round on Saturday. Be-
tween the three of them, they
lost six games.
Kvitova was leading 6-0, 1-0
when Russian opponent Maria
Kirilenko retired. Sharapova,
who won her first two matches
6-0, 6-1, was tested for the first
timeandstill cameout witha 6-1,
6-2winover U.S. Opensemifinal-
ist Angelique Kerber.
Like Williams, Sharapova
came into the tournament short
of matches. The three-time
Grand Slam champion hurt her
left ankle late last season and
didnt play a tuneup event before
the Australian Open.
No. 1-ranked Novak Djokovic
routedNicolas Mahut 6-0, 6-1, 6-1
in 1 hour, 14 minutes to give the
Frenchman a miserable 30th
birthday present.
Djokoviclikelygets anevening
slot for his fourth-round match
against Lleyton Hewitt. The 30-
year-old Australian downed
promisingCanadianMilos Raon-
ic 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-3.
A U S T R A L I A N O P E N
Serena highlights day of easy victories
Notable women Williams,
Sharapova and Kvitova lost a
combined six games.
By CAROLINE CHEESE
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
Serena Williams plays a shot against Hungarys Greta Arn on her
way to winning the third round match at the Australian Open.
MIAMI Chris Bosh scored
30 points, LeBron James added
28 points and nine rebounds
and the Miami Heat remained
unbeaten without Dwyane Wade
in the lineup this season, defeat-
ing the Philadelphia 76ers 113-
92 on Saturday night.
Mario Chalmers scored 11 and
Joel Anthony finished with nine
points and nine rebounds for
Miami, which outrebounded
Philadelphia 52-31 and moved
into a tie with Orlando for first
in the Southeast Division. The
Heat are 6-0 this season without
Wade, who missed his third
straight game with a sprained
right ankle.
Lou Williams scored 22 points
and Evan Turner added 16 for
Philadelphia, which has lost
eight of nine against Miami
since the start of last season,
including a five-game defeat in
the opening round of last sea-
sons playoffs.
Hawks 121, Cavaliers 94
ATLANTA Joe Johnson
scored 25 points and the Atlanta
Hawks, coming off a loss that
prompted their coach to say
they quit, responded with a
121-94 rout of the Cleveland
Cavaliers on Saturday night.
Johnson scored 19 of his
points in the first half for Atlan-
ta, which sat all its starters in
the final quarter. Jannero Pargo,
who opened the fourth with
back-to-back 3-pointers, had a
season-high 14 points.
Pistons 94, Trail Blazers 91
AUBURN HILLS, Mich.
Rodney Stuckey scored 28
points and the Detroit Pistons
won for only the second time in
12 games, beating the Portland
Trail Blazers 94-91 on Saturday
night.
Raymond Felton lost control
of the ball at midcourt as Por-
tland was trying to tie it in the
final seconds.
Bulls 95, Bobcats 89
CHICAGO Carlos Boozer
scored 17 of his 23 points in the
second half to lead the injury-
depleted Chicago Bulls to a
95-89 win over the struggling
Charlotte Bobcats on Saturday
night.
Mavericks 83, Hornets 81
NEW ORLEANS Lamar
Odom scored 16 points in his
first start of the season and the
Dallas Mavericks overcame the
absence of Dirk Nowitzki to
send the New Orleans Hornets
to a seventh-straight loss, 83-81
on Saturday night.
Rockets 105, Spurs 102
HOUSTON Kevin Martin
scored 25 points, Kyle Lowry
had 14 points and eight assists
and the Houston Rockets took
advantage of Tim Duncans
absence to beat the San Antonio
Spurs 105-102 on Saturday
night.
Thunder 84, Nets 74
NEWARK, N.J. Kevin Du-
rant had 20 points and a season-
high 15 rebounds and the Okla-
homa Thunder stifled the New
Jersey Nets on defense in an
84-74 victory Saturday night.
N B A
Bosh, Heat
dismantle
hot Sixers
The Associated Press
Canucks 4, Sharks 3
VANCOUVER, British Co-
lumbia Cody Hodgson
scored his second goal of the
game with 4:17 left, and the
Vancouver Canucks beat the
San Jose Sharks.
Ducks 2, Senators 1
ANAHEIM, Calif. Jonas
Hiller made 31 saves, Corey
Perry scored, and Lubomir
Visnovsky was credited with a
goal that Ottawas Erik Karlsson
knocked into his own net dur-
ing the Anaheim Ducks 2-1
victory.
Red Wings 3, Blue Jackets 2,
SO
DETROIT Valtteri Fil-
ppula scored in the fourth
round of a shootout to give the
Detroit Red Wings their 16th
straight home victory, 3-2 over
the Columbus Blue Jackets on
Saturday night.
Canadiens 3, Maple Leafs 1
TORONTO Carey Price
made 32 saves, and Rafael Diaz
and Lars Eller scored third-
period goals in the Montreal
Canadiens 3-1 victory over the
Toronto Maple Leafs on Sat-
urday night.
Predators 5, Blackhawks 2
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Sergei
Kostitsyn, Kevin Klein and
Patric Hornqvist each had a
NEWARK, N.J. Scott Hart-
nell scored two power-play
goals, and Wayne Simmonds
had a goal and two assists,
leading the Philadelphia Flyers
to a 4-1 victory over the New
Jersey Devils on Saturday.
The Flyers (28-14-4) re-
mained four points behind the
Eastern Conference-leading
New York Rangers. The Devils
(26-19-2) lost for the second
straight time in the middle of a
six-game homestand.
Hartnell scored in the second
and third periods. His first goal
came off a deflection, and his
second the 22nd of the sea-
son came off a one-timer
that eluded goalie Martin Bro-
deur.
Islanders 2, Hurricanes 1, OT
UNIONDALE, N.Y. John
Tavares scored his second goal
of the game 3:58 into overtime,
and the New York Islanders
beat the Carolina Hurricanes
2-1 on Saturday night for their
third straight win.
Rangers 3, Bruins 2
BOSTON Marian Gaborik
scored twice, the second on a
third-try backhander with 3.6
seconds left in overtime, and
the New York Rangers beat the
Boston Bruins in a matchup of
the top two teams in the East-
ern Conference.
goal and an assist to help the
Nashville Predators beat the
Chicago Blackhawks 5-2 on
Saturday night.
Lightning 4, Coyotes 3
GLENDALE, Ariz. Steven
Stamkos scored his NHL-lead-
ing 32nd goal, Martin St. Louis
and Steve Downie each had a
goal and an assist, and the
Tampa Bay Lightning beat the
Phoenix Coyotes 4-3 on Sat-
urday night for their third
straight victory.
Blues 4, Sabres 2
ST. LOUIS David Backes
had two goals and two assists,
and Jaroslav Halak made 19
saves to lift the St. Louis Blues
to a 4-2 victory over the Buffalo
Sabres on Saturday night.
Panthers 4, Jets 3, SO
WINNIPEG, Manitoba
Kris Versteeg scored two goals
and added an assist for the
Florida Panthers, who snapped
an eight-game, road-losing
streak with a 4-3 shootout win
over the Winnipeg Jets on Sat-
urday night.
N H L R O U N D U P
Hartnell powers
Flyers to victory
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Philadelphias Kimmo Timonen celebrates his goal against the New Jersey Devils during the sec-
ond period of Saturdays game in Newark, N.J. The Flyers won 4-1.
KITZBUEHEL, Austria Di-
dier Cuche of Switzerland used
his last visit to the Streif on
Saturday to earn a record fifth
victory on one of the World
Cups most challenging down-
hill courses.
Bode Miller nearly crashed on
an icy bump and finished 29th.
Cuche, who announced his re-
tirement at the end of the sea-
son two days ago, overtook Aus-
trian great Franz Klammer, who
won the Hahnenkamm downhill
four times in the 1970s and 80s.
That record was my final
thought before I left the start
gate, Cuche said. Somehow it
helped me to relax a bit and to
enjoy my run.
Cuche went down the moun-
tain in 1 minute, 13.28 seconds
in heavy snowfall to beat Aus-
trian pair Romed Baumann and
Klaus Kroell by 0.24 and 0.30
seconds, respectively.
In the finish area, Klammer
was among the first to congrat-
ulate his Swiss successor.
Cuche is now the Emperor of
Kitzbuehel, I can live with that,
said the 58-year-old Klammer,
before joking, I think he should
have quit already before this
season.
The snowfall became heavier
during the race and slowed late
starters. Many of the pre-race
favorites battled with the condi-
tions.
Cuches teammate Beat Feuz
finished 0.45 back in sixth to
stay on top of the discipline
standings with 300 points, lead-
ing Cuche by 23.
Miller barely avoided a crash
in the icy lower section of the
course, finishing 1.35 seconds
behind the winner.
These were less than ideal
conditions, Miller said. But
its no fluke that Didier won.
For me, I was pushing pretty
hard, I knew I had to take some
risks.
Miller was relieved by his
quick reactions.
It feels good to make a
save like that, he said.
Those are life-savers. One
hundred points is great, but I
always try to be at the finish
with all my parts intact.
S K I I N G
Cuche wins record fifth World Cup downhill; Miller 29th
By ERIC WILLEMSEN
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
OUTDOORS
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
The Falls Lions Club will host its
annual venison/wild game dinner
Sunday, Jan. 29, from 2-4 p.m. at
Ardees Foodrinkery in Falls. For
more information, call 388-2337.
The Factoryville Sportsmens
Club will hold its regular monthly
meeting Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
in the clubhouse. Annual member-
ship dues are being accepted. All
successful deer hunters wishing
to have their racks measured are
reminded that this is the last
meeting to do so to be eligible for
recognition. Tickets for the Henry
rifle prize package in support of
the scholarship fund will also be
available.
The agenda for the Pennsylvania
Board of Game Commissioners
meeting, set for today to Tuesday,
is available on the agencys web-
site, www.pgc.state.pa.us. It can
be viewed by clicking on Com-
missioners Meeting: Jan. 22-24,
2012 in the Quick Clicks box in
the right-hand column of the
homepage and then on the agen-
da link. The Board meeting will be
held in the auditorium of the
agencys Harrisburg headquarters
to collect public comments on the
2012-13 proposed seasons and bag
limits, receive staff reports and
hold a formal meeting. The head-
quarters is at 2001 Elmerton Ave.,
just off the Progress Avenue exit
of Interstate 81 in Harrisburg.
At 1 p.m. today, the Board will hear
public comments regarding the
2012-13 hunting and furtaking
seasons and bag limits. Doors will
open at noon. Individuals in-
terested in offering public testi-
mony limited to five minutes
may begin to register at noon on
a first-come, first-to-speak basis.
On Monday at 8:30 a.m., the
Board will gather any additional
public comments and then receive
Game Commission staff reports.
On Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., the
Game Commission will take up its
prepared agenda to, among other
things, give preliminary approval
to hunting and trapping seasons
and bag limits for 2012-13.
Antlerless deer license allocations
for the 2012-13 seasons will be
presented for the Board to consid-
er at its meeting in April. Harvest
results from the 2011-12 deer sea-
sons will be announced in mid-
March.
For those unable to attend the
meeting, the Game Commission
will webcast the meeting begin-
ning with the Game Commission
staff reports on Monday, immedi-
ately following the conclusion of
public comments. In addition, the
full Board meeting on Tuesday will
be webcast beginning at 8:30 a.m.
An icon will be posted on the
agencys website Monday and
Tuesday to access the webcasts.
The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat
Commission will hold its 100th
quarterly meeting on Jan. 30-31 at
its Harrisburg office.
Commission committees will meet
beginning at 10:10 a.m. on Monday,
Jan. 30, and again at 8 a.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 31. Formal consid-
eration of the agenda by the full
Commission will begin at approxi-
mately 10:20 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan.
31. All committee meetings and
the formal meeting are open to
the public.
In addition to the regular business
meeting, the PFBC will host a free
fly-fishing program on Monday
night from 6-9 p.m. at the Harris-
burg office. Participants will meet
leaders of Pennsylvanias fly-
fishing tradition and experience
world-class fly tiers in action as
they show fly patterns made
famous on Commonwealth wa-
ters. Also, participants will be able
to view paintings by artist Thom
Glace, see the Commissions new
Pennsylvania Waters collectible
embroidered patches, and pur-
chase a 2012 fishing license. The
Cumberland Valley Chapter of
Trout Unlimited will also be recog-
nized by the Commission.
The program is free and open to
the public, but registration is
required. Space is limited and
registration will close Jan. 27.
Individuals can register online
through the Commissions website
at: http://www.fishandboat.com/
promo/form/register_one-
time_2012jan.htm. For more in-
formation on the evening pro-
gram, call Ted Walke at 717-705-
7813.
O U T D O O R S N O T E S
Hunters and trappers could
gain an additional 400 acres in
LuzerneCountywhenthePenn-
sylvania Game Commission
board meets Tuesday.
Onthe agenda is a proposal to
purchase 406 acres in Hanover
and Fairview townships from
the Earth Conservancy. The
property adjoins State Game
Lands 207 and the purchase
price is $243,930.
If the PGC commissioners
vote to approve the purchase, it
would expand SGL 207 to 2,479
acres.
Commissioner Jay Delaney,
who resides in Wilkes-Barre, is
hopeful he measure will pass be-
cause it provides numerous ben-
efits to wildlife, hunters and
trappers, and land conservation
efforts in the area.
This acquisition is a great
proposal for wildlife habitat,
land conservation and our
strong heritage of hunting and
trappinginPennsylvania, Dela-
ney said. I am hopeful the
Board of Commissioners feels
as strongly about the conserva-
tionvalue of this project as I do.
Mike Dziak, president and
CEOof EarthConservancy, said
the property which is com-
prised of 13 parcels -- has access
points from Brown Street in
Fairview Township and along
state Route 309 in Hanover
Township.
Theadditional access for hun-
ters plus the chance to see the
land conserved are reasons why
the Earth Conservancy board
supports the purchase, Dziak
said.
We have a plan to maintain
certain areas as undeveloped
andthis is one of them, he said.
It would round out the 309 cor-
ridor goinguptoMountainTop,
and we really hope it gets ap-
proved.
The 406 acres contain a varie-
ty of habitats, including oak for-
est, blueberry bushes, succes-
sional habitat that benefit small
game and watershed areas that
border Solomons Creek.
Best of all, Delaney said, the
propertyis only10minutes from
downtown Wilkes-Barre.
This is something thats for
wildlife first, then sportsmen
and land conservation, Dela-
neysaid, addingtheGameCom-
mission has only made one oth-
er land purchase in Luzerne
County over the past four years.
This proposed acquisition is
the largest for northeastern
Pennsylvania since I joined the
board four years ago. Theres a
lot of land for sale in the region,
but it comes down to what the
Game Commission can afford,
Delaney said. The Earth Con-
servancy has been an excellent
partner with the agency with
this proposal and in keeping
much of their holdings open for
hunting.
PGC may
add land
in Luzerne
The Earth Conservancy is
offering more than 400
acres near SGL 207 for sale.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
It was a standoff.
Agray squirrel flattened itself into the crotch of
an oak tree and froze.
A fewyards away, perched on a limb, was a red-
tailed hawk waiting patiently for the squirrel to
move.
At the bottom of the tree stood Wes Hunt, an
apprentice falconer who eagerly watched his one-
year-old female hawk wait out the squirrel.
Usually the squirrel goes ina hole or we get it,
he said. But she has to get height on the squirrel.
Height is her advantage because it gives her speed
as shes coming down.
Thesquirrel cautiouslyinchedaroundtheother
side of the tree, and the hawk took flight. A thick
tree canopy prevented the hawk from getting
muchheight onthe squirrel, andwhenit swooped
down the squirrel quickly dove back into the
crotch to narrowly avoid being snatched by a pair
of razor sharp talons.
It was a clean miss, but Hunts hawk would get
another opportunity later in the day.
Hunt, whoresides inWilliamsport, huntedwith
his hawk on Monday in wooded areas of Lehman
Township. A dedicated falconer, Hunt takes his
hawk afield three times a week hoping to snag a
rabbit or squirrel.
Falconry season for small game runs fromSept.
1 to March 31. This season Hunt and his hawk
have taken two rabbits and 16 squirrels.
But Hunt doesnt practice falconry just to put
meat in the freezer. He does it because its an art
form that molds a unique bond between man and
raptor.
It takes a significant amount of training and
commitment before such a bond can be establish-
ed.
Hunt is in his second year of apprenticeship. By
law, he is required to serve as an apprentice to a
general or master class falconer for two years. Be-
coming an apprentice also requires the passing a
150-question exam, followed by a year of hunting
with a sponsor to get an idea of the work involved
in falconry.
An apprentice falconer is allowed to trap either
a red-tailed hawk or American kestrel two of the
most common raptors in Pennsylvania. They
must also be passage birds meaning a bird less
than a year old.
Hunts trapped his hawk Oct. 5 with a net trap.
The young bird is still honing her skills, he said.
Shes still learning to hunt. They do learn rath-
er quickly, however, and the next year she should
double her catch, Hunt said.
Williamsport resident Michael Kuriga serves as
Hunts sponsor. Amaster falconer with more than
35years experience, Kuriga saidfalconryis a high-
ly-involved process that is more like an art form
than a sport.
This is a highly-regulated activity and first-
hand experience is a big part of the training proc-
ess for both the bird and the person, Kuriga said.
After a while, you become part of the hunting
team. The bird learns to accept you as a hunting
partner.
Hunting with a hawk or raptor is similar to
hunting small game with a dog. The hunter, or fal-
coner, walks through brush or woods trying to
kick out a rabbit or squirrel.
While Hunt did this last Monday, his hawk fol-
lowed along by flying through the tree canopy
overhead, perching and watching Hunt below.
Its behavioral conditioning, Kuriga said. You
cant put a shock collar on a hawk, so you train it
through positive reward. The bird knows that you
will kick game out for it.
There are 168 licensed falconers in Pennsylva-
nia, Kuriga said. Most hunt with red-tailed hawks
and the majority are released back into the wild
after the season is over.
Keeping the bird during the summer requires a
lot of maintenance and its easier to let it go and
trap another when the next season begins.
Whenyourelease them, the survivability is sky
high because they made it through the winter,
Kuriga said. With birds of prey, the first winter
usuallykills 80to90percent of themfromdisease,
accidents or anearlysnowfall, whichis thebiggest
factor.
Afalconer regulates the body weight of his bird
to coincide with the hunt. Its a balancing act,
Hunt said, because the birds body weight needs
to be slightly lower so it will hunt, but it has to
remainat a healthy level soit has the endurance to
attack prey.
On Monday, Hunt spent about four hours with
his bird, hunting along the field edges and wood-
lots.
As the hunt was drawing to an end, the hawk
perched in a treetop and stared intently into a tan-
gle of tree limbs nearby. A flicker of movement
caught its eye and, in an instant, the hawk soared
out off its perch and accelerated down to the near-
by treetop with startling speed.
The quick flight ended with a thump as the
hawk pounced on a squirrel and used its talons to
pin it against the tree. When it had a firmgrasp on
the squirrel, the hawkflewtounderneatha nearby
evergreen to eat its meal.
Hunt hurried over and carefully removed the
squirrel. In the same motion, he removed a piece
of meat fromhis packandplacedit onhis glove for
the hawk.
Thats her reward, Hunt said. Shes not real
happy about me takingthe squirrel, soyouhave to
reward her.
Kuriga said Hunt has done extremely well as an
apprentice and said he shouldnt have a problem
taking the next step as a general falconer.
He really understands what falconry is about,
Kurigasaid. Wedont dothis for theegothing. Its
about being a part of the natural scheme of things
-- playing a role in the predator/prey relation-
ship.
SUMBITTED PHOTO
Wes Hunt is shown with his female red-tailed hawk. Hunt is in the second year as an apprentice falconer.
A true work of art
The team of falconer and their bird is
about more than just a day of hunting
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 13C
BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION/
VERIZON WIRELESS
HOME
E
X
P
O
BOOTH SPACE
is available at the
Builders Remodelers Suppliers Financial Insurance Childrens Area
with McDonalds characters and crafts Ken Pollock vacation give away
Vendor drawing for 1 FREE 10x10 booth Free electronic recycling
available Locally built outdoor items rafe to benet Ronald McDonald
House Separate Wine tasting event
And everything about the home plus much more
Your Business could be there!
CALL FOR RATES AND SPACE AVAILABILITY
MARCH 2, 3 & 4 AT THE KINGSTON ARMORY
The Building Industry Association
Of Northeastern Penna.
287-3331
411 Main St., Kingston, Pa 18704
Support
Your Local
Businesses
RICHMOND, Va. Legisla-
tion that would reverse Virgin-
ias ban on Sunday hunting has
advanced to the Senate floor on
an overwhelming vote by the
Agriculture, Commerce and
Natural Resources Committee.
Two Democratic bills, consoli-
dated into one, would permit
hunting on Sundays on private
land. The legislation won the
committees endorsement
Thursday on an 11-4 vote over
the opposition of animal rights
groups, fox hunting enthusiasts
and bird watchers among others.
Sen. Ralph Northam of Nor-
folk, sponsor of one of the bills,
said state government had no
right telling Virginians what
they could do on their own
private land.
And Sen. Chap Petersen of
Fairfax said the prohibition on
Sunday hunting clashes with an
amendment to the Virginia
Constitution guaranteeing a
right to hunt and fish.
Illinois
CHICAGO Hunters in
Illinois killed more than 181,000
deer during the bow-hunting
and firearms seasons that ended
this month.
The Illinois Department of
Natural Resources said Thurs-
day that the total was a slight
dip from the previous hunting
season, when just more than
182,000 deer were killed.
The states record deer har-
vest, during the 2005-2006 sea-
son, totaled more than 200,000.
The departments forest wild-
life program manager, Paul
Shelton, says deer populations
in many parts of Illinois have
been reduced to levels closer to
population targets.
Minnesota
ST. PAUL, Minn. The state
Department of Natural Re-
sources says Minnesotas deer
harvest declined 7 percent in
2011.
The DNR cites lower deer
populations and a windy first
weekend of the firearms season.
Minnesota hunters harvested
192,300 deer during the 2011
season. Thats a drop of 15,000
from the 207,000 deer harvested
in 2010.
In 2011, firearms hunters
harvested 164,800 deer. Archery
hunters harvested 20,200 deer
while muzzleloader hunters
took 7,300 deer.
DNR wildlife research manag-
er Lou Cornicelli notes that up
to 50 percent of the annual deer
harvest happens during opening
weekend. He says the high
winds during opening weekend
cut into deer activity and the
harvest.
Hunting regulations designed
to bring deer populations to
goal levels, combined with a
harsh winter in 2010, meant
lower deer densities in many
areas.
Iowa
DES MOINES, Iowa Iowa
approved the hunting of mourn-
ing doves nearly a year ago, but
the issue resurfaced Thursday at
the state Capitol when a Senate
panel discussed whether target-
ing the birds with lead-shot
ammunition could indirectly
harm other animals.
The states Natural Resources
Commission last year unani-
mously recommended that
lead-shot ammunition be
banned in dove hunting. A legis-
lative committee put the ban on
hold, but it would take effect if
lawmakers dont reverse the rule
before adjourning in a few
months.
If lead shot is banned, steel-
shot ammunition would still be
allowed.
Environmental advocates told
committee members that in-
gesting lead shot could harm or
kill animals. Neila Seaman of
the Sierra Club said lead-shot
ingestion in mourning doves has
been documented for more than
50 years, and secondary in-
gestion by predators and scav-
engers can be harmful.
But hunting advocates said
the harm is minor and there
arent comparable alternatives
to lead shot.
Louisiana
NEW ORLEANS A scraw-
ny 2-year-old Louisiana black
bear that was able to regain its
health at a rescue center was
shot to death in December,
about eight months after it was
released into the wild.
Tom MacKenzie of the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service says it
is extremely rare, at least in the
Southeast, for something like
this to happen.
The bear was shot in Amite
County, Miss. Federal officials
are investigating and say a man
there could face charges because
Louisiana black bears are pro-
tected under the Endangered
Species Act.
The bear was named Kris
because it arrived at the rescue
center in Townsend, Tenn.,
shortly before Christmas 2010
after it was found going through
trash in south Louisiana.
The bear weighed about 200
pounds when it was shot.
Alaska
ANCHORAGE, Alaska
Authorities are making progress
in their investigation into a bear
hunt that led to the resignation
of a top state Department Fish
and Game official, including
charges that a member of his
hunting party shot a cub.
Corey Rossi, who was the
head of the Department of Wild-
life Conservation, faces 12 charg-
es in connection with the 2008
hunt, including allegations he
falsified records. Authorities say
Rossi was an assistant guide for
a party that included three out-
of-state hunters.
Alaska State Troopers say the
hunting party killed five black
bears but thats not what
hunt records show.
A R O U N D T H E C O U N T R Y
Va. may add Sunday hunting
The Associated Press
OUTDOORS
N O T E B O O K
HARRISBURGThe admin-
istration of Pennsylvania Gov.
TomCorbett has cut funding for
a wildlife research program by
nearly 70 percent, eliminating
state money for projects meant
to examine the impact of natu-
ral gas drilling and climate
change, according to a report.
Richard Allan, the secretary
of the Department of Conserva-
tion and Natural Resources,
eliminated 13 of the 21 projects
that staff in the agencys Wild-
life Resource Conservation Pro-
gram had recommended for
funding, StateImpact Pennsyl-
vania reported Wednesday.
Allan failed to consult with
program staff about which pro-
grams to keep and which ones
to cut, and only one drilling-re-
lated project evaluating plant
growth along natural gas pipe-
line routes remained after
last months cuts, reported
StateImpact, a collaboration of
NPR and public radio stations
in Harrisburg and Philadelphia.
The programs budget was cut
from $780,000 to $251,683.
The Department of Conserva-
tion and Natural Resources at-
tributed the funding cuts to de-
clining revenue, and said some
of the proposed research was
duplicative. The Sierra Clubs
Pennsylvania chapter on Tues-
day criticized the funding re-
ductions as an "attempt to con-
ceal the true environmental im-
pacts of gas drilling."
Typically, a team of three
state employees works with the
conservation programs execu-
tive director to review grant ap-
plications and come up with a
list of recommended projects
and funding amounts. The sev-
en-member Wildlife Resource
Conservation Board which
includes the agencys secretary,
the executive directors of the
Fish & Boat and Game commis-
sions, and the majority and mi-
nority chairs of the state House
and Senate environmental com-
mittees meets each October
to vote on the projects.
The team reviewed 46 appli-
cations last year, and together
with the programs executive di-
rector, Greg Czarnecki, submit-
ted to the board a list of 21 rec-
ommended projects, including
two focused on climate change
and three focused on gas drill-
ing and pipelines.
A DCNR spokeswoman did
not explain how projects were
selected, nor say why the con-
servation program staff wasnt
involved in the funding deci-
sion.
State slashes funding for research
DCNRs wildlife program sees
13 of its 21 projects ended due
to lack of money after cuts.
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
W E A T H E R
1
9
6
6
0
0
Find the car you want fromhome. timesleaderautos.com m
TV AND APPLIANCES
639 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston 287-9631
1313 Wyoming Avenue, Exeter 655-8801
Visit us on the web at www.voitektv.com
PlasmaTV
60 Inch Full 1080p
Z60PV220
$
999
95
600Hz Max Sub
Field Driving
Full HD 1080p
Resolution
2M:1 Dynamic
Contrast Ratio
Innite Surround
40Full 1080p LCDTV
HDLCD4050
$
449
95
High Denition Digital TV (1080p Display)
Receives Over-the-Air DTV Broadcast Signals
3D Comb Filter
Energy Star compliant
HDMI Input x 3
46G310
$
699
95
461080p LCDTV p
46G310
461080
46G310
4661080
Full 1080p Display
ClearFrame 120Hz Panel for
crisp, clear picture
4 HDMI Inputs
Gaming Mode
TFTV3227
$
249
95
32LCDHDTV
HDMI digital connection for perfect AV signal
transmission
AV input jacks for use with media players,
DVR/VCRs, video games, and more
15-pin VGA interface for use with computer
systems
Full-range stereo speakers (20W)
Digital comb lter and noise reduction
V-ship parental control, Closed-Caption, and
Electronic Program Guide support
Your Choice 32LCDSpecial
$
399
95
Your Choice KDL32BX320
32BraviaTV
5 HD inputs USB input
LightSensor technology
24p True Cinema technology
32LCDTV
Wide color enhancer
improves image quality
DNIE provides the best
possible picture
ConnectShare allows
access to photos and
music on your TV
LN32D403
BDVE570
$
299
95
Experience full 1080p and powerful 5.1 channel HD surround sound
Wirelessly stream movies
Upscales DVDs to near HD quality
WiFi enabled
HomeTheatre
Systemwith
Blu-Ray Player
y
Blu-Ra
Beer Dispenser
HBF05EABB
$
599
95
Comes complete with tap system, CO2 tank
and regulator and cleaning kit
Dispenses, mini, 1/4 or 1/2 kegs
Can be converted to a beverage center
70Quattron LEDTV
LC70LE743 Exeter Location
SAVE NOW!
Smart TV - delivers
Netix, CinemaNow
and Vudu streaming video
Built-inWi-Fi - no
additional hardware needed
UltraBrilliant LEDsystem
Full HD1080p
X-Gen LCDPanel
40LEDTV
KDL40EX523
$
999
95
Experience the next level of picture quality and
contrast with Edge LED Backlight technology
With built-in Wi-Fi, you can go beyond scheduled
programming and watch what you want, when
you want.
Enjoy the widest selection of internet
entertainment including Hollywood blockbusters
from Qriocity
Connect your digital camera or USB ash drive
directly into this TVs built-in USB input
HomeTheatre
In a Box
System
YHT595BL
$
499
95
System
A powerful HTiB system for Blu-ray players and at panel displays,
featuring a 105W 5-channel A/V Receiver with HD Audio decoding,
1080p-compatible HDMI with 3D and
Audio Return Channel
12
Months
NO
Interest
Take with price
ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 25/18
Average 33/18
Record High 67 in 1906
Record Low -21 in 1994
Yesterday 43
Month to date 749
Year to date 2685
Last year to date 3219
Normal year to date 3183
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.34
Month to date 1.15
Normal month to date 1.57
Year to date 1.15
Normal year to date 1.57
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 5.17 -0.90 22.0
Towanda 3.16 -0.34 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 3.48 -0.07 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 31-35. Lows: 27-31. Mostly cloudy
skies today, chance of rain/snow showers
moving in tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 40-44. Lows: 37-42. Partly to most-
ly cloudy.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 30-37. Lows: 27-36. Partly cloudy
skies today, increasing clouds tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 31-40. Lows: 28-37. Mostly cloudy
skies.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 41-46. Lows: 39-44. Cloudy with
isolated showers tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 10/0/.00 16/11/sf 20/8/c
Atlanta 61/61/.53 56/49/t 66/38/sh
Baltimore 32/26/.29 37/35/c 59/38/r
Boston 22/17/.17 28/25/s 48/41/sh
Buffalo 27/18/.10 37/36/pc 50/33/r
Charlotte 54/46/.40 45/42/sh 59/38/sh
Chicago 25/16/.00 39/33/r 37/22/r
Cleveland 27/19/.10 41/38/pc 42/27/r
Dallas 50/36/.00 73/38/t 69/44/s
Denver 65/32/.00 40/23/rs 52/28/pc
Detroit 27/13/.02 39/38/pc 45/28/r
Honolulu 83/73/.00 81/65/s 80/66/s
Houston 73/67/.00 80/52/t 70/54/pc
Indianapolis 24/19/.06 47/40/c 42/28/sh
Las Vegas 63/50/.00 59/43/pc 59/39/pc
Los Angeles 61/54/.62 62/49/pc 61/47/r
Miami 78/59/.00 78/67/s 80/67/s
Milwaukee 26/6/.00 37/33/i 36/19/rs
Minneapolis 18/-1/.00 31/22/i 24/11/c
Myrtle Beach 70/59/.02 56/51/sh 69/49/pc
Nashville 66/36/.47 63/50/c 56/37/pc
New Orleans 81/68/.01 75/61/t 70/54/t
Norfolk 60/41/.47 47/42/sh 66/45/sh
Oklahoma City 43/21/.00 69/32/w 59/35/s
Omaha 23/11/.00 40/23/rs 30/20/s
Orlando 77/48/.00 78/61/s 79/59/pc
Phoenix 72/48/.00 69/43/pc 70/43/c
Pittsburgh 28/21/.39 44/39/pc 44/32/r
Portland, Ore. 52/44/.05 44/38/r 45/39/c
St. Louis 32/21/.00 50/35/t 46/29/pc
Salt Lake City 53/33/.69 39/25/pc 39/22/rs
San Antonio 68/49/.00 80/44/pc 75/49/pc
San Diego 62/54/.09 65/49/pc 62/50/r
San Francisco 57/49/.10 54/45/r 55/42/r
Seattle 47/39/.13 47/40/r 45/39/r
Tampa 74/59/.00 79/59/pc 80/59/pc
Tucson 72/44/.00 67/43/pc 68/40/c
Washington, DC 34/28/.24 38/36/c 59/38/r
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 50/37/.00 45/41/sh 43/39/sh
Baghdad 54/32/.00 56/33/s 60/34/s
Beijing 25/10/.00 28/6/s 32/4/s
Berlin 39/34/.21 40/35/sh 37/32/rs
Buenos Aires 95/75/.00 90/72/t 93/70/t
Dublin 50/43/.00 47/39/pc 44/37/pc
Frankfurt 50/34/.11 40/36/sh 37/31/rs
Hong Kong 66/61/.00 62/50/sh 56/49/sh
Jerusalem 55/45/.00 46/40/r 49/39/pc
London 55/43/.00 50/40/pc 47/37/pc
Mexico City 73/43/.00 73/48/pc 74/47/pc
Montreal 10/3/.00 20/18/pc 45/37/sh
Moscow 14/10/.00 17/9/c 13/4/c
Paris 54/48/.00 52/42/c 48/40/sh
Rio de Janeiro 91/73/.00 87/74/pc 86/73/t
Riyadh 55/39/.00 60/44/s 66/42/s
Rome 59/39/.00 61/47/pc 62/45/pc
San Juan 82/70/.00 82/72/sh 81/71/sh
Tokyo 39/37/.00 47/39/sh 44/34/sh
Warsaw 32/30/.24 36/32/rs 34/28/sn
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
40/37
Reading
35/33
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
31/30
33/30
Harrisburg
33/32
Atlantic City
43/37
New York City
36/34
Syracuse
32/31
Pottsville
32/30
Albany
31/25
Binghamton
Towanda
34/31
33/30
State College
31/28
Poughkeepsie
33/26
73/38
39/33
40/23
66/39
31/22
62/49
54/47
56/31
37/17
47/40
36/34
39/38
56/49
78/67
80/52
81/65
30/23
16/11
38/36
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:23a 5:07p
Tomorrow 7:23a 5:08p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 6:38a 4:47p
Tomorrow 7:16a 5:54p
New First Full Last
Jan. 23 Jan. 30 Feb. 7 Feb. 14
Our first winter
snowstorm has
come and gone!
We saw around
3.8 inches in the
backyard. Milder
weather will kick
into gear for this
week. Today will
start off sunny
and nice. Clouds
will come in later
in the day and
there could be
snow urries.
There could be
ice Monday
morning and
urries change
to all rain as
temperatures
warm up.
Tuesday starts
off with light
urries and then
becomes partly
cloudy with a
mild tempera-
ture of 42.
Wednesday is
looking very
nice, a mostly
clear day. Clouds
and the chance
for a light mix
return Thursday.
Friday and
Saturday look
decent heading
into the week-
end.
- Michelle Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: A series of low pressure systems centered in the central U.S. will be responsi-
ble for widespread precipitation today. Look for rain and snow for the central and northern Plains,
with snow and ice across the Upper Midwest. There will also be a chance of scattered showers and
thunderstorms for the southern Mississippi Valley, with showers extending into the Southeast.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Morning sun,
evening urries
MONDAY
Ice in the
morning,
then rain
47
30
WEDNESDAY
Mostly
sunny
40
27
THURSDAY
Mostly
cloudy,
p.m. mix
43
28
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny
40
27
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny
40
25
TUESDAY
Flurries,
partly
sunny
42
32
31

14

C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012
timesleader.com
I
t took more than one misstep to
bring down Eastman Kodak, which
filed for bankruptcy last week. But a
failure to capitalize on its own pioneer-
ing research certainly is high on the list
of stumbles.
Its possible the creation by Kodak
engineer Steven Sasson in 1975 of the
digital camera could have been the
companys salvation. Instead, the tech-
nology helped lead to the downfall of
an American icon; if Kodak survives it
will be as just another maker of inkjet
printers and cartridges.
Supposedly, Kodak executives chose
to hold back on developing the digital
camera in order to protect its highly
profitable film business. But it wasnt
long before competitors attracted by
the fat profit margins chiefly Japa-
nese firm Fuji moved into the film
field. By the time Kodak saw what was
coming it was too late, in both film and
digital technology.
I was part of the problem. Watching
our expenses at the small newspaper
company my wife and I owned, we
switched to the less-expensive Fuji
film. Later, we followed the lead of
hobbyists and took our exposed film to
the drugstore where it could be proc-
essed and picked up within a couple of
hours.
A few years later we moved to dig-
ital, with a camera made by Minolta. At
the time it was the only 1 megapixel
model under our price limit of $1,000.
By then Kodak was marketing digital
cameras made for it in Japan, but their
features didnt measure up.
Business history is filled with stories
like this, from the South Sea Company
to AIG. Often some financial shenani-
gans were involved, but that doesnt
appear to be the case with Kodak. This
time it looks like pure inertia; a highly
successful company trying to protect
its near-monopoly in film by hiding the
Next Big Thing and getting burned.
Will anyone care? Aside from those
nostalgic for tiny black-and-white
prints with scalloped edges, probably
not.
Professional photographer Andy
Molitoris came up through the film era,
but hes shedding no tears at Kodaks
demise. For better or worse, tech-
nologys come in and taken over, he
said last week. I guess its just evolv-
ing.
Kodaks upstate New York neighbor,
IBM, offers a stark contrast. Faced with
tough competition in the once-lucrative
hardware business, the company that
pioneered the personal computer took
the radical step of abandoning that
category and focusing on services, even
if that meant integrating competitors
products into its own. By doing so it
avoided Kodaks fate of getting trapped
in a business that was quickly being
commoditized.
Innovation is a hard principle to keep
fresh when the profits are rolling in, as
they were for most of Kodaks history.
Small companies can respond quickly
when challenged by a shift in their
industry; its a lot harder for giant firms
like Kodak, which once had 145,000
employees spread around the globe.
That makes IBMs performance more
unusual under savvy leadership
since the mid-1990s, the behemoth
hasnt waited for the ground to shift
under its feet, instead constantly seek-
ing out new opportunities that some-
times have meant a radical change in
direction.
Kodak had the opportunity to do
that, but chose instead to believe it
could manage the marketplace. That
makes the company perhaps the most
visible casualty of a modern business
climate in which you must assume
theres someone out there ready and
able to eat your lunch.
In the immortal words of Satchel
Paige: Dont look back. Something
might be gaining on you.
RON BARTIZEK
B U S I N E S S L O C A L
Kodak missed
shot that could
have saved it
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor,
may be reached at rbartizek@timeslead-
er.com or 570-970-7157.
ANYONE WHO
reads this column
regularly knows
there are certain
restaurants I tend to
favor over others.
The reasons include
taste, value and of
course, which ones offer the best
coupons. In all three categories,
Smoky Bones makes my list.
If youve eaten there, heres a rea-
son to go back. If you havent, heres a
reason to try it out: www.smoke-
ybones.com/5off15/
HEAVY11812.html
If you have a newborn, or are ex-
pecting, you probably know that
formula is expensive. This $5 off
Enfamil formula should help:www.en-
familalerts.com/enfamilcoupon
And if your little one is a bit older,
Target has Gerber two packs of 1st or
2nd foods for 85 cents.
Want to start early stocking up on
birthday or holiday gifts for the
slightly larger tykes in your life?
Go here and register then print out
some Hasbro coupons: hasbro.pro-
mo.eprize.com/deals/coupon.html
One is for $8 off a Kre-O Transfor-
mers Optimus Prime 90 piece set.
Some retailers, including Target, sell
them for $7.99, so it will be free.
Also, the site has a $5 off any Hungry
Hungry Hippos game. Search the
travel games section at your toy re-
tailer and youre likely to see they
cost less than $5, so get it for free,
too.
Some people love shopping at Pier
1. Theyll like it more with this $10
off a $40 purchase coupon good today
only: www.pier1.com/DailyDealy/
tabid/953/Default.aspx
Heres another freebie to grab while
youre out and about today:
Visit www.facebook.com/bathand-
bodyworks, click on the photos tab,
then on their wall photos album.
There is a photo coupon good for a
free Pink Chiffon Body Lotion at Bath
and Body Works and no other pur-
chase is required. These sell for $3.50
a piece.
I listed some Walgreens Register
Rewards offers in this column last
week and got plenty of thanks from
readers who had never shopped at
the pharmacy but said they liked
what they saw and will head back for
more Register Rewards deals when
theyre offered.
Well lace up those shoes. This
week, get an Ultimate Flurry Protein
Bar for $1.99, and get $1.99 in Regis-
ter Rewards, which is a coupon for
that amount good for your next store
purchase.
At CVS, Estroven maximum
strength is on sale for $9.99, and
youll get $9.99 in Extra Bucks print-
ed on your receipt. Unlike Walgreens,
which does not require a store card to
benefit from the offer, CVS requires
you use your CVS ExtraCare Card.
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
Smell like pink chiffon in Bath & Body Works Facebook giveaway
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If
you know of any local Super Bowl-related
deals, send them to aseder@timeslead-
er.com.
DUBLINIreland is testing
thelimits for howmuchEurope-
an Union-ordered austerity one
country can take. Its four-year
struggle to save its banks and
tame a runaway deficit has al-
readymeant slashingthousands
fromtheannual budgets of most
households and many Irish
say theyre close to breaking
point.
Were squeezed to the pips,
said Tommy Larkin, a 35-year-
oldmechanicchangingtiresand
oil on the double in northside
Dublin. I never had to watch
my money in the good times,
but thats all I dowithmymoney
now.
Across theroad, butcher Sean
Smith, 43, isnt quite as forlorn
about his own family finances
but is just as bleak about Ire-
lands financial future.
WereunderGermanrule, its
as simple as that, and well be
paying them back forever,
Smithsaid, referringtoIrelands
loss of economic sovereignty
since taking a bailout from the
EU and International Monetary
Fund14 months ago.
Last week, EUandIMFchiefs
monitoringIrelandshandlingof
its debt crisis left Dublinsinging
the praises of a government that
has slashedits 2011deficit to be-
low10 percent of GDP, ahead of
Cash-strapped Ireland tests limits of austerity
AP PHOTO
Butcher Sean Smith, 43, chats with one of his regular cus-
tomers in his shop in Dublin.
By SHAWN POGATCHNIK
Associated Press
See IRELAND, Page 2D
Were under German
rule, its as simple as
that, and well be pay-
ing them back forever."
Butcher Sean Smith
As Americans receive their
first paychecks of the new year,
there are some tax provisions
they can count on.
Individual tax rates will be the
same for 2012 as they were in
2011, as will the 15 percent maxi-
mum tax rate on capital gains.
People at higher incomes wont
see their personal exemptions or
deductions phasedout. Andcred-
its for adopting a child and for
college expenses continue.
But several deductions, credits
and other provisions that existed
for 2011will nolonger be inplace.
The alternative minimum tax
exemptions will drop to pre-2001
levels if Congress doesnt pass a
patch and make it retroactive to
cover the entire year. If history is
any guide, however, Congress
will do that.
Similarly, without congres-
sional action people over 70 1/2
will no longer be able to make
tax-free withdrawals from their
IRAs for a charitable contribu-
tion, and teachers wont be able
totakea$250deductionfor class-
room supplies bought with their
own money.
During the course of 2012, the
IRS will be keeping a close eye on
developments in Congress,
agency spokesman Terry Lem-
ons said. There are a lot of open
question marks.
Tax experts advise people to
monitor other developments as
well.
The IRS recommends review-
ing your withholding sometime
during the year to make sure it is
inlinewithwhat your taxliability
is likely to be. Theres a withhold-
ing calculator on its website,
www.irs.gov. By having less with-
held, people can get their money
upfront, rather than waiting for a
refund.
For most of us, checking our
withholding and preparing tax
returns are among the biggest fi-
nancial tasks we face, Lemons
said.
Some of the tax lawprovisions
Individual,
gains rates
unchanged
See TAXES, Page 2D
By CAROLE FELDMAN
Associated Press
A
s predictably as clearance sales, ads from
debt management services flood the air-
waves this time of year, touting painless
methods to shrink bloated credit card bills or pro-
vide needed cash for a winter vacation. But you
dont need to dial an 800 number for help that
can be the worst thing to do. There are plenty of
resources close to home, starting with your local
bank.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Terri Stocki, education director at Consumer Credit Counseling Service in Pittston holds a water bottle full of
clients cut up credit cards.
Getting out of debt
See DEBT, Page 2D
By EILEEN GODIN Times Leader Correspondent
Debt management tips from Consumer Credit
Counseling Service of Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia
Look for ways to save on expenses and elim-
inate nonessential spending, such as eating
out.
Make the budget a family project. Everyone
must be involved in order for it to work.
Keep an accurate record of cash flow and
expenses.
Make spending habits consistent. Large
expenses should be pro-rated over a period of
time.
Refrain from using credit to subsidize in-
come.
Deposit a part of your income into a savings
account to meet emergency expenses.
From www.cccsnepa.org/debt-management-
program.
BUDGETING TIPS
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
THE BAKE SHACK
Michelle Brockway has opened the
bake shop at 750 Wilkes-Barre
Township Blvd., Wilkes-Barre.
Products, made from scratch
with organic ingredients, include
cookies, cake pops, cupcakes,
brownies, pies, cheesecakes and
whoopie pies. Gourmet fresh
ground coffee is available, as are
pastries, muffins and cinnamon
buns. The Bake Shack can make
custom cakes for all occasions.
Gift baskets and cupcake/cake-
pop/chocolate bouquets can be
delivered within a 5-mile radius.
Gluten-free, lactose-free and
diabetic items are available on
request.
Winter hours are 1-7 p.m., Monday
thru Friday, and 8 a.m.-7 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday.
Call 270-2929 or 350-3282.
ARTSTREET, USA & THE
SWEET CAF
Tim and Lisa Mulcahy of Hanover
Township have opened the
business at 6 W. Northampton
St., Wilkes-Barre. The store
specializes in American craft and
currently represents more than
100 artists. Products include
jewelry, handbags, picture
frames, pottery, soaps and can-
dles. There also are more than
45 varieties of old-fashioned
candy and a variety of choco-
lates by Ashers. Coffee is sold
by the cup, with many sizes and
flavors available, as well as
pre-made baked goods, soda and
snacks.
Hours are 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tues-
day-Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Saturdays.
OPEN FOR BUSINESS
Q: Inmyprevious job, I basical-
ly committed career suicide. I
gossiped, backstabbed and
yelled at important people. I as-
sumed my co-workers were out
to get me, even though I had no
proof. I eventually realized that I
was creating my own problems,
but changing was difficult as
longas I was inthesameenviron-
ment.
After finding my present job
three years ago, I worked hard to
avoid conflicts, improve my be-
havior, and become more politi-
cally astute. Unfortunately, how-
ever, one of my former col-
leagues has nowjoined our staff,
and Imafraid she will tell people
about my past. ShouldI go to her
and make amends or just wait
and see what happens?
A: First, lets give you a hearty
round of applause for taking a
long, hard look at yourself and
making some difficult changes.
Very few people manage to be
that objective about their own
behavior.
Regarding your former co-
worker, I dont think you have
muchtoworryabout. After expe-
riencing the new you for three
years, your current colleagues
are unlikely to put much stock in
ancient gossip. Nevertheless, if
the two of you have a history of
conflicts, youshouldinviteher to
join you in making a fresh start.
For example: When we
worked together before, I know
that I was not a very nice co-
worker. However, in the past
three years, I have really made an
effort to become a better person
anda more helpful colleague. My
hope is that we can have a good
working relationship this time
around.
After that, make everyeffort to
live up to your words. If this co-
worker is equally mature, your
rocky past will soonbe forgotten.
Q: Our micromanaging boss
makes it difficult to accomplish
our team goals. When we start a
new project, she never discusses
her expectations or her vision of
theendresult. Sheoftenshifts di-
rection on a whim, leaving us
feeling that weve done a lot of
work for nothing. Do you have
any suggestions?
A: Actually, your boss sounds
more like a flip-flopper thana mi-
cromanager. Flip-flopping man-
agers are either afraid to make a
decision or constantly distracted
by new ideas. Their chronic va-
cillation wastes a great deal of
time and drives employees abso-
lutely crazy.
With a flip-flopper boss, three
strategies can help to save your
sanity. One is to ask a lot of ques-
tions at the beginning of a pro-
ject. This will not only help you
understand your managers ob-
jectives, but may also help her
clarify her own thinking.
The second strategy is to
schedule regular check-in meet-
ings during the project to review
progress and ask your boss for
feedback. This allows you to see
if you are on the right track and
get an early warning of possible
changes.
Finally, you must simply ac-
cept the fact that you have an in-
decisive manager. If you fail to
adapt to her management style,
she will sense your irritation and
possibly change her mind about
you.
OFFICE COACH
New attitude means poor work past is history
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics. Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
TMG HEALTH
Roger Nawrocki was recently
appointed Senior Director of
Cross-Functional Operations,
Dunmore. Nawrocki was most
recently employed as the Senior
Director of Operations and Tech-
nical Support at CareFirst Blue
Cross and Blue Shield of Mary-
land. He holds a bachelors de-
gree in Management Science
from Kean University, Union, N.J.
Carl Hurst, Plains Township, joined
the company as the Director of
Technical Infrastructure. Hurst
holds a bachelors degree in
Computer Science from Wilkes
University and has more than 20
years of IT experience, most
recently serving as the Manager
of Network and Desktop In-
frastructure at Blue Cross of
Northeastern Pennsylvania. He is
based in the companys Scranton
Data Center.
Camille Jescavage, Hunlock Creek,
was promoted to Director of
Medicaid Compliance. Jescavage
holds a bachelors degree in
Economics/Marketing from
Kings College and a law degree
from Oklahoma City University.
She joined TMG Health in 2010
and is based in the companys
National Operations Center,
Dunmore.
James Shanahan, Glenolden,
joined the company as Director
of Technical Sales Support. Sha-
nahan holds a bachelors degree
in Business Management from
Widener University and is a
certified Project Management
Professional. He has more than
15 years of upper-level man-
agerial experience. He will be
based in the King of Prussia
headquarters.
Amy Moyer-Carey, York, joined the
company as Director of Enroll-
ment and Billing Operations.
Moyer-Carey holds a bachelors
degree in Business Adminis-
tration from Duquesne University
and earned her Lean Six Sigma
Black Belt from Villanova Uni-
versity. Moyer-Carey is based in
the Companys National Oper-
ations Center, Dunmore.
CLEARWATER CHRISTIAN
COLLEGE
John F. (Jack) Klem, Clearwater,
Fla., will serve as the fifth presi-
dent of the school. Klem, origi-
nally from
Wilkes-Barre,
holds degrees
from Lancaster
Bible College in
Lancaster;
Baptist Bible
College in
Clarks Summit;
and Central
Baptist The-
ological Seminary in Plymouth,
Minn. He has served as Vice
President of Academics and Dean
of Graduate School at Northland
International University in Dun-
bar, Wis., and Academic Dean and
Executive Vice President at the
Central Baptist Theological Semi-
nary in Virginia Beach, Va., where
he also served on the faculty as
Professor of Biblical Theology
and Exegesis.
MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY
Allen C. Minor, assistant professor
of business and director of the
Health Care
Management
program at
Misericordia
University, has
been named to
the Healthy
Northeast
Pennsylvania
Initiative board.
Minor has a
bachelors
degree in accounting from the
University of Baltimore and a
masters in finance from the
University of South Carolina. He
has earned his Juris Doctor from
the University of Baltimore and
his Doctor of Business Adminis-
tration from Nova Southeastern
University.
BORTON-LAWSON
Doreen Rushton joined the compa-
ny as Director of Human Re-
sources. Rushton will be based
out of Wilkes-Barre. She received
a bachelors degree in business
administration from Kings Col-
lege and masters in human
resource management from the
University of Scranton.
Andrew Andreeko has joined the
firm as Director of Land Devel-
opment. Andreeko earned a
bachelors degree in civil engi-
neering from Clemson University.
He is a registered Professional
Engineer in New Jersey and
Pennsylvania. He is also certified
as a flood plain manager and
Pennsylvania NBIS Bridge Safety
Inspector.
Thomas Chervanick is the Manag-
er of Construction Services and
will also serve as Corporate
Safety Officer. Chervanicks
background includes electrical
apprentice training by the In-
ternational Brotherhood of Elec-
trical Workers, coursework in
advanced motor control systems
from Williamsport Area Commu-
nity College and participating in
the electronics program at the
Pennsylvania State University.
METZ CULINARY
MANAGEMENT,
KimBrenkus has
been hired as
Director of
Clinical Nutrition
Services. Bren-
kus is affiliated
with the American Dietetic Asso-
ciation, Ohio Dietetic Association,
Cleveland Dietetic Association
and Clinical Nutrition Managers
DPG. She graduated from Edin-
boro University with a bachelors
degree in Nutrition and Lake Erie
College with a Master of Business
Administration.
CORPORATE LADDER
The Times Leader publishes an-
nouncements of business promo-
tions, hirings and other noteworthy
events on Sundays. Photographs may
be included as space allows. Submit
an announcement by e-mail to tlbusi-
ness@timesleader.com, by mail to 15
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711; or
by fax to 829-5537. Photos in jpeg
format may be attached to e-mails.
Brenkus
Klem
Minor
RED CARPET BREAKFAST:
Wednesday, 7:45-9 a.m., Meas
Restaurant, downtown Hazleton.
Speaker will be Hazleton mayor
Joseph Yannuzzi. Hazleton
Chamber members $15, non-
members $20. Register online at
www.hazletonchamber.org, call
455-1509 or email jferry@hazle-
tonchamber.org.
OSHA EXCAVATING & TRENCH-
ING TRAINING: Wednesday, 9
a.m.-3:30p.m., Greater Hazleton
Chamber office, 20 W. Broad St.,
Hazleton. Learn important safe-
ty guidelines enforced by OSHA,
in order to maintain a safer work
environment $79 per person,
$39 each additional person from
the same company, includes
lunch and materials. Reserva-
tions required, online at www.ha-
zletonchamber.org, call 455-1509
or email jferry@hazletoncham-
ber.org.
NEPA NETWORKERS MIXER:
Thursday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.,Radis-
son Lackawanna Station, Scran-
ton. NEPA Networkers is a Link-
edIn online community. $15 per
person and includes hors
douevres and non-alcoholic
beverages; cash bar available. To
participate and view the attend-
ee list, RSVP at http://linkd.in/
sEFMVh.
LANDLORDS HELPING LAND-
LORDS: Jan. 31, 7:30 p.m., Ra-
mada Inn on Public Square,
Wilkes-Barre. Speaker Barry
Williams will discuss changes in
tax law for the upcoming filing
season as it relates to landlords
and real estate investors. $10 at
the door or $60 annual dues for
the Wyoming Valley Real Estate
Investors Association. Call 240-
6475 or email benjamin_cor-
by@hotmail.com for more in-
formation.
WOMENS NETWORKING LUN-
CHEON: Jan. 31, noon-1 p.m.,
Best Western Genetti Inn &
Suites, 1341 N. Church St., Hazle-
ton. Hazleton Chamber mem-
bers $16, nonmembers $21, in-
cludes buffet lunch. Reserva-
tions required, online at www.ha-
zletonchamber.org, call 455-1509
or email jferry@hazletoncham-
ber.org.
INTEGRATING PLANNED GIVING
INTO YOUR DEVELOPMENT
PLAN: Feb. 7, 1 1:30a.m.-1:30 p.m.,
Woodlands, Rt. 315, Plains. For
development officers, estate
planners, attorneys and financial
planners. $25 for AFP, NCAC and
WBLLA members, and $40 for
nonmembers. Reservations may
be made at: http://afp-
feb2012.eventbrite.com/
WYOMING COUNTY CHAMBER
EDUCATIONAL LUNCHEON:
Feb. 8, 1 1:45 a.m., Twigs Cafe,
Route 6, Tunkhannock. Marty
McGuire, marketing manager at
Frontier Communications, will
provide quick leverage social
media tips to help grow a busi-
ness. Included; how to use social
media, Google, Yahoo and Bing;
how to create a Facebook page
and tools to optimize websites
and online business listings. Free
to Chamber members, $10 for
nonmembers. To reserve, call
570-836-7755 or email Rob-
in@wyccc.com.
BUSINESS AGENDA
the bailout plans target.
Ireland has been cutting its
budgets and raising a slewof tax-
es since January 2009 and, ac-
cording to the EU-IMF bailout
plan, still must cut billions more
over the next three years just to
regain a 2015 deficit of 3 percent
of GDP, the maximum level per-
mitted in the eurozone.
Middle-class wages have been
cut around 15 percent, while the
nearly 15 percent unemployed
have seen welfare and other aid
payments trimmed. The govern-
ment has just raised sales tax to
23 percent, joint highest in the
EU, imposing a new household
tax, and planning new water
charges next. Keeping a car on
the road can mean an annual fee
of anything from (euro) 160
($205) to (euro) 2,258 ($3,045),
while recent fuel-tax hikes have
helpedtakegas above(euro)1.50
per liter ($7.25 per U.S. gallon).
Many economists believe Ire-
land is trying to defy economic
gravity by fighting a war on its
owndebt that, tosucceed, will re-
quire strong economic growth
alongside spending cuts. Auster-
ity alone, the recipe so far, under-
cuts the hopes of growthby suck-
ing money out of the economy.
The same formula of reforms
centeredonausterity is being ap-
plied across Europe and is cham-
pioned by Germanys chancellor
and leading voice in Europes fi-
nancial planning, Angela Merkel,
as a way out of the regions finan-
cial crisis. Recession-hit Greece
and Portugal, which have also
been the recipients of bailouts,
face severe austerity measures.
The proponents of austerity
have pointed to Ireland as proof
that it can work, but questions
aregrowingover howmuchlong-
er the country can keep squeez-
ing money fromits economy.
If austerity dont work in Ire-
land, it wont work anywhere.
And it cant work here if people
are scared stiff of spending what-
ever money they have, said Da-
vid McWilliams, Irelands most
prominent economic commenta-
tor, who foresaw the demise of
the1994-2007CelticTigerecono-
my as credit and property bub-
bles collapsed.
McWilliams notedthat Ireland
has an extremely flexible labor
market byEuropeanstandards, is
quick to use its traditional safety
valve of emigration to keep un-
employment artificially low, and
has built a lopsided economy de-
pendent onthe fortunes of nearly
1,000 foreign multinationals
based here.
Despite these advantages, he
said, Ireland still stands little
chance of achieving the econom-
ic growth it needs so long as its
trapped in an EU-directed plan
that takes progressively more
money out of peoples pockets.
Search every economic text-
book youve ever read and find
theonethat sayscuttingexpendi-
ture in the teeth of a recession
will make the economy grow. It
doesnt exist, McWilliams said.
Austin Hughes, chief econo-
mist at KBC Ireland, a Belgian-
owned bank that is one of Ire-
lands main mortgage providers,
said the country faces a make-or-
break 2012. If the economy
doesnt growsufficiently, he said,
people will increasingly reject
the whole rationale of austerity.
IRELAND
Continued from Page 1D
still in effect for 2012:
The Bush tax cuts, which set
marginal income tax rates of 10
percent, 15 percent, 25 percent,
28percent, 33percent and35per-
cent. Theserates will increasebe-
ginning in 2013 unless they are
renewed by Congress.
Capital gains tax rates of 0
percent and 15 percent. Capital
gains generallyaretheincreasein
the value of an asset, such as
stockor a home, fromtimeof pur-
chase until sale. Net long-term
capital gains those on assets
held more than a year are
taxed at the 0 percent or 15 per-
cent rate. Net gains on assets
held less than a year short-
termgains are taxedat the reg-
ular income tax rates.
The child tax credit of $1,000
per child. The credit will drop to
$500 in 2013 unless Congress
acts.
The higher earned income
tax credit for families with three
or morechildren. After 2012, fam-
ilies with three or more children
will be treated the same as those
with two children if Congress
doesnt pass an extension.
The credit for expenses asso-
ciated with the adoption of a
child. However, the adoption
credit is nolonger refundable and
is limited to $12,650 in 2012. It
phases out for people withhigher
incomes.
The American Opportunity
Credit, which allows a maximum
credit of $2,500 for tuition and
other expenses for each of the
first four years of higher educa-
tion. The credit, which also phas-
es out at higher incomes, is par-
tially refundable.
Some of the provisions that ex-
pired at the end of 2011:
A patch for the alternative
minimum tax. Absent congres-
sional action, the exemption will
drop to $45,000 for married cou-
ples filing jointly, $33,750 for sin-
gle person or the head of a house-
hold, and $22,500 for married
people filing separately.
The deduction for state and
local sales taxes, in lieu of state
and local income taxes.
The deduction for qualified
tuition and fees.
TAXES
Continued from Page 1D
Banks are having debt man-
agement conversations with
customers every day, said Peter
Curtin, regional manager of re-
tail banking at PNC Bank in
Scranton.
These conversations can
lead to solutions the customer
never thought of, he said.
Edward J. Kozmor, vice presi-
dent of media relations with
PNC Financial Services Group,
said debt management needs to
be looked at individually.
There is not a cookie-cutter
approach, Kozmor said.
Credit card bills fromthe holi-
day season combined with ris-
ingcosts of utilities andfoodand
gas prices can make the average
paycheck disappear the same
day it arrives. Feelings of frustra-
tionandembarrassment are nor-
mal, Terri Stocki, educational di-
rector at Consumer Credit
Counseling Service of North-
eastern Pennsylvania said.
Money is a touchy subject,
Stocki said. The hardest thing
to do is to call for help.
Stocki said ideally clients
should sit down and list income
and expenses to see areas where
they can cut back on.
It could be just a budgeting
issue, she said. Consolidation
is not for everybody.
Stocki said the CCCS can
work with a client and credit
cardcompanies toarrange lower
interest rates and payments.
CCCS also offers a consolida-
tion program for clients who
need it. The program requires
clients tomake a lowpayment to
an account held by the agency,
which disperses funds to the
credit card accounts.
Settlement companies adver-
tise similar programs, but Stocki
warns to be careful and thor-
oughly check out the company
making the offer. Two things to
look for are an office where you
can talk to someone face-to-face
and a clear explanation of fees.
Ken Silagy, CEO of Dollar
Sense, a debt settlement compa-
ny in Reading, is aware of the
bad reputation some settlement
companies have, and advises
consumers to check out the
company with the Better Busi-
ness Bureau, and do an internet
search to see what complaints
have been filed.
Just like CCCS, Dollar Sense,
sets up a non-interest-bearing
account clients pay in to, while
representatives work with the
credit card companies to settle.
Silagysays unlike manysettle-
ment companies, Dollar Sense
does not collect fees in advance,
deducting them only when a
case is resolved.
We get paid a percentage of
what we save our client, Silagy
said.
Settlement programs take
time to work, sometimes lasting
a year or longer, Silagy said.
Clients did not develop debt
overnight, Stocki said. So it
will not be resolved overnight.
Ed Novak, a spokesman for
the Pennsylvania Department of
Banking, said debt settlement
companies are not regulated,
while debt management compa-
nies are. A Federal Trade Com-
mission ruling last year barred
debt management companies
from collecting advance fees by
phone.
The backlash of settlement
programs is the adverse but tem-
porary effect it has on a persons
credit rating.
Settlements can wreak havoc
with a credit report, Novak
said, as well as leave the debtor
vulnerable to lawsuits for non-
payment.
Stocki said when a client com-
pletes the CCCS program, the
appearance of the program
comes off the credit report in
about a month.
Inher12years of workingwith
CCCS, Stocki found the most
common problem with credit
card debt is the belief that mak-
ing the minimum payment will
pay off the account. She said
many clients also are unaware of
how much interest is tacked on
their account monthly.
Local financial institutions of-
fer a variety of ways to help con-
sumers deal with debt manage-
ment, control spendingandbud-
get funds.
Cross Valley Federal Credit
Union, Wilkes-Barre, offers a
low-interest loan for consolida-
tion of debt. But members
shouldcome inanddiscuss their
options first with a representa-
tive, said Colleen Phillips, vice
president of marketing.
We want to work with them,
Phillips said. Maybe an option
might betorefinancetheir home
to pay off the debt. We take it on
a case-by-case basis.
Education on money and
credit management is an impor-
tant part of the money equation.
Curtin, of PNC, said consumers
need to understand how the
debt occurred and develop a
long-term goal of where they
want to be.
It is very hard to say you
should be saving 10 percent of
your paycheck in this economy,
he said. More realistically, he ad-
vises to save what is possible,
but not waiting until the debt is
paid off.
If you wait until tomorrowto
start saving, tomorrowmay nev-
er come, Curtin said.
To help consumers, PNC of-
fers a money management pro-
gram called the Virtual Wallet
which can schedule payments,
track spending habits, and de-
velop long-term and short-term
savings goals.
DEBT
Continued from Page 1D
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 3D
B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
AP
THE GLOBAL OUTLOOK FOR BANKING
Banks around the world are still recovering from the finan-
cial crisis in 2008 and the recession, and many are likely to
have a hard time in 2012. Thats the finding of the research
and consulting firm Celent, which has issued a study on
the global banking industry. Celent said banks in many
countries will have to increase their business with existing
customers this year because it will be harder to find new
ones. And the path to higher profits will be from cost-cut-
ting, not revenue increases. Banks will have to focus more
of their business on digital channels like smartphones. And
banks in Canada, Australia and Asia are doing better than
those in the U.S. and Western Europe.
ANOTHER RE BOOM
Falling mortgage rates arent
tempting people to buy homes,
but they are convincing home-
owners its time to renance. The
Mortgage Bankers Association
said its index of mortgage loan
activity rose 23.1 percent in the
week ended Jan. 13, compared
with the previous week.
Renancings accounted for 82.2
percent of the loan applications.
That was up from 80.8 percent
the previous week and it was
the highest share of mortgage
activity since October 2010. Interest rates have fallen to record
lows, following the drop in the 10-year Treasury note. Investors
have been buying bonds out of concern that the European debt cri-
sis could spill over to the U.S. The average interest rate on a 30-
year xed mortgage fell this past week to a record 3.88 percent.
THEY DONT EAT WHAT THEY DONT HEARABOUT
Professors at the University of Illinois and the University of British Columbia believe that if
there were a ban on advertising for fast-food, people would eat less of it. The professors
studied the impact of a ban on junk-food ads in the Canadian province of Quebec from
1984 to 1992. They found evidence that French-speaking households spent 13 percent
less each week on fast food. And they computed that there were between 11 million and
22 million fewer fast-food meals eaten each year in the province. But Professor Kathy
Baylis of the University of Illinois notes that many children spend time on the Internet, so
even if there were no commercials for burgers and fries on TV, kids could still see plenty
of fast-food ads.
Thomas Vandeventer, a portfolio
manager at Tocqueville Asset
Management, explains why he
sees Priceline.com, Lululemon
and Facebook as good long-term
invest-
ments, not
just fads.
He helps
manage
about $700
million in
assets and
runs the
Tocqueville
Opportunity
fund
(TOPPX),
which fo-
cuses on small and mid-sized
stocks.
Why own Priceline.com when
its stock trades at about 17
times its earnings per share ex-
pected over the next 12
months?
What weve seen consistently is
an earnings surprise every single
quarter. The company has given
really positive guidance and
hasnt gotten any credit for it. Its
also a little unusual among the on-
line travel agencies in that it yields
kind of heavier revenues and prof-
its from the hotel side than the air-
line side. It has a very significant
exposure to the fragmented hotel
market in Europe.
Wouldnt that be a negative,
given Europes economic prob-
lems?
Unlike the U.S., where you have
the large branded hotel chains
like, lets call it Marriott, Hilton and
Starwood, Europe is a very frag-
mented market, and Priceline has
consolidated the dominant market
share in that market. And we have
not seen weakness in European
bookings or revenues. Weve
seen occupancy rates, average
daily revenues and room rates ac-
tually kind of consistent. The un-
derlying economy and business
travel appears to be stronger than
the credit that investors seem to
be giving.
What about Lululemon, the yo-
ga-wear retailer. It trades at 38
times its expected earnings per
share over the next 12 months.
Lulu is a very powerful kind of
leading-edge retailer with a very
intriguing business model. They
have 110 to 120 stores. They
have a very conservative develop-
ment strategy for new stores. The
company is emphasizing their on-
line sales strategy as much as
their retail. Margins are very
strong at Lulu. And its not an
overly expanded concept. We
think their target market is very
loyal - yoga, high-end premium
exercise wear.
Youve bought Facebook
shares on the secondary mar-
ket. Do the recent stumbles of
some tech IPOs make you wor-
ried that investors will be skep-
tical of Facebooks?
The IPO market has been a really
difficult market over the last year.
One of the major problems that
the IPO market has had is that a
lot of the properties that have
come onto the market dont nec-
essarily have the barriers to entry
and the competitive advantages
that Google had when it came
public and that we believe Face-
book possesses. While the busi-
ness model for Facebook is not
entirely determined (meaning in-
vestors arent yet fully sure how
the company will make a profit off
its users), we were an original in-
vestor in Google at the IPO, and
we had to cross that same chal-
lenge. Even at the Google IPO,
the company was pretty tight
lipped about what the business
model was going to be.
In terms of the user base, in terms
of the potential that we anticipate
that Facebook has to monetize,
we think it will be probably the
best.
Looking
for growth
InsiderQ&A
Vandeventer
David Pitt, J. Paschke AP
Higher contribution limits
The maximum annual 401(k) contribution rises to
$17,000. Thats up $500 from the $16,500
maximum that has been in effect since 2009.
People 50 or older can save an additional $5,500.
That amount hasnt changed.
More information about fees
New Labor Department rules require 401(k)
plan providers like Vanguard, ING and Aon
Hewitt to give more information about what
they charge to employers who use their
plans. That will help companies compari-
son shop.
Another rule goes into effect in May. It
will require additional information to be
given to 401(k) account holders. That will
help workers factor in costs when theyre
picking investments.
Cheaper plans
An increasing focus on fees the last few
years has forced mutual fund companies to
lower their charges to stay competitive.
Thats expected to continue. Average fees
and expenses for stock mutual funds fell to
0.95 percent in 2010 from 1.28 percent in
2000, according to the Investment Company
Institute, a trade group. A fee of 0.95 percent
means you pay $9.50 for each $1,000 you have
invested. Expenses for bond funds fell to 0.72
percent from 1 percent in 2000.
A wider choice of investments
Expect more 401(k) plans to offer a greater
number of index mutual funds, exchange
traded funds and other funds with lower
costs. Index mutual funds are increas-
ingly popular because their fees on
average can be nearly half those of
actively managed funds. Schwab
Retirement Plan Services announced
last week that it was starting a new
all-index 401(k) plan.
ETFs are also more popular. They
track various indexes, but are bought
and sold throughout the day like
stocks. ETF fees are often three to
four times lower than actively
managed funds. Vanguard, ING
Direct and T.D. Ameritrade are among
providers offering ETFs in 401(k)
plans. Schwab plans to launch its
version of a 401(k) with ETFs this year.
Your 401(k) retirement account is likely to be more investor-friendly in 2011. Youll be able to contribute
more money to your account. New government regulations will help you figure out how much youre paying
in fees. And competition among mutual funds is expected to lower those costs and to give you more
investment choices. Some of the changes youll see:
Your 401(k) this year
Air Products APD 72.26 8 98.01 90.65 0.74 0.8 s s 6.4 +6.54 2 7.0 16 2.6
Amer Water Works AWK 25.27 0 32.98 32.89 0.96 3.0 s s 3.2+31.68 120.3a 19 2.8
Amerigas Part LP APU 36.76 5 51.50 42.78 1.60 3.9 t t -6.8 8.02 3 12.2 19 7.1
Aqua America Inc WTR 19.28 6 23.79 21.74 0.48 2.3 t t -1.4 3.45 3 2.0 22 3.0
Arch Dan Mid ADM 23.69 5 38.02 30.04 0.87 3.0 s s 5.0 8.07 3 0.9 9 2.3
AutoZone Inc AZO 246.26 0347.48 347.00 2.56 0.7 s s 6.8+37.39 1 22.6 17 ...
Bank of America BAC 4.92 3 15.16 7.07 0.46 7.0 s s 27.251.10 5-26.1 ... 0.6
Bk of NY Mellon BK 17.10 3 32.50 21.28 -0.17 -0.8 s s 6.931.20 4 -9.8 10 2.4
Bon Ton Store BONT 2.23 1 17.49 3.34 0.32 10.6 r t -0.968.14 5-36.0 ... 6.0
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 31.30 0 43.17 42.77 0.78 1.9 s s 4.9+22.65 1 6.0 17 1.5
Cigna Corp CI 38.79 6 52.95 46.14 0.53 1.2 s s 9.9+13.05 2 1.4 10 0.1
CocaCola KO 61.29 7 71.77 68.09 1.10 1.6 t t -2.7 +11.19 2 9.6 13 2.8
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 19.19 9 27.16 26.07 0.69 2.7 s s 10.0+14.02 1 -1.6 18 1.7
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.67 0 28.91 28.35 0.11 0.4 s s 2.0 +8.10 2 7.8 14 3.7
Community Hlth Sys CYH 14.61 1 42.50 17.28 0.58 3.5 s t -1.051.81 5-13.8 6 ...
Entercom Comm ETM 4.61 4 13.63 8.06 0.63 8.5 s s 31.121.60 4-18.4 8 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 10.25 4 21.02 14.35 1.43 11.1 s s 19.211.75 3 -3.6 12 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 4.79 1 9.84 4.87 -0.23 -4.4 t t -5.438.65 4 -7.8 32 15.4
Genpact Ltd G 13.09 5 18.16 15.19 0.69 4.8 s t 1.6 +2.84 219.9a 20 1.2
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.00 4 13.74 9.67 0.44 4.8 t s 6.425.00 4-16.9 14 3.3
Heinz HNZ 46.99 7 55.00 51.95 -0.77 -1.5 t t -3.9 +9.68 2 5.3 17 3.7
Hershey Company HSY 46.54 0 62.38 61.54 0.06 0.1 s s -0.4+27.91 1 5.3 23 2.2
Kraft Foods KFT 30.21 0 38.84 38.67 0.90 2.4 s s 3.5+27.54 1 4.5 21 3.0
Lowes Cos LOW 18.07 9 27.57 26.53 0.21 0.8 s s 4.5 +6.40 2 -3.4 19 2.1
M&T Bank MTB 66.40 7 91.05 81.72 -0.62 -0.8 s s 7.0 1.41 3 -4.3 13 3.4
McDonalds Corp MCD 72.89 0101.87 101.74 1.39 1.4 s s 1.4+38.73 1 20.0 20 2.8
NBT Bncp NBTB 17.05 9 24.98 23.89 0.75 3.2 s s 8.0 +3.65 2 2.9 14 3.3
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 4.59 8 10.28 8.71 0.17 2.0 s s 11.1+66.54 1 9.2 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 42.70 8 65.19 59.63 -2.10 -3.4 s s 3.4 -+.05 3 -2.2 11 2.3
PPL Corp PPL 24.10 6 30.27 27.50 -0.59 -2.1 t t -6.5 +11.15 2 -0.3 10 5.1
Penna REIT PEI 6.50 6 17.34 12.27 0.74 6.4 s s 17.5 2.72 3-14.5 ... 4.9
PepsiCo PEP 58.50 6 71.89 66.28 1.88 2.9 t s -0.1 +3.65 2 3.0 17 3.1
Philip Morris Intl PM 55.98 8 79.96 74.52 -2.80 -3.6 t s -5.0+36.91 125.5a 16 4.1
Procter & Gamble PG 57.56 9 67.72 66.23 0.95 1.5 t r -0.7 +3.84 2 2.6 17 3.2
Prudential Fncl PRU 42.45 6 67.52 57.36 2.11 3.8 s s 14.4 3.29 3 -6.8 7 2.5
SLM Corp SLM 10.91 6 17.11 14.62 0.98 7.2 s s 9.1 +5.59 2-19.7 12 2.7
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 39.00 3 60.00 43.25 2.28 5.6 s s 10.9 ... 0.0 ... 10.7
Southn Union Co SUG 25.58 0 44.65 43.25 0.55 1.3 s s 2.7+68.46 1 11.3 22 1.4
TJX Cos TJX 45.79 0 67.10 66.58 1.43 2.2 s s 3.1+43.13 1 18.1 19 1.1
UGI Corp UGI 24.07 5 33.53 28.20 0.33 1.2 t s -4.1 9.67 3 3.3 14 3.7
Verizon Comm VZ 32.28 9 40.48 38.97 0.05 0.1 t s -2.9+18.30 1 6.6 16 5.1
WalMart Strs WMT 48.31 0 61.06 61.01 1.47 2.5 s s 2.1 +11.57 2 6.6 14 2.4
Weis Mkts WMK 36.52 9 42.20 41.28 0.68 1.7 t s 3.4+10.08 2 2.6 16 2.9
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
SOURCES: Credit Suisse; FactSet
Buying companies that sell to companies
Stock
Screener
Companies are sitting on a record amount of cash, their profits
are still growing and their balance sheets look healthy. Sounds like a
good customer base.
Thats why Credit Suisse strategists suggest investors look to
companies that depend on corporate spending for their revenue.
Business spending looks more dependable than government spend-
ing, given stretched budgets around the world.
This screen from Credit Suisse shows companies that get at least
60 percent of their revenue from corporate spending and whose
businesses either generate lots of cash or look cheap based on
earnings and other criteria.
Flowserve, for example, sells pumps, valves and other equipment
used in the oil, chemical and other industries, so all of its revenue
comes from businesses. Financial analysts expect its earnings per
share to rise 13 percent in 2012. It trades at 15 times its earnings
per share over the last 12 months, below its average of 16 times
over the last five years.
*1=buy; 2=hold; 3=sell Data through Jan. 19
Cummins CMI 100% $105.51 $79.53 $121.49 1.5% 1.4
Flowserve FLS 100 108.29 66.84 135.72 1.2 1.2
Parker Hannifin PH 100 84.97 59.26 99.40 1.7 1.5
Google GOOG 100 639.57 473.02 670.25 0.0 1.3
EMC EMC 91 23.16 19.84 28.73 0.0 1.2
BMC Software BMC 90 33.39 31.62 56.55 0.0 1.5
Oracle ORCL 90 28.56 24.72 36.50 0.8 1.4
National CineMedia NCMI 90 13.37 11.21 19.07 6.6 1.8
Emerson Electric EMR 88 49.80 39.50 64.56 3.2 1.6
Kennametal KMT 86 43.04 29.30 45.66 1.3 1.5
Fluor FLR 85 56.63 44.16 75.76 0.9 1.3
General Electric GE 80 19.15 14.02 21.65 3.6 1.3
SPX SPW 77 67.73 40.66 87.13 1.5 1.4
Jacobs Engineering JEC 75 45.16 30.74 53.18 0.0 1.4
Rockwell Automation ROK 73 81.75 50.36 98.19 2.1 1.5
VeriSign VRSN 70 35.75 27.00 37.73 0.0 1.6
Marriott International MAR 60 34.66 24.03 40.32 1.2 1.4
Microsoft MSFT 60 28.12 23.65 29.46 2.8 1.5
Symantec SYMC 60 16.59 14.94 20.50 0.0 1.3
REVENUE FROM
CORP. SPENDING LOW HIGH
52 WEEK
AVERAGE
BROKER
RATING* COMPANY TICKER CLOSE
DIVIDEND
YIELD
American Funds BalA m ABALX 18.85 +.25 +4.5 +6.2/A +3.0/B
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.56 -.03 +.6 +7.0/B +3.6/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 49.54 +.46 +2.2 +3.5/A +1.0/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 33.51 +.92 +5.8 -4.4/C -.2/B
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 37.05 +1.43 +6.4 -9.1/B -.5/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 37.18 +.75 +6.4 +2.1/C +1.4/A
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 30.36 +.62 +6.7 -.7/D +.4/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 17.04 +.17 +3.1 +6.5/A +2.0/C
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 28.37 +.56 +6.5 +1.3/D /C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 27.50 +.78 +6.0 -2.8/B +1.6/A
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 29.33 +.45 +4.9 +9.0/A +.6/B
BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX 18.88 +.35 +4.6 -.5/C +4.4/B
BlackRock GlobAlcC m MCLOX 17.59 +.33 +4.6 -1.2/C +3.6/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 18.96 +.35 +4.6 -.2/C +4.7/B
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.42 -.01 +1.3 +5.7/D +6.5/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 31.04 +1.58 +7.3 -11.3/D -2.5/A
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 108.62 +3.30 +8.6 -.2/D -3.1/E
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 69.86 +1.11 +4.3 +2.7/B +3.1/B
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 86.30 +1.89 +7.1 +5.2/A +5.0/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 37.68 +.98 +6.6 +4.6/A +3.1/B
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv FUSEX 46.58 +.93 +6.1 +4.8/A +.4/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX 2.12 +.01 +3.0 +2.4/D +3.0/C
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.14 +.01 +2.9 +1.9/D +2.5/D
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 19.60 +.51 +5.5 -7.7/B -.3/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX 12.84 +.25 +3.7 +2.2/E +10.0/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 12.80 +.24 +3.7 +2.4/E +10.3/A
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 56.23 +2.51 +8.5 -5.0/A +.6/A
Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX 27.73 +.44 +3.5 +2.4/C +4.8/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 11.83 +.13 +3.2 +4.9/A +6.3/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.34 -.02 +.9 +2.2/B +5.4/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 10.95 -.04 +1.4 +4.8/E +7.8/A
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 10.95 -.04 +1.4 +5.0/E +8.0/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 10.95 -.04 +1.4 +5.2/E +8.3/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 10.95 -.04 +1.4 +4.9/E +8.0/A
Permanent Portfolio PRPFX 47.89 +.82 +3.5 +8.0/A +9.2/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 24.25 +.47 +7.1 +2.4/C -.1/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 33.50 +.63 +5.6 +2.8/B +1.8/C
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 6.60 +.04 +3.1 +3.7/C +6.8/A
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 55.48 +1.12 +6.0 +2.5/B +6.3/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.66 -.04 +.5 +6.5/C +6.6/B
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 121.23 +2.44 +6.1 +4.9/A +.5/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 121.23 +2.45 +6.1 +4.8/A +.4/B
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 11.06 -.04 +.3 +8.1/A +6.9/A
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 120.44 +2.43 +6.1 +4.9/A +.5/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 120.45 +2.43 +6.1 +4.9/A +.5/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 29.74 +.62 +6.4 +4.5/B +1.2/A
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 14.19 -.04 +1.8 +12.5/B +5.4/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.68 +.01 +.7 +2.4/B +4.5/B
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 12.73 +.23 +4.8 +2.5/A +1.9/A
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 10.97 -.06 +.2 +7.9/A +6.5/B
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 10.97 -.06 +.2 +7.9/A +6.5/B
Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX 13.84 +.57 +7.2 -9.9/C -2.5/B
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 32.87 +.69 +6.4 +4.5/B +1.1/A
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 32.87 +.69 +6.4 +4.5/B +1.1/A
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 32.86 +.69 +6.4 +4.3/B +1.0/B
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 56.16 +.22 +2.2 +10.8/A +6.4/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 32.41 +.46 +4.7 +6.0/A +4.1/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 55.98 +.80 +4.8 +6.0/A +4.2/A
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 26.89 +.42 +6.2 +4.5/B -.5/B
Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX 12.13 +.18 +3.7 +1.4/ +2.5/
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
+2.4%
+3.5%
Nasdaq
+2.8%
+6.4%
S&P 500
+2.0%
+4.0%
Russell 2000
+2.7%
+4.9%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+4.1%
+7.0%
+4.6%
+5.9%
Treasury yields climb
The yield on the 10-year Treasury rose back above
2 percent following encouraging economic reports.
The fewest Americans filed for jobless benefits
since 2008, and even the shellacked housing in-
dustry improved. Rising optimism means less de-
mand for safe investments, such as Treasurys.
When a Treasurys price falls, its yield rises. Yields
affect interest rates on consumer loans.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Davis Govt MMF/Cl A 0.17 $ 1,000 min (800) 279-0279
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
BMO Tax Free MMF/Class Y 0.07 $ 1,000 min (800) 236-3863
Broad market Lehman 2.22 0.03 t t -0.74 3.29 2.14
Triple-A corporate Moodys 3.87 -0.03 t t -1.15 5.31 3.73
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.64 -0.04 t t -0.33 4.22 3.36
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.67 0.04 t t -1.23 5.95 4.59
U.S. high yield Barclays 7.82 -0.13 t t 0.72 10.15 6.61
Treasury Barclays 1.07 0.08 s t -1.04 2.46 0.96
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.05 0.02 s s -0.10 0.15
1-year T-Bill 0.14 0.01 t t -0.12 0.33 0.07
6-month T-Bill 0.06 0.01 s s -0.12 0.18 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.25 0.03 t t -0.36 0.83 0.16
5-year T-Note 0.89 0.10 t t -1.15 2.39 0.78
10-year T-Note 2.02 0.15 r t -1.43 3.72 1.72
30-year T-Bond 3.10 0.19 s t -1.52 4.77 2.72
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Funds letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012
timesleader.com
KNEE SURGURY last
spring repaired a torn
something and laid
me up for nine weeks.
It seemed like eterni-
ty.
I discovered even I
can watch only so
much CNN, MSNBC, NewsHour,
Washington Week, Fox News (just
kidding), and CSPAN. I had my fill of
wall-to-wall politics, debates and com-
mentary. I needed a diversion.
Surfing news channels, I was inad-
vertently diverted to an NBA playoff
game. Not since the days of Hal Greer,
Bill Russell, John Havlicek and Jerrys
West and Lucas had I watched a
professional basketball game. Yes, I
caught a glimpse of Julius and John-
son, but the NBA? I wasnt a fan.
However
Seal your leg in a full-length cast for
six weeks and its astonishing what
youll read, watch and suddenly find
inexplicably fascinating. I found myself
watching the NBA.
What I saw was gymnastics present-
ed as basketball, players as gymnasts,
and a level of athleticism that was
incredible. I was hooked. I needed a
favorite team.
A pre-game report on one of the
sports channels featured the Oklahoma
City Thunder. I didnt know OKC had
an NBA franchise. And when did Char-
lotte get one?
The inspirational story of Oklahoma
City and the Thunder is one of courage
and self-reliance. It was more than a
highlight reel; it was hard news.
In 1993 Oklahoma City, like many
cities, was struggling economically and
fighting a losing battle. The situation
was bleak and turning things around
would require tens of millions of dol-
lars. OKC could expect no federal
assistance and even less from the state.
OKC residents determined if their
city was to be rescued, they would
have to do it themselves. And so it
began.
Visionary leaders developed a plan
to transform Oklahoma City into a
modern, national model. However, it
would require that city residents agree
to tax themselves toward a more pros-
perous future.
In December 1993 voters in Repub-
lican Oklahoma City, located in Repub-
lican Oklahoma County, in the very
conservative GOP state, were asked to
impose a 1 percent sales tax on them-
selves for a period of 66 months. Of the
60,129 Oklahoma City residents who
went to the polls, 54 percent said YES.
Their votes raised $363 million to
fund the goals outlined in their ambi-
tious Metropolitan Area Projects
plan (MAPS).
MAPS called for a modern conven-
tion center and improvements to the
state fairgrounds and seven miles of
the Oklahoma River. It included new
trolleys, a new library, learning center
and a rebuilt music hall. It required
construction of a minor league baseball
stadium and an artificial, self-filtering,
mile-long canal. An engineering mar-
vel, located where an empty street
once ran, The Bricktown Canal and its
water taxis now connect shops, restau-
rants and attractions along its new
promenade near the 20,000-seat NBA
arena MAPS completed in 2002.
MAPS was such a success that vot-
ers returned to the polls in November
2001 to reinstate the 1 percent sales tax
on themselves, for seven years, to
create MAPS for Kids. Sixty-one
percent voted YES.
MAPS for Kids generated $700 mil-
lion for specific OKC and suburban
school district projects. It included
hundreds of technology devices and
programs, and much-needed repair and
replacement of buildings, all to benefit
the children.
MAPS 3 was launched in Decem-
ber 2009. It will extend the tax for
eight years and generate $835 million
to improve or replace the citys aging
infrastructure. When the 75,421 votes
were tallied, 54 percent had said YES.
The triumphant courage embodied
in the story of Oklahoma City is a
model for the nation. It also can be an
example for Luzerne Countys new
government.
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
Lets be bold
and MAP out
countys future
See BLAUM, Page 6E
S
ome have advanced degrees and remem-
ber middle-class lives. Some workselling
lingerie or building websites. They are
white,blackandHispanic,youngandold,home-
owners and homeless. What they have in com-
mon: Theyreall onfoodstamps.
As thefoodstampprogramhas becomeanis-
sueintheRepublicanpresidential primary, with
candidatesseekingtotiePresident BarackOba-
matotheprograms recordnumbers, TheAsso-
ciated Press interviewed recipients across the
countryandfoundmanywhowishedthatcritics
wouldspendsometimeintheir shoes.
Most said they never expected to need food
stamps, buttheGreatRecession, whichwipedout
millions of jobs, left themno choice. Some strug-
gledwiththeideaof takingahandout; otherssaw
it as their due, earned through years of working
steadyjobs. Theyyearntoget backtoreceivinga
paycheckthatwillmakefoodstampsunnecessary.
I could never have comprehended being on
food stamps, said Christopher Jenks, who be-
came homeless in his hometown of Minneapo-
lis-St. Paul after a successful career in sales and
marketing.
He refused to apply for several years, even
panhandlingonafreewayexit rampbeforefinal-
lygivingin. Afewmonthsago, whilelivinginhis
fromtheSouthCarolina audience.
Linda Miles is grateful to have food stamps, al-
thoughshesnothappyaboutwhysheneedsthem.
An Army veteran with a masters degree, Miles,
whois black, was laidoff as a substituteteacher in
Philadelphiaamiddeepbudgetcuts.Afterfacingan
emptyrefrigeratorfortoolong,sherecentlystarted
receiving$200permonthinfoodaid.
Food stamps are essential, especially with
theeconomyintheshapeitsin,shesaid. I pay
taxes. I dont steal anything from the govern-
ment. I paid my dues to society; Im a veteran.
Youtooksomethingfrommebytakingawaymy
job. I wouldnt need food stamps if you hadnt
takenmyjob.
Miles startedanunpaidinternshipthis week,
andalsowascertifiedtoworkinearlychildhood
carewhileshelooks for a permanent job.
Imnot one of these people who sit on their
butt and just collect a check, Miles said. Ive
got a resumethreepages long.
Ronnie McHugh was watching the GOP de-
bate from home in Spring City, Pa. When Gin-
grich received the standing ovation, McHugh
got soangrythat sheturnedoff theTV.
Id give a million dollars if I could find a job.
car, hebeganreceiving$200per month.
ItseitherthatorIdie,saidJenks, whogrewup
inawhite,middle-classfamilyandlosthisjobinthe
recession. I want a job. Sodoa lot of other Amer-
icansthat havebeencaught upinthistragedy.
In2011, morethan45millionpeopleabout
one in seven Americans received benefits
fromthefederal Supplemental NutritionAssist-
anceProgram, themost ever. Fewerthan31mil-
lion people collected the benefits about three
years earlier.
Forty-nine percent of recipients are white, 26
percent are black and 20 percent are Hispanic,
accordingtoCensus data.
Foodassistanceemergedasacampaignissue
after statements by GOPcandidates Newt Gin-
grich and Rick Santorumabout African-Ameri-
cans, the poor and Obama, whom Gingrich la-
beled the best food stamp president in Ameri-
canhistory.
Critics accused Gingrich of seeking votes by
invoking racial stereotypes about black welfare
recipients with comments like the African-
American community should demand pay-
checks and not be satisfied with food stamps.
Challenged at a GOP debate this week on
whether therhetoricwasinsulting, Gingrichin-
sistedit wasnot andreceivedastandingovation
AP FILE PHOTOS
Above: Lynda Wheeler shops with her daughter, Jaime, 2, shortly after midnight at One Stop Food & Liquors on Chicagos South Side.
The market doors open at midnight on the first of each month for the express purpose of letting her and a dozen or so others to start
shopping the instant they have access to the new months allotment of food stamps.
FOOD STAMP FAMILIES TO CRITICS:
WALK
in our shoes
Domitila Lara, left, helps her children Ariana, center,
and Eduardo, right, with their homework in San Diego.
Lara, 44, applied for food stamps in San Diego in late
2008 after her husband lost his job in construction.
For more than three months, Lara called and waited in
line repeatedly for food stamps.
By JESSE WASHINGTON AP National Writer
Chris Jenks, 54, who became homeless in
his hometown of Minneapolis-St. Paul
after a successful career in sales and
marketing, refused to apply for for food
stamps for several years, but now says
Im on food stamps because its either
that or I die.
A sign announces the acceptance of elec-
tronic Benefit Transfer cards at a farmers
market in Roseville, Calif. Food stamp
recipients have had problems purchasing
food at farmers markets because many of
them do not accept the cards that food
stamp recipients use to buy groceries.
Victoria Busby holds her three-week-old
daughter Christy Kalbaugh, at the Depart-
ment of Human Services, in Oklahoma
City. Busby, a single mom with two chil-
dren, has received food assistance in-
termittently since her first child was born
two years ago.
Food stamps are essential, especially with the economy in the shape its in. I pay taxes. I dont steal
anything from the government. I paid my dues to society; Im a veteran. You took something from me by
taking away my job. I wouldnt need food stamps if you hadnt taken my job.
Linda Miles,
An Army veteran with a masters degree
See STAMPS, Page 6E
K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
This proposal strikes the
appropriate balance between
respecting religious freedom and
increasing access to important
preventive services.
Kathleen Sebelius
The Health and Human Services secretary announced on Friday that
church-affiliated institutions will get only one additional year to meet a
new rule to cover birth control free of charge.
WHEN VICE President Dick Cheney held
secret meetings for his energy task force in
the early days of President George W. Bushs
first term, he was excoriated by the left and
even some on the right. Both Judicial Watch
and the Sierra Club sued, but the Supreme
Court found the proceedings were protected
by executive privilege.
President Barack Obama came into office
pledging to end such secrecy, saying, The
way to make government accountable is to
make it transparent.
On his own energy agenda, however, the
president has been as opaque as Cheney,
repeatedly holding closed-door meetings,
anonymously courting lobbyists, dodging
Freedom of Information Act requests and
ignoring subpoenas from Congress.
When Solyndra CEO Brian Harrison
warned the Energy Department that the
companys financial problems were starting
to leak outside Solyndra, Obamas ac-
countable, transparent administration
helped cover up the failure telling So-
lyndra executives to postpone any layoffs
until after the 2010 elections. Even after the
solar energy company went bankrupt and
the FBI launched an investigation, the ad-
ministration has refused congressional
subpoenas to hand over documents.
Solyndra is only part of a larger pattern of
backroom deals designed to push the presi-
dents environmental agenda. Take the nego-
tiation of the new Corporate Average Fuel
Economy standards, for example. U.S. car
manufacturers strongly opposed any change
in the status quo, but the administration
threatened to change the rules to allow
states led by California to adopt their
own standards, leading to a chaotic patch-
work of balkanized state rules a much
worse fear for manufacturers.
Then California Air Resources Board
Chairman Mary Nichols and Climate Czar
Carol Browner organized a series of closed-
door negotiations to get manufacturers on
board. Nichols and Browner gave no up-
dates to the press, held no group meetings
and wrote nothing down. We put nothing
in writing, ever, Nichols later remarked,
ostensibly to protect everyones ability to
talk freely.
However, off-record negotiations are for-
bidden under the Federal Advisory Commit-
tee Act and Presidential Records Act, which
require documentation, minutes and re-
cords to be kept for the public. So while the
manufacturers gave in, no one knows, to
quote Obama, how the decision was
made.
Nichols noted that, It was an astonishing
thing that on something of this magnitude,
there were no leaks.
But if there were leaks, this adminis-
tration has made clear how it treats leakers
as criminals. Obamas Department of
Justice, in conjunction with United King-
dom authorities, is pursuing a criminal
investigation into the Climategate leaker(s).
In December, DOJ sent a search-and-seize
letter to the host of three blogs that released
the Climategate emails, while U.K. police
raided the home of a climate skeptic blog-
ger.
Examples are endless. Administration
officials have met with environmental lobby-
ists at a coffee shop near the White House
to avoid standard record keeping. Only after
Solyndra emails were subpoenaed did the
public learn that administration officials
met with Solyndra investor George Kaiser
to discuss the Solyndra loan the White
House had claimed the opposite for months.
This lack of transparency is more than a
pattern its policy. President Obama is
simply too committed to his green agenda
to bother upholding the transparency he
promised. Somewhere, Dick Cheney is
smiling.
Obama has closed the door on transparent government
Iain Murray is a vice president and David Bier a
research associate at the Competitive Enterprise
Institute, 1899 L Street NW, Floor 12, Washington,
D.C. 20036; website: www.cei.org.
COMMENTARY
I A I N M U R R A Y
A N D
D A V I D B I E R
PLEASE EXCUSE me if
youve already read about
this Im always the last guy
to know but apparently
some people are unhappy
with the calendar. In other
calendar news, the world
apparently is going to end next Dec. 21, ac-
cording to the Mayan calendar.
About this latter point, many people in
pseudo-scientific circles have been worrying
about it for decades. Me, I only began to wor-
ry about it after seeing a John Cusack movie
on cable.
The deal is that the Mayan Long Count
calendar, which began in 3114 B.C., is set to
run out after 5,126 years, meaning this year,
specifically on Dec. 21. So if you usually do
your Christmas shopping early, you might
want to hold off.
There is some dispute about that Dec. 21
date, which some experts say could be off by
as much as 60 days, owing to variations in
how different calendars count dates. This is
the part about the Mayan calendar debate I
love best Of course the ancient Mayans
correctly predicted the end of the world, but
they were off by a few weeks.
The calendar we use is called the Gregorian
calendar. Some people who are really, really
picky worry that the Gregorian calendar is
imprecise and/or awkward. Because it takes
the Earth 365 days and six hours or so to orbit
the sun, you have to add an extra day every
four years to make things come out even, plus
re-jigger the clocks for a leap second every
now and then.
As someone who often gets through a day
without knowing the date, I dont understand
this yearning for more precision. Close
enough is good enough.
But right before the new year, I read in
Wired magazine about these two guys at
Johns Hopkins University who are calendar
reformers. Economist Steve Hanke and astron-
omer Richard Cohn Henry have developed
what they modestly call the Hanke-Henry
Permanent Calendar.
Under their calendar a refined version of
one developed in1996 by a guy named Bob
McClenon every date always would fall on
the same day of the week.
Christmas and New Years Day always
would be on Sundays. March17, St. Patricks
Day, always would be on a Saturday, which
would make bar owners happy.
The Hanke-Henry Permanent Calendar
divides the year into equal quarters of 91 days.
Each quarter has two 30-day months followed
by a 31-day month.
Alas, October would be a 30-day month, so
youd have to trick-or-treat on the 30th, which
still would be All Hallows Eve because the
next day is Nov. 1, All Saints Day.
If Oct. 31 or Jan. 31, May 31, July 31 or
Aug. 31 is your birthday, youre out of luck.
This all works out to a 364-day year and no
leap years. Hanke and Henry make this up by
adding an extra week or mini-month
which they call Extra or Xtr at the end of
December every five or six years, which also
more or less aligns the months with the sea-
sons. Otherwise, sooner or later baseball
weather would be starting in January.
Not content to just mess with the calendar,
Hanke and Hart also want to do away with
time zones and impose Universal Time
around the world. It would be the same time
everywhere, only darker in some places.
Hanke and Hart say this would result in
greatly facilitating international understand-
ing.
How, I dont know. Im already confused.
Still, its nice to know that if the world is
going to end on Dec. 21 this year, it will be on
a Wednesday, not a Friday. I wouldnt want to
work those two extra days if I didnt have to.
If calendars change, end of world cant come too soon
Kevin Horrigan is a columnist for the St. Louis
Post-Dispatch. Readers may write to him at: St.
Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 North Tucker Blvd., St.
Louis, MO 63101, or email him at khorrigan@post-
dispatch.com.
COMMENTARY
K E V I N H O R R I G A N
S
OMEONE CALL 9-1-1.
Wilkes-Barre Mayor
Tom Leighton is stuck
in a tight spot of his
own doing, and he seemingly
cannot get out.
Leighton for reasons that
are not entirely clear failed to
notify the citys council mem-
bers, its firefighters, its resi-
dents or seemingly anyone else
that an anonymous donor had
conferred $1 million to Wilkes-
Barre in 2005 for the purchase
of three new fire trucks.
The mayor for reasons that
are not entirely clear even re-
mained mum on the remarka-
bly generous gift in 2006 when
the fire trucks were put into
service, seeming to credit the
acquisition to his own com-
prehensive fire plan to boost
public safety. A news account
in July 2006 indicated the
$860,000 for the engines came
from multiple sources includ-
ing grants and city coffers.
Few people other than
Leighton apparently knew of
the transaction until Karen
Ceppa Hirko, a sleuthing city
resident, whose husband is a
firefighter, raised questions
about it earlier this month.
Since then, the picture hasnt
become much clearer.
The mayor maintains noth-
ing improper took place, and
the donation should be cele-
brated.
The city for reasons that
are not entirely clear had se-
lected a company called KME-
Kovatch Organization, of Nes-
quehoning, to supply the
trucks, even though certain
city firefighters supposedly fa-
vored another firm.
Now, City Hall for reasons
that are not entirely clear
cant provide copies of propos-
als they say came from at least
two other firefighting equip-
ment companies that pursued
the deal. City workers say they
looked, and they dont have the
documents.
Based on this administra-
tions prior lapses, residents are
right to question whether the
still-unfolding fire truck fiasco
is a case of sloppy record keep-
ing or chicanery. And based on
Northeastern Pennsylvanias
rampant public corruption,
plenty of people understanda-
bly will assume the worst until
investigators root through this
situation.
Themayor, thoughobligated
to protect the donors identity,
has left too many other ques-
tions unanswered to soothe
peoples suspicions. His admin-
istration repeatedly has failed
in this respect, chipping away
at its own credibility.
Says Jay Ostrich, director of
public affairs at the Common-
wealth Foundation for Public
Policy Alternatives in Harris-
burg: Transparency and good
record-keeping is an essential
part of being a good steward of
taxpayer money. When either
of those elements is lost, its in-
cumbent upon the elected offi-
cials tocorrect it immediately.
The Leighton administra-
tion it should now be clear
must operate openly on every
matter, every day. Until then,
residents are justified to ques-
tion that where there is smoke,
theres probably fire.
OUR OPINION: W-B GOVERNMENT
Fire engine deal
sets off alarms
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and InterimCEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and Interim CEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
RICHARD DEHAVEN
Vice President/Circulation
ALLISON UHRIN
Vice President/
Chief Financial Officer
W
HEN THE state
faces a difficult is-
sueconcerningthe
juvenilejusticesys-
tem or child abuse, one of the
most reliable resources is here
in Berks County.
Senior Judge Arthur E. Grim
has made work in juvenile and
family court his specialty ever
since taking the bench in 1987.
The latest responsibility for
Grim is a role on a statewide
task force to recommend im-
provements to child abuse laws
following the Jerry Sandusky
sex abuse scandal that rocked
Penn State University.
The10-member panel was se-
lectedby Gov. TomCorbett and
leaders of the state House and
Senate. The group is to issue a
report by Nov. 30. Much of the
work is to look into the way
child abuse is reported in the
state and howagencies and law
enforcement respond to abuse
allegations.
Grimsaid he was honored by
the appointment but made it
clear his eye was on the larger
issue, not the
sensational
cases that
have brought
it so much at-
tention in re-
cent years.
This is not
about Penn
State, he said. This is not
about theCatholicChurch. This
is about the child abuse laws
and making recommendations
for possible changes.
This is only the latest work
Grim has done that has had an
impact farbeyondthebordersof
Berks.
In 2009, the state Supreme
Court appointed Grim to pre-
sideover thousands of cases ina
scandal in which two Luzerne
County judges were paid kick-
backs in exchange for sending
juveniles to prisons.
Grims track record suggests
he will helpthe newpanel make
progress toward fixing a glaring
problem exposed by the Sand-
usky case.
Reading Eagle
OTHER OPINION: TASK FORCE
Grim good man
to tackle abuse
Grim
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 3E
F O R U M
Are you
better off
today than
you were $4
trillion ago?
Former
presidential
candidate
Rick Perry
ITS THE campaign line of
the year, and while the author
wont be carrying it into the
general election, the eventual
nominee will.
The charge is straightfor-
ward: President Obamas reck-
less spending has dangerously
increased the national debt
while leaving unemployment
high and the economy stag-
nant. Concurrently, he has
vastly increased the scope and
reach of government with new
entitlements and oppressive
regulation, with higher taxes to
come (to offset the unprece-
dented spending).
In 2010, that narrative car-
ried the Republicans to historic
electoral success. Through
most of 2011, it dominated
Washington discourse.
Whats the incumbent to do?
He admits current conditions
are bad. He knows that his
major legislative initiatives
Obamacare, the near-trillion-
dollar stimulus, (the rejected)
cap-and-trade are unpopular.
If you cant run on stewardship
or policy, how do you win re-
election?
Create an entirely new narra-
tive. Push an entirely new
issue. Change the subject from
your record and your ideology,
from massive debt and overre-
aching government, to fairness
and inequality. Make the elec-
tion a referendum on which
party really cares about you,
which party will stand up to
the greedy rich who have pil-
laged the 99 percent and
robbed the middle class of
hope.
This charge, too, is straight-
forward: The Republicans put
party over nation, fat-cat do-
nors over people, political
power over everything.
Its all rather uncomplicated,
capturing nicely the Mani-
chaean core of the Occupy
movement blame the rich,
then soak them. But the real
beauty of this strategy is its
adaptability. While its first
target was the do-nothing pro-
tect-the-rich Congress, it is
perfectly tailored to fit the
liabilities of Republican front-
runner Mitt Romney plu-
tocrat, capitalist, 1 percenter.
Obama rolled out this class-
war counter-narrative in his
Dec. 6 Teddy Roosevelt
speech and hasnt governed a
day since. Every action, every
proposal, every we cant wait
circumvention of the Constitu-
tion such as recess appoint-
ments when the Senate is not
in recess is designed to fit
this re-election narrative.
For the first few weeks, the
class-envy gambit had some
effect, bumping Obamas num-
bers slightly. But the story was
still lagging, suffering in part
from its association with an
Occupy rabble that had widely
worn out its welcome.
Then came the twist: The
struggling Democratic class-
war narrative is suddenly given
life and legitimacy by ... Repub-
licans! Newt Gingrich and Rick
Perry make the case that pri-
vate equity as practiced by
Romneys Bain Capital is noth-
ing more than vulture capital-
ism looting companies and
sucking them dry while casu-
ally destroying the lives of
workers.
Richard Trumka of the AFL-
CIO nods approvingly. Michael
Moore wonders aloud whether
Gingrich has stolen his staff.
The assault on Bain/Romney
instantly turns Obamas class-
war campaign from partisan
attack into universal complaint.
Suddenly Romneys wealth,
practices and taxes take center
stage. And why not? If leading
Republicans are denouncing
rapacious capitalism that en-
riches the 1 percent while im-
poverishing everyone else,
should this not be the para-
mount issue in a campaign
occurring at a time of econom-
ic distress?
Now, economic inequality is
an important issue, but the idea
that it is the cause of Americas
current economic troubles is
absurd. Yet, in a stroke, the
Republicans have succeeded in
turning a Democratic talking
point into a central focus of the
nations political discourse.
How quickly has the zeitgeist
changed? Wednesday, the Re-
publican House reconvened to
reject Obamas planned $1.2
trillion debt-ceiling increase.
(Lacking Senate concurrence,
the debt ceiling will be raised
nonetheless.) No one noticed.
It made page A16 of The New
York Times. All eyes were on
South Carolina and Romneys
taxes.
This is no mainstream media
conspiracy. This is the GOP
maneuvering itself right onto
Obama terrain.
The president is a very smart
man. But if he wins in Novem-
ber, that wont be the reason. It
will be luck. He could not have
chosen more self-destructive
adversaries.
Self-destructive GOP
Obamas best friend
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammers email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
S
uppose, if only for one winter day, we shrouded the street and sidewalk in
white sand, rigged the stereo for constant calypso and showed up at this
Wilkes-Barre site in our bathing suits and sandals? Would our escapism annoy
you? Or might you enter our tropical fantasy? For those inclined to the latter,
its BYOBC bring your own beach chair.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Don Carey and
words by Mark E. Jones
IF YOURE
around my
age, which can
be defined as
too old for
work-study
but too young
for crema-
tion, you already might know
what Ive only recently
learned: You can pretend to be
older but you cannot pretend
to be younger.
And yet entire industries,
magazine empires, advertising
conglomerates and the global
conspiracy of Spanx manu-
facturers are trying to convince
women otherwise.
At one point, I loved looking
older than my years.
Didnt we all once love not
getting carded at bars when
our friends were all digging
around for their fake IDs
(Um, I know it says Im 5-
foot-9 but I was wearing 7-inch
heels at the DMV) because it
meant we looked sophisti-
cated?
Didnt we love when older
men flirted with us, only to be
surprised by our actual age
because we sounded so much
more mature? Wasnt it funny
to watch how the men then
backed away really fast?
But after a while, the seem-
ing-mature thing loses its po-
tency for women. Just when
guys reach the age where
theyre becoming George Cloo-
ney, women are becoming his
aunt Rosemary.
And just as theres no female
Cialis to sustain the elasticity
of a womans cheery insou-
ciance or, for that matter, firm
her chin or bust-line, theres no
pill or placenta-based face
cream to erase those fine lines.
Maybe magic potions can
help erase the appearance of
those lines as the ads promise,
but I never could understand
what that phrase meant: do
they fog up the vision of the
person looking at you? How
can the appearance change if
the lines dont?
(Who thought up placenta-
based cosmetics, anyhow? I bet
it wasnt women. I bet there
were a couple guys in a Madi-
son Avenue office saying to
each other Hey, Benny, lets
see if we can get women to put
wait, wait placenta on their
faces! Nah, theyll never do
that. They will if we put it in
small jars and charge a lot.)
Can you imagine if Cialis or
Viagra only helped the ap-
pearance of oh, never mind.
They would still be covered by
medical insurance. And wom-
en would still be paying out-of-
pocket for our own gall-blad-
der operations from coins we
saved in a Folgers can. Not
that Im bitter.
Look, in every persons life,
the curtain comes down on
youth and goes up on middle
age. There are no encores,
except farcical ones performed
by those who paid no attention
to the curtain. If theyre genu-
inely happy, then good for
them; if theyre trying too hard
simply to appear happy, the
hook is going to get them
around the neck from the
wings.
Ever see a much older per-
son trying to act like a much
younger person? Guys look like
Mickey Rourke in that wres-
tling movie and women look
the same, except with breast
implants. Its the stuff of come-
dy because its inherently ab-
surd; its as silly or, in extreme
cases, as obscene as a little kid
in grown-up clothes.
As a teacher, I work with
people in their early lives and
theres nothing like being
around those in the blush of
youth to remind you why the
blush is there in the first place.
I dont envy my students their
inexperience, even if I envy the
fact that they can pull all-
nighters, run 26 miles after
eating a Happy Meal and look
good in cargo pants (whereas I
simply look like cargo).
If I dont wish to be in my
20s or 30s its because I know
too well these gazelles are
thinking OH MY ACHING
GOD I AM ALMOST 27 (insert
any age below 38) AND WHAT
I AM DOING WITH MY
LIFE? At least when youve
hit middle age, you know what
youre doing. Even if you dont
like it, its familiar.
So next time you see a twen-
ty-something walking down
the street with her stabbing
stilettos and perky perkiness
remember that we can hold
our heads higher than those
heels.
We have the confidence that
comes from knowing: how to
pay our bills, how to wear our
hair, how and when to leave
them smiling. We now know
ourselves.
Why pretend otherwise?
Chin up a little higher and
heres to erasing those fine
lines of self-doubt.
Lets face it, theres no erasing those fine lines
COMMENTARY
G I N A B A R R E C A
Gina Barreca is an English professor
at the University of Connecticut, a
feminist scholar who has written
eight books and a columnist for the
Hartford Courant. She can be reac-
hed through her website: www.gina-
barreca.com.
MCT ILLUSTRATION
A bountiful
day of giving
T
hank you for the lovely
photograph of our fourth
annual Christmas Turkey
and Trimmings Giveaway.
This year, 405 low-income
families from the Greater
Pittston and Wyoming areas
received turkeys, trimmings,
milk, fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles along with winter coats,
hats, gloves and scarves.
This was possible because
of an enormous group effort.
As head of the Care and
Concern Ministries, Monsig-
nor John Bendik, pastor of St.
John the Evangelist Parish,
allows the food pantry to use
the former Seton Catholic
High School facility. In addi-
tion to the 23 dedicated volun-
teers who serve there 52
weeks a year, the pantry was
fortunate to receive support
from 20 additional volunteers
for the annual Christmas
event. They included the
Pittston mayor and chief of
police!
The days bounty was made
possible by The Commission
on Economic Opportunity,
Blue Ribbon Dairy, an anony-
mous produce provider, local
schools, churches, social orga-
nizations, private donations,
Girl Scout and Boy Scout
troops, businesses and hose
companies.
The Kids Clothes Closet
joined in as well by providing
childrens winter outerwear. It
was a joyful day! Thank you to
all who made it possible.
Anyone living within the 15
communities that comprise
Greater Pittston who is in
need of food should call 654-
9923.
Peggy Burke
Coordinator
Greater Pittston Food Pantry
Kindness fuels
furnace fund
W
e thank the wonderful,
caring people of Wyom-
ing Valley and beyond
for helping us in our time of
need at the Catherine McAu-
ley House in Plymouth.
When the furnace broke the
week before Thanksgiving it
was a devastating blow to the
six women and eight children
staying here at the time. It
was traumatic enough for
them to be homeless, but they
then had to face another move
to a hotel or to a family mem-
bers residence until the heat
was restored. All we could do
was hope and pray that the
money for the replacement
furnace would come.
Thanks to generous donors,
we have been able to pay for
the new furnace. One woman
sent in five single-dollar bills
and apologized for the fact
that she could not give more.
Another woman, who was
impacted by the flood and
who was still living in a trailer,
sent a check for $100. People
had been so kind to her family
in its time of need that she
wanted to keep the circle of
giving going.
So many people responded
to this crisis that at times it
was overwhelming. We are
grateful to all who contributed
to the furnace fund and to all
who support us on a regular
basis. Without our donors and
our amazing team of volun-
teers this ministry could not
continue.
May the new year be one of
love, joy and peace for all
and one in which the circle of
giving continues!
Sister Marie Larkin
Catherine McAuley House
Plymouth.
Holiday spirit
filled downtown
T
he Downtown Wilkes-
Barre Business Association
thanks the businesses,
organizations and individuals
who contributed to the posi-
tive momentum that could be
felt throughout the downtown
this holiday season. Whether
you supported the small busi-
ness community by shopping
locally or participated in some
of our holiday activities, you
made our efforts a success.
Storefronts around town
were turned into a window
wonderland thanks to the
talents of our vibrant art com-
munity and the businesses
that generously offered their
windows. We could not have
accomplished this ambitious
first-time project without
them. These displays set the
scene for the citys Christmas
parade, which drew thousands
to the downtown and marked
the beginning of the holiday
shopping season. To add to
the excitement of the day,
businesses offered storytimes,
a complimentary movie and a
toy collection for Toys for
Tots.
In December, a group of
enthusiastic volunteers
donned reindeer antlers and
performed carols for shoppers
and lunchtime patrons. The
DWBBA is proud to present
these activities, which comple-
ment our existing retail and
dining options and draw even
more people to downtown
Wilkes-Barre.
Our organization is commit-
ted to supporting the econom-
ic vitality of downtown
Wilkes-Barre, and we looks
forward to continuing the
successes we enjoyed during
the holidays throughout 2012.
We welcome the involve-
ment of the community and
look forward to seeing you at
a future event such as our
Easter egg hunt, which will
take place this spring on Pub-
lic Square.
On behalf of the entire
Downtown Wilkes-Barre Busi-
ness Association membership,
thank you for your support!
John Chaump
President
Downtown Wilkes-Barre
Business Association
Good reporting
helps community
I
congratulate The Times
Leader on the way it reports
its news, especially local
robberies. It is helpful to the
public to have some general
description of the robber. This
should include male or fe-
male, height, clothing and
race.
Kudos for good, honest
reporting. Help keep us all
safe.
Louis DeSpirito
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers convey-
ing thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help
or kindness.
MOUNTAIN LAURELS
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
P E R S P E C T I V E S
Store Hours: Mon., Wed. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Tues, Fri. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Thur. 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. ; Sat. 10 a.m. -5 p.m.
570-287-4354
The Place For Price, Service, Selection!
431 Market Street, Kingston
Plus many other unadvertised specials
to choose from!!
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS WELCOME
Prior orders exempt... See sales person for full details
Just drop by FASHION FLOOR. Youll fnd a
wide range of carpets in the
textures, styles, and extraordinary colors
youve admired at full price, at savings of
up to 50%.
The permanent stain-resistance barrier plus
built-in soil resistance barrier of
carpet adds a very practical side
to all this luxury.
So give in to your extravagant nature. Theres
no need to feel guilty. At least not this month,
while carpet is on sale.
d a
S
A
L
E
!
!
Smart Warranties
Lifetime Stain Resistance Warranty Lifetime Anti-Static Warranty
15/20Year Abrasive Wear Warranty 15Year Texture Retention Warranty
15Year Soil Warranty 15Year Fade Warranty
* See product label for more information
Oak Plank
scothguard treated!!
sale!
sa.
$
3.
99
12x12
sq.ft.
$
1.
39
Year
Same as Cash
Financing
Available
UP
TO
1 O.A.C.
sale!
sa.
sq.ft.
$
1.
49
Laminate
sale!
sa.
If you have extravagant
tastes, this is the month you
can afford to indulge them.
sq.ft.
Saxony
sale! sa.
$
1.
39
sq.ft.
Textured
sale! sa.
$
2.
79
sq.ft.
Pindot
sale! sa.
$
2.
39
sq.ft.
Trackless
sale! sa.
$
3.
39
sq.ft.
39 39 99 99
CeramicTile
Sunday hunting
proposal blasted
I
am responding to a letter to
the editor by a school stu-
dent who favored Sunday
hunting.
He is probably too young to
remember the days when you
saw many deer together, not
just one or two after all day
sitting in the woods. Or the
days when hunters would
shoot boxes of shells a day
during pheasant, grouse or
woodcock hunting. The Game
Commission apparently
thought the way he did and
was influenced by the insur-
ance companies to decrease
the deer herd to stop auto
damage. What the commis-
sion did was make it possible
to get as many as six or seven
deer per person by issuing
special permits.
Gone were the days that you
got one deer, a doe or buck.
Now the game lands have few
if any deer.
If Sunday hunting is al-
lowed, he said that would
allow 24 more days of hunt-
ing. You do the math. Deer
and animals hunted seven
days a week, and throw in all
the extra licenses, only means
disaster.
You want to do something,
then put all your effort into
making a regulation stipulat-
ing one deer per person. Only
one.
You are not going to see any
more deer on a Sunday. The
only outcome of that will be a
slaughter of the remaining
deer and small game.
If there were limits, then
Sunday hunting might work.
John Barilla
Dallas
Trapped motorist
grateful for police
T
here are people who do
things and do not consider
how their actions affect
others.
On Jan. 8 friends and I went
to the movie theater in Wilkes-
Barre. I parked in the lot
across the street from the
theater and was fortunate to
find a space facing North-
ampton Street.
However, after leaving the
theater, I was not able to back
up my car to exit the parking
lot as someone driving a Toyo-
ta Corolla had parked diag-
onally behind me and several
other vehicles.
I had to call the police, and
an officer came to our rescue.
He was very helpful and man-
aged to get a car next to my
vehicle out of its parking
space, and that enabled me to
maneuver my car so that I
could exit the lot.
I want to thank police offi-
cer David Balchum for coming
to our assistance.
Joyce Ann Perez
Rice Township
Proper military
disposal costly
N
ot that the Air Force has
any right to just cremate
body parts that it cannot
identify, but it would cost
more money and time to fig-
ure out who they belonged to
than we can do right now.
There reportedly were 976
fragments from the 274 mil-
itary personnel who had been
cremated and taken to the
landfill. This has been happen-
ing since 2004 and stopped in
2008. There are still 1,762
fragments that are not identi-
fied.
How do you expect them to
figure out who these parts
belong to without going fur-
ther into debt? I say just cre-
mate the bodies and give the
families and the soldiers rec-
ognition.
There is no reason why
anyones opinion should
change about the military or
the Air Force. Its not their
fault; they were just doing
what they were told.
Montana Chacko
Fairview Township
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
WHILE IT has been
in existence for only
about three weeks,
due to the distressed
state of county financ-
es left behind by
previous government,
the newly formed
Luzerne County Council now faces a
most daunting task. The 11 members
of council must find a way to both live
up to their recent oaths of office and
find a solution to the budget crisis
that stems largely from the legacy of a
$415 million debt burden which, for all
practical purposes, has put a strangle-
hold on councils ability to adequately
fund the courts and other branches
and departments of government.
A review of the budget covering the
past four years readily demonstrates
how and why the county finances are
strained to the point of a projected
slashing of $4.7 million from the court
budget for 2012 while, at the same
time, not making any increased alloca-
tion for county-mandated union raises
for court-related employees. Those
raises amount to approximately
$400,000.
The allocations for county debt
service have escalated from a mere
$1,025,362 paid in 2008, to the pay-
ment of $4,282,177 in 2010, to the
projected sum of $24,799,064 for 2012.
It is obvious that the strategy of struc-
turing the countys debt by paying
down minimal sums in earlier years
and obligating the county to pay larger
sums in outlying years lies at the heart
of its fiscal problems. Perhaps there
was an expectation that there would
have been an economic recovery and
that the countys tax base would have
expanded to absorb higher debt ser-
vice; regardless, it is a fact that the
strategy has failed.
The overall impact of this failed
strategy has resulted in a budget plan
that, in effect, drains revenues from
what would otherwise be allocated to
meet ordinary operating expenses of
county government and channels
same to meet the countys burgeoning
debt service. The limitations that this
approach will place on the courts and
county government overall pose a
serious problem this year, which will
only worsen over the next several
years.
Article 1 Section 11 of the Pennsylva-
nia Constitution provides, in pertinent
part, All courts shall be open; and
every man for an injury done him in
his lands, goods, person or reputation
shall have remedy by due course of
law This is a mandate that is bind-
ing upon Luzerne County, and the law
requires that county government must
meet the reasonable necessity stan-
dard with respect to funding the
courts.
It is clear that the members of coun-
ty council and transition team mem-
bers have worked tirelessly and stead-
fastly toward the goal of effectuating a
smooth transition into the new year.
At the same time, its equally clear
that the court, including its six new
judges, have likewise prepared dili-
gently and worked unceasingly to
enable the court to maintain its busy
docket and also to pursue the ongoing
goal of restoring public trust and con-
fidence in our court system.
There has never been a time when
its been more important for the Lu-
zerne County court to not take a step
backward. Inadequate resources that
would prevent the court from meeting
its demanding caseload, as well as
from maintaining due process stan-
dards, will both jeopardize public
safety and invite further scandal. The
civil, criminal and family court case-
loads in Luzerne County are generally
above average as compared to the 10
other third-class counties in Penn-
sylvania. Our budget needs of
$24,412,289 are very much in line with
the court expenditures in those same
counties, and, in several instances, fall
well below them on a proportional
basis. The importance to its citizens of
a county meeting the constitutional
mandates of a fair and effective court
system cannot be overemphasized.
In addition, there likely will be ad-
verse consequences to the residents of
Luzerne County, both tangibly and
intangibly, if the courts are not ade-
quately funded. Specifically, the ability
to maintain operations in Treatment
Court, the Day Reporting Center, the
Mortgage Foreclosure Diversionary
Program and plans to create a Veter-
ans Court would be severely ham-
pered.
Estimates are that the Day Report-
ing Program has saved the county $1.9
million over the past 12 months
easily calculated when one realizes
the average daily cost of monitoring
(and rehabilitating) a criminal offend-
er in that program is $33 compared to
$94 to incarcerate that same person.
The tangible savings with respect to
reducing recidivism and incarceration
costs among graduates of the countys
Treatment Court Program computes
to some $4 million savings since the
program started. These are programs
that were designed and funded with
objectives of generating cost savings
to the county while, at the same time,
enhancing the delivery of justice.
Any effort to adequately fund the
court system must be paralleled with
adequate funding and staffing to meet
the needs of indigent representation
according to constitutional standards,
which is a direct obligation of the
county, and to also meet the needs of
county offices that support the courts
including the sheriff, security and the
Office of Judicial Records and Ser-
vices.
The plain fact is that misfeasance or
nonfeasance on the part of the county
to adequately support those functions
also would jeopardize public safety
and create financial exposure for the
county. Consider that a single incident
involving a protection from abuse
order, PFA, not served by the sheriff in
a timely fashion that results in serious
harm to a victim in the interim would
be one too many and, moreover, could
very well result in significant financial
liability for the county.
In conclusion, while the court is
continuing its effort toward cost con-
tainment in its operations and will
continue to explore creative revenue
enhancements with a goal toward
helping solve the countys budget
dilemma, it fairly appears that the
under-funding of the courts and court-
related operations poses a gap that
must be addressed urgently. Unless
council sees fit to take prompt and
decisive action to close that gap, the
court will have little recourse but to
pursue a legal remedy.
County council must ensure that court system is adequately funded
COMMENTARY
J U D G E T H O M A S F .
B U R K E J R .
Judge Thomas F. Burke Jr. is president
judge of the Luzerne County Court of Com-
mon Pleas.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 5E
P E R S P E C T I V E S
New Laser Treatment for Toenail Fungus
Call Today for a Consultation
Complimentary Whirlpool Session
with all routine nailcare
Dr. Nicole M. Branning
New for 2011
CryoPen
Advanced
Treatment
for
Plantar Warts.
CALL TODAY!
Dr. David A. Scalzo
Foot & Ankle Surgery
Diabetic Foot Care/Shoes
Heel Pain
Bunion Repair
Hammer Toe Correction
Arthritic Foot Care
Plantar Warts
Ingrown Nails
Corns & Calluses
Reconstructive Procedures
Ankle Arthroscopy
Sports Related Injury
Onsite Ultrasound used for diagnosing multiple
foot problems including:
Plantar Fasciitis Neuromas Tendonitis
Inammatory Arthritis
570-457-4560
Endoscopic Heel Surgery
David A. Scalzo, D.P.M., P.C.
Certied by the American
Board of Podiatric Surgery
We Make
Housecalls!
Day, Evening and Weekend Appointments Available
1.9%APRFinancingupto60months.
60Monthly Payments of $17.48per $1,000
Financed
2
Excludes ofcial fees, taxes and dealer charges.
No security deposit required.
$
399/mo. 36mos.
1
$
3,974
due at
signing
1
2012 ES 350 LEASE
While some automakers in the category offer luxury features like leather-trimmed seating,
genuine wood trimand keyless access as options, we refuse to make an ES that is anything less
than complete luxury in a class full of compromises.
ES
Reese recalled as
great achiever
K
athleen Dorris Reese, a
longtime champion of
human services, died in
late summer. But her untiring
commitment to improving the
quality of lives for thousands
of people over her many dec-
ades of service will long re-
main in the hearts of all.
With her steadfast commit-
ment to individuals with men-
tal health concerns, Kathleen
wasted no time following her
social work studies at then
College Misericordia, coupled
with graduate programs at
Fordham University and Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, to
outline her journey of more
than half a century, that is, to
bring effective mental health
services to the community.
Kathleen exemplified her
compassion-filled leadership
abilities as assistant to the
Commissioner of Mental
Health and chief of Pennsylva-
nias Bureau of Mental Health
Services. She also served as
superintendent of Clarks Sum-
mit State Hospital and super-
intendent of Farview State
Hospital, where she was re-
sponsible for operations of
Pennsylvanias sole forensic
psychiatric hospital.
Words such as revitalized,
implemented, guided and
promoted characterize Kath-
leens life. As a result of her
boundless talents and long-
ranging achievements, Kath-
leens legacy is a profusion of
monumental changes to the
care of people with mental
illness.
Widely recognized in the
field of human services, Kath-
leen was honored in 2001 as
Pennsylvania Social Worker of
the Year. She clearly provided
a positive presence at her
alma mater, College Miser-
icordia, through her decade of
service on the board of trust-
ees and contributions to its
alumni board. For her lead-
ership in the betterment of the
human condition for more
than a half century, she was
presented the 2005 Trustee
Associates Award.
In mid-November, Kathleen
Dorris Reese, a veteran mem-
ber of the Luzerne-Wyoming
Counties Mental Health/
Mental Retardation Programs
Advisory Board, was memo-
rialized by her colleagues for
her tireless advocacy, re-
nowned leadership and genu-
ine contributions in delivering
effective mental health ser-
vices and improving the qual-
ify of life for tens of thousands
of people.
She will long be remem-
bered as a mentor to many
and a champion to all.
Paul J. Gritman
Chairman
Luzerne-Wyoming Counties
Mental Health/Mental
Retardation Program
Reader cringes
over GOP policies
I
f youve ever watched the
Ed Show, then you know
that Ed Shultz believes that
the Republican Party leaders
are trying to eliminate the
middle class in America and
create a society of only the
rich, the superrich and the
poor.
The very liberal Mr. Shultz
also thinks that the Repub-
licans will try to use some or
all of the following tactics to
achieve their goal:
(1) bust unions (2) privatize
Social Security (3) eliminate
Medicare for the elderly (4)
eliminate Medicaid for the
poor (5) eliminate welfare (6)
eliminate government regu-
lation of banks, insurance
companies and Wall Street (7)
eliminate the IRS (8) repeal
the national health care law
(9) shrink government by
cutting services and employ-
ees, including the post office
and (10) cut funding for public
schools while giving tax cuts
to corporations.
I dont know if the liberals
are right, but after seeing
whats been happening in
Florida, Michigan, New Jer-
sey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wis-
consin and other states with
conservative Republican gov-
ernors, as well as whats been
happening in the Republican-
controlled U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives, it makes me
think that Mr. Shultz just
might be right.
If he and the other liberals
are right and the Republican
leaders get their way, then we
can look forward in the near
future to the return of orphan-
ages, old folks homes and a
Depression-era economy and
lifestyle.
David L. Faust
Selinsgrove
U of S urged to
rethink Margolies
I
n rejecting Bishop Joseph
Bamberas request to with-
draw abortion advocate
Marjorie Margolies invitation
to speak during the upcoming
Ready to Run program,
University of Scranton Presi-
dent Kevin Quinn noted that
the university was not endors-
ing her personal views.
Suppose the university were
to announce these speakers:
Bernard Madoff: Building
investor confidence, and Dr.
Kermit Gosnell: The Scissors:
Its importance in medicine.
Even if both, while awaiting
sentencing, were to give ex-
emplary presentations, could
the university avoid being
tainted, and its students as
well, by the reputation and
personality of each speaker?
Abortion is horrific. Thats
starkly evident to anyone who
has seen really seen an
aborted baby or his or her
photo. The tragic absurdity of
I can do as I please with my
own body then becomes so
clear. That body in the abor-
tionists bucket is not the
mothers; it is that of her pre-
cious, innocent baby. And
abortion is sexist; it kills more
women than men.
Let the university, my alma
mater, invite Ms. Margolies to
debate a skilled, Catholic,
anti-abortion advocate. She
would leave the stage in
shame.
But invite Rep. Michele
Bachmann or South Carolina
Governor Nikki Haley, for
example, to inspire our uni-
versity women to run for of-
fice.
I appeal to Father Quinn, as
I hope many people will, to
remain in full accord with the
Catholic Church by acceding
to our bishops request.
Jerome D. Gilmartin
Madison Township
Reader questions
drillers openness
I
n a Dec. 25 letter to the
editor, Steve Forde, policy
and communications direc-
tor of the Marcellus Shale
Coalition a PR firm funded
by the natural gas industry
responded to a newspaper
editorial questioning the in-
dustrys openness and concern
for the environment.
In his letter, Mr. Forde touts
the same old industry line that
hydraulic fracturing is a 60-
year-old production process
that has never impacted
groundwater. This statement
is a smokescreen intended to
assure the public that there is
no need for concern. In reality,
it is a perfect example of the
industrys lack of openness for
two reasons:
First, hydraulic fracturing
has been around for 60-plus
years used in conventional gas
drilling. But, it is a new type
of fracturing, high-volume
slick water lateral hydraulic
fracturing and its methods
used in unconventional gas
drilling that has recently been
developed and has made drill-
ing in the Marcellus Shale
economically viable. The
technique was introduced
commercially in 2002 only
10, not 60, years ago and,
because of its environmentally
unfriendly nature, in the 2005
Energy Bill the industry quiet-
ly orchestrated exemptions
from environmental laws (see
Halliburton Loophole) de-
signed to protect our fresh air
and clean water.
Second, Mr. Forde refers to
an old statement made by
Environmental Protection
Agency Administrator Lisa
Jackson that she was not
aware of any proven case in
which the fracking process
itself has affected water. Yet, a
recent study by the EPA in
Wyoming, in an area with
extensive gas drilling activity,
linked chemicals used in frack-
ing, not found naturally deep
in the earth, to the drinking
water of local residents. Now,
it is possible, but hard to
imagine, that a person in Mr.
Fordes position was not aware
of this significant finding
when he wrote his letter. Of
course, this study is some-
thing the industry would not
want the general public to
know when it is touting how
environmentally concerned it
is.
Finally, Mr. Forde justifies
the industrys opposition to
the FRAC Act calling it mis-
guided legislation that is not
needed to regulate the indus-
try. Mr. Forde, if the drilling
technique is so safe, please
explain the industrys need to
keep this process exempt from
the laws designed to protect
the environment?
Here again, just some more
examples of the industrys
openness and transparency
in dealing with the issue of
hydraulic fracturing. Because
it suits its purpose, industry
representatives routinely refer
to statements relevant to
conventional and not uncon-
ventional drilling using hy-
draulic fracturing. They rou-
tinely deny any culpability for
air and water pollution despite
growing evidence to the con-
trary. And, they proclaim their
desire to be stewards of the
environment while opposing
the very laws designed to
protect clean water, fresh air
and human health. Openness
and transparency, really?
Dave Thomas
Hunlock Creek
U.S. patriotism
needs refresher
M
any years ago when my
great grandfather Tha-
deusz (we always called
him Poppy) was still alive,
he would tell me stories of his
time serving in World War II.
During the conflict, he was
an Army radioman serving in
the Pacific. He received a
Purple Heart and left the
military as a sergeant. He also
drove the Jeeps for the offi-
cers, even the famous Five-
star Gen. Douglas MacArthur,
which is how he got his nick-
name Jeep.
Most important, he would
tell me how proud he was of
this great nation. This was
fostered from his time in the
military and the fact that he
was the first generation of his
family to be born in the Unit-
ed States, since his mother
and father had emigrated from
Poland. His ideal of patriot-
ism, which I share also, is
something that I feel most of
the populace of the United
States does not have anymore.
Too many times I hear
things such as were in a
decline. Also, the behavior of
some of the students during
my schools Veterans Day
assembly was atrocious.
People seem to forget how
lucky they are to live in the
United States.
John Jasionowicz
Dennison Township
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the writers name, address and
daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no
more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writ-
ers to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA1871 1
SEND US YOUR OPINION
C M Y K
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
V I E W S
Due to overwhelming response,
weve extended our offer!
1
9
0
3
0
9
1
9
0
3
0
7
Theres Still Time
To Have A
Be Dazzling Smile
For Valentines Day!
Dr. Gary Nataupsky
Riverside Commons, 575 Pierce Street, Suite 201
Kingston 331-8100 www.dr-gmn.com King ng gston 331 8100 ww www
We Accept CareCredit
Bad Credit - No Credit
We Make It Simple
2 WAYS TO PURCHASE
YOUR NEXT CAR
TOLL
FREE 1-855-313-LOAN (5626)
or
ONLINE @ www.ApproveMyCredit.com
An Eynon Buick GMC Dealership
BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O .
PA012959
824- 7220
RO O FING
S IDING
W INDO W S &
C ARPENTRY
THE BES T
Dry, Itchy Eyes?
Dr. Michele
Domiano
Dry Eye Syndrome Covered By Most Insurances
The economic impact of
MAPS has been enormous.
The gutsy citizens of
Oklahomas capital city,
who endured a 1995 bomb-
ing of a federal office
building, have seen their
town transformed into a
modernized big-league
city, and they did it them-
selves.
So can we.
OKC has a council-man-
ager form of government,
and while its population is
larger than Luzerne Coun-
ty, our overall economic
activity might compare
more favorably to 1993
OKC than current raw
census numbers might
suggest. Regardless, Lu-
zerne County wields a
critical mass sufficient to
generate a very successful
MAPS program.
All it takes is political
will. Not to mention the
legislative authorization
needed to levy a tempo-
rary 1 percent sales tax,
approved by voters, for
specific projects, of signif-
icant impact, publicly
aired and recommended
by citizen committees and
the county council.
Such authorization
would require a change in
Pennsylvania law and
extraordinary leadership
from Luzerne Countys
legislative delegation.
If the people in OKC
possess this financial in-
strument to strengthen
their community and cre-
ate a brighter future for
themselves and their chil-
dren, certainly Pennsylva-
nia should not withhold it
from the residents of Lu-
zerne County.
The financial challenges
facing Luzerne County will
not soon dissipate and the
county should do more
than race to the lowest-
common-denominator
budgets possible. OKC
chose to be bold. Its worth
investigating.
Before long the county
council should consider
sending a delegation to
Oklahoma City to meet
with community leaders
and learn all they can
about the success of
MAPS.
BLAUM
Continued from Page 1E
Kevin Blaums column called
In The Arena appears each
Sunday in The Times Leader.
Im64years old, andnoonewants to
hire me, said McHugh, who is
white, divorced, has no savings and
lives off $810per monthinSocial Se-
curity.
Iwouldlikethemtositinmyshoes,
she said of the debate audience. I
would tell themI had a husband who
made$150,000ayear, Ihadagoodsala-
ry. We were both laid off at the same
time by the same company, and Ive
neverbeenabletorallyfromthat.
If they had a chance to sit in my
shoes, theywouldbehappytohavea
program to help people who did
workall their life.
Some critics say the Obama ad-
ministrations policies have pushed
people into dependency on food
stamps. Eligibility rules were broad-
enedin2002and2008beforeObama
took office; his 2009 stimulus pack-
agerelaxedsomeworkrequirements
andtemporarilyincreasedpayouts.
For others, the recession, which
pushed the unemployment rate as
highas10percent andincreasedpov-
erty, is theprimaryculprit.
The Greater Philadelphia Coalition
AgainstHungerhasseenadoublingof
enrollments in suburban counties,
withasmallerincreaseinthecityitself.
These are much higher-income ar-
eas, said Julie Zaebst, the coalitions
policycenter manager. This is part of
the evidence showing that the most
importantreasonforthegrowthinthe
programwastherecession.
It was aninjurythat pushedRussell
Johnson of Morgantown, W.Va., over
theedge. Hehelddownasteadyrefrig-
eration job until he fell off a roof six
years ago. On Wednesday, he and his
wife, Carolyn, used their food stamp
cardto buy $64.71worthof groceries.
That was more than half of their $102
monthlybenefit.
Its not enough, but it helps,
Carolynsaid. Ithinkitsagreatpro-
gramfor the people who needit.
The Johnsons, who are white,
maintainabiggarden, hunt, fishand
buyinbulk, likethe50-poundsackof
potatoes intheir cart. Carolynalsois
disabled; they receive $763 per
monthintotal disabilitypayments.
Theyarefurious withGingrich. Id
rather work than be on food stamps,
but, I mean, mybodysaysno. Sowhat
amIgonnado?Russellsaid.IfIsitfor
too long, my back starts hurting and
my leggoes numb. If I standtoolong,
the same old thing. And if I walk too
much, my legs give out like they aint
eventhere.
Hesaidthepeoplecriticizingfood
assistance eat at fancy restaurants
andpay$25for a sackof potatoes.
Me, Imdangluckytoget togoto
McDonalds, Russell said.
About half of those receiving food
aid are children. In Fresno, Calif., Jo-
sephine Gonzales has received as-
sistance since becoming pregnant
with her first child last fall. She is
trained as a medical assistant and
previously worked at an elementary
school, but hasnt found a new job
sincegivingbirth.
IusefoodstampsbecauseImasin-
gle momandI dont work, soI needa
waytosurvive, saidGonzales, whois
Hispanic. Instead of spending the lit-
tlecashIhaveonfood,Icanspenditon
diapers and other things for my baby.
Itsjustasmallhelp.Itsnotmakingour
livesluxurious.
Victoria Busby of Oklahoma City
is a white single momwith two chil-
dren. She has received food assist-
ance intermittently since her first
childwas borntwoyears ago. Ahigh
school graduate, sheworkspart-time
building websites for a manufactur-
ing company, and aspires to become
a nurse.
She is not ashamed about receiv-
ing aid. I dont feel bad about it be-
cause my children need to eat. Its
helpedquite a bit.
Sophia Clark is a filmschool gradu-
ate in New York City who works part
time at Victorias Secret while she free-
lances on movie productions. In De-
cember she began receiving $130 per
month because she couldnt afford to
buy food after paying for rent, college
loansandhercell phone.
Itwasnever, evermyintentionto
relyonpublicassistanceinanyway,
said Clark, who is black and unmar-
riedwithnochildren.
Clark was recently entertaining a
guest in the Bronx apartment she
shares withher unclewhenthedinner
conversation turned to food stamps.
The guest emphatically statedthat his
taxdollars shouldnot feedpeoplewho
preferwelfareoverwork.
She asked the guest if he had en-
joyedthepastawithhomemadepes-
to sauce. He had. Do you find me a
lazyperson?Clarkasked. Not at all,
the guest replied.
Well, Clark said, you just ate a
dinnerthatwaspurchasedwithfood
stamps.
STAMPS
Continued from Page 1E
AP PHOTO
Victoria Busby holds her three-
week-old daughter Christy Kal-
baugh, at the Department of Hu-
man Services, in Oklahoma City. A
high school graduate, she works
part time building websites for a
manufacturing company, and
aspires to become a nurse.
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
In hard times, comedian Kath-
leenMadigansays, peoplewanten-
tertainment morethanever.
What mademoneythroughthe
Depression was vaudeville, she
said during a telephone interview.
Peoplestillfiguredoutawaytoget
thedimetoseethebeardedlady.
Madigan isnt likely to sport a
beard during her showFriday eve-
ning at the F.M. Kirby Center,
where tickets do cost more than a
dime nowadays, but you get the
idea.
Its all ad lib, she said of her
style, whichhas beenseenbyview-
ers of The Tonight Show, Dr.
Phil andLast Comic Standing.
If Ithinkof
new stuff, I
just say it on
stage.
Past topics
haveincluded
everything
from politics
tohervisitsto
Iran and Af-
ghanistan to
her memo-
ries of grow-
ing up as one
of seven sib-
lings.
Iminthemiddle, theoldest girl
but fourth down, the 46-year-old
Madigansaid, addingheryoungest
brother, Patrick, was the favorite.
St. Patrick, as I refer to him. Seri-
ously, he could run around the
neighborhoodwithahot firepoker
and kill people. My mother would
say, They shouldnt have parked
there.
References tosaints come easily
to the comedian, who spent 10
years inCatholic schools.
She remembers at least one of
therituals, thecollectionof money
to send to missionaries in foreign
countries, as mystifying.
Someof thestuff that went on,
shesaid. Coinsinthismilkcarton.
Theysaiditwasforpaganbabies. I
thought as soon as I saved enough
someonewasgoingtogivemeaba-
by, and I thought Imtoo young to
have a baby. There was just never
any explanation. You just do it. Pe-
riod.
She didnt experience nuns in
traditional habits or witness any
stereotypical hitting of students
with rulers. That was a generation
earlier.
My parents got taught by the
ones that dressed like they were in
The Soundof Music, she said. I
never saw anyone get hit They
mustvehadameetinganddecided
to stop hitting kids before I got
there.
We dont have any nuns any-
more, she added. No one agrees
toanyjobforlifeanymore. TheVat-
ican should let people be a nun for
onedaya week.
While Madigan never consid-
ered the convent when she was
growingupinSt. Louis, shedidpre-
pare for, and enter, a career as a
newspaper reporter. She tendedto
gravitatetowardthesofter topics.
I didnt want to go and investi-
gate things. As soon as they would
Madigans
good for a
few laughs
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
Kathleen Madigan will bring her
comedy to the F.M. Kirby Cen-
ter on Friday.
See MADIGAN, Page 4F
What: Kathleen
Madigan
When: 8 p.m.
Friday. Doors
open at 7 p.m.
Where: F.M. Kirby
Center for the
Performing Arts,
Wilkes-Barre
Tickets: $27
More info: 826-
1100
IF YOU GO
PASADENA, Calif. Some Holly-
wood-style guerrilla warfare has not only
earned the maker of ABCs sitcom Cou-
gar Town some notice but has finally
achieved its goal. The series is set to re-
turn to the airwaves as a Valentine to
viewers on Feb. 14.
The show, which stars Courteney Cox
as a man-hungry divorcee, was last seen
on ABC in May 2011, and wasnt on the
networks fall schedule. It hadnt been
canceled, but no return date had been set
either.
With ABC bringing many of its stars,
showcreators andexecutives toaseries of
news conferences at a Pasadena hotel re-
cently, Cougar Town creator Bill Law-
rence took action. He rented the Lang-
ham Hotels bar, brought Cox and others
involved in the show and invited dozens
of reporters in for free food and drinks.
Lawrences message was clear: Dont
forget about me.
Given the uncertainty over his shows
future, Lawrence said he didnt want to
appear at any of ABCs recent news con-
ferences.
I didnt want to sit up there clapping
and handshaking and acting like Im hap-
py, because Im not, Lawrence said. (He
wasnt invited anyway, ABC spokeswo-
man Hope Hartman said).
Lawrence, a successful 43-year-old pro-
ducer who also created Spin City and
Scrubs, could afford to throw the party.
He suggested there were possible finan-
cial reasons for ABC delaying the shows
third season, because money problems
might mean the network could order few-
er episodes. The risk for the show was
that the longer it was away, the greater
the chance fans would forget about it.
Asked how mad he was at ABC, on a
scale of one to10, he answered: Four. But
if they cancel the show, it will be an 11.
There were no hard feelings, ABC En-
tertainment President Paul Lee said.
I used to be Bill, when I used to be sort
of a pirate show runner, Lee said, using
the TVindustrys termfor a producer. He
does such a good job of getting his audi-
enceexcitedandgettinga groupof people
around it. Hes the pirate, and Im the Na-
vy, in this case. I miss being on the pirate
ship.
Lee said Cougar Town is one of a
handful of sharp, smart comedies he was
tryingtobuildintoABCs schedule andhe
just needed to get the jigsaw in place for
where we want to put it.
Cougars return to the cul-de-sac for Valentines Day
By DAVID BAUDER
AP Television Writer
AP PHOTO
Courteney Cox and Busy Philipps star in
Cougar Town.
T
hankstoJamesCameronsAvatar,
SamWorthington has made one of
the speediest ascents up the A-list
since Julia Roberts unleashed that killer
smile inPretty Woman.
Less than a year before Avatar be-
camethemostsuccessful filmof all time,
Worthington was a homeless Aussie
who couldnt land a decent role in his
homeland, let alone inHollywood.
But hepersevered, eventuallysending
an audition tape to Cameron, who gave
the actor the life-changing role of para-
plegic U.S. Marine Jake Sully.
Sincefilmingthesci-fiadventure, Wor-
thington has racked up additional hits
withTerminator: SalvationandClash
of the Titans while showing off his dra-
matic range inThe Debt as well as the
little-seen Last Night and The Texas
Killing Fields, which arrives on DVD
this week.
For his latest project, Worthington
playsthetitleroleinManonaLedge,a
heist thriller that requiredhimto practi-
cally camp out on the ledge of Manhat-
tans Hotel Roosevelt.
In the flick, opening Friday, the actor
plays an ex-cop-turned-robber who
threatens to jump to his death. The
NYPD dispatches dozens of officers to
the scene, including a psychologist (Eli-
zabethBanks) whos taskedwithtalking
himdown. Butwhatthecopsdontknow
is that the suicide attempt is a cover for
an elaborate diamond heist pulled by
Worthingtons brother (Jamie Bell).
The actor says he was drawn to Man
onaLedge becauseit was unashamed-
lyapopcornmovie. ItslikeTheNego-
tiator or Phone Booth withColin(Far-
rell), he muses. I said, Lets just steal
fromthemand try to make a better ver-
sion.
Because Worthington opted not to
perform any trial runs, the first time he
stepped out on the 14-by-17-inch ledge,
the cameras capturedhis reaction.
I was happy that I didnt burst into
tearsandcurl upinaball,saystheactor,
who insists he doesnt have a fear of
heights. I morehaveafear of fallingand
landing.
Asif actingonaledgewasnt challeng-
ingenough, themoviewas filmedinlate
November and December, when, after
sunset, temps would drop low and the
windwouldstart howling.
Itwasicyattheendoftheday,recalls
the actor, 35. But it was really the pi-
geons that you have to worry about.
Youre in their home. With a head like
mine, they probably thought I was a big
egg.
Worthington is the first to admit he
was never in any danger shooting the
By AMY LONGSDORF
For The Times Leader
Actor Sam Worthington
climbs Hollywoods A-list
after Camerons Avatar
See WORTHINGTON, Page 4F
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
DIAGRAMLESS
CRYPTOGRAMS
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
You will get the sense that
you dont need a special
key to unlock your destiny.
You are the key. It was you
all along! Remember when
you used to believe in your
own powers? Get back to
that belief.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Your internal engine is
revved up and ready to go,
but the street is blocked
off due to construction.
You can find another route
on your own, but it will be
easier if you ask around
for directions.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
What builds character
doesnt have to be earth-
shattering. Youll make
lasting change in small
increments. It just feels
right to you to try to
improve yourself on a daily
basis.
CANCER (June 22-July
22). Solving problems is
what makes you smarter.
Instead of seeing a prob-
lem as frustrating, youll
see it as an interesting
little challenge. This new
point of view will support
your success.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Youre
naturally competitive, and
this means you are bound
to be jealous every once in
a while. Its a helpful state
if you use it properly. Let
your envy inform you as
to what improvements you
want to make in your own
life.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
You have a style all your
own that is constantly
developing. Because you
know yourself and what
you like, what you produce
will be more interesting,
specific and effective.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You might be having
fun with a new venture,
though its not really pay-
ing you back as of yet.
Make adjustments. Dont
put any more money into
this until it starts making
dollars sense.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Youre trying to look on
the bright side, but certain
pessimists have your ear.
Theres some good in this.
A kernel of gloomy knowl-
edge could help you take
preventive action or per-
fect your plan.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). You feel the moment
is right, and you act on
it. This decisiveness will
make you a great leader.
But first, youll lead your-
self. Filled with the passion
of your conviction, youll
push through to the end
you desire.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Youll give a little more
of your heart, fully know-
ing that this makes you
vulnerable to being hurt.
The benefits will outweigh
the risk. Love requires you
to be courageous.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
Creating your ideal world
takes initiative, drive and
imagination. You have
plenty of all three qual-
ities now. Youll welcome
spontaneity and seize
the chance for fun this
afternoon.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
You may have the impulse
to save things that will not
really be useful to you in
the end. If youre not total-
ly convinced of the inher-
ent value of something,
discard it. If you dont love
it, lose it.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Jan.
22). This year represents
a personal breakthrough,
and your work over the
next six months allows
you to reach a major goal
midyear. Family fun will be
highlighted in February.
A change in March allows
you to study something
youve long been inter-
ested in but unable to
concentrate on due to life
circumstances. Leo and
Gemini people adore you.
Your lucky numbers are: 6,
23, 1, 24 and 19.
"PAJAMA PARTY"
Jeff Chen
1/22/12
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 3F
D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
JUMBLE
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEKS PUZZLE ANSWERS
By Henri Arnold and
Mike Argirion
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS
MINUTE MAZE
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAYS SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
1/22
1/22
1/22
1/22
1/22
1. A clever duck was quick to point
out the faults and problems in the
lives of other birds. He became
known as a wise quacker.
2. Portugal has plenty of bird life:
robins, crows, warblers and
especially the Portu-geese!
3. My big blue parrot is definitely
not well today. His bright plumage
is falling out. He needs tweetment!
4. The growing young chick worried
that he was not all he was cracked
up to be. But finally, after he pecked
his way to the top, he was egg-static.
DEAR ABBY
Common courtesy helps
in the drive-through lane
Dear Abby:
I hope you
can help me
pass along
some tips on
drive-through
etiquette to
your readers. I work in the
fast food industry, and on
behalf of my fellow workers,
may I dish out the following:
Please have a general idea
of what youd like BEFORE
you reach the speaker. The
corporate office has us on a
timer, which starts ticking as
soon as you pull up.
Please be patient. We
know youre tired of waiting
behind the car ahead of you,
but were trying our best to
make sure you get quality
food.
If you have a large order
or a special request, please
come inside to order. The
people behind you are wait-
ing for their food, too.
Speak clearly (but dont
yell!) into the speaker. Also,
although it may seem cute to
you, I can barely understand
your 4-year-old when she
asks me for her kiddie meal.
If you cant hear yourself
over your car radio, I cant
either. But if youre talk-
ing on your cellphone or to
someone in your vehicle, I
CAN hear you.
If its raining, please turn
off your windshield wipers
before you reach my window.
Otherwise, I get splashed.
Finally, PLEASE treat me
with respect! Yes, I know
I only work the drive-
through at your local burger
joint, but you want that
burger, dont you?
Working the Window in
Georgia
Dear Working The Window:
I hope your letter will be
taken to heart because it
deserves to be. Personnel
in the food service business
often must deal with cus-
tomers who are less than at
their best people who are
stressed, hungry and more
but thats no excuse to
treat the server rudely. Your
suggestions are good ones,
to which I would add that
please and thank you are
always appreciated.
Now, may I please have
a double with extra-crispy
fries? Thank you.
For everything you need
to know about wedding
planning, order How to
Have a Lovely Wedding.
Send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $6
(U.S. funds only) to: Dear
Abby Wedding Booklet,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447. (Postage is
included in the price.)
To receive a collection of Abbys
most memorable and most fre-
quently requested poems and
essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check
or money order for $3.95 ($4.50
in Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keep-
ers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
ELLISON CARPET
$589
3 ROOMS
PLUSH
CARPET
INSTALLED WITH PAD FREE ESTIMATES
MARKET ST., NANTICOKE
Call (570) 436-1500
Based On
40 Sq. Yds.
EQ UIPM EN T
Y our P ow er Equipm ent
H eadquarters
Cu b Ca d etStihl Ariens
M eyer& Fis herTru c k plo w s
Truckplow Repairs& Service
Snow EquipmentSales& Service
570-675-3003
6 8 7 M em o ria l Hw y., D a lla s
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
NO PASSES
UNDERWORLD
AWAKENING
UNDERWORLDAWAKENING (XD-3D) (R)
12:55PM, 3:10PM, 5:25PM, 7:40PM, 10:00PM
ADVENTURES OF TINTIN (3D) (PG)
1:30PM
ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED
(DIGITAL) (G)
2:25PM, 4:50PM, 7:05PM, 9:20PM
ARTIST, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:05PM, 2:35PM, 5:05PM, 7:35PM, 10:05PM
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (2012) (3D) (G)
12:20PM, 2:00PM, 2:50PM, 3:55PM, 4:30PM,
5:20PM, 7:00PM, 7:50PM, 9:30PM, 10:20PM
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (2012) (DIGITAL) (G)
1:10PM
CARNAGE (DIGITAL) (R)
12:15PM
CONTRABAND (DIGITAL) (R)
12:50PM, 2:15PM, 3:35PM, 4:55PM, 6:15PM,
7:35PM, 8:55PM, 10:45PM
DESCENDANTS, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
1:45PM, 4:40PM, 7:20PM, 10:30PM
DEVIL INSIDE, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
7:45PM, 10:40PM
EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:35PM, 3:30PM, 7:05PM, 10:00PM
GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, THE (2011)
(DIGITAL) (R)
11:50AM, 3:15PM, 6:50PM, 10:20PM
HAYWIRE (DIGITAL) (R)
12:10PM, 2:40PM, 5:00PM, 7:55PM, 10:25PM
HUGO (3D) (PG)
4:20PM
IRON LADY, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:00PM, 2:30PM, 5:00PM, 7:30PM, 9:55PM
JOYFUL NOISE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:25PM, 4:00PM, 7:20PM, 10:05PM
MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE GHOST PROTOCOL
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:45PM, 3:45PM, 6:45PM, 9:45PM
NEWYEARS EVE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
1:05PM (DOES NOT PLAY ON SAT., JAN. 21)
RED TAILS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
1:15PM, 4:25PM, 7:25PM, 10:15PM
SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF
SHADOWS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
4:15PM (DOES NOT PLAY ON SAT., JAN. 21), 7:15PM,
10:35PM
TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER, SPY (DIGITAL) (R)
4:05PM, 10:10PM
UNDERWORLD AWAKENING (3D) (R)
4:10PM, 6:30PM, 8:45PM, 11:00PM
UNDERWORLD AWAKENING (DIGITAL) (R)
1:50PM
WAR HORSE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
6:55PM, 10:10PM
WE BOUGHT A ZOO (DIGITAL) (PG)
1:00PM, 7:10PM
*Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close
PG13 - 140 min.
(12:30), (3:30), 7:15, 10:10
*Haywire - R - 105 min.
(1:00), (3:20), 7:30, 9:50
***Hugo in 3D - PG - 135 min.
(3:40), 9:45 (no 3:40 show on Sat Jan 21st)
*Red Tails - PG13 - 130 min.
(12:45), (3:40), 7:20, 10:05
***Underworld Awakening in 3D -
R - 100 min.
(1:20), (3:40), 7:30, 9:50
***Beauty and the Beast in 3D -
G - 95 min.
(12:30), (2:40), (4:45), 7:00, 9:10
Contraband - R - 120 min.
(1:15), (3:45), 7:00, 9:30
Contraband in D-Box - R - 120 min.
(1:15), (3:45), 7:00, 9:30
Joyful Noise - PG13 - 130 min.
(12:45), (3:30), 7:20, 10:00
The Devil Inside - R - 95 min.
(1:15), (3:30), 7:10, 9:30
War Horse - PG13 - 155 min.
(12:50), (3:55), 7:00, 10:05
We Bought a Zoo - PG - 135 min
(12:50), (3:40), 7:10, 9:55
***The Adventures of Tintin in 3-D -
PG- 115 min.
(1:10), 7:20 (no 1:10 show on Sat Jan 21st)
Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol
- PG13 - 130 min
(12:40), (3:40), 7:10, 10:05
Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chip-
wrecked - G - 95 min
(12:30), (2:40), (4:50), 7:05, 9:15
Sherlock Holmes: A Game of
Shadows - PG13 - 140 min
(12:40), (3:30), 7:00, 9:50
Dont just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
825.4444 rctheatres.com
3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
FIRST MATINEE SHOW ALL SEATS $5.25
EXPERIENCE D/BOX MOTION ENHANCED
SEATING ON SELECT FEATURES
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: The Enchanted Island LIVE
Saturday, January 21st at 12:55 pm only
THE MUSIC BOX DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 Hughes St, Swoyersville, PA 18704
CALL: 283-2195 OR 800-698-PLAY
A Musical Revue Featuring
The Music Box Youth Players
February 3, 4: 7pm
and
February 5: 2pm
Friday, January 20
6:30pm
A NITE AT
THE RACES
3400 N. Main Ave, SCRANTON
www.ToyotaScionofScranton.com
34444400 00 00 00 00 00 00 NNNNNN..... Ma Ma Ma Ma Ma MM in in in in in in AAAAAAAve ve ve ve ve ve ve,,,,,,,,, SC SC SC SC SC SC CRA RA RA RA RA RANT NT NT NT NT NT NTON ON ON ON ON ON O
ooofffffffffffSSSSSSSSSSScccrrraannntttttttooonn cccooommm
570-489-7584
We Make The Difference!
In 2009 and 2010, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with
the prestigious Presidents Award for excellence in each of a
series of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and
Customer Service Satisfaction.
3
www ToyotaScion
3
n
W
*All offers end close of business Tuesday, January 31, 2012 or while supplies last. All offers exclude 1st payment, tax, tags, $125 processing fee and $650 acquisition fee on lease offers.
Quantities as of 1/17/12. Finance and lease offers require tier 1 plus credit approval throughToyota Financial Services. All leases are based on 12,000 miles per year. No security deposit
required for all leases. Available unit counts include both in-stock and incoming units for all model years and trimlevels for series described. **Cash Back offers includes funds fromToyota
of Scranton, Toyota Financial Services and Toyota Motor Sales combined. Vehicle must be in-stock units --- Prior sales excluded. Customer must present ad at time of purchase. Camry
cash back, APR and lease contracts must nance or lease through Toyota Financial Services. Tundra cash back and APR offer must nance through Toyota Financial Services. ***Lease
based on 36 month term or 12,000 miles. Includes all state, registration, tag fees and also includes all necessary taxes with scheduled maintenance complimentary for 24 months or
25,000 miles. See dealer for details.

No purchase necessary. Restrictions apply. See salesperson for complete ofcial entry rules. 2012 Impact Advertising 12TSS-NVC-WTL012212
CLEARANCE
OVER 585 TOYOTAS AVAILABLE!
A NEW WINNER EVERY MONTH!
STOP BY TODAY AND ENTER TO WIN!
INTRODUCING THE AREAS EXCLUSIVE...
Y MONT ERY MONTH!
EEEEEEEEEENNNNNNNNNNTTTTTTTTTTEEEEEEEEEERRRRRRRRRR TTTTTTTTTTOOOOOOOOOO WWWWWWWWWWIIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNN
Stop in and test drive any new vehicle and be entered to win
$3,000 just for driving! Please contact us for additional information
and details or to schedule your test drive!

ONE-PAY-LEASE!
ONLY: LY Y:
$
9,995
***
$$
***
One-Pay-Lease Price INCLUDES:
All State, Registration & Tag Fees
All Necessary Taxes
Complimentary 24 Mo. Scheduled Maintenance
Full Factory Warranty
Model #2514 Stock# 43847 MSRP: $22,845
2012 CAMRY L
NEW
82
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
for 60 mos.

OR
2
.9%
APR LOWDOWN
PAYMENT!
per mo. for
36 mos. lease
with $1,999 down
TTRROODDUUCCIINNGG TTHHEE AARREEAASS EE
R OR
DOWN DOWN
MENT!
per mo. for
36 mos. lease
with $1,999 down ith $1 999 d
$
199
*
OR
ONE-PAY-LEASE!
ONLY: LY Y:
$
8,995
***
$$
***
One-Pay-Lease Price INCLUDES:
All State, Registration & Tag Fees
All Necessary Taxes
Complimentary 24 Mo. Scheduled Maintenance
Full Factory Warranty
Model #1832 Stock# 43918 MSRP: $17,660
2011 COROLLA BASE
NEW
25
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
for 60 mos.

OR
0
%
APR LOWDOWN
PAYMENT!
per mo. for
36 mos. lease
with $1,999 down
ONE-PAY-LEASE! ONE-PAY-LEASE!
y L e i e CLUD ay Lease Price INCLUDES:
Model #2514 Stoc
Y RY R MM A CC 2 C C 2 01 0 2012 CAMRY L 2012 CAMRY L
RR OORR
DOWN DOWN
MENT!
pe perr mo mo. fo forr
36 mos. lease
with $1,999 down ith $1 999 d
$
149
*
OR
ONE-PAY-LEASE!
ONLY: NLY LY:
$
10,995
***
$$
***
One-Pay-Lease Price INCLUDES:
All State, Registration & Tag Fees
All Necessary Taxes
Complimentary 24 Mo. Scheduled Maintenance
Full Factory Warranty
Model #4432 Stock# 44276 MSRP: $25,034
2011 RAV4 AWD
NEW
12
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
for 60 mos.

OR
1
.9%
APR LOWDOWN
PAYMENT!
per mo. for
36 mos. lease
with $999 down
R OR
OWN OWN
NT!
per mo. for
36 mos. lease
with $999 down ith $999 d
$
209
*
OR
Model #6948 Stock# 44348 MSRP: $33,963
2012 HIGHLANDER
NEW
38
OTHER UNITS
AVAILABLE
ONE-PAY-LEASE!
ONLY: NLY LY:
$
15,495
***
$$
***
One-Pay-Lease Price INCLUDES:
All State, Registration & Tag Fees
All Necessary Taxes
Complimentary 24 Mo. Scheduled Maintenance
Full Factory Warranty
for 60 mos.

OR
1
.9%
APR LOWDOWN
PAYMENT!
per mo. for
36 mos. lease
with $2,999 down
In 2009 and 2010, Toyota Scion of Scranton w TT
the prestigious Presidents Award for excellen AA
i f t i i l di C t S l
R OR
OWN OWN
NT!
per mo. for
36 mos. lease
with $2,999 down ith $2 999 d
$
299
*
OR
put choices on the board, I would
see my friends take somethinglike
toxic waste dumping and Id be,
Ill doone about the newsaladbar
at thegrocerystore.
She may have shied away from
thetoughertopicsasareporter, but
Madiganwas braveenoughtotrav-
el to Iraq and Afghanistan to bring
somelaughter tothetroops.
Im glad we went there, she
said. Theshows aregreat, andthe
soldiers are great, but the condi-
tions are awful. We may have been
in Kandahar; no, I think it was in
Kabul. Its like a civilization from
the 100s, not even from the year
1,000. And the bases What does
that tell you when the Russians
gaveupandranaway?
MADIGAN
Continued from Page 1F
movie. Hewas, afterall, tetheredto
a safety cord the entire time. Still,
hesays,ittookhimafewminutesto
trust that the safety tag would
catchhimif hefell.
I said, I dont want tobe able to
feel the safety tag because that
would be ridiculous. Ill just trust
you that itll kick in if I slip off. So,
everynowandthenIdsliporstum-
ble andit kickedinlike a seatbelt,
herecalls. Youdbelike, Oh, there
it is. Imfine. Its when you slip off
and youre hanging like a mario-
nette; that was theworst bit.
Worthington, borninEnglandto
Australian parents, grew up want-
ing to be actor. When he was six
months old, the family returned to
Oz, where Worthingtoneventually
attended an acting school called
theJohnCurtinCollegeof theArts.
Notlongintohistenure, hedrop-
pedout andbeganworkingaseries
of construction jobs, including
bricklaying, before going back to
acting via a scholarship from the
National Institute For Dramatic
Arts.
After graduation, Worthington
toiled regularly in Aussie movies,
including Bootmen, Dirty
Deeds, Somersault and Mac-
beth. But aroundthetimeheturn-
ed30, hehit apatchof badluck. He
couldnt landanyroleshelikedand
wound up selling all his posses-
sions. With about $2,000 to his
name, hebegansleepinginhis car.
Then, out of the blue, Worthing-
tonwasintherunningfor Avatar.
Aftermorethaneightmonthsofau-
ditions, Worthington nabbed the
starringrole.
Youget somethinglike Avatar,
and it opens up a lot of big, block-
buster doors, hesays.
Initially, Worthingtonadmits, he
wasnt sure in which direction he
wantedhis career togo.
Icanremembertellingmymate
a few years ago that there was a
great independent script and a
great blockbusterscript, andI said,
The independent thing will show
me off as a character (actor). And
he said, Yeah, but which movie
would you go and see? You go see
blockbusters.
So, thats howI pick which mo-
vies to do. I mean, Imthe luckiest
guy in the world, dude. I get to
makemovies that I want tosee.
In the next couple of years, the
actorcanthrowhimself aSamWor-
thington FilmFestival. In addition
tothesurfingmovieDriftandthe
Iraq War thriller Thunder Run,
Worthingtonhastwosequelsinthe
offing.
Theresnostart dateyet forAva-
tar 2 but Worthingtonalready has
signed on for a pair of follow-ups.
While he cant reveal any spoilers,
hesaysthesequel will beworththe
wait.
Ive talked to Jim, and hes told
mewhat his plans for thestoryare.
Its huge. Its just monumental, but
hesnotgoingtostartuntilheraises
the bar for himself. Hes innorush.
Its goingtobeamazing.
First up, Worthingtonstepsback
into Perseus boots in a sequel to
Clashof theTitans calledWrath
of theTitans. Theadventuresaga,
due in theaters March 30, is set a
decade after the first filmandfinds
Perseus traveling to Hades to res-
cue Zeus (Liam Neeson) whos
been double-crossed by his traitor-
ous sonAres (Edgar Ramirez)
Ithinkitsaterrificmovie,Wor-
thington says. I wasnt personally
happy with what I did in the first
one. I was very vocal about that. I
think I let down the audience. I
think I didnt try. The perform-
ance was just a generic, bland,
shaved-headconduit for action.
In the sequel, we literally sat
down with the director and
mapped out what I wanted to say
with the heroic journey of Perseus
and who he was as a man. (Now)
youve got a character that people
will have empathy for. I screwed
uponthefirst one. So, I triedtorec-
tifyit onthis one.
Unlike a lot of action heroes,
Worthington isnt one to brag
about histraining. Infact, heteases
thatherarelyfeelstheneedtowork
out.
Idontlikegoingtothegym,he
says. So I try nowto put that into
mycharacters. Perseushasnt done
much for 10 years. He hasnt flown
onthehorse. Sohehurts his buma
bit, and I complain all the time in
themoviethat I havetorun.
My girlfriend is the best. She
watchedWrath andsaid, Yourun
really funny. I said, What do you
mean? She said, You look out of
breath. You look out of shape. I
said, Hang on a minute. And she
goes, Itsgood. Perseushasntdone
anythingfor10years. Itsgreat. Itsa
goodcharacter choice.
But, in reality, I was just ex-
hausted.
WORTHINGTON
Continued from Page 1F
Sam Worthington stars in Man on a Ledge. As one of Hollywoods rising stars, Worthington is
throwing himself into a number of different projects.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 5F
BOOKS
timesleader.com
HARDCOVER FICTION
1. Believing the Lie. Elizabeth
George. Dutton, $28.95
2. Private: 1 Suspect. James
Patterson & Maxine Paetro.
Little, Brown, $27.99
3. Gideons Corpse. Douglas Pres-
ton & Lincoln Child. Grand Cen-
tral, $26.99
4. Death Comes to Pemberley.
P.D. James. Knopf, $25.95
5. Star Wars Darth Plagueis.
James Luceno. Del Rey/Lucas-
Books, $27
6. The Girl Who Kicked the Horn-
ets Nest. Stieg Larsson. Knopf,
$27.95
7. 11/22/63. Stephen King. Scribn-
er, $35
8. The Litigators. John Grisham.
Doubleday, $28.95
9. Lothaire. Kresley Cole. Gallery,
$25
10. Copper Beach. Jayne Ann
Krentz. Putnam, $25.95
11. Locked On. Tom Clancy with
Mark Greaney. Putnam, $28.95
12. 77 Shadow Street. Dean
Koontz. Bantam, $28
HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. American Sniper. Scott McEwen
& Jim DeFelice. Morrow, $26.99
2. Through My Eyes. Tim Tebow
with Nathan Whitaker. Harpe-
rOne, $26.99
3. Taking People with You. David
Novak. Portfolio, $25.95
4. Steve Jobs. Walter Isaacson.
Simon & Schuster, $35
5. Choose to Lose. Chris Powell.
Hyperion, $24.99
6. Killing Lincoln. Bill OReilly &
Martin Dugard. Holt, $28
7. The Obamas. Jodi Kantor. Little,
Brown, $29.99
8. The 17 Day Diet. Dr. Mike More-
no. Free Press, $25
9. Thinking, Fast and Slow. Daniel
Kahneman. Farrar, Straus &
Giroux, $30
10. Elizabeth the Queen. Sally
Bedell Smith. Random House,
$30
11. Sexperiment. Ed & Lisa Young.
FaithWords, $21.99
12. Unbroken. Laura Hillenbrand.
Random House, $27
MASS MARKET
1. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $7.99
2. The Girl Who Played with Fire.
Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $9.99
3. Hidden Summit. Robyn Carr.
Mira, $7.99
4. Spirit Bound. Christine Feehan.
Jove, $7.99
5. Mr. and Miss Anonymous. Fern
Michaels. Zebra, $7.99
6. Skeleton Coast. Clive Cussler
with Jack Du Brul. Berkley, $9.99
7. The Jefferson Key. Steve Berry.
Ballantine, $9.99
8. You ... Again. Debbie Macomber.
Mira, $7.99
9. Moonlight in the Morning. Jude
Deveraux. Pocket Star, $7.99
10. Trader of Secrets. Steve Marti-
ni. Harper, $9.99
11. The Sentry. Robert Crais. Ber-
kley, $9.99
12. A Game of Thrones. George
R.R. Martin. Bantam, $8.99
TRADE
1. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $15.95
2. The Help. Kathryn Stockett.
Berkley, $16
3. Heaven Is for Real. Todd Burpo
with Lynn Vincent. Thomas
Nelson, $16.99
4. Extremely Loud and Incredibly
Close. Jonathan Safran Foer.
Mariner, $14.95
5. Bossypants. Tina Fey. Back
Bay/Reagan Arthur, $15.95
6. The Tigers Wife. Tea Obreht.
Random House, $15
7. 10th Anniversary. James Pat-
terson & Maxine Paetro. Grand
Central, $14.99
8. The Immortal Life of Henrietta
Lacks. Rebecca Skloot. Broad-
way, $16
9. The Girl Who Played with Fire.
Stieg Larsson. Vintage, $15.95
10. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. John
le Carre. Penguin, $16
11. Assholes Finish First. Tucker
Max. Gallery, $16
12. Night Road. Kristin Hannah. St.
Martins Griffin, $14.99
BEST SELLERS
Death comes to Pemberley, one
of the great houses in Derbyshire,
and a most unwelcome guest it is.
Notonlydoesthelossof lifecome
at a most inopportune time, the
night beforetheannual LadyAnnes
ball, the highlight of the local social
season, but it is a most violent and
unexpectedfatalityintothebargain.
He has been bludgeoned, the
examining physician says of the
victim. The woundis characteris-
tic of the severe headwounds with
strands of hair, tissue and blood
vessels impacted into the bone.
Severeheadwoundscausedbya
bludgeoning? In the woods near
Pemberley? Surely there must be
some mistake.
For Pemberley, asthosedevoted
to Jane Austen
know, is the an-
cestral estateof
Mr. Darcy, the
stunning prop-
erty to which
he and his
bride, Eliza-
beth Bennet,
retired at the
endof PrideandPrejudice.What
on Earth is such extreme violence
doing there?
No one understands the incon-
gruityof thismorethanthewoman
whobrought deathtothosepartic-
ular woods. That would be the
British writer P.D. James, the ven-
erable 91-year-old author of potent
detective fiction for whom the
word doyenne might well have
been invented.
Herself a major Austen fan,
James starts the book with an au-
thors note in which she allows, I
owe an apology to the shade of
Jane Austen for involving her be-
loved Elizabeth in the trauma of a
murder investigation. Especially
because, as James points out, Aus-
ten had plainly declared in Mans-
field Park, Let other pens dwell
on guilt and misery. I quit such
odious subjects as soonas I can. ...
Still, thisisnotthefirsttimeAus-
tens characters have been thrust
into disturbing waters, and having
P.D. Jamesasyour guideiscertain-
ly an improvement on the likes of
Pride and Prejudice and Zom-
bies. If you appreciate mysteries
as well as the Mighty Jane, this
pleasant entertainment will do
nicely.
For onething, it iscertainlyfunto
get back in touch with the old P-
and-P crowd, and James briskly
bringsusuptodate.DarcyandEliza-
beth, nowmarriedforsixyears, have
twoyoungsons, and, not surprising-
ly, see anawful lot of Elizabeths sis-
ter Jane andher husbandBingley.
New to matrimony is bookish
sister Mary, whohasmarriedarec-
tor, while flighty Lydia is still wed-
ded to Wickham, who had a mo-
ment as something of a national
hero because of actions duringan
Irish military campaign before
leaving the service and returning
to his generally feckless life.
It is one of James typically
shrewdinsightstounderstandthatif
something like murder were to
touch society at Pemberley, Wick-
hamwould inevitably be the cause.
A man of sketchy moral character
who is forever looking for the main
chance, Wickhamgets the plot roll-
ing when he is discovered slumped
overthebodyof oneCaptainDenny,
proclaiming, Hewasmyfriend, my
only friend, and Ive killed him! Ive
killedhim! Its myfault.
Aseventsunfoldandattemptsare
made to figure out exactly what
went downinthosewoodsandwho
is to blame for the captains death,
newcharacterscomeintoplay, most
prominently a dashing and success-
ful attorney named Henry Allerton
whohappenstohavehiseyeonDar-
cys sister Georgina.
Also interested in Georgina is
another returnee from the Austen
book, Col. Fitzwilliam, an officer
often described as among the
most handsome and gallant in the
British Army. Coming back as
well is the hysterical Lydia.
Wickhamsinvolvementwithsha-
dydealings is, of course, nosurprise
toDarcy, andchunks of Death are
taken up with his resentment
againstthemanhefeelshasbeentoo
much in his life, a feeling James de-
scribes as a bitterness of spirit bro-
ken from time to time by surges of
anger, like the rush of an incoming
tide.
As that passage makes clear,
though these are Austens charac-
ters, this novel reflects James sensi-
bilityandpreoccupations. It is auni-
verseof darkmeanings, hiddenrela-
tionshipsandeventsthat aremired
in apprehension and potential dan-
ger.Jamesisalsointentonbringing
the real world into Austens world,
mentioning Napoleon and the war
withFranceaswell asthenewinven-
tionknownasthewatercloset. With
all the plots bleakness, readers will
inevitably miss Austens amused
andsparklingwit, but James is wise
enoughnot totrytoduplicate that.
The writer also steers clear of
tarnishing the Elizabeth-Darcy re-
lationship. Six years of marriage
have, if anything, deepened that
love match, and a good thing too.
Janeites around the globe would
arise in united fury if any novelist,
even the illustrious P.D. James,
had tried to have it any other way.
A murder mystery transforms Jane Austens Pemberley
By KENNETH TURAN
Los Angeles Times
Death Comes to Pemberley by
P.D. James; Alfred A. Knopf
($25.95)
When a book wins an award
for promoting social justice in
this case, the Bellwether Prize,
established by writer Barbara
Kingsolver one might expect
it to be heavy-handed or preachy.
Running the Rift is neither
of those: its a nuanced, complex
portrait of people in a nation ri-
ven by conflict.
When a book is set during gen-
ocide in this case, the Rwan-
dan genocide
of the 1990s
one might
expect it to
be irredeem-
ably depress-
ing.
Running
the Rift is
unsparing in
its depiction of the hatred and vi-
olence, but doesnt let that
crowdout the goodness of family
and friendship and the power of
hope.
The book isnt a war story; its
the story of a boy growing up in
Africa, a boy who can run very
fast, fast enough to dream of
Olympic gold.
Jean Patrick Nkuba, the run-
ner, is a Tutsi, a distinction that
shouldnt matter but does. Be-
cause of who he is, his path is set
in ways he cant control. Because
people are focused on the dis-
tinction between Hutu and Tut-
si, and are willing to kill because
of it, his country is forever
changed.
As a boy, Jean Patrick loses his
father not to war, but to a car ac-
cident. He and his family leave
their home at the school where
his father taught to move in with
an uncle, but because Jean Pa-
trick is a skilled student as well
as a gifted athlete, he is able to
continue his schooling. And he
has the love and support of his
extended family in doing so.
As he pursues higher educa-
tion and moves up the ladder
of competitive track he be-
comes more aware of the tenu-
ous political situation in Rwan-
da. He watches with alarm as
longstanding tensions flare be-
tween Tutsi and Hutu; he must
tolerate the casual slur of cock-
roach applied to all Tutsi.
And he must make a difficult
choice when an opportunity pre-
sents itself: should he take a Hu-
tu ID card to ease his way?
As JeanPatrickcloses inonhis
goal of the Olympics, he realizes
that there is far more to it than
winning a medal for himself.
Run as if your life depended on
it, a friends father tells him. As
if all our lives depended on it.
Running the Rift does not
spare readers the horrors of the
violence in Rwanda, but never
loses sight of the beauty the
love and, yes, the hope that
persists evenamidsucha desper-
ate situation.
Rift finds
hope amid
war horrors
By LISA MCLENDON
McClatchy Newspapers
Running the Rift by Naomi
Benaron; Algonquin Books ($24.95)
S
omeof thefunfactsrecountedinI Want My
MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music
Revolution:
When an Epic Records executive start-
edshowing a video froma newgroupcalled
Culture Club for the song Do You Really Want to Hurt
Me?, everyone who watched it said, Man, shes really
ugly.
On the shoot of the first video for The Polices Syn-
chronicity album, lead singer Sting told the director,
Just keep the camera on the money, and pointed to
himself. It was the last album the group would ever re-
cord.
MTV programmers didnt think much of Guns N
Roses first video Welcome to the Jungle and initially
aired it only once or twice after midnight. Then David
Geffen called the channel and requested the clip get
more airplay. Acouple of weeks later, Guns N Roses be-
came superstars.
Ontheset of theBlackor Whitevideo, director John
Landis had to keep asking Michael Jackson to stop grab-
bing his crotch and rubbing himself on camera. Madon-
na does it. Prince does it, Jackson pointed out. Youre
not Madonna or Prince, Landis replied. Youre Mickey
Mouse.
When Sinead OConnors Nothing Compares to U
beat out Madonnas Vogue for the Video of the Year
award, Madonna was furious (Sinead OConnor has
about as much sex appeal as Venetian blinds) and Si-
nead gloated (I was very pleased to beat the s--- out of
her.)
Every page of this fat, addictive, ridiculously enter-
taining book, which covers the rise and fall of MTV
from1981-1992, is overstuffed with such anecdotes.
Authors Craig Marks and Rob Tannenbaum inter-
viewed more than 400 musicians, directors, exec-
utives and VJs to create an unusually candid oral
history of the music video channel and its enor-
mous impact on pop culture. Although the
writers couldnt land any of the really big
names Bruce Springsteen, Prince,
Madonnatheydidget enoughpeo-
ple who knew and worked closely
withthe superstars to make their
absence irrelevant.
Prince, for example, was
cuckoo paranoid, barely
spoke toanyone outside his in-
ner circle, directed most of his
videos himself via passive-aggres-
sive tactics, showed up to meet-
ings wearing different-colored high
heel shoes andusedsomuchsmoke
onthesets of his clips that everyone
got diarrhea.
Springsteen was initially suspi-
cious of music videos, but he even-
tually embraced them only on
his terms, though. For his famed
video for Brilliant Disguise a
singleshot that graduallypulls clos-
er tohis face as he plays the songon
a guitar director Meiert Avis scoured homes in New
Jersey until he found one with a kitchen big enough to
filmin. But the day before the shoot, with the trucks car-
rying equipment already in route, the man who lived at
the house returned from a business trip and nixed the
whole thing. Panicked, the director called the National
Guardandfoundakitchenat anabandonedmilitarybase
big enough to house the production.
Although it focuses exclusively on the channel, I
Want My MTV doubles as a cultural history of the
1980s, showing how the network influenced everything
from fashion trends to hairstyles to filmmaking. The
book argues that trends such as rap music and hip-hop
might have never entered the mainstream if MTV exec-
utives, who hailedfromrock-orientedradio, hadnt grad-
ually relented and started playing videos by black artists
(most notably, of course, by Michael Jackson, but also
Run-DMC, MC Hammer and Public Enemy). Pretty
much every member of Generation X watched MTV ob-
sessively at some period in their lives, so reading about
the time Bobby Brown dropped a vial of cocaine on the
stagewhileperformingat theVideoMusicAwards or the
uproar that greeted Madonnas Like a Prayer video
feels like leafing through a yearbook of your youth.
For readers who knowMTV primarily as the home of
JerseyShore and16andPregnant, thebookwill seem
like a work of science-fiction. Yes, there was a time when
MTVairednothingbut music, whenVJs were huge stars
(and treated horribly by their bosses), when President
Bill Clinton went on the channel to secure the youth
vote, when the world premiere of a new video was the
sort of thing you marked down on your calendar.
Like the era it covers, I Want My MTV is filled with
excess, drugs, egos and tragedy. It is also a legacy to the
music of that decade, some of it garbage, but a lot of it
better than you might remember. It also helps to explain
the ambivalence most everyone feels about the era:
The 1980s werent just something you lived
through. Theywerealsosomethingyou
survived.
BY RENE RODRIGUEZ McClatchy Newspapers
I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Revolution
by Craig Marks and Rob Tannenbaum; Dutton ($29.95)
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
T R A V E L
** New York City **
Wednesday & Saturday
** Mt Airy Casino **
2/20, 3/19, 4/16
** Hollywood Casino **
2/19, 3/18, 4/15
** One Day Tours **
King of Prussia 3/4
Philadelphia Flower Show
3/4, 3/7, 3/9
Cayuga Lake Wine Tour 4/14
Hershey Outlets 4/15
Sight & Sound Jonah 4/21
American Girl Place NYC 4/22
Peddlers Village (Strawberry Fest) 5/6
Ellis/Liberty Islands/Seaport 5/12, 6/16
Spirit of Philadelphia Cruise
& Sugarhouse Casino 5/20
Baltimore Harbor 5/27, 6/24, 7/21
Seneca Lake Wine Tour 6/16
NYC 3-hr Sightseeing Cruise 6/17
Hershey Gardens/Riverboat Cruise 6/23
Little Odessa & Coney Island 7/28
** Multi-Day Tours **
Trump Plaza Casino - AC 4/15-16
Azalea Festival -VA 4/27-29
Nordic Lodge Lobster/Casinos 6/2-3
Long Island Hamptons Tour
6/17-18
Cape Cod 7/8-12
Washington, DC 7/13-15
Myrtle Beach 9/9-15
Hudson Valley Wine Tour 10/13-14
Call: (570) 655-5050
JO JOS TRAVELERS
JO JOS TRAVELERS
www.JoJosTravelers.com
7
3
2
9
5
9
570-474-6771 ext. 4
www.auto-bus.com
AUTO-BUS
Call For a 2012 Brochure
NYC Canal St. Shops Ocean City, NJ
Rehoboth Beach, DE Wildwood, NJ
Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ IKEA
Shopping Cape May, NJ King of
Prussia Shopping Knoebles
Baltimore Harbor Wine Fest,
Watkins Glen NJ Meadowlands Flea
Market NYC San Gennaro Fest. NYC
Southside Seaport NYC (Times Sq.)
Sands Casino Phila. Flower Show
Atlantic City Resorts Casino and more
Group Bus Rental To & From Florida
You & Your Car
LivingInQuailHill.com
Beautiful New Homes Priced
From $275,000 to $595,000 CALL MARTZ TRAILWAYS FOR THESE:
BROADWAY: Jersey Boys, On A Clear Day, Book Of Mormon, Mamma Mia,
Wicked, Phantom Of The Operagreat seats for great shows!
PHILA. FLOWER SHOW Daily March 4-10. Theme: Hawaii Islands Of Aloha
PASSION PLAY & HUDSON RIVER LUNCH CRUISE MARCH 31
DEAD SEA SCROLLS EXHIBIT APRIL 14 Discovery Expo, NYC free time
SIGHT & SOUND DINNER THEATRE APRIL 14 Jonah and Dinner
SENECA LAKE WINE & CHEESE WEEKEND APRIL 28-29 Lake Cruise
LONGWOOD GARDENS & QVC STUDIO TOUR APRIL 28
9/11 MEMORIAL MAY 12 Includes Free Time in New York City
AMERICAN GIRL PLACE MAY 19 Lunch at American Girl Caf
PHILA. SIGHTSEEING MAY 19 Includes Eastern State Penitentiary
BOSTON POPS WEEKEND MAY 26-28 Concert, Boston Tour, 3 Meals
CEDAR POINT PARK AUG. 4-5 Hotel, 2 Meals, Two 1-Day Park Tickets
NIAGARA FALLS JUNE 15-17 Dinner Show, 2 Cruises
MARTZ TOURS
CALL 821-3855 or 1-800-432-8069
Visit us online at www.martztours.com
WASHINGTON
CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL
April 13-15 Japanese Festival Tickets, Parade Seats
7
3
4
7
1
1
&
Choose One of Our 6 2012 Group Departures
IRELAND WALES & ENGLAND SCOTLAND
Call for a Full Color Brochure!
Call Today
at 288-9311
601 Market Street Kingston
www.asktravelworld.com
8-Day Spring
Ireland Tour
8-Day Wales &
England Tour
9-Day Scottish
Dream Tour
9-Day Summer
Ireland Tour
8-Day Notre Dame
vs Navy In Dublin
9-Day Irish
Heritage Tour
April 23-30
$
1995 pp
July 13-21
$
2990 pp
Sept 15-23
$
2895 pp
July 8-16
$
2495 pp
August 26-Sept 2
$
2895 pp
October 3-11
$
2795 pp
BROADWAY SHOW
BUS TRIPS
JERSEY BOYS Wed. April 11th $150
WICKED Wed. May 2nd $169
LION KING Wed. June 13th $175
CALL ROSEANN
@
655-4247
INDIANAPOLISIndianapo-
lis wont ever be mistaken for
Miamis South Beach or New Or-
leans Bourbon Street, but vis-
itors headed to the Circle City for
the Super Bowl will findplenty of
attractions, great restaurants and
interesting taverns not to
mention some uniquely Hoosier
experiences.
The same can-do spirit and
public-private partnerships that
delivered the Colts from Balti-
more in 1984 and won hosting
rights for this years Super Bowl
have transformed a once-sleepy
city center into a vibrant, pedes-
trian-friendly district filled with
office towers, shops, eateries,
bars, museums, theaters and his-
toric churches.
The city nicknamed the Cross-
roads of America has turned out
such cultural icons as writer Kurt
Vonnegut, comedianDavidLetter-
man and the Indianapolis 500. It
boasts one of the worlds largest
childrens museums, an infamous
shrimp cocktail and jazz and blues
at a legendary venue with roots in
the Underground Railroad.
Andeventhoughthe weather in
the first week of February can be
unpredictable, as apt to produce
highs in the 60s as 6-inch snow-
falls, tourism officials are confi-
dent Indy has something to offer
everyone descendingfor the Feb. 5
game at Lucas Oil Stadium.
FOOTBALL FESTIVITIES:
Thoughthis is its first Super Bowl,
Indianapolis is no stranger to ma-
jor sporting events: Lucas Oil Sta-
dium three years ago hosted the
sixth NCAAMens Final Four held
indowntownIndianapolis, andthe
Super Bowl Village took a trial run
as a tailgating zone during the Big
Ten football championship game
Dec. 3. The Indianapolis Motor
Speedwaydraws thousands of fans
each year for the 500 and Brick-
yard 400.
One of the citys selling points
as a Super Bowl site was the
abundance of hotels and attrac-
tions within easy walking dis-
tance of the stadium.
That accessibility will be on dis-
play at the free, family-friendly Su-
per Bowl Village opening Jan. 27,
with more than 80 national, re-
gional and local bands performing
on two stages and Tailgate Town,
featuring tailgate competitions,
football turf andinteractivegames.
Thrill-seekers willing to brave the
elements can pay $10 to race 650
feet down Georgia Street, the
heart of theSuper Bowl village, on
oneof four ziplines strung80feet
above ground.
TheNFLExperienceinteractive
theme park in the Convention
Center bordering the west end of
the village is expected to draw
200,000 fans paying $25 ($20 for
kids under 12) to attend football
clinics and autograph sessions,
whats billed as the largest football
memorabiliashowever andarepli-
ca of an NFL locker room as it ap-
pears on game days. The NFLalso
will let 5,000 fans buy tickets to at-
tend Super Bowl Media Day on
Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Lucas Oil Sta-
dium just two blocks away.
EATINGOUT: Bars andrestau-
rants ringthestadium, but noneas
historic as the Slippery Noodle at
MeridianandSouthstreets, where
bars have operated since 1850. It
served as a stop on the Under-
ground Railroad during the Civil
War, as a hangout for John Dillin-
gersgangduringProhibition(Dill-
inger is buried in Crown Hill Cem-
etery a few miles away) and as a
bordello up until 1953. Today, the
venue is a tour stop for regional
and national blues acts.
Acant-miss for steak fans is St.
Elmo Steak House, an Indianapo-
lis fixture since 1902. But here,
the steaks are often upstaged by
its famous shrimp cocktail with
hot and spicy sauce.
Another popular eatery is the
Red Key Tavern, featured in Indi-
anapolis-born author Dan Wake-
fields Going All the Way (the
1997 movie based on the story
starred Ben Stiller and Jeremy
Davies). Be sure to check out the
model airplanes hanging from
the ceiling.
HOOSIER HYSTERIA: It
wouldnt be Indiana without the
basketball mania thats referred
to as Hoosier Hysteria. Sports
fans seeking a diversion from
football can explore some of the
greatest temples of hoops tradi-
tion in Indiana.
Must-sees include Hinkle
Fieldhouse on the Butler Univer-
sity campus on the citys north
side, the longtime home of the
single-class state high school fi-
nals and featured in the final
scenes of Hoosiers. The Bull-
dogs, the NCAA runners-up for
two years running, have home
games there Feb. 2.
The NCAAs Hall of Champions
downtown features a replica of a
1930s basketball gymnasium.
The Indiana Basketball Hall of
Fame, about an hours drive to the
east in New Castle, celebrates the
states basketball heritagefromthe
late 1800s with interactive exhib-
its, memorabilia from past state
championship teams and a cour-
tyard containing more than 6,000
engraved bricks arranged in the
shape of Indiana. The bricks fea-
ture the names of the teams,
coaches, players, and others who
have been a part of the states bas-
ketball tradition.
Those just wanting to see a
game can catch the Indiana Pacers
in action with home games at
Bankers Life Fieldhouse Jan. 31
and Feb. 4.
UNIQUELY INDIANA: White
River StateParkimmediatelywest
of the ConventionCenter provides
a greenway connecting the Indi-
anapolis ZooandWhite River Gar-
dens, an IMAX theater, the NCAA
Hall of Champions Museum, the
Indiana State Museumand the Ei-
teljorg Museum of American Indi-
ans and Western Art.
The Central Canal linking the
museums runs past two of the
downtown areas many military
monuments, the Medal of Honor
Memorial and another honoring
the crewof the USS Indianapolis,
which was hit by three Japanese
torpedoes and sank in shark-in-
festedwaters of the Pacific Ocean
on July 30, 1945, after delivering
components for the atomic bomb
that wouldbedroppedonHirosh-
ima. The Indianapolis death toll
of 880 froma crewof nearly1,200
men is the U.S. Navys worst sin-
gle loss of life at sea.
Four blocks east of the USSIndi-
anapolis Memorial is the Indiana
War Memorial Plaza Historic Dis-
trict, home to two museums and
24 acres of monuments, statues
and sculptures and the national
headquarters of the American Le-
gion. The monolithic War Memo-
rials upper floor is the110-foot-tall
Shrine Room, symbolizing peace
and unity and made of materials
from across the world because of
the global nature of the Great
War. The citys nickname, Circle
City, derives from the circular
street surrounding the Soldier and
Sailors Monument.
During World War II, 20-year
Kurt Vonnegut joined the Army
and was captured by the Germans
at theBattleof Bulge. Heandother
prisoners survived the Allied fire-
bombing of Dresden because they
were housed underground in a for-
mer meat locker and slaughter-
house, but the experience marked
himforever and inspired his novel
Slaughterhouse-Five.
Theyear-oldKurt Vonnegut Me-
morial Library, tuckedinto a store-
front between the canal and the
War Memorial, is small but fasci-
nating for literary lovers. It con-
tains aNazi swordhebrought back
to the U.S. and a letter his father
sent to him, but which he hadnt
openedbecause he was inGerman
hands at the time. The walls are
covered with portraits and photos
of the author, his artwork, his type-
writer from the 1970s, and recre-
ation of his writing den.
Vonneguts grandfather, sec-
ond-generation German-Ameri-
canBernardVonnegut, designed
the Athenaeum, once one of the
largest social clubhouses in the
U.S. with an auditorium, gym,
and restaurant, the Rathskeller.
Its part of downtowns Mass Ave
cultural district, a collection of
galleries, shops restaurants and
bars that also includes the Chat-
terbox, a tiny jazz club once vis-
ited by Mick Jagger when the
Rolling Stones were in town. A
giant mural of Vonnegut looms
over the 300 block of Massachu-
setts Avenue.
I dont know what it is about
Hoosiers, Vonnegut wrote in
the novel Cats Cradle. But
wherever you go there is always
a Hoosier doing something very
important there.
Indy offers fans big attractions
AP FILE PHOTOS
A fan cheers for the Indianapolis Colts during a preseason NFL football game against the Buffalo
Bills at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.
Hikers, joggers and paddleboa-
ters enjoy a section of the Cen-
tral Canal on the west side of
downtown Indianapolis.
Visitors headed to the Circle
City for the Super Bowl will find
plenty of attractions, great
restaurants and interesting
taverns. Among them is the
Kurt Vonnegut Mural.
The Associated Press
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 1G
CALL TO PLACE 24/7
570.829.7130
800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED
EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM
MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
KEN POLLOCK
SUZUKIS
7
3
4
7
1
9
7
3
4
7
1
9
KEN
POLLOCK
SUPER CENTER
PRE-OWNED
Ken Pollock AT
339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA
Hours
M-F 9-8pm
Sat 9-5pm
1-800-223-1111
www.kenpollocksuzuki.com
CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE
WERE EASY TO FIND
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 PITTSTON
* 1.99% Based on 60 months. Must be approved under program guidelines. Tax & Tags Additional. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. * See Salesperson for complete details.
SCAN HERE FOR
MORE INFO
Has Been Extended Through MONDAY
RATES AS LOW AS 1.99%
^
^Rates Based on Bank Approved Credit on 60 Month Term.
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
2009 HYUNDAI
ACCENT SEDAN
Auto, Dual Airbags, A/C,
Great Gas Mileage!
NOW
$
8,897
*
WAS
$
10,995
2008 TOYOTA
YARIS HATCHBACK
Automatic, Dual Airbags, Great On Gas!
NOW
$
9,497
*
WAS
$
11,995
2010 KIA RIO
SEDAN
Auto, Dual Airbags, A/C,
Great Gas Mileage!
NOW
$
9,797
*
WAS
$
11,995
2009 NISSAN
SENTRA S SEDAN
Auto, Power Windows/Locks, 1-Owner!
NOW
$
9,997
*
WAS
$
12,995
2006 PONTIAC G6
SEDAN
Dual Sunroof Pkg, Chrome Wheels,
Auto, PW, PL
NOW
$
10,497
*
WAS
$
12,995
2007 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER 4X4
Sunroof, Leather, 3rd Row, Auto
NOW
$
12,997
*
WAS
$
15,995
2008 HONDA
ACCORD EX-L SEDAN
Leather, Sunroof, AT, PW, PL, P. Seat
NOW
$
13,497
*
WAS
$
15,995
2009 HYUNDAI
SONATA GLS SDN
Power Windows/Locks,
CD, Great On Gas!
NOW
$
10,697
*
WAS
$
12,995
2010 CHEVY
COBALT SEDAN
Automatic, CD, Power Windows/Locks,
One Owner!
NOW
$
10,997
*
WAS
$
13,995
2007 CHEVY HHR
LT
Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels,
Low Low Miles
NOW
$
11,997
*
WAS
$
14,995
2010 CHEVY
COBALT LT SEDAN
Automatic, Power Windows/Locks,
CD, One Owner!
NOW
$
11,997
*
WAS
$
14,995
2010 VOLKSWAGEN
BEETLE
Leather, PW, PL, Auto
NOW
$
12,997
*
WAS
$
14,995
Pre-Owned Vehicle
Extravaganza
2005 CHEVY
MALIBU CLASSIC
Automatic, Power Windows/Locks,
Low Miles!
NOW
$
7,997
*
WAS
$
9,995
2006 SUBARU
OUTBACK WAGON AWD
Alloy Wheels, Automatic, CD, PW, PL
NOW
$
12,997
*
WAS
$
14,995
2009 AUDI A4
QUATTRO SEDAN
All Wheel Drive, Leather, Sunroof,
PW, PL
NOW
$
17,597
*
WAS
$
19,995
2009 JEEP
WRANGLER 2DR
4X4
Wheel Package, Fog Light Package,
Ready for Fun!
NOW
$
17,597
*
WAS
$
19,995
2008 SAAB 9-3
CONVERTIBLE
Leather, Alloys, Auto, PW, PL
NOW
$
17,697
*
WAS
$
19,995
2011 TOYOTA TACOMA
ACCESS CAB 2WD
SR5 Package, PW, PL, Auto,
Rearview Camera
NOW
$
18,897
*
WAS
$
21,995
2010 DODGE
AVENGER R/T SDN
Leather, Alloy Wheels,
Automatic, PW, PL
NOW
$
13,997
*
WAS
$
15,995
2008 HONDA CIVIC
SI COUPE
Sunroof, Alloys, Nice Car!
NOW
$
15,797
*
WAS
$
16,995
2010 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY
VAN
Stow N Go, 2nd Row Buckets,
3rd Row, Alloys
NOW
$
16,897
*
WAS
$
19,995
2010 VOLKSWAGEN
JETTA
Automatic, Power Windows/Locks,
CD, Great On Gas!
NOW
$
13,797
*
WAS
$
15,995
2008 FORD
ESCAPE 4X4
XLT Pkg, Sunroof, Auto, PW, PL
NOW
$
13,997
*
WAS
$
15,995
2009 SUBARU
LEGACY AWD
Alloy Wheels, Sunroof, 5-Speed,
Harmon Kardon Stereo
NOW
$
15,897
*
WAS
$
16,995
2006 DODGE RAM
1500 QUAD CAB 4X4
SLT Pkg, Alloys, 8 Ft Bed, Auto, PW, PL
NOW
$
16,897
*
WAS
$
18,995
2009 SUBARU
FORESTER AWD
Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Heated Seats,
Automatic, 2 To Choose From!
NOW
$
19,997
*
WAS
$
21,995
2009 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AWD
Alloy Wheels, Automatic,
Remote Start, PW, PL
NOW
$
13,697
*
WAS
$
15,995
2007 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA 4X4
Automatic, Power Windows/Locks, CD
NOW
$
13,897
*
WAS
$
14,995
2011 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER TECH
AWD
Alloy Wheels, Navigation
Fog Lights, 6 Speed
NOW
$
14,497
*
WAS
$
16,995
2011 SUZUKI GRAND
VITARA LIMITED 4X4
Sunroof, Leather, 18 Alloys,
One Owner, Only 8K Miles
NOW
$
22,397
*
WAS
$
24,995
2008 SUZUKI XL-7
AWD
Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, PW, PL
NOW
$
15,997
*
WAS
$
18,995
2010 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AWD
Tech Pkg w/ Navigation, Auto, PW, PL
NOW
$
14,997
*
WAS
$
16,995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
230 Real Estate
Auction
150 Special Notices
230 Real Estate
Auction
150 Special Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The City of Wilkes-Barre will receive sealed bids for Fire Station
energy efficient doors within its two fire houses, in the City of
Wilkes-Barre. Sealed bids will be accepted at the Office of the
City Clerk 4th floor, City Hall, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. 18711, until 9:30 A.M., local time, February 2, 2012. All
timely bids will then be opened and read aloud at 10:00A.M.,
local time, February 2, 2012 in Wilkes-Barre City Council Cham-
bers. The City Clerk will strictly enforce time deadlines. Bidders
are encouraged to provide their bids well in advance of the time
listed above.
Copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained at the Office
of the City Clerk, 4th Floor, Wilkes-Barre City Hall on January 23,
2012 after 9:00 AM.
The Contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for
employment are not discriminated against because of their race,
age, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or family sta-
tus, and that to the greatest extent feasible utilize project area
business located in or owned in substantial part of project area
residents.
Bid security, in an amount equal to ten (10%) of the total bid, shall
be submitted with each Bid, in accordance with the Instructions
to Bidders. Attention is called to the fact that not less than the
minimum salaries and wages, as set forth in the Contract Docu-
ments must be paid on the project.
The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for per-
formance and payment bond or bonds.
In accordance with Executive Orders 11625 and 12138, the suc-
cessful bidder must utilize, to the greatest extent feasible,
minority and/or women-owned business concerns which are
located within the municipality, county, or general trade area.
In addition to Equal Employment requirements of Executive
Order 11246, as amended, the contractor must also establish a
6.9% goal for female participation and a 0.6% goal for minority
participation in his aggregate on-site construction work force,
for contracts in excess $10,000.00 (Ten Thousand Dollars)
whether or not part of that work force is performing work on a
federal or federally assisted construction contract or subcon-
tract.
The City of Wilkes-Barre reserves the right to reject any or all
bids or portions thereof, and to waive any informality in the bid-
ding.
The selection of the successful bidder shall be made in the best
interest of the City of Wilkes-Barre, as solely determined by the
City, and bidders acknowledge this by submitting a bid.
Bids may be held by the City of Wilkes-Barre for a period not to
exceed ninety (90) days from the date of the opening of bids for
the purpose of reviewing the bids, before awarding the Contract.
In this period of time no Bidder may withdraw their bid.
The City of Wilkes-Barre does not discriminate of the basis of
race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, family and handi-
capped status in employment or the provision of services. This
project is funded by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation
Block Grant Program from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).
Wilkes-Barre City hall is a facility accessible to persons with dis-
abilities.
THOMAS M. LEIGHTON, MAYOR
THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE IS AN
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY / AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
EMPLOYER
LEGAL NOTICE
FAIR HOUSING NOTICE
This Notice will serve to advise all resi-
dents of the City of Pittston that the follow-
ing actions, if based on race, color, reli-
gion, sex, national origin, familial status
(families with children), or handicap are
considered discriminatory.
Refusing to sell or rent, deal or
negotiate with any person
Discriminating on terms or con-
ditions for buying or renting housing
Discriminating by advertising
that housing is available only to persons of
a certain race, color, religion, sex, nation-
al origin, familial status, or handicap
Denying that housing is available
for inspection, sale or rent when it really is
available
Blockbusting for profit, persuad-
ing owners to sell or rent housing by telling
them that minority groups are moving into
the neighborhood
Denying or making different
terms or conditions for home loans by
financial institutions
Denying to anyone the use of or
participation in any real estate services,
multiple-listing services or other facilities
related to the selling and renting of hous-
ing
All residents are hereby notified that any
complaints regarding a discriminatory
action under one of the above conditions
may be filed with the:
Pennsylvania Human Relations
Commission
Harrisburg Regional Office
Riverfront Office Center
1101-1125 South Front Street,
5th Floor
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
17104-2515
And
U. S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development Fair Housing
Enforcement Center
The Wanamaker Building
100 Penn Square East
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
19107-9344
FAIR HOUSING NOTICE
LEGAL PUBLICATION-2012
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
WEEKEND WEEKEND SPECIAL SPECIAL
$13.49 $13.49 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Present coupon upon ordering.
Home of the Original O-Bar Pizza
FORECLOSURE SALE
13 ACRE MOBILE HOME PARK
Located on State Rt 92, Exeter Twp.
Permitted for 55 sites, approved for 75.
River frontage. 1,300 ft of road frontage.
February 3rd @ 10:30AM
Luzerne County Courthouse,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
nationalREOholdings@gmail.com
DIRECTED BY SECURED PARTIES!
Public AUCTION
Fine! Restaurant, Kitchen,
& Deli Equipt.!
Monday, January 30 @ 10:00AM
(Snow Date: Feb. 2nd @ 12pm)
RELOCATED TO: BUILDING
2091 Seamans Rd,
Factoryville, PA 18419
Details: Col. Steve Sitar & Co.
(570) 586-1397 Pa.Lic. AU2124-L
www.sitarauctions.com
PAGE 2G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
470 Auto Repair
OWNER:
Frank Gubbiotti
HEAD MECHANIC:
Howard Balbach
The Auto Lodge is
a local family run
business based on
quality workman-
ship & honest
business prac-
tices.
The Auto Lodge
provides all auto-
motive needs for
all types of vehi-
cles.
Inspections/
Emissions
Tires
Tune Ups
Brakes
General
Maintenance
We gladly
welcome back
our old clients
& warmly
welcome new
ones!!
570-270-0777
570-760-3714
1350 NORTH RIVER ST
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITOS
&
GINOS
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Dont Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
AFFORDABLE FEES
Divorce DUI
Adoption
BANKRUPTCY
debt relief agency
helping people file
bankruptcy
IRS Tax Disputes
Attorney
Marjorie Barlow
570-344-6543
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
120 Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
FOUND. Bulldog/
Rottweiler mix,
black and white.
Found on 01/9/12 in
S. Wilkes-Barre.
Good dog, looking
for good home.
570-235-0809
135 Legals/
Public Notices
NOTICE:
The Dallas School
District Board Of
Directors has
scheduled the fol-
lowing meeting:
General Purpose
Meeting
Wednesday,
January 25, 2012,
7:00 A.M.
Administration
Building
Conyngham
Avenue, Dallas, PA
By Order of The
Board
Nancy Merithew
Board Secretary
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
NOTICE
Berwick Area
School District is
accepting bids for
Spring Sports
Equipment. For
more information,
go to Bid Notices
under the Public
Notice Section on
our website:
www.berwicksd.org
150 Special Notices
ADOPT: Adoring
couple longs to
adopt a newborn.
Giving secure life &
endless love.
Kelly & Peter
1-866-627-2220
Expenses Paid
Want a new
idea for wed-
ding transporta-
tion? How
about a hot air
balloons, sleigh,
two person bike
or motorcycle?
bridezella.net
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
150 Special Notices
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly, at
814-237-7900
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
I like the 49ers at
home 27 - 21. I
like the Patriots
at home too...35
- 14. In the third
place game this
Wednesday..I will
take the Giants
over the Ravens
28 to 24.
RED GREEN LIVE: A
hilarious one-man
show. Tues., April
17th, 7 pm, F.M.
Kirby Center for
Performing Arts,
Wilkes-Barre. Call
570-826-1100, or
visit www.ticket-
master.com
www.redgreen.com
310 Attorney
Services
To place your
ad call...829-7130
330 Child Care
CHILD DAYCARE
available in my West
Pittston home M-F
available Jan 30th
Contact 239-0265
360 Instruction &
Training
EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical *Business
*Criminal Justice.
Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call 888-220-
3984 www.
CenturaOnline.com
380 Travel
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
ALL INCLUSIVE
SPECIAL!
8 Days/7nights
CANCUN from PHL
SENS DEL MAR RESORT
Departs
1/29, 2/4 & 2/5
ONLY
$799/pp
DOUBLE
+ taxes &
fees
FIRST COME,
FIRST SERVED!
Subject to Availability
300 Market St.,
Kingston, Pa 18704
570-288-TRiP
(288-8747)
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK `11 125CC
Auto, key start, with
reverse & remote
control. $950. OBO
570-674-2920
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,695 takes it
away.
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
YAMAHA `07 RHINO
450. Green, 6 ft.
snow plow, winch,
mud bottommounts,
moose utility push
tube, windshield,
hard top, gauges,
side mirrors, doors,
80 hours run time.
Like new. $7,000.
570-477-2342
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD `95 F150
4x4. 6 cylinder.
Automatic. 8 ft.
modified flat bed.
90k miles. Runs
great. $4,900
(570) 675-5046
Call after 6:00 p.m.
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 00 ACCENT
4 cylinder. 5
speed. Sharp
economy car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
409 Autos under
$5000
LEOS AUTO SALES
92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
97 FORD EXPLORER
SP0RT
2 door. 6 cylinder.
Auto. 4x4.
$1,750
95 CHEVY BLAZER
2 door. 6 cylinder.
Auto. 112K 4x4.
New tires.
$2,150
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
PONTIAC 00 GRAND
AM
White. 4 door. 4
cylinder. Auto.
AM/FM/CD. 155,000
miles. Extra snow
tires on rims. New
brake and inspec-
tion. Runs very
good! $2,500
570-466-7427
SUZUKI 06
SWIFT RENO
4 cylinder. Automat-
ic. 4 door. $4,800
(570) 709-5677
(570) 819-3140
WE BUY CARS
Highest
prices paid
for good cars
Eastern Auto
570-779-9999
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `06 TL
4 Door 3.2 VTEC 6
Cylinder engine
Auto with slapstick.
Navigation system.
57k miles. Black
with Camel Leather
interior. Heated
Seats. Sun Roof,
Excellent condition.
Satellite Radio, Fully
loaded. $18,000.
570-814-2501
ACURA `06 TL
White Diamond
80K original miles,
1 Owner, Garage
Kept, Camel Lea-
ther Interior, 3.2L /
6 Cylinder, 5-Speed
Automatic,
Front/Rear & Side
Airbags, ABS Nav-
igation System, 8-
Speaker Surround
System, DVD /CD
/AM/FM/ Cass-
ette, XM Satellite
Radio, Power &
Heated Front Seats,
Power Door Locks
& Windows, Power
Moonroof, 4 Snow
Tires Included!....
And Much, Much,
More!
Car runs and looks
beautiful
$16,500 Firm
Call 239-8461
AUDI `96 QUATTRO
A6 station wagon.
143k miles. 3rd row
seating. $2,800 or
best offer. Call
570-861-0202
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $8,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $11,500
OBO. 570-466-2630
C&L AUTO MOTORS
INC
804 S. Church St.,
Rt 309 S
570-436-5336
5 5 5 5 5 5
VW 04 Jetta
GLI 6 speed
$12,900
Land Rover 03
Discovery 4x4
$7,999
Ford 02 Tarus
SW $2,995
Jeep 00
Cherokee
4 door. 4x4.
$3,995
Dodge 00
Grand Caravan
$3,495
Pontiac 98
Grand Am G
2 door $2,495
Cadillac 98
Sedan DeVille
$3,499
Chevy 92
Caprice low
miles $1,999
CADILLAC 06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 55,000 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$16,500
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET 06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVY `97 ASTROVAN
Beautiful, 4 door.
Power steering &
brakes. 8 cylinder.
Excellent condition.
$3,000. Negotiable.
570-762-3504
CHEVY 08 IMPALA LTZ
Metallic gray, sun-
roof, leather, Bose
Satellite with CD
radio, heated seats,
traction control, fully
loaded. Remote
Start. 50k miles.
$16,995 or trade.
(570) 639-5329
CHEVY`10 CAMARO
SS2. Fully load, V8,
jewel red with white
stripes on hood &
trunk, list price is
$34,500, Selling for
$29,900. Call
570-406-1974
CHRYSLER `06 300
4 door sedan in per-
fect condition. Full
service records. All
luxury options and
features. 25.5 MPG.
$12,800. Call
570-371-1615
DODGE `02
DURANGO SLT
All power, 4.7, all
leather, 7 passen-
ger, running boards,
80,000 miles, CD
player, new tires.
$6,500.
570-877-9896
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO
CONVERTIBLE Sprint
blue/black, tan
leather, auto, 7
speed, turbo, 330
HP, Navigation,
AWD
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING
4 door, alloys,
seafoam blue.
08 PONTIAC GRAND
PRIX SE, blue,
auto V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
07 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, navy blue,
auto, alloys
07 CHRYSLER 300
LTD, AWD, silver,
grey leather
06 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER, mint
green, V6, alloys
06 NISSAN MAXIMA SE
silver, V6, sunroof
06 DODGE STRATUS
SXT, red
05 CHRYSLER 300C
TOURING, black,
gray, leather
05 DODGE NEON SXT,
red, 4 cyl, auto
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
burgundy, tan
leather, sunroof
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
MAXX, white, grey
leather, sunroof
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL,
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 SAAB 9-3, silver,
auto, sunroof
03 VW JETTA GLS,
black, auto,
sunroof
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
02 MUSTANG GT, V8,
green, black
leather, 5 speed
01 VW JETTA GLS,
green, auto, 4 cyl
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
00 PLYMOUTH NEON
purple, 4 door,
auto
98 MAZDA MILLENIA
green
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS, black
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 JEEP COMPASS
SPORT, silver, 4
cyl, auto, 4x4
08 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, white,
5.7 Hemi, 4 door,
4x4
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
black, black
leather, 3rd seat,
navigation, 4x4
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN
LTD, silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
07 DODGE DURANGO
SLT, blue, 3rd seat
4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT, blue
grey leather, 7
pax mini van
06 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS,
AWD, blue auto, V6
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4 dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
05 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT,
blue, auto, 4x4
truck
05 FORD F150 XLT,
extra cab, truck,
black, V8, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT, blue, grey
leather, 4x4
05 BUICK RANIER CXL
gold, tan, leather,
sunroof (AWD)
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS, burgundy,
auto (AWD)
04 FORD FREESTAR,
blue, 4 door, 7
passenger mini
van
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, sil-
ver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, 4x4
black, black
leather, 3rd seat,
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT, 4
door, green, tan,
leather, 4x4
03 GMC SAFARI, 7
passenger mini
van, gray (AWD)
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
pax mini van
02 CHEVY 2500 HD
reg. cab. pickup
truck, green,
auto, 4x4
01 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT XLT, gold,
sunroof, 2 door,
4x4
01 F150 SUPERCREW
XLT, green, 4 door,
V8, 4x4 truck
00 GMC SIERRA SLE,
extra cab, pewter
silver, V8, 4x4,
truck
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
98 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SE, silver, V6, 4x4
96 CHEVY BLAZER,
black 4x4
89 CHEVY 1500,
4X4 TRUCK
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
CHRYSLER 04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $5900.
570-991-5558
412 Autos for Sale
10 Dodge Cara-
van SXT 32K. Sil-
ver-Black. Power
slides. Factory war-
ranty. $16,999
09 Jeep Libery
Limited Power sun-
roof. Only 18K. Fac-
tory Warranty.
$19,599
09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$11,899
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS Only 18K! One
Owner - Estate
Sale. Factory War-
ranty. $11,999
08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42k, 5 speed, AWD.
Factory warranty.
$12,999
08 CHEVY
SILVERADO 1500
4x4, Regular Cab,
63K, Factory War-
ranty $12,999
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 4 door, only
37K! 5 Yr. 100K fac-
tory warranty
$11,499
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 60k. Factory
warranty. $9,499
05 HONDA CRV EX
One owner, just
traded, 65K.
$12,799
05 Suzuki
Verona LX Auto.
64K. Factory war-
ranty. $5,199
01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,699
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
FORD `02 FOCUS
Gold sedan, AM/FM
stereo, A/C, very
good condition.
79,000 miles.
$3,500
570-655-3137
or
570-825-1869
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
LEXUS `01 ES 300
80,000 miles,
excellent condi-
tion, all options.
Recently serv-
iced. New tires.
$9,300.
570-388-6669
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA `09 CIVIC LX-S
Excellent condition
inside & out. Garage
kept. Regularly
serviced by dealer,
records available.
Option include alloy
wheels, decklid
spoiler, sport seats,
interior accent light-
ing (blue), Nose
mask and custom
cut floor mats. Dark
grey with black inte-
rior. 56K highway
miles. REDUCED!
$13,300. Call
570-709-4695
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
HYUNDAI 06
ELANTRA
Tan, 4 door,
clean title, 4
cylinder, auto,
115k miles.
Power windows,
& keyless entry,
CD player,
cruise, central
console heated
power mirrors.
$3900
570-991-5558
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
NISSAN `08 XTERRA
Grey, Mint condition.
35K miles. New, all-
season tires. Sirius
radio. 2 sets of
mats, including
cargo mats.
$18,400. Call
570-822-3494 or
570-498-0977
VOLKSWAGEN 00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
Travel
380
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNNL L NNNL N YONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLE LLE LEE LE LE LLE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 3G
229 M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
w w w.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes .
As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f O c t2 0 11. All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 1/3 1/12 .

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
S C AN HERE
FO R S ERVIC E
S PEC IAL S
NO W TA KING
R ESER VA TIO NS FO R
TH E A LL NEW A LL
ELEC TR IC
NISSA N LEA F
SENSATIO NAL SAVING S O N ALL 2012S!
2012
HAS ARRIVED !
2012 NISSAN VERSA 1.8S HATCHBACK 2012 NISSAN VERSA 1.8S HATCHBACK
STK#N21327
M O DEL# 11412
M SRP $17,190
B U Y FO R
$
15,995
*
4 Cyl, Au to , A/ C, Plu s
Pkg, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts ,
Ca rgo Orga n izer,
M u ch M o re!
W / $50 0 N M AC AP R R EB ATE
AN D GET 1.9% FO R 60 M O N TH S
O R
$
169
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$169 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $9282.60; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity.
Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50
3 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS P R IC E
2012 NISSAN SENTRA 2.0SL 2012 NISSAN SENTRA 2.0SL
STK#N20792
M O DEL# 12312
M SRP $22,860
B U Y FO R
$
18 ,995
*
4 Cyl, CVT , Na viga tio n ,
Au d io Pkg, L ea ther,
S p cl Va lu e Pkg, F lo o r
M a ts , S p la s h Gu a rd s
a n d M u ch M o re!
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAS H
O R
$
199
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $13,030.20; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity.
Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50
5 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS P R IC E
LEA TH ER ,
M O O NR O O F &
NA VIG A TIO N
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S SEDAN 2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S SEDAN
STK#N20558
M O DEL# 13112
M SRP $23,820
B U Y FO R
$
19,0 56
*
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts &
S p la s h Gu a rd s
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$750 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
O R
$
199
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $12,862.80; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity.
Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $825 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
O VER 30
A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS P R IC E
20%
O FF!
TH ES E D EALS ARE H O T!
2011 NISSAN MAXIMA SV SPORT SDN 2011 NISSAN MAXIMA SV SPORT SDN
STK#N20831
M O DEL# 16211
M SRP $37,825
B U Y FO R
$
30 ,8 25
*
V6, CVT , S p o rtPkg,
L ea ther, M o o n ro o f,
Bo s e, Allo ys , F lo o r
M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s ,
M u ch M o re!
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
O R
$
319
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$319 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $18,156; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity.
Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $2300 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
LA ST 2011
M A XIM A
SA VE $7000
O FF M SR P !
2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD 2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD
STK#N20706
M O DEL# 23211
M SRP $32,130
B U Y FO R
$
25,995
*
V6, AW D, CVT , PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts , S p la s h
Gu a rd s , & M u ch
M o re!
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAS H
O R
$
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$299 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $14,779.80; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity.
Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1700 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
3 A T TH IS P R IC E!
LA ST O NES!
2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER SV 4X4 2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER SV 4X4
STK#N21000
M O DEL# 25211
M SRP $34,930
B U Y FO R
$
28 ,930
*
V6, Au to , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
Allo ys , F lo o rM a ts &
T ru n k M a t
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R
$
329
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$199 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $14,670.60; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity.
Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $3300 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed .
SA VE $6000 O R
M O R E O N A LL 2011
P A TH FINDER S!
2011 NISSAN CUBE 1.8SL 2011 NISSAN CUBE 1.8SL
STK#N21437
M O DEL# 21211
M SRP $19,525
B U Y FO R
$
17,995
*
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , In t. Des ign ,
F lo o rM a ts
& S p la s h Gu a rd s t
*S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .
2011 NISSAN MURANO CROSS-CABRIOLET 2011 NISSAN MURANO CROSS-CABRIOLET
STK#N20931
M O DEL# 27011
M SRP $48,020
B U Y FO R
$
39,995
*
V-6, CVT , All W heel
Drive, Na viga tio n ,
F u ll Po w erT o p ,
L ea ther, Bo s e
S o u n d , F lo o rM a ts
& S p la s h Gu a rd s
*S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .
W / $30 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O NLY
3 2011 C U B ES LEFT!!
SIM ILA R SA VING S
O N A LL C U B ES
O NLY
3 C R O SS C A B S
A VA ILA B LE! B LA C K,
P LA TINU M ,
P EA R L W H ITE!
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
FOR WEEKLY SPECIALS AND GIVEAWAYS! SSPECCIALS AND GGIVEAWAYSS! FFOOR WEEKLLYY SP
7
3
4
0
3
6
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
FREE INSPECTION &
OIL CHANGE FOR A YEAR
**
$
6,990
*
2002 Hyundai
Elantra
$
5,590
*
4 Cyl., 88K, Loaded
2000 Ford
Ranger 4x4
$
7,990
*
73K, Great Condition
2000 Ford Taurus
$
2,990
*
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags. **See dealer for details.
2003 Kia Spectra
$
5,990
*
2000 GMC
Jimmy 4x4
2003 Ford
Taurus
$
4,990
*
6 Cyl., Station Wagon,
151K, Runs Great
4 Cyl., 73K, Extra Clean! 6 Cyl., 98K
88K, Like New
412 Autos for Sale
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
OLDSMOBILE `97
CUTLASS SUPREME
Museum kept, never
driven, last Cutlass
off the GM line. Crim-
son red with black
leather interior. Every
available option in-
cluding sunroof. Per-
fect condition. 300
original miles.
$21,900 or best offer.
Call 570-650-0278
PONTIAC `04 VIBE
White. New manual
transmission &
clutch. Front wheel
drive. 165k highway
miles. Great on gas.
Good condition,
runs well. $3,000 or
best offer
570-331-4777
412 Autos for Sale
MARZAK MOTORS
601 Green Ridge St, Scranton
9 9 9 9 9 9 9
FORD 03 WIND-
STAR, green exteri-
or, tan cloth interior,
power options,
front/rear A/C-heat
$3,995
DODGE 00
DURANGO,
black/tan, 4 door,
4x4, 3rd seat,
loaded, 146k miles
$3,995
SAAB 97 900
4 door
$1,995
CHEVY 90 COR-
SICA, 66K miles, 4
door
$1,900
9 9 9 9 9 9 9
570-955-5792
Line up a place to live
in classified!
PORSCHE `85 944
Low mileage,
110,000 miles, 5
speed, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
windows, power
mirrors, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $8,000.
(570) 817-1803
412 Autos for Sale
SUZUKI 10 SX4
4x4 6,000 miles.
$14,000.
08 Ford F250, 4x4
4,000 miles, 4 door,
8 foot bed/with or
without plow.
$45,000.
All showroom new!
570-826-0200 or
570-868-3968
TOM DRIEBE
AUTO SALES
570-350-4541
9 S. Keyser Ave
Taylor, PA 18517
Where Taylor meets
Old Forge
02 Dodge 1500
RAM Conversion
Van Fully equipped.
See the USA in this
beauty. 90K.
Only $6,775
04 Chevy Tahoe
This beauty is fully
equipped & almost
brand new.
Reduced $17,850
99 Buick Century
Custom 4 door. Air.
Auto. New inspec-
tion. Gold in color.
Only $2,375
01 Chevy Impala
4 door. V6. Air. Auto.
Alloys. Like new.
Bright Red. $4,675
00 Ford Tarus SE
4 door. Air. Auto.
Alloys. Just traded.
Now $3,975
00 Pontiac Grand
Pre V6. Auto. Air.
Alloys. Moonroof.
Local Trade.
Just $5,875
02 Chrysler
Sebring LXI 2
door. V6. Auto. Air.
Alloys. A true sports
car! 60K.
Now $5,775
02 Buick Century
Custom 4 door. V6.
Auto. Air. Leather.
70K. Like New.
$5,775
01 Pontiac Mon-
tana Van V6. Auto.
Air. Alloys. 3rd row
seating. Nice!
$3,975
95 Jeep Grand
Cherokee 6 Cylin-
der. Auto. Air. Alloys.
4WD. New Inspec-
tion. Only $3,475
95 Chevy Blazer
V6. Auto. Air. Alloys.
4WD. New inspec-
tion. Only $2,875
94 Oldsmobile
Royale 88 4 door.
V6. Auto. Air. Alloys.
60K. Inspected.
$3,475
SPECIALIZING IN CARS
UNDER $5,000
TOYOTA 04 CELICA
GT
112K miles. Blue, 5
speed. Air, power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car
drives and has
current PA inspec-
tion. Slight rust on
corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
VOLVO `95 940
STATIONWAGON
Looks and runs like
new. Sun roof, CD
loader, all power.
98,000 miles,
$2,950, OBO
570-702-6023
To place your
ad call...829-7130
VOLVO 850 95
WAGON
Runs good, air,
automatic, fair
shape. $1,800.
347-693-4156
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `77 COUPE
70,000 original
miles. Leather inte-
rior. Excellent condi-
tion. $2,500. Call
570-282-4272 or
570-877-2385
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD 76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES 76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
FORD 28 MODEL A
Sport Coupe.
Rumble Seat.
Professionally
Restored. Ford Blue
with tan canvas
top. $15,225
570-339-1552
after 5:00pm
HOURS: Monday Thru Thursday 8:00am - 7:00pm
Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm
1-888-307-7077
*In stock vehicles only. Prices plus tax & Tags, All rebates applied. See Salesperson for Details. Financing must be approved thru ally bank. See dealer for details.
1-888-307-7077
BAD CREDIT
NO CREDIT
W
e
C
a
n
H
e
l
p
T
O
L
L
F
R
E
E
!
1-855-313-LOAN
A New Way To
Buy Your Next Car
SAFE, SIMPLE, SECURE
www.ApproveMyCredit.com
USED CARS
NEW CARS
2010 DODGE
CHARGER SXTS
Choose From 3
From
$16,995
All vehicles plus tax & tags. All rebates applied. Customers must qualify for rebates. See salesperson for details. Sale ends 1/19/12.
Customer must nance thru Ally Bank with approved credit to get Low Finance Rates.
NEW 2011 BUICK ENCLAVE
CXL
$
40,480
All Wheel Drive,
Leather, Moonroof,
Chrome Wheels
MSRP $44,385
-$3,905
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
0%
Financing
Available
NEW 2012 GMC CANYON
REG CAB 4X4
$
21,462
W/T Package, Auto,
Air, Tilt & Cruise
MSRP $23,115
-$1,653
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
1.9%
Financing
Available
NEW 2012 GMC CANYON
CREW CAB 4X4
$
28,251
SLE Package,
Chrome Wheels,
Z-71, Off Road Pkg
MSRP $31,025
-$2,774
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
1.9%
Financing
Available
NEW 2011 GMC SIERRA
1500 EXT CAB 4X4
$
33,919
SLT Pkg, Z-71,
Leather,
Convenience Pkg
MSRP $41,385
-$7,466
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
0%
Financing
Available
NEW 2011 GMC ACADIA
SLT
$
41,900
All Wheel Drive,
Moonroof,
Tow Package
MSRP $45,995
-$4,095
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
DEMO
SAVE
NEW 2012 GMC ACADIA
DENALI
$
44,078
All Wheel Drive,
White Diamond
Beauty
MSRP $47,485
-$3,407
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
0%
Financing
Available
NEW 2012 BUICK
LACROSSE
$
28,897
V6 Engine,
Convenience
Group
MSRP $31,290
-$2,393
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
0%
Financing
Available
NEW 2012 GMC TERRAIN
$
26,967
All Wheel Drive,
SLE-One Package
MSRP $28,040
-$1,073
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
2.9%
Financing
Available
NEW 2011 GMC YUKON
DENALI AWD
$
52,995
Sun & Entertainment
Pkg, Side Blind
Zone Alert
MSRP $60,230
-$7,235
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
0%
Financing
Available
NEW 2012 BUICK VERANO
$
23,233
White Diamond
Beauty, 1SD Pkg
MSRP $23,965
-$732
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
3.9%
Financing
Available
NEW 2012 BUICK ENCLAVE
$
37,709
All Wheel Drive,
Convenience
Group
MSRP $40,825
-$3,116
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
0%
Financing
Available
NEW 2012 GMC SIERRA
2500 HD REG CAB 4X4
$
29,366
Power Locks,
Tow Pkg,
Skid Plate Pkg
MSRP $34,085
-$4,719
Sale
Price
Discount
& Rebate
3.9%
Financing
Available
2010 KIA RIO
$
11,900
Stk# 1684
2003 GMC YUKON
DENALI
$
11,995
Must See Local Trade, One Owner
2010 CHEVY AVEO SDNS
Starting @
$
12,995
Choose From 4, Tons of Warranty
2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING
$
14,995
Stk# 1811, Choose From 2
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY
$
14,900
Stk# 1859
2008 BUICK LUCERNE
$
14,995
Local Trade, Low Miles
2010 CHEVY HHR
$
13,995
Choose From 2, LT Package, Nice Miles!
2010 FORD FOCUS SDNS
$
13,995
Choose From 2, SE Package
2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT
SDN
$
11,995
Balance of Warranty
2006 CHRYSLER
PACIFICA TOURING
$
11,995
Local One Owner, All Wheel Drive
2010 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR AWD
$
18,900
Stk# 1734
2009 VW ROUTAN SE
$
18,995
7 Passenger, Rear DVD, 34K Miles, Leather
2008 KIA SEDONA LX
$
17,995
7 Passenger, Rear DVD, Local Trade
2001 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
$
6,995
Only 63K Miles, Local Trade
From
$
13,995
2010 DODGE AVENGER
SXT SDNS
Choose From 4, All The Toys
2006 CHRYSLER SEBRING
LX
$
6,995
Local One Owner, Extra Clean
2010 VW BEETLE CPE
$
13,995
Just 33K Miles
2000 VW BEETLE
$
6,995
Low Miles, Moonroof
2006 MAZDA 6 SDN
$
11,995
Black Beauty, 52K Miles
2010 CHRYSLER 300
$
16,900
Stk# 1797
2010 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS
$
16,900
Stk# 1542
2010 HONDA CIVIC
$
16,900
Stk# 1537
2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONVERTIBLE
$
16,900
Stk# 1782
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
$
15,900
Stk# 1688
2010 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
REG CAB 1500 4X4
$
24,900
2011 GMC TERRAIN AWD
$
24,900
Stk# 1857
2010 FORD EXPLORER
AWD
$
22,900
Stk# 1650
2010 JEEP WRANGLER
4DR
$
22,900
Stk# 1794
2011 FORD ESCAPE AWD
$
22,900
Stk# 1791
2010 DODGE JOURNEY
RT4
AWD
$
22,900
Stk# 1783
2011 BUICK REGAL
$
22,900
Stk# 1801
2010 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE 4X4
$
23,900
Adventure Pkg, Heated Leather Seats,
25K Miles
2010 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 4X4 EXT CAB
$
23,900
Stk# 1535
2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE
AWD
$
23,900
Stk# 1731
2008 BUICK ENCLAVE
CXL
$
21,995
All Wheel Drive, Local Trade
2011 HYUNDAI TUCSON
AWD
$
21,900
Stk# 1836
2011 DODGE NITRO
AWD
$
18,900
Stk# 1732
2011 NISSAN ROGUE
AWD
$
21,900
Stk# 1907, 12K Miles, Silver Beauty
2010 CHEVY EXPRESS 2500
CARGO
$
18,900
Stk# 1597
2009 CHEVY EQUINOX LS
$
20,900
AWD, Local Low Mileage Trade
2010 JEEP COMMANDER
AWD
$
21,900
Stk# 1694
2011 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
$
19,995
White Beauty Just 19K Miles
2011 DODGE
CHALLENGER SE
$
23,995
15K Miles, Black Beauty
2009 CADILLAC CTS
$
25,900
Stk# 1431
2010 MERCEDES 300C
AWD
$
29,900
Stk# 1833
2011 CHEVY SUBURBAN
AWD
$
34,900
Stk# 1649
2010 CHEVY TAHOE AWD
$
34,900
Stk# 1681
2011 GMC ACADIA AWD
$
33,900
Stk# 1858
2011 BUICK
ENCLAVE CXL
$
34,995
All Wheel Drive, 19K Miles
2010 FORD TAURUS
LIMITED
$
23,900
Stk# 1521
2011 CHEVY CAMARO LT
$
23,995
Power Galore, Tons of Warranty
2011 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB
4X4
$
23,995
SLT Equipment, Miles As LowAs 14K, Choose From 3
Starting
At
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 5G
(570) 341 -1 400 1 -800-822-21 1 0 (570) 341 -1 400 1 -800-822-21 1 0 (570) 341 -1 400 1 -800-822-21 1 0
M onda y - T hu rs da y 9-8:00 F rida y 9-5 & S a tu rda y 9-3:30 M onda y - T hu rs da y 9-8:00 F rida y 9-5 & S a tu rda y 9-3:30
1 1 1 0 W Y O M I N G A V E . S C R A N T O N , PA 1 8509 1 1 1 0 W Y O M I N G A V E . S C R A N T O N , PA 1 8509
w w w .m a ttbu rnehonda .com
M ATT B U R N E H O N D A PR E -O W N E D CE N TE R M ATT B U R N E H O N D A PR E -O W N E D CE N TE R
SH OP AT W W W .M ATTBURNE H OND A.COM SH OP AT W W W .M ATTBURNE H OND A.COM CAL L :1-800-NE XTH OND A CAL L :1-800-NE XTH OND A
M ATT BURNE H O NDA
M ATT BURNE H O NDA M ATT BURNE H O NDA
1110 WYOMINGAVE. SCRANTON 1-800-NEXT-HONDA
www.MattBurneHonda.com
*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT
COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 1/ 31/ 2012.
G AS
M ILEAG E
17CITY/ 24HW Y
250-hp 24-V alve SO HC i-V TEC 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission 8 Passenger
Seating V ariable Torque M anagem ent 4-W heelDrive System (V TM -4 )
V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA ) w ith Traction C ontrol Pow er W Indow s/Locks/
M irrors Front and Rear A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System 229-W att
A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 7 Speakers including Subw oofer Rem ote Entry
A BS Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SRS) Front Side A irbags
w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS)
2012 Hon d a
A CCORD L X
M odel#C P2f3C EW 177-hp 16-V alve DO HC i-V TEC Engine 5-Speed
A utom atic Transm ission Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors Rem ote Entry
C ruise C ontrol A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System 160-W att A M /
FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA )
w ith Traction C ontrol A BS Sual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags
(SRS) Dual-C ham ber Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant
Position Detection System (O PDS) Side C urtain A irbags
G AS
M ILEAG E
22CITY/ 30HW Y
2012 Hon d a
CR-V E X
M odelRM 4H5C JW 185-hp 2.4-Liter,16-V alve SO HC i-V TEC 4-C ylinder Engine
RealTim e A W D w ith Intelligent C ontrolSystem V ehicle Stability A ssist (V SA ) w ith Traction C ontrol
A utom atic Transm ission C ruise C ontrol A /C O ne-Touch Pow er M oonroof w ith Tilt Feature
Rem ote Entry System Bluetooth HandsFreeLink M ulti-angle rearview cam era w ith guidelines
160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers Bluetooth Stream ing A udio Pandora Internet
Radio com patibility SM S Text M essage Function USB A udio Interface A nti-Lock Braking System (A BS)
Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SRS) Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant
Position Detection System (O PDS) Side C urtain A irbags w ith Rollover Sensor
M odel#FB2F5C EW 140-hp 16-V alve SO HC i-V TEC 5-Speed A utom atic
Transm ission A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System Pow er W indow s/
Locks/M irrors C ruise C ontrol Rem ote Entry 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio
System w ith 4 Speakers A BS Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front
A irbags (SRS) Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position
Detection System (O PDS) Side C urtain A irbags
G AS
M ILEAG E
28CITY/ 39HW Y
$0DO W N
****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $28,470.00
2012 Hon d a
P IL OT L X
$
319/M O.****
$
319/M O.****
$
319/M O.****
D isclosure:1.9% - 36 m os,2.9% - 60 m osthru A .H .F.C .W -A -C on C ertified A ccords.C ertified H ondashave
1yr - 12k B asic W arranty.B alance of7yr - 100K P ow ertrain W arranty from in-service date.
06 PILO T EXL R ed,71K.......................................NO W $17,950
09 PILO T EXL S ilver,35K.....................................NO W $26,950
09 PILO T TO URING NA V I N avy,47K.........NO W $27,950
PIL OT 4W D
H O N D A S
08 ELEM ENT LX S ilver,56K...............................NO W $15,950
10 ELEM ENT EX Orange,10K............................NO W $21,950
EL EM EN T 4W D
10 INSIG HT EX B lue,21K M iles...........................NO W $16,950
10 INSIG HT EX G ray,22K...................................NO W $18,500
IN S IGHT HYBRID
07 C RV EX 45K......................................................NO W $17,950
07 C RV EX S ilver,49K.............................................NO W $17,950
08 C RV EX B lack,43K.............................................NO W $18,750
09 C RV LX G reen,34K............................................NO W $18,950
07 C RV EXLLt.B lue,38K.......................................NO W $19,750
10 C RV LX B lack,22K.............................................NO W $20,500
07 C RV EXLS ilver,18K..........................................NO W $20,950
09 C RV EXLB lack,38K..........................................NO W $21,500
10 C RV EXLB lack,30K..........................................NO W $24,500
10 C RV EXLB lue,23K...........................................NO W $24,950
10 C RV EXLS ilver,21K..........................................NO W $24,950
10 C RV EXL W hite,21K.........................................NO W $24,950
11 C RV EXLR ed,14K............................................NO W $26,950
CRV 4W D
ACCORDS
$
219/M O.**
$
219/M O.**
$
219/M O.**
$0DO W N
**LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $13 ,3 11.00
2.9%
60 m os
1.9%
36 m os
10 O DY SSEY EXLG ray,15K...............................NO W $29,500
10 O DY SSEY TO URING N avi,R .D V D ,G ray,26K NO W $32,250
ODYS S EY
CIV IC
08 C IV IC LX C PE G ray,41K,5 S peed.....................NO W $13,500
09 C IV IC LX SDN Titanium ,36K..........................NO W $14,950
08 C IV IC EX SDN W hite,41K,5 S peed...................NO W $15,250
08 C IV IC LX SDN G old,12K...............................NO W $14,950
09 C IV IC LX C PE N avy,30K................................NO W $15,950
10 C IV IC LX SDN S ilver,17K.............................NO W $15,950
10 C IV IC LXS SDN S ilver,16K...........................NO W $16,500
09 C IV IC EX SDN B lue,22K................................NO W $16,950
G AS
M ILEAG E
23CITY/ 34HW Y
***LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S
DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $12,043 .50
$
199/M O.***
$
199/M O.***
$
199/M O.***
$0DO W N
09 FIT SPO RT R ed,15K......................................NO W $15,750
FIT
0.9% for24-36 m on ths a n d 1.9%
for37 to 60 m on th on a ll n e w
2012 A c c ord , Civic (e xc lud e s
Hyb rid s ), Cros s tour, Fit, Od ys s e y,
P ilot, a n d Rid ge lin e m od e ls
2012 Hon d a
CIV IC L X
09A C C O RD LXP SDN B urgandy,26K..............................NO W $16,950
10A C C O RD LX SDN W hite,19K................................NO W $17,750
09A C C O RD EX SDN G reen,21K...............................NO W $18,950
09A C C O RD EX SDN B lack,19K................................NO W $18,950
09A C C O RD EXLB lack,27K...........................................NO W $19,950
08A C C O RD LXP SDN G ray,29K..............................NO W $15,950
08A C C O RD LXP SDN G ray,30K..............................NO W $15,950
07A C C O RD EXLSDN N avy,23K..............................NO W $16,250
08A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,42K................................NO W $16,500
09A C C O RD LX SDN R ed,13K..................................NO W $16,950
IN S TO CK!
09 HY UNDA I
SO NA TA G LS SDN
B row n,40K M iles
Now $13,500
04 HY UNDA IXG
350 SDN
S ilver,97K M iles
Now $7,500
06 HO NDA
C IV IC LX SDN
S ilver,105K M iles
A s Traded $10,500
08 HY UNDA I
V ERA C RUZ A W D
B lack,29K M iles
Now $22,500
02 M A ZDA
M ILLENIA SE SDN
B lack,79K M iles
Now $6,950
08 DO DG E G RA ND
C A RA V A N SXT
W hite,79K M iles
Now $11,950
08 TO Y O TA TA C O M A
C LUB C A B TRD 4X4
N avy,46K M iles,W as$26,500
Now $22,500
08 NISSA N
A LTIM A S SDN
W hite,13K M iles,W as$18,950
Now $15,950
S ilver,57K M iles
Now $16,950
04 DO DG E RA M 2500
Q UA D C A B SLT 4X4
05 TO Y O TA
C A M RY LE SDN
S ilver,67K M iles
Now $11,500
G reen,50K M iles
Now $15,950
06 V O LV O S60T
A W D SDN
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPO RT 4W D
B lack,20K M iles
Now $17,250
05 FO RD EXPLO RER
BA UER 4X4
W hite,72K,W as$14,500
Now $11,250
07 JEEP W RA NG LER
X 4DR 4W D
G reen,60K M iles
Now $19,500
09 TO Y O TA
M A TRIX S A W D
R ed,56K M iles
Now $15,950
10 DO DG E NITRO
SE 4W D
B lue,27K M iles
Now $18,950
08 NISSA N
SENTRA SDN
G ray,91K M iles
Now $9,950
09 HY UNDA ISO NA TA
G LS SDN V 6
S ilver,45K M iles
Now $12,500
06 C HEV Y C O LO RA DO
XC A B 4X4
B lack,47K M iles
Now $16,950
03 HO NDA C IV IC
LX SDN
S ilver,50K M iles
Now $9,250
R ed,99K M iles
Now $6,950
01 NISSA N A LTIM A
G XE SDN
07 SUBA RU
IM PREZA A W D
S ilver,39K,W as$17,950
Now $15,750
04 HO NDA C RV
4W D
EX B lack,103K $10,950
LX S ilver,98K $9,950
07 M A ZDA C X-7
TO URING A W D
B lack,58K M iles
Now $17,350
A CCO R D S
1
.9%
1
.9%
36 M O S. 36 M O S. 2
.9%
2
.9%
60 M O S. 60 M O S.
B R R R !!!
ITS CO L D O U TSID E ,
B U T W E H A VE H O T H O T
D E A L S H E R E
06 HO NDA
PILO T EX 4W D
B lack,71K M iles
Now $17,950
Y O UR
NIC E
TRA DE
HERE
EV ERY
V EHIC LE
HA S A
W A RRA NTY
W E
FINA NC E
PAGE 6G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD DECEMBER 31
Harrys U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 7G
750 Jewelry 750 Jewelry
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
JACKOS
Paying Top Cash Dollar for
Your Gold & Silver!
$1 Gold Coin paying $100 to $500 & up
$2.50 Gold Coin paying $600-$1,000 & up
$3 Gold Coin paying $500 to $1,000 & up
$5 Gold Coin paying $600 to $3,000 & up
$10 Gold Coin paying $1,200 to $2,200 & up
$20 Gold Coin paying $1,900 to $4,000 & up
Also paying top dollar for scrap gold & silver.
570-855-7197 570-328-3428
39 Prospect St Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 6pm
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
exterior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$1,300 or
best offer
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $28,000. Call
825-6272
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
All original
45,000 miles
350 Rocket
engine
Fender skirts
Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
CHEVY 89 2500
SCOTTSDALE
Pickup Truck with
insulated refrigerat-
ed box, cooling unit.
5 speed, rebuilt 8
cylinder. $2,500.
Box only an option.
570-333-4827
FORD `90 TRUCK
17 box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
GMC 98 SIERRA 3500
4WD Stake Side,
350 V8, Auto.
75,000 miles on
current engine. 12'
wood bed, body,
tires, interior good.
Excellent running
condition. New
generator, starter,
battery. Just tuned
and inspected.
$6,900.
Call 570-656-1080
439 Motorcycles
DAELIM 2006
150 CCs. 4,700
miles. 70 MPG.
New battery & tires.
$1,500; negotiable.
Call 570-288-1246
or 570-328-6897
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
NIGHTTRAIN
New rear tire. Very
good condition. 23K
miles. $8,500. Call
570-510-1429
HARLEY DAVIDSON 05
V-ROD VRSCA
Blue pearl,
excellent condition,
3,100 miles, factory
alarm with extras.
$10,500.
or best offer.
Tony 570-237-1631
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY
DAVIDSON 01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON
03 Dyna Wide Glide
Excellent condition -
garage kept! Gold-
en Anniversary - sil-
ver/black. New
Tires. Extras.
19,000 miles.
Must Sell!
$10,000.
570-639-2539
HARLEY DAVIDSON 80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
MOTO GUZZI `03
1,100 cc. 1,900
miles. Full dress.
Shaft driven. Garage
kept. Excellent condi-
tion. $6000. Health
Problems. Call
570-654-7863
POLARIS 00
VICTORY CRUISER
14,000 miles,
92 V-twin, 1507 cc,
extras $6000.
570-883-9047
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
SUNLINE SOLARIS `91
25 travel trailer A/C.
Bunk beds. New
fridge & hot water
heater. Excellent
condition. $3,900.
570-466-4995
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
06 CHEVY COLORADO
CREW CAB Z71
78K MILES.
NEWER 31-10-15
HANKOOK TIRES.
4WD, AUTO,
POWER WINDOWS
LOCKS. TRUCK
RUNS LIKE NEW.
5 CYLINDER
GREAT ON GAS
HAVE LEER CAP &
NERF BARS AND
BED LINER, CD,
AIR LIGHT BLUE
WITH BLUE
INTERIOR. $12,500
570-575-5087 OR
570-718-1834
CADILLAC `99
ESCALADE
97k miles. Black
with beige leather
interior. 22 rims.
Runs great. $8,500
Call 570-861-0202
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `08
EQUINOX LT
AWD. 92,000 miles.
V6. Silver. CD
changer. Power
locks. Keyless entry.
$12,000
(570) 814-0462
CHEVY `00 BLAZER
2 door. New brakes,
shocks & exhaust. 4
wheel drive. 92,561
miles. Asking
$3,200 or best offer
(570) 823-0881
CHEVY `99 SILVERADO
Auto. V6 Vortec.
Standard cab. 8
bed with liner. Dark
Blue. 98,400 miles.
$5,500 or best offer
570-823-8196
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 03
SILVERADO
4x4. Extra clean.
Local new truck
trade! $5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 05
SILVERADO
2WD. Extra cab.
Highway miles.
Like new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHEVY 99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 99
SILVERADO 4X4
Auto. V8. Bargain
price! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD `04 EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition
59,000 miles,
4 door, 3 row
seats, V6, all power
options, moon roof,
video screen
$12,999.
570-690-3995 or
570-287-0031
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 00 EXPLORER
XLT. CD. Power
seats. Extra
Clean! $3,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Very clean.
$10,750. Call
570-474-6028
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
JEEP `03 LIBERTY
SPORT. Rare. 5
speed. 23 MPG.
102K highway miles.
Silver with black
interior. Immaculate
condition, inside and
out. Garage kept.
No rust, mainte-
nance records
included. 4wd, all
power. $6,900 or
best offer, trades
will be considered.
Call 570-575-0518
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 03 LIBERTY
4x4. Sunroof. Like
new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP 03 WRANGLER X
6 cylinder. Auto.
4x4.
$10,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 04 LIBERTY
Auto. V6.
Black Beauty!
$6,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 98 CHEROKEE
SPORT
2 door. 4x4. 6
cylinder. Auto.
Like new! $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LEXUS `06 GX 470
Cypress Pearl with
ivory leather
interior. Like new
condition, garage
kept. All service
records. All options
including premium
audio package, rear
climate control,
adjustable suspen-
sion, towing pack-
age, rear spoiler,
Lexus bug guard.
52,000 miles.
$25,995
(570) 237-1082
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MAZDA 03 MPV VAN
V6. CD Player.
1 owner vehicle!!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
RANGE ROVER
07 SPORT
Supercharged
59,000 miles, fully
loaded. Impeccable
service record.
$36,000
570-283-1130
SUBARU `03 BAJA
Sport Utility 4 door
pickup. 68K. AWD. 4
cylinder. 2.5 Litre
engine. 165hp. Bed-
liner & cover. Pre-
mium Sound.
$10,700. Call
570-474-9321 or
570-690-4877
SUZUKI `03 XL-7
85K. 4x4. Auto.
Nice, clean interior.
Runs good. New
battery & brakes. All
power. CD. $6,800
570-762-8034
570-696-5444
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
TAX REFUND COMING?
INVEST IN
YOURSELF WITH
JAN PRO
Quote from current
Franchisee,
I started with a
small investment &
I have grown my
business over
600%. It definitely
changed my life and
I would recommend
Jan-Pro.
* Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
* Insurance &
Bonding
* Training &
Ongoing Support
* Low Start Up Costs
* Accounts available
throughout Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
WINDOW, $25.
570-779-1215
AIR CONDITIONERS:
5 For $150. Call
570-362-3626
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
COINS: Buffalo nick-
els, 1 roll from the
20s &30s. All have
dates, some mint
marks. $40.
570-262-0708
NORMAN ROCK-
WELL 13 cups, 6
plates, boxes for all.
$20. 570-472-6028
PRECIOUS
Moments figurines
26 with boxes. All
pieces for $100.
OBO.570-868-5048
SEWING MACHINE.
(1) Singer Vintage
factory with sewing
table $25. OBO. (1)
Singer touch &
sewing machine
with sewing table.
$20 OBO
570-824-7314
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
STAMP collecting
supplies, black
backed mounts,
individual stamp
sizes as well as
strips, retails over
$125 sell for $50.
Old stamp collecting
catalogues 1981 us
SPECIALIZED $15.
1981 us., un., bRIT.,
cOMMONWEALTH
415. 1983 us., Cana-
da, Gr. Britain &
Commonwealth, UN
$15. all excellent
condition. 3 for $40.
570-823-6035
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
CONVECTION OVEN
Ge Profile Stainless
30 built in oven.
Never used or
installed. $999.
570- 678-7075
DISHWASHER,
portable, Kenmore,
black with butcher
block top, $200.
570-333-4494
MICROWAVE. GE.
Countertop, white.
1.4 cf, 1100 watts.
Like new $35.
570-474-6028
WASHER & DRYER
$100.00
570-855-5803
WASHER/DRYER
Kenmore Elite.
White. FRONT
LOAD. Like new.
Electric dryer.
Storage drawer
on bottom
of each.
$800 for both
570-261-5120
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
BABY ITEMS: Baby
crib/toddler bed,
white no mattress
$30. Snap & go $25,
Travel System with
2 bases great con-
dition $70.
570-693-3028
BABY WALKER
Baby walker with
lights & music, hard-
ly used $25.
570-735-6527.
CHILD CARRIER
Kelty Kids FC 3.0
frame child carrier
like new! $100.
570-333-0470
716 Building
Materials
KITCHEN CABINETS
10 with counter top
& sink $400. 30
bath room cabinet
with sink $50.
570-301-8200
VANITY TOP solid
surface 5 X 22, &
undermount china
sink. New. Bought
wrong size. $375.
call 570 288-9843
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
MEMORIAL SHRINE
LOTS FOR SALE
6 lots available at
Memorial Shrine
Cemetery. $2,400.
Call 717-774-1520
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY
724 Cellular Phones
APPLE IPHONE 4 S
Brand new with
64GB Memory and
Apple iPad 2, 64GB
with wifi-3g this are
factory unlocked
with Complete
accessories (Well
packed & sealed in
original company
box) and can be
used with any net-
work provider of
your choice Email:
order@tradebitlimit-
ed.com or skype:
wg.fields for more
information.
726 Clothing
CLOTHING,
womens size 14. 3
pair slacks & 2
skirts, $10. Large, 10
tops and 1 skirt,
$20. Like new.
570-474-6028
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
COAT mens all-
weather with zip-
out lining. New. Tan.
Size 44. $65.
570-654-2657
FUR COAT, long ma
made approximate
size 14, beautiful,
must see asking
$60. 570-779-1977
JACKETS new,
never worn , with
tags & bag, Dennis
Basso black faux fur
pelts size 2x-3x
$75. Denim embroi-
dered light blue
jacket, new, never
worn size 2x-3x
$35. 570-779-1215
JEANS mens LL
Bean Denim - flan-
nel lined, never
worn 38wx30l $25.
570-735-5274
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER. Dell
optiplex GXa and
large computer
desk. All for $60
570-344-1207
732 Exercise
Equipment
EXERCISE BIKE,
ergometer, arm
action, computer,
fan wheel, excellent
condition $30.
570-735-0436
PROFORM BIKE &
ELIPTICAL
CROSSTRAINER
PLUS PROFORM
CROSSWALK
(TREADMILL) 380 -
$250.00
570-829-2628
TEETER HANG UPS
Inversion Table, like
new. Cant use any-
more due to health
condition. Paid
$300, will sacrifice
for $150. 836-0304
TOTAL GYM 1700
Like New. $100.
570-262-6052
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
COAL STOVE Har-
man insert with
accessories, 3 year
old stainless steel
chimney liner with
cap. All for $500.
Dimensions of coal
stove 23 H x 26
W x 10 D.
Plate will cover
standard fireplace.
570-574-4816
HEATER, tower
quartz, electric, $15.
2 Hoover vacuum
cleaners $30 each
or $50 both.
570-825-5847
HEATER. Hot water.
Gas, 40 gallon tank.
GE, 2 years old.
$150 firm. 570-779-
1215 after 6pm
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BAKERS RACK
green metal with 2
wicker baskets for
storage. Excellent
condition, asking
$100. Large living
room lamps (2)
brass base with
cream colored
shade, brand new
asking $30 each or
$50 for pair.
570-239-6011.
BED FRAME & metal
headboard, blue,
twin size. FREE.
570-235-6056
BEDFRAME cherry-
wood headboard
queen size. New,
moving, used 3
months paid $400
selling for $100.
570-654-1691
BEDROOM FURNI-
TURE: Har dwood
Bunk Beds. Can be
set up individually.
$125. 2 Chest of
Drawers, $50.
570-362-3626
BRAND NEW
P-TOP QUEEN
MATTRESS SET!!
Still in bags! $150!!
MUST SELL!!
Call Steve @
280-9628!!
COUCH medium
brown. Excellent
Condition. $75.
570-603-9597
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER 56wx71h,
glass doors, 2
lights, $200.
570-735-5482
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER 63.5h x
53w. Looks brand
new . Must see,
asking $100.
570-235-6694
ENTERTAINMENT
center solid oak,
leaded glass door, 2
shelves, large bot-
tom drawer, solid
brass handles, 26
TV opening, like new
$100. 592-4858
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
SCHOOL DESK
$20.
570-825-5847
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ROCKING CHAIR
wood with blue seat
cushion & back.
clean & well taken
care of in a smoke-
free home. Excel-
lent condition &
works perfect. $90
570-824-3310
SOFA BED LIKE
NEW - $250.00
570-829-2628
VANITY with mirror
& 2 glass shelves.
Excellent condition.
$25.. Adult walker.
Like new. $15.
570-735-6527.
WYOMING
91 1/2 Breese St.
(same St. as
Wyoming Borough
Building)
Saturday & Sunday
January 21 and 22
8am - 3pm
NO EARLY BIRDS
Furniture, appli-
ances tools, bed-
ding, antiques, patio
furniture, yard tools,
childrens toys and
much more
CASH AND CARRY CASH AND CARRY
WYOMING
ANTIQUES & FURNISHINGS
TAG SALE
Jan. 21, 22, 23,
12 noon - 4 pm
The Estate of
Helene Kretchik
6 Tamanini Dr
Wyoming, PA
Kingston Twp.
Take Carverton
Rd. go by
Checkerboard
Inn turn left at
the sign Sunrise
Estates. 2nd
home on right.
Living room,
dining room,
bedroom furni-
ture, marble top
tables, hospital
bed, wheel-
chairs, glass,
china, kitchen-
wares, lots of
jewelry, Grand-
fathers clock,
books,
womens
clothes large,
some are free,
dryer, all items
marked for
flood victims.
Dale K Myers,
Mgr
570-836-1582
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SAWMILLS: from
only $3997, make
money & save
money with your
own bandmill - cut
lumber any dimen-
sion. In stock ready
to ship. Free info &
DVD. www.Nor-
woodSawMills.com/
300N. Ext 300N
1-800-578-1363
SNOW THROWER.
Snow Joe. Brand
new, never used.
$85. 570-779-4246
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
CORNING WARE
roaster, baking
dishes with lids,
much more. $125.
New Brevetti deep
fryer from tv shop-
ping show $35.
New Wolfgang Puck
bistro hand stand
mixer with stainless
steel bowl, color red
$25. Pressure cook-
er Bravitte used
once, like new $50.
LA-MACHINE food
processer
$15. 570-779-1215
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
MINI BIKE 07 Baja
Warrior recoil start
(like a lawn mower)
top speed 25 mph.
for off road use only.
$450. 472-3440
PING PONG TABLE
asking $40.
570-825-5847
758 Miscellaneous
SEWING machine
Singer in cabinet,
attachments + 18
discs for various
patterns $50.
570-474-6028
TIRES/snows 4- 13
$160. 2 - 185/75r/14
$95. 2 - 2-205/70r
/14 $105. 2-225/75R
/15 $125. 2-215/65r
/15 $125. 2-205/70r
/15 $125. 2-195/65r
/14 $110. All season
2-265/70r/17 $150.
570-969-1481
Don't need that
Guitar?
Sell it in the
Classified Section!
570-829-7130
TIRES: 4 matching
Bridgestone Blizzak
16 Studless DM-Z3
snow tires. 225/
70R16 102Q -Used 3
seasons on 4WD
Hyundai. Good
tread . Purchased
from Kost Tire for
$600. Selling now
for $150. 371-3699
VHS MOVIES chil-
drens Olsen twins 3
pack $20. 5 Disney
movies $5. each.
HONDA CAR RIMS 4
pair 15 will fit any
model Accord, Civic
& Del-Sol cars.
Brand new $250. or
OBO. 570-239-6011
WHEELS AND TIRE
SET (4) factory 5
spoke with good
mounted tires for
Ford Windstar
p21565r16 $250.
570-696-2212
WINE JUGS. 25 One
gallon glass. $15 for
all. 825-3408
766 Office
Equipment
EPSON workforce
500 printer new in
box 5 features-
print/scan/copy/fax/
photo including.
cable retail $90 sell
for $35. 819-4951
FAX MACHINE
Excellent. Sacrifice.
$50.
570-540-0175
OFFICE FURNITURE
Conference Room
table, 4 chairs $100.
6 desk & chairs
$100 per set. Metal
Filing cabinets-$50.
Nice condition
Call 570-690-7912
768 Personal
Electronics
TELEPHONE,
Mobile 1993
Motorola cellular
one. Carry type.
New in box. $25.
826-1415
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA. Brownie
Kodak movie. Model
#2-8mm. Still in box.
$25. 570-826-1415
776 Sporting Goods
BOW Hoyt Reflex
compound, camou-
flage, right handed.
Excellent condition.
29 adjustable draw
length, 60-70lbs
adjustable draw
strength. Comes
with peep sight,
vibration dampen-
ers, 3 pin glow in
the dark Truglo bow
sight, bow wrist
sling, bow stabilizer,
removable Truglo
bow quiver, and
bow whisker biscuit
rest. $200. OBO
570-510-0503
ICE FISHING EQUIP-
MENT. 2 hand
auger, 7 tip-ups, 2
jig poles, 2 ice
scoops, ice cleats.
$125 for all.
570-826-1415
POOL TABLE
barley used $75.
570-417-5256
UNICYCLE Sun uni-
cycle with 24 tire.
New/excellent con-
dition. $40.
570-868-5048
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 32 Quasar color
with original remote
$35.
570-868-5450
784 Tools
BAND SAW 12
Craftsman, Rock-
well drill press,
Craftsman power
table saw. 10
Craftsman belt &
disc sander, all
standing units $800.
package deal.
570-822-8646
SCROLL SAW
Craftsman $90.
Delta saw convert-
ed to a router,,
shaper table with
router $95. Details
call 570-288-9260
SNOW THROWER
Craftsman 5HP, 24
$250 Kerosene
heater, can & extra
wick $30.
570-868-0440
SNOWBLOWER. 8
HP, heavy duty, Sim-
plicity, electric start
& light. Paid $1300
sell $550. 474-6028
786 Toys & Games
KITCHEN Step 2
Lifestyle Party Time
with accessories.
42h x 37w. $40.
SWEET STREETS 7
houses with acces-
sories, + Sweet
Streets town floor
layout. All pieces
for $40. 868-5048
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED
Pre 1975. Call 856-
571-3618 or email
trebor_crane@yahoo
.com to let me know
what you have. Top
prices paid and
I PAY CASH!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
PAYING TOP DOLLAR
for Your Gold,
Silver, Scrap Jew-
elry, Sterling Flat-
ware, Diamonds,
Old High School
Rings, Foreign &
American Paper
Money & Coins.
WE WILL BEAT
PRICES!
We Buy Tin and
Iron Toys, Vintage
Coke Machines,
Vintage Brass,
Cash Registers,
Old Costume
Jewelry, Slot
Machines, Lionel
Trains & Antique
Firearms.
IF YOU THINK ITS
OLD BRING IT IN,
WE WILL GIVE
YOU A PRICE.
COME SEE US AT
134 RTE. 11,
Larksville
570-855-7197
570-328-3428
The Vi deo
Game St or e
28 S. Main W.B.
Open Mon- Sat,
12pm 6pm
570-822-9929 /
570-941-9908
$$ CASH PAID $$
VI DE O GAME S &
S YS TE MS
Highest $$ Paid
Guaranteed
Buying all video
games &
systems. PS1 & 2,
Xbox, Nintendo,
Atari, Coleco,
Sega, Mattel,
Gameboy,
Vectrex etc.
DVDs, VHS & CDs
& Pre 90s toys,
The Video
Game Store
1150 S. Main
Scranton
Mon - Sat,
12pm 6pm
570-822-9929
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Jan. 20: $1,653.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
805 Birds
PARROTS
Many for adoption
All personalities &
sizes. Cages avail-
able. MyHouseOf
Wings.com or email
MyHouseOfWings@
Hotmail.com
Pat: 570-735-4316
Bob: 570-289-8675
810 Cats
CAT/ADULT
neutered, spayed,
loving, kids & people
friendly, urgent,
would bring.
570-977-9167
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
KITTENS (3) free to
good home.
570-575-9984
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
2002
Hyundai
Santa Fe
$5,995
STK# 71206c
2003
Kia
Sorento
$5,995
STK# 4321a
2004
Honda
Accord
$5,995
STK# 2297A
2001
Chevrolet
Blazer LS
$4,995
STK# 81422c
2004
Honda
Pilot EX-L
$10,995
STK# 22177b
2007
Pontiac
G6 Sedan
$6,995
STK# 32146a
2007
Jeep
Grand Cheerokee
$12,995
STK# 32047a
2005
Mazda
Tribute
$7,795
STK# 82198a
2005
BMW
325 XI
$10,995
STK# 72044a
2002
Honda
Civic Coupe
$5,995
STK# 42040a
2002
Dodge Grand
Caravan Sport
$4,995
STK# 81714A
2006
Jeep Grand
Cherokee Laredo
$8,995
STK# 32122A
2005
Dodge Caravan Mini-
van
$6,995
STK# K1429b
2002
Saturn
L100 Premium
$4,995
STK# K2149a
2003
Honda
CR-V
$8,495
STK# K2175a
2
1
M
P
G
!
TA
K
E
M
E
F
O
R
A
T
E
S
T
D
R
IV
E
!
2007
Toyota
Corolla CE
$9,395
STK# 22084A
W
A
S
$
10
,9
9
5
2005
Chrysler
PT Cruiser
$5,795
STK# K2108a
1999
Subaru
Legacy Outback
$4,995
STK# 82140a
A
L
L
W
H
E
E
L
D
R
IV
E
!
2001
Chevrolet
Malibu Sedan
$3,995
STK# K2068a
GREAT VALUE!
2008
Honda
Civic Hybrid
$7,995
STK# 81644B
2008
GREAT DEAL!
Pierce Street
MOTORS
W
e
h
a
v
e
4
0
+
vehicles ready for immediate delivery with nancin
g
o
n
th
e
s
p
o
t
!
IF BAD CREDIT IS HOLDING YOU BACK, AND YOU HAVE A CASH DOWN PAYMENT,
OR A FREE AND CLEAR TRADE WE MAY BE ABLE TO HELP,
HURRY DOWN!
PRE-OWNED INVENTORY
543 Pierce Street Kingston, PA 18704 570-288-3000
View our entire pre-owned inventory online at:
www.piercestmotors.com
Follow us on facebook: www.facebook.com/piercestmotors
2004
Chrysler
PT Cruiser GT
$5,995
STK# H65172
2000
Volkswagen
Jetta GLS
$4,495
STK# 61428c
2004
Kia
Optima LX
$5,995
STK# K2115a
2004
Jeep
Liberty Sport
$6,495
STK# 31253a
2002
Oldsmobile
Silhouette
$3,995
STK# 41116A
2001
Subaru
Impreza Outback
$3,895
STK# 81481b
1998
Toyota
Camry Sedan
$3,999
STK# K2151a
W
A
S
$
11,9
9
5
Y
O
U
S
A
V
E
$
4
,0
0
0
!
PAGE 8G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 9G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
BLUE RIDGE MOTORS
bl uer i dgecar s . net
C A R S - V A N S - S U V S
NOW WITH
2 LOCATIONS!
TO SERVEYOU.
51 S. Wyoming Ave.
Edwardsville, PA
Ph. 570-714-2621
4150 Birney Ave.
Moosic, PA
(Next To Grande Pizza)
Ph. 570-871-4299
100%
Credit
Approval
Finance with a National Company
Dont Overpay Due To Credit
OVER 150 VEHICLES AVAILABLE!
VISIT US ONLINE!
Were
Here
For
You!
ON THE VEHICLEYOU NEED!
Pre-Owned Cars
100,000-Mi l e/7-Year Power t rain Limi ted
Warrant y. Fully Transferable. No Deductible.
713 N STATE ST., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 570-586-6676 WWW.CHERMAKAUTO.COM
M-TH 8-7 F 8-5 SAT 8-1
The power of engineering.
Stock #300017
*See dealer for details. Includes $500 rebate and $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty.
JANUARY
MANAGERS SPECIAL
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 AWD
CROSSOVER
AMERICAS
#
1 WARRANTY
100,000-mile/7-year*
2008 Toyota
Tacoma 4x4
60K Miles
$16,995
2008 Mazda 3 Sport
37K Miles
$13,995
2006 Chrysler
PT Cruiser
$7,995
MSRP $18,019
SPECIAL
$15,995
2004 Chevrolet
Impala LS
Freshly Serviced
$8,995
2004 Suzuki
XL-7 LX 4x4
$9,995
2005 Mazda
Tribute 4x4
Freshly Serviced & Detailed
$7,995
2004 Suzuki
Aerio LX
New Car Trade
$5,995
2011 Chevy 2500
Cargo Van
19K Miles
$20,995
2009 Suzuki SX4
Touring
53K Miles
$13,995
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
WVONMO VALLEV
UV MEME PAV MEME UV MEME
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
Think
Cars
Use your tax refund to buy.
(See sales representative for details)
FREE GAS when you nance a vehicle
up to 36 months
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm Happy Trails!
810 Cats
KITTENS, FREE, 7
weeks old, litter
trained.
570-417-1506
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
CHOCOLATE LAB PUPS
$350 each. 7 weeks
old. Dewormed. Call
570-836-1090
DOG free to good
home, Chihuahua
Tox Fox Terrier,
male, 4 years old.
570-362-0263
ENGLISH YELLOW
LABRADOR PUPPIES
AKC Reg. Family
raised, wormed,
shots, etc. $475.
717-933-4037
GERMAN SHEPHERD
AKC Registered. 1
year old female.
Great disposition &
good with children.
Unable to care for.
$300.00
570-693-2218
PUG PUPPY
Six month old male,
very good with kids.
Free crate. $350.
570-328-1528
Poms, Yorkies, Mal-
tese, Husky, Rot-
ties, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
Chihuahua, Labs &
Shitzus.
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
815 Dogs
SCHNAUZER PUPPIES
Excellent blood
lines. Born Christ-
mas Day. Hypoaller-
genic breed, does
not shed. 2 males -
black & tan. 4
females - 2 white, 2
brindle (silver &
white). See and
choose your puppy
now! Ready to go
week of 2/26.
Males $700.
Females $800.
$200 deposit.
Breed requires total
bonding with new
owner. Puppies
must be placed
between 10 and 12
weeks of age.
570-843-5040
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
SHIH-TZU MIX PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $400
570-250-9690
845 Pet Supplies
BIRD CAGES
$25.
570-362-0263
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E DER DDD .
timesleader.com
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriffs Ofce
PAGE 10G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
EVEN WHEN
YOURE OUT
OF THE OFFICE.
DRIVE SALES
92% of consumers search online
before doing business with
a company.
*
Online business solutions from Impressions Media Digital
gives buyers 24/7 access to learn about your business.
POWER YOUR PROFILE. GROW YOUR PROFITS.
CALL ERICA AT 570.970.7201
OR VISIT IMPRESSIONSMEDIADIGITAL.COM
*Source: Internet Retailer
INTERSTATE
ROUTE 315
KEN
POLLOCK
SUZUKI
81
ROUTE 315
EXIT 175
CLOSE TOEVERYWHERE!
WERE EASY TOFIND!
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 PITTSTON
Automatic, AM/FM/CD,
Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry
MSRP w/ Add Ons
$
23,519*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
21,899*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
$
20,399*
SALE PRICE
Stk# S1792
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
S AWD
Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry,
CD, A/C
MSRP
$
18,019*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,499*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
500*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
$
15,499*
SALE PRICE
2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER
AWD
Stk#S1749
2012 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA LIMITED
4X4
MSRP
$
26,684*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
24,899*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
$
23,399*
SALE PRICE
Navigation, Heated Leather, Sunroof, 18 Alloys
Stk# S1949
MSRP
$
18,289*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
$
15,499*
SALE PRICE
LE Popular Package, Power Windows/
Locks, Keyless Entry, CD
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 SEDAN
Stk#S1733
Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry,
CD, Alloy Wheels, Bedliner, 6Ft Box
$
23,499*
Stk#S1893
2012 SUZUKI EQUATOR
EX CAB 4x4
SALE PRICE
MSRP
$
27,239*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
25,249*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,250*
Suzuki Owner Loyalty -
$
500***
OFTHE
ARE
YOUA
MEMBER...
I love my
suzuki
car club!
WHAT ARE
YOUWAITING FOR?
JOINTHE GROWING
RANKS TODAY!
WHY BUY
ANYWHERE ELSE?
#1 in Customer Satisfaction
For Sales And Service**
A National Top 10 Sales
Volume Dealer For The
2nd Straight Year***
The Best Deals in NEPA
Dont Believe Us!
ASK OUR
CUSTOMERS!
** BASED ON SUZUKI DISTRICT RANKINGS FOR 2011
*** BASED ON SUZUKI NATIONAL SALES VOLUME RANKINGS FOR 2010 & 2011
SCAN HERE FOR
MORE INFO
* ALL PRICES +TAX & REGISTRATION. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL REBATES AND DISCOUNTS INCLUDED. **BASED ON SUZUKI NATIONAL
SALES VOLUME REPORTS FOR 2010. THIS IS A COMBINED OFFER. MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL ONA PACKAGE PRICE. ***OWNER LOYALTY REBATE, MUST HAVE OR OWN
SUZUKI VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD. +2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI JD POWERS HIGHEST RANKD MIDSIZE VEHICLE (APPEAL) STUDY JULY 2011. OFFERS END JAN 31, 2012.
THE MOST AFFORDABLE
ALL WHEEL DRIVES
IN AMERICA!
YOUR AWD
HEADQUARTERS
2011 JD POWER
MOST APPEALING
MIDSIZE CAR - WINNER
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 11G
Ta x, Do c u m e n ta tio n Fe e a n d Re gis tra tio n Fe e s a re e xtra . C hrys le rG ro u p re ta in s the rightto c ha n ge in c e n tive s / re b a te s w itho u tprio rn o tic e . le a s e Bo n u s Re b a te is fo re ligib le c u s to m e rs c u rre n tly le a s in g a C hrys le rG ro u p V e hic le o rre tu rn in g fro m a C hrys le r
G ro u p V e hic le Le a s e , Re s tric tio n s Apply. M ilita ry Re b a te s a re fo rM ilita ry M e m b e rs c u rre n tly s e rvin g o rre tire d M ilita ry M e m b e rs w ith 20 ye a rs o f prio rs e rvic e . Re b a te s a re in lie u o f lo w fin a n c e o ptio n s s u c h a s 0% Ally (e xc e pto n s e le c tm o d e ls s e e s a le s
c o n s u lta n t). All prio rs a le s / o ffe rs e xc lu d e d . All re b a te s ha ve b e e n a pplie d to pric e s . All s u b je c tto prio rs a le s . Pho to s o f ve hic le s a re fo rillu s tra tio n pu rpo s e s o n ly. *De d u c tio n s fro m tra d e in a llo w a n c e w ill b e m a d e fo re qu ipm e n tfa ilu re , b o d y/ in te rio rd a m a ge ,
re c o n d itio n in g c o s ts a n d e xc e s s m ile a ge . Exp. Da te 1/ 21/ 2012.
www.Tun kA utoM a rt.c om
G ood Friends A re H ard To Find!
G ood Friends A re H ard To Find!
C O N N EC T W ITH U S:
Like U s Follow U s
Scan for
Savings on
Service!
www.Tun kA utoM a rt.com
2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2012
Limited 4x4
S T K # 1223008
M S RP $43,375
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $38,053
$38,053 $38,053
3.6-Liter V 6 5-Speed A utom atic,Leather Seats,C om m and V iew Dual-Pane
Panoram ic Sunroof,Heated Steering W heelw ith A udio C ontrols,Pow er Liftgate,
G PS Navigation w ith V oice C om m and,ParkV iew Rear Back Up C am era,Rem ote
Start System ,Rain-Sensitive W indshield W ipers,Heated Seats,C D/DV D/M P3/
HDD/NA V ,G arm in Navigation System ,6.5-Inch Touch-Screen Display,Uconnect
V oice C om m and w ith Bluetooth,Fog Lam ps,Bi-Xenon Headlam ps w ith A uto
Leveling System ,Dedicated Daytim e Running Headlam ps
Includes $1,000 Rebate,$1000 Lessee,$1,000 W eekend Bonus
2012 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2012
LAREDO 4X4
S tk#1223047
M S RP -$30,415
U-CON N E CT
V OICE COM M A N D
W / BL UE TOOTH !
FOG L A M P S !
$27,947
*
$27,947
*
N OW A S L OW A S
Price In clu d es $1,000 Reb a te & $1,000 W eek en d Bo n u s , $1,000 Retu rn in g L es s ee
Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n fe e s w hic h
in c lu d e s $750 a c qu is itio n fe e s a n d $100 d o c fe e . 10000 m ile s / ye a r. $1000 le a s e c a s h
re b a te a n d $1000 le a s e o rc o n qu e s tre b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s .
$229
**
36 M ON THS
L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S
P E R
M O.
2012 JEEP COMPASS 2012
LATITUDE 4X4
S tk#1255015
M S RP -$24,700
RE M OTE
S TA RT &
U-CON N E CT
$172
**
36 M ON THS
L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S
P E R
M O.
Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n fe e s w hic h
in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r, $2,500 Le a s e C a s h
Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e / C o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s
$21,900
*
$21,900
*
N OW A S L OW A S
Price in clu d es $500 Reb a te a n d $1000 L ea s e L o ya lty/ Co n qu es tCa s h.
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012DODGE RAM2500 SLT 2012
CREWCAB
4X4
S T K # 1286007
M S RP $52,700
Includes $2500 Rebate,$1000 Returning Leasee,$500
M ilitary,$1000 C om m ercialRebate,$1000 Trade A ssistance
Prem ium C loth,40/20/40 Bench Seat,Protection G roup,C old W eather G roup,
Heavy Duty Snow Plow Prep Package,6-Speed A utom atic,6.7L C um m ins
Diesel,Pw r Heat Trailer Tow ,M irrors w / Lam ps,Roof-M ounted C learance
Lam ps,UC onnect V oice C om m and w /Bluetooth,
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $41,912
*
$41,912
*
$41,912
*
SAVE
OVER
$10,000
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012DODGE RAM2500 SLT 2012
REGULAR CAB
4X4
S T K # 1286004
Includes $2,500 Rebate,$500 Snow Plow Bonus,$1,000 Returning Lessee
6.7L C um m ins Turbo DieselEngine,Heavy Duty Snow Plow Prep
Package,Lim ited-Slip DifferentialRear A xle,Roof-M ounted
C learance Lam ps,UC onnect V oice C om m and w / Bluetooth,Rem ote
Start System
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $38,415
*
$38,415
*
$38,415
*
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012JEEP WRANGLER 2012
SPORT 4X4
S T K # 1220048
M S RP $24,395
Includes $1,000 Returning Lease Rebate
3.6-Liter V 6,A ir C onditioning,Sirius XM Satellite,
UC onnect V oice C om m and w ith Bluetooth
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $21,965
*
$21,965
*
$21,965
*
S E V E RA L
N E W
COL ORS
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012JEEP WRANGLER 2012
UNLIMITED
S T K # 1220061
M S RP $27,080
Includes $1,000 Returning Lesse,M iliary $500
3.6 Liter,Black 3 Piece Hardtop w ith Storage Bag
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $24,780 $24,780 $24,780
2012 Dodge Challenger 2012
R/T AWD
S T K # 1248001
M S RP $38,520
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $33,482 $33,482 $33,482
5.7-Liter V 8 HEM I,A utom atic,Leather Seats,Pow er Sunroof,
A W D Super Track Pak
Includes $1,500 Rebate,$1000 Lessee
ALL WHEEL
DRIVE
P E R
M O.
2012JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 2012
S tk#1234010
M S RP -$26,915
Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495
d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n fe e s w hic h in c lu d e s $750
Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r,
$4,000 Le a s e C a s h Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o r
C o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s
$22,900
*
$22,900
*
N OW A S L OW A S
Pric e in c lu d e s $3 ,000 Re b a te
a n d $1,000 W e e ke n d Bo n u s ,
$1,000 Re tu rn in g Le s s e e
3 .7-Lite rV 6, Au to m a tic , Fo g La m ps , De e p
Tin tS u n s c re e n G la s s , C D/ M P3 S iriu s X M
S a te llite Ra d io , Bla c k S id e Ro o f Ra ils
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012DODGE RAM1500 2012
BIG HORN QUAD CAB 4X4
S T K # 1286055
M S RP $37,640
Includes $1,000 W eekend Bonus,$2,500 Rebate,
$2,500 Ram SLT Bonus,$1,000 Returning Lessee
5.7L V 8 Hem i,Rem ote Start and Security G roup,
UC onnect V oice C om m and w / Bluetooth
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $29,907
*
$29,907
*
$29,907
*
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012DODGE GRAND 2012
CARAVAN SE
S T K # 1281003
M S RP $21,830
Includes $1000 Event Leases,$500 M ilitary
C loth Low -Back Bucket Seats,6-Speed A utom atic
Transm ission,3.6L V 6,Flexible FuelV ehicle
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $19,900
*
$19,900
*
$19,900
*
2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2012
TOURING
S tk#1257009
Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is
$3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n fe e s w hic h
in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c
Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r, $2,500 Le a s e C a s h
Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o rC o n qu e s tRe b a te is
u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s
$24,759
*
$24,759
*
N OW A S L OW A S
L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S
$239
36 M ON THS
P E R
M O.
Pric e in c lu d e s $1,000 Re b a te ,
$1,000 C o n qu e s t/ Lo ya lty a n d
$750 M in iva n Ow n e rLo ya lty
P OW E R A DJUS TA BL E P E DA L S !
S IRIUS XM S A TE L L ITE RA DIO!
P OW E R L IFTGA TE !
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012JEEP PATRIOT 2012
SPORT 4X4
S T K # 1274001
M S RP $22,400
Includes $500 Rebate,$1000 Returning Leases,$1,000 W eekend Bonus
A utom atic,Prem ium C loth Bucket Seats,Pow er V alue G roup,
A ir C onditioning,UC onnect V oice C om m and w /Bluetooth
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $20,278
*
$20,278
*
$20,278
*
2012 DODGE DURANGO 2012
CREWAWD
S tk#1287007
$36,200
*
$36,200
*
N OW A S L OW A S
L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S
$369
36 M ON THS
P E R
M O.
Price in clu d es $1,000 Reb a te a n d $1,000 Co n qu es t/ L o ya lty
L E A THE R!
S UN ROOF!
N A V IGA TION BL IN D
S P OT DE TE CTION !
Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n w hic h
in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r, $3 ,750 Le a s e
C a s h Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o rC o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s
2012 DODGE CHARGER SXT 2012
S tk#1241001
L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S
$249
36 M ON THS
P E R
M O.
$24,400
*
$24,400
*
N OW A S L OW A S
Price in clu d es $2,000 Reb a te a n d $1,000 L o ya lty/ Co n qu es tReb a te
Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n fe e s w hic h
in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r, $1,000 Le a s e C a s h
Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o rC o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s
8-S P E E D A UTOM A TIC!
RE A R BODY S P OIL E R!
K E YL E S S -N -GO
FOG L A M P S
31 M P G
HW Y
NEW2011 CHRYSLER 200 S
S tk#1173016
$21,900
*
N OW A S L OW A S
V -6
6 S P E E D
A UTOM A TIC
M S RP -$27,285
2 L E FT
ON L Y 2 2011
A V E N GE RS
L E FT!
N OW A S
L OW A S
$18,861
*
Includes $500 A lly Bonus C ash,$1000 Returning Lessee,$500 M ilitary
S tk#1182009
M S RP -$24,950
3.6L,Uconnect w ith V oice C om m and Pow er
W indow s & Pow er Locks,M p3,Sirius XM Satellite Radio
NEW2011 DODGE AVENGER
MAINSTREET
Returning lessee $1,000,M ilitary $500
NEW2011 JEEP PATRIOT
LATITUDE 4x4
S tk#1174066
M S RP -$26,120
A utoStick A utom atic Transm ission,Uconnect V oice C om m and w ith
Bluetooth,USB Port for M obile Devices,A uto-Dim m ing Rearview M irror
w ith,M icrophone,Pow er door locks,pow er w indow s,Heated seats,
Pow er 6-W ay Driver Seat,C D/DV D/M P3,SiriusXM Satellite Radio
L A S T
P A TRIOT
IN S TOCK
$22,892
* N OW A S
L OW A S
Includes $500 M ilitary,$1,000 Returning Leasee
N OW A S
L OW A S
$13,985
*
ON L Y
2
L E FT!
S tk#1161007
M S RP -$18,130*
Pow er W indow s,Pow er Locks,C D/M P3
& Sirius XM Satellite Radio
NEW2011 DODGE CALIBER
EXPRESS
L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S
$197
36 M ON THS
P E R
M O.
201 2 DODGE JOURNEY SXT AWD 201 2
Pa ym e n tis plu s ta x. Am o u n td u e @ d e live ry is $3 ,495 d o w n plu s re gis tra tio n fe e s w hic h
in c lu d e s $750 Ac qu is itio n Fe e a n d $100 Do c Fe e , 10,000 m ile s / ye a r, $3 ,000 Le a s e C a s h
Re b a te a n d $1,000 Le a s e o rC o n qu e s tRe b a te is u s e d in pa ym e n tc a lc u la tio n s
$25,800
*
$25,800
*
N OW A S L OW A S
L E A S E FOR A S L OW A S
$259
36 M ON THS
P E R
M O.
Price in clu d es $1,000 Reb a te, $1,000 Co n qu es t/ L o ya lty
3RD ROW S E A T
RE M OTE S TA RT
A L L W HE E L DRIV E
S tk#1247005
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012DODGE RAM1500 2012
SLT CREWCAB 4X4
S T K # 1286025
M S RP $38,735
Includes $1,000 W eekend Bonus,$2,500 Rebate,$2,500
Ram SLT Bonus,$1,000 Returning Lessee
5.7-Liter V 8 Hem i,C lass IV Receiver Hitch
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $29,860
*
$29,860
*
$29,860
*
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012DODGE AVENGER 2012
SXT
S T K # 1282003
M S RP $22,605
Includes $3,000 Rebate,Returning Lessee $1,000
Uconnect V oice C om m and w ith Bluetooth,C D/M P3,
Sirius XM Satellite Radio
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $17,769
*
$17,769
*
$17,769
*
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012CHRYSLER 300 2012
LIMITED
S T K # 1251003
M S RP $38,605
Includes $1,500 Rebate,Returning Lessee $1,000
Luxury Leather Seats,3.6L V 6,8-Speed A uto
Transm ission w /E-Shift,Dual-Pane Panoram ic Sunroof,
Uconnect Touch 8.4N SA T/C D/DV D/M P3,Rear Fog
Lam ps,Rain Sensitive W indshield W ipers,Universal
G arage Door O pener,Rem ote Start System
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $34,219
*
$34,219
*
$34,219
*
S T K #1173023
M S RP $22,650
2012CHRYSLER 200 2012
LIMITED
S T K # 1273004
M S RP $26,615
Includes $2,500 Rebate,Returning Lessee $1,000
3.6-Liter V 6,Leather,Uconnect V oice C om m and w ith
Bluetooth,Bluetooth(R) Stream ing A udio,Rem ote Start
System ,UniversalG arage Door O pener,Heated Front
Seats,C D/DV D/M P3/HDD,6.5-Inch Touch-Screen
Display,40 G B Hard Drive,Sirius XM Satellite Radio
N OW A S N OW A S
L OW A S L OW A S $21,938
*
$21,938
*
$21,938
*
PAGE 12G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Masonry, stucco,
& concrete
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
BATHROOMS,
KITCHENS,
ROOFING, SID-
ING, DECKS,
WINDOWS, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 332-7023
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
See Us At
The
Home
Show
March
2, 3 & 4th
at the
Kingston
Armory
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
1024 Building &
Remodeling
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
1078 Dry Wall
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings and
painting. Free esti-
mates. Licensed &
Insured. 328-1230
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
MODULAR HOMES/EXCAVATING
570-332-0077
Custom excavating,
foundations, land
clearing, driveways,
storm drainage, etc.
1132 Handyman
Services
#1 FOR ALL YOUR
CONSTRUCTION
NEEDS
Interior & exterior
painting. All types
of remodeling, &
plumbing. Front
and back porches
repaired &
replaced
Call 570-301-4417
COMPLETE
MAINTENANCE
Roofing, siding,
plumbing, electric,
drywall, painting,
rough and finished
carpentry, lawn
service and more.
Residential
& Commercial
570-852-9281
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
1132 Handyman
Services
RUSSELLS
Property & Lawn
Mai ntenance
LICENSED & INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
All types of interior
and exterior home
& business repairs
570-406-3339
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
HAUL ALL
HAULING &
PAINTING SERVICES.
Free Estimates.
570-332-5946
VERY CHEAP
JUNK REMOVAL!
Licensed,
Insured & Bonded.
Will beat any price,
guaranteed! Free
Estimates. Over
10,000 served.
570-693-3932
1156 Insurance
NEPA LONG TERM
CARE AGENCY
Long Term Care
Insurance
products/life insur-
ance/estate plan-
ning. Reputable
Companies.
570-580-0797
FREE CONSULT
www
nepalong
termcare.com
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding,
Hazard tree
removal, Grading,
Drainage, Lot clear-
ing, Snow plowing,
Stone/Soil delivery.
Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
AWESOME INTERIORS
Quality Interior &
Exterior Painting.
Owner Present
on Every Job.
Satisfaction Guar-
anteed.
36 Years Exp.
570-885-3614
FREE ESTIMATES
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING
Prices starting at
$100/room.
570-762-6889
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1225 Plumbing
BERNIE THE PLUMBER
& HOME BUILDER
SAME DAY SERVICE
Why Pay more?
Interior & exterior.
We do hardwood
floors, furnaces,
water heaters - all
your home remodel-
ing needs.
Pay when youre
pleased. All work
guaranteed.
Free Estimates.
570-899-3123
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
NEED FLOOD REPAIRS?
Boilers, Furnaces,
Air. 0% Interest 6
months.
570-736-HVAC
(4822)
1252 Roofing &
Siding
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour Emer-
gency Calls*
1252 Roofing &
Siding
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
WINTER
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW
PLOWING
Commercial
Industrial
Residential
DRIVEWAYS
SIDEWALKS
SALTING
VITO & GINOS
570-574-1275
1297 Tree Care
TOPS TREE
SERVICE, LLC
Total Tree Work.
Free Estimates,
Fully Insured.
570-520-4073
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 13G
Tell Your Friends!
timesleader.com
You can ndd a total of
$
302.14
worth of coupon savings
inside todays copy of
The Times Leader.
PLACE
YOUR
OWN
CLASSIFIED
AD
ONLINE!
ITS FAST AND EASY!
PLUS, YOUR AD WILL
RUN FREE FOR ITEMS
PRICED UNDER $1000.
GO TO CLASSIFIED ADS
AND CLICK ON
PLACE YOUR AD.
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings,
Merchandise, Pets & Animals, Real
Estate and Garage Sales.
Customize the way your ad looks
and then nd it in the next days
edition of The Times Leader, in our
weekly newspapers and online at
timesleader.com.
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
*Your ad will appear in the next days paper if placed online
before 4 p.m. Mon. through Thurs. Place on Friday before
1 p.m. for Saturdays paper and before 4 p.m.
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings, gg
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only.
XM and OnStar fees applicable. Low APR to well qualified buyers.Not responsible for typographical errors.
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
601 K id d e rS tre e t, W ilke s -Ba rre , P A
V A L L E Y
CHE V ROL E T
K E N W A L L A CE S
V isitus24/ 7a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let.c o m
General M otors
General M otors General M otors
CERT IFIED
CERT IFIED CERT IFIED
SPECIAL
SPECIAL
PURCHASE
PURCHASE
TH E SE P R ICE S
CAN NOT B E
R E P E ATE D !
L im ite d
Tim e Offe r
2010 Chevy Cobalt
LS LT
2DR 4DR
#Z2615,2.2L DOHC VVT
4 Speed,Autom atic,Deluxe
FrontBucketSeats,Air
Conditioning,XM Satellite
Radio,OnStar,AM /FM /
CD/M P3,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
Starting
At
$
13,950
*
2011 Chevy Aveo LT
#Z2571,1.6L ECOTEC DOHC
4 Cyl.,Autom atic,Tinted Glass,
AM /FM /CD/M P3,Spoiler,
Power W indows,A/C,Rem ote
Keyless Entry,TiltW heel,
Cruise Control,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
13,999
*
6 AV EO S AV AILABLE
2011 Chevy HHR LT
#Z2540,2.2L Auto.,
Stabilitrak,A/C,PW ,PDL,
Deluxe FrontBuckets,Running
Boards,Traction Control,
AM /FM Stereo w/ CD,
Luggage RoofRails,Power
Drivers Seat,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
13,999
*
1 0 HHRS AV AILABLE
2010 & 2011 Chevy M alibu
#Z2451,2.4L DOHC,
Autom atic,Rem ote
Keyless Entry,A/C,PW ,
PDL,Power M irrors,
AM /FM /CD,Front
BucketSeats,Body Side
M oldings,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
15,999
*
1 0 M ALIBUS AV AILABLE
2011 Chevy Cruze LT
#Z2523,1.4L ECOTEC VVT DOHC
4 Cyl.,Turbo 6 Speed,Autom atic
Transm ission,A/C,PW ,PDL,Front
BucketSeats,16SteelW heels,XM
Satellite Radio,OnStar w/ Auto Crash
Response & Turn-By-Turn N avigation,
AM /FM / CD/M P3,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
17,999
*
1 1 CRUZES
AV AILABLE
LT & LTZ
2011 Chevy Im pala LT
#Z2595,3.5L V6,Auto.,A/C,
PW ,PDL,Power M irrors,Power
Drivers Seat,XM Satellite Radio,
AM /FM /CD,Tilt,Heated Front
BucketSeats,Bose Stereo,
Alum inum W heels,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
17,995
*
2011 Chevy Traverse AW D
#Z2596,3.6L V6 Auto.,Traction
Control,A/C,8 Passenger,2nd &
3rd Row SplitBench,Power
Options,Power Driver Seat,Rear
Spoiler,18Alum .W heels,Power
Heated M irrors,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
27,950
*
3 TRAV ERSES AV AILABLE 8 IM PALAS AV AILABLE
Lea ther
W E W A N T YOUR TRA DE !
$$TOP DOL L A R$$
FINANCING
AS LO W AS
2.
9% APR
AV AILABLE
1 0 CO BALTS AV AILABLE
Starting
At
Starting
At
Starting
At
Starting
At
Starting
At
Starting
At
Scan From
M obile
Device For
M ore
Specials
2012 Ca d illa c S RX 2012 Ca d illa c S RX
FW D L uxury Colle c tion FW D L uxury Colle c tion
M SR P $4 0 ,9 4 0
Featuring New Featuring New
308H P,3.6L,V6 308H P,3.6L,V6
$
359
$
359
$
359
L E A S E IT! L E A S E IT! 2 4 M ON THS
2012 Ca d illa c CTS 2012 Ca d illa c CTS
A ll W he e l Drive S e d a n A ll W he e l Drive S e d a n
M SR P $3 9 ,9 9 0
$
299
$
299
$
299
L E A S E IT! L E A S E IT! 3 9 M ON THS
2012 Ca d illa c S RX 2012 Ca d illa c S RX
M SR P $3 7,0 5 5
Featuring New Featuring New
308H P,3.6L,V6, 308H P,3.6L,V6,
P lus P latinum Ice P aint P lus P latinum Ice P aint
$
299
$
299
$
299
L E A S E IT! L E A S E IT!
P e rM on th + Ta x* P e rM on th + Ta x*
2 4 M ON THS
Lease price based on a 2012 SRX Fwd $37,055 M SRP.$299 permonth plus9% PA salestaxtotal$325 per
month.24 M onth lease 10,000 milesperyear.23 M onthly paymentstotal$7,475 $.25/mile penalty over20,000
miles.$2500 down paymentplus$0 firstpaymentplustaxand tagsdue atdelivery.Totaldue atdelivery $2725
plustag fees.M UST B E A CUR R EN T LESSEE OFA 19 9 9 OR N EW ER N ON -G M LEASE. Leasee responsible
forexcessive wearand tear.M usttake delivery by 1/31/2012.RequiresALLY BankTierS creditapproval.Please
see salesperson forcomplete details.
$
01S T P A YM E N T
$
0 1S T P A YM E N T
$
0S E CURITY DE P OS IT
$
0 S E CURITY DE P OS IT
P e rM on th + Ta x* P e rM on th + Ta x*
$
01S T P A YM E N T
$
0 1S T P A YM E N T
$
0S E CURITY DE P OS IT
$
0 S E CURITY DE P OS IT
Lease price based on a 2012 SRX Fwd Luxury Edition $40,895 M SRP.$359 permonth plus9% PA salestax
total$391 permonth.24 M onth lease 10,000 milesperyear.23 M onthly paymentstotal$8,993 $.25/mile
penalty over20,000 miles.$2500 down paymentplus$0 firstpaymentplustaxand tagsdue atdelivery.Total
due atdelivery $2725 plustag fees.M UST B E A CUR R EN T LESSEE OFA 19 9 9 OR N EW ER N ON -G M
LEASE. Leasee responsible forexcessive wearand tear.M usttake delivery by 1/31/2012.RequiresALLY Bank
TierS creditapproval.Please see salesperson forcomplete details.
$
01S T P A YM E N T
$
0 1S T P A YM E N T
$
0S E CURITY DE P OS IT
$
0 S E CURITY DE P OS IT
P e rM on th + Ta x* P e rM on th + Ta x*
Lease price based on a 2012 CTS Sdn with AllW heelDrive $39,990 M SRP.$299 permonth
plus9% PA salestaxtotal$326 permonth.39 M onth lease 10,000 milesperyear.38 M onthly
paymentstotal$12,388 $.25/mile penalty over32,500 miles.$2000 down paymentplus$0 first
paymentplustaxand tagsdue atdelivery.Totaldue atdelivery $2180 plustag fees.M UST B E
A CUR R EN T LESSEE OFA 19 9 9 OR N EW ER N ON -G M LEASE. Leasee responsible for
excessive wearand tear.M usttake delivery by 2/29/2012.RequiresALLY BankTierS credit
approval.Please see salesperson forcomplete details.
ofS c ra n ton - N E P A
ofS c ra n ton - N E P A
W YOM IN G A V E . E
X
P
W
A
Y
8
1
From Cla rks S um m it/S c ra n ton
E xpre s s wa y - L e fton W yom in g A ve .
From W ilke s -Ba rre to S c ra n ton
E xpre s s wa y8 Bloc ks on
W yom in g A ve n ue
R.J. BURN E
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570)342-0107 1-888-880-6537
www.rjb urn e .c om Mon-Thurs 9-8 Sat 9-4
*TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certified
PAGE 14G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Make it count.
Advertise on timesleader.comand reach over
700,000
*
online readers each month.
*Google Analytics
THE TIMES LEADER | | 570.829.7101
Its
there
when
you
wake
up.
Get convenient
home delivery.
Call 829-5000
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 15G
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 15G
Start your new year of right.
Your new home awaits. Call today!
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
www.lewith-freeman.com
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Ofce
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*
Watch this Community come to life by
becoming a Bell Weather Resident. Tere
has never been a better time to join us
Prices Starting in the $170s
Find us in our convenient Location:
Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn
onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne.
Two-story
New Construction
Townhomes
1st oor master
Formal Dining Room
Eat-in Kitchen
Loft
Valuted Ceilings
Front Porch
Garage
Garden Area
Pure Indulgence...
Luxury
Condominiums
nestled in a quiet
corner of Northeast
Pennsylvania
Waypoint
In Luzerne
Contact one of our
Luzerne County
Real Estate
Professionals at
570.403.3000
Visit Our Open House
Every Sunday 1:00-3:00
2
6
3
4
9
0
38 THOMAS ST , EXETER
11-4530
Nestled on a compact,
low-maintenance lot,
this well kept home
features 2 fireplaces
(1 gas, 1 wood), 2 car
oversized garage with
cabinetry and pull
down storage,
composite deck with
hot tub and even a
heated sunroom!
CALL KIM 466-3338 $189,900
DIR: From Kingston: Rte 11N to Exeter to left on Schooley St, to
right on Coolidge, home on left @corner of Coolidge and Thomas.
Open House!
1
2
:0
0
-1
:3
0
p
m
405 SUTTON CREEK RD,
EXETER TWP 12-33
Enjoy the quiet setting
on almost 1 acre yet
close to town. Home
features an indoor
in-ground pool,
master bedroom with
whirlpool tub, large
2 car detached garage
with finished loft area
and so much more!
CALL JACK 878-6225 $139,900
DIR: Rte 92N make left onto Sutton Creek Rd, 2nd house on
right.
Open House!
1
2
:0
0
-1
:3
0
p
m
1 GRANDVIEW AVE,
HANOVER TWP
11-3625
Discover the values
in this welcoming
3-bedroom home.
Some of the delights
of this very special
home are hardwood
floors, deck, fully
fenced yard and
screened porch.
A captivating charmer that handles all your needs!
CALL MICHAEL 760-4961 $97,500
DIR: From San Souci to St. Marys Road. Make first right onto
Elma Dr, left onto Grandview.
Open House!
1
2
:0
0
-2
:0
0
p
m
WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM
Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Proudly serving our community for 24 years.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY
318 ROOSEVELT ST., EXETER
Ready to move right in, ranch with new
kitchen and stainless steel appliances,
modern tile kitchen, new fooring, roof,
open foor plan with gas heat, deck, off
street parking. MLS #11-4221.
Call Luann 602-9280 $119,210
Dir: South on Wyoming Ave, right on
Schooley, right on Roosevelt, home on
right.
47 CLARKS LANE, PLAINS
Picture perfect 3 bedroom townhome with
ultra modern kitchen, granite counter-
tops, hw foors on frst foor, etc.
MLS #12-30.
Call Luann 602-9280 $159,900
Dir: North on Main St, just past Birch-
wood Hills, right on Clarks Lane.
63 CLARKS LANE, PLAINS
Three story townhome with plenty of stor-
age and 2 car built in garage, modern
kitchen & baths, large room sizes and
deck. Two bedrooms. MLS #11-4567.
Call Charlie 829-6200 $144,900
Dir: North on Main St. just past Birch-
wood Hille, right on Clarks Lane, property
on right.
1
2
-1
:3
0
PENDING
PENDING
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
PLAINS
1,879 Sq Ft. Modern 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 baths with a 1 car garage and
fenced yard in Plains Twp. Com-
bination living room/dining room
with hardwood oors. Modern
kitchen with Corian counter tops
and tiled backsplash. Modern tiled
bath. Additional rst oor family
room. New carpeting throughout.
Finished lower level with 1/2 bath.
Central air. Shed included.
$109,900
HUNLOCK CREEK
No home for sale in Sweet Val-
ley/Hunlock Creek area comes
close. Newly restored 2280sq
ft, 3 bedroom, 3 bath Colonial
on its own private, secluded
1.55 acre lot, this energy e-
cient home, soaked in history
and restored with loving care
is Simply Magnicent! Presti-
gious Lehman School District, Low LowTaxes and a great country location
next to lakes, hiking, shing and more, make this a GEM! $199,000
NANTICOKE
Totally Remodeled 3 Bedroom
home on large lot on nice, well-
kept street-Move Right In! Priced
To Sell Plus Seller paying Clos-
ing Costs (Up to 6%). Home
Includes 1 1/2 Modern Baths,
tile oors, stone countertops,
spacious kitchen with all new ap-
pliances & plenty of countertop
space! New carpet throughout! An Amazing Price- Tis home can be yours
with very little out-of-pocket money! An ideal home! $59,900
R
E
D
U
C
E
D
WILKES-BARRE
Move right into this 3
bedroom, 1 1/2 bath
in very good condition
with modern kitchen
and bathrooms and a 3
season sunroom o of
the kitchen. Central air
throughout.
$59,900
$625,000
BACK
MOUNTAIN
FANTASTIC
HOME over-
looking Francis
Slocum State
Park W/ 5 BRs,
Ultra modern
master bath,
Out of this World Florida Room W/ built in Bar, multiple ga-
rage stalls & more! All on over 6 acres of pure privacy!
Four Star McCabe Realty
(570) 674-9950 (570) 824-1499 (570) 654-4428
$178,600
PLAINS
3 BR Townhouse
W/ 2.5 baths, for-
mal DR & large
eat in kitchen. New
rugs throughout &
all rooms freshly
painted.
$179,900
KINGSTON
Spacious Brick Cape
Cod W/ 4 BRs, 2
baths & oversized 2
car garage W/ a large
storage loft above.
HW oors, addl
space for LL family
room, large kitchen
& some knotty pine
walls.
$298,500
YATESVILLE
Beautiful home
in WILLOW
VIEW that
shows Pride of
Ownershi p. . . .
Spacious Flor-
ida Room lead-
ing to a private
back yard W/ extensive landscaping, 2 car garagebrand new roof,
3 baths , 4 BRs & LL Family room. Lovely home!
GERALD L. BUSCH
REAL ESTATE, INC.
288-2514
EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM
Pat Is Ready
To Work For You!
Call Pat Today 885-4165
Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready
To Work For You!
Call Jerry Today 709-7798
Each Ofce is Independently Owned And Operated.
FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514
NEW LISTING - PLYMOUTH
Youll Pop Your Shirt Buttons....
When You See This One ! This
home has 3-4 good sized bed-
rooms, 2 full modern baths,
modern eat-in kitchen, large
spacious living room and dining
room, family room with cushion
soft carpet, laundry room, ga-
rage and comfortable gas heat.
Call Jerry Busch Jr $119,900
LARKSVILLE
Bring Your Tools ! This fabu-
lous bargain has 7 rooms,
4 bedrooms and bath.
Great chance to build some
equity or buy as an invest-
ment. Better Hurry!
Call Pat Busch 885-4165
$42,900
Opportunity Knocking! This
home needs some tender
loving care but has many
replacement windows, new
drywall and many other up-
dates. Bargin Priced!
Call Pat Busch 885-4165
$40,900
LARKSVILLE HARVEYS LAKE
8.5 Acres Be Natures
Neighbor and enjoy 8.5
acres of paradise. Wood-
ed and level land, electric
and access to public sew-
ers. Call Jerry Busch Jr
$79,900
Story by
Marianne Tucker Puhalla
Advertising Projects Writer
Surrounded by 12.75 acres of wooded
property, this unique Colonial at 1296
Hillside Rd. in Shavertown offers coun-
try living just minutes from the Wyoming
Valley. This Shavertown nd has 2,575
square feet of space and an interesting
layout with plentiful windows that over-
look the nearby Lands at Hillside Farms.
Listed by Joe OConnor of OConnor
Real Estate, this home offers many up-
grades including black granite counter-
tops in the kitchen, a breakfast room that
overlooks the adjacent farm, and beauti-
ful hardwood oors. Make sure to see
the master bedroom with separate sitting
room, and the two separate master baths.
There is also a two-car detached
garage and a large two-story barn with
extra storage. The property is zoned
residential.
The front door leads into the 13-by-
12 living room, where this pretty room
has hardwood ooring, celery green
walls, and windows to the front and side.
Custom Hunter Douglas Roman shades
provide privacy on these windows.
The living room is open to the left
forming one large room with the adjacent
dining room. Measuring 15-by-12, this
room has more of the hardwood ooring
and a triple window front that overlooks
the countryside.
The nearby kitchen provides striking
black granite countertops designed to ac-
cent frosted maple cabinets. The look is
accented by a gray ceramic tile oor, and
a black and gray tiled backsplash. You
will be able to add your own signature to
the home by providing the appliances.
Storage is plentiful thanks to two pantry
cabinets, one with drawers for storing
spices. There is also a second vegetable
sink. Two side windows have half round
tops.
There is more of a view of the nearby
farms available from two walls of win-
dows in the adjacent, sunken breakfast
room. This room has custom pleated
shades on the windows, cream walls and
a gray tile oor. A mudroom off the side
of the kitchen has a large walk-in closet
and opens into a breezeway that con-
nects to the garage. The mudroom also
offers access to the basement.
A full bath on the rst oor features
a white tile oor with pale green walls
and an acrylic tub and shower surround.
This bath has pleated shades on a single
window facing rear.
The rst bedroom is on the rst oor
Reduced Price Offered on Hillside Rd Traditional
Continued
SUNDAYREAL ESTATE
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Visit Our Website
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
Eddie Heck 283-9100 x41
MLS#11-3500 $125,000
Architecturally designedcondo
on3 oors. 3 or 4 bedrooms,
3.5 baths. Beautifully tiledentry
foyer, larger thanaverage kitchen
w/double oven&Termadore
cook top. Spacious master
bedroomwithgreat closet space.
Maribeth Jones 696-6565
MLS#12-203 $269,000
Tis home was not ooded!
Tree large bedrooms, 2.5
baths, laundry roomand oce
on rst oor. Family room
with hardwood oors. Semi-
modern eat-in kitchen. Lots
of roomfor this price! Large
garage, fenced-in yard.
Move inthis summer! New
constructionby Dave Ferrey.
2500SF4 bedroom, 2.5 bath
2-sty home or choose your own
design. Level 2 acre lot set back
fromthe mainroad. Adjacent
lot also available for additional
privacy or alternate bldg. plan.
Paul Pukatch 696-6559
MLS #12-84 $285,000
Chris Jones 696-6558
MLS#12-162 $237,000
Practically newranchhome in
beautiful St. Johns Estates. Just
a fewminutes fromRt. 80 &
81. Tile oors throughout the
spacious living area. Beautiful
country setting, spacious back-
yardw/walk-inaccess to base-
ment. 2 decks &coveredpatio.
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Shickshinny-Move in! W. Pittston-Lots for thePrice! Drums-Practically new! Newberry Estates-Dallas
We Bring Homes & Families together! Call us today, we can help!
N
E
W
L
IS
T
IN
G
!
N
E
W
L
IS
T
IN
G
!
N
E
W
L
IS
T
IN
G
!
PAGE 16G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
Title Insurance
Rapid Title Search & Closing
Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
7
3
0
0
0
4
and measures 12-by-12, with blue walls, hardwood
ooring, and a bay of windows that extends to the side.
This room has a separate single window rear and its
own closet.
The nearby 15-by-12 second bedroom has two single
windows rear, cheerful yellow walls and a single closet.
Upstairs, the unique master bedroom offers a
16-by-14 sleeping area with a 12-by-11 sitting room.
Throughout are great windows that offer a view of the
surrounding farmlands. This space has pale gold walls,
hardwood ooring, and a textured ceiling. Roman
shades in Colonial red add contrast. French doors lead
to a private deck, offering more of those great vistas.
The rst of two master baths is a beauty - complete
with jetted tub set into a tiled surround, hardwood
ooring and double window rear. There is one walk-in
closet here and a second nearby in the hall.
The second full bath on this level has a gray tile oor
and pale gray walls, with a black vanity and black and
gray cultured marble countertop and white sink. A
dramatic walk-in shower has black and gray tiled walls
with a glass door.
An ofce is sized at 13-by-8 with hunter green walls,
hardwood ooring, and windows to the side and rear.
There is a pull-down to attic storage in the hall.
The second oor hallway is large enough to host
a computer or serve as a reading nook with plenty of
windows.
The unnished basement has washer and dryer
hook-ups and additional storage space.
There is an oil hot water baseboard heating system,
with ductless air conditioning units throughout, a
private well and public sewer system.
For more information, contact Joe OConnor, (570)
715-7707.
SPECIFICATIONS:
Colonial
2,575 square feet
BEDROOMS: 3
BATHS: 3
PRICE: Call for price
LOCATION: 1296 Hillside Rd., Shavertown
AGENT: Joe OConnor
REALTOR: OConnor Real Estate, (570) 715-7707
Hillside Rd
Continued from front page
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
ALDEN
1100 Walnut Street
Great starter or
investment home.
Nice neighborhood.
Property sold in as
is condition.
MLS#11-215.
$23,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY
3 bedroom, 1 bath 2
story in good loca-
tion. Fenced yard
with 2 car detached
garage. Large attic
for storage. Gas
heat. $79,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY-
REDUCED
Delightfully pleas-
ant. This home has
been totally remod-
eled, a great buy
for your money.
New modern
kitchen with all
appliances, living
room and dining
room have new
hardwood floors.
Nice size 3 bed-
rooms. 1 car
garage. Be sure to
see these values.
MLS 11-2890
$65,000
Call Theresa
Eileen R. Melone
Real estate
570-821-7022
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
30 Costello Circle
Fine Line construc-
tion. 4 bedroom 2.5
bath Colonial. Great
floor plan, master
bedroom, walk in
closet. 2 car
garage, fenced in
yard. 2 driveways,
above ground pool
For additional info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3162
$248,500
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
AVOCA
314 Packer St.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room with 2 baths,
master bedroom
and laundry on 1st
floor. New siding
and shingles. New
kitchen. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3174
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
Renovated 3 bed-
room, 2 story on
corner lot. New roof
& windows. New
kitchen, carpeting &
paint. Hardwood
floors, gas fireplace
& garage. All appli-
ances included. A
MUST SEE. $119,000.
570-457-1538
Leave Message
BACK MOUNTAIN
Beautiful 5 bed-
room, 2.2 baths &
FANTASTIC Great
Room with built in
bar, private brick
patio, hot tub &
grills! 4 car garage
with loft + attached
2 car garage.
Situated on over 6
acres of privacy
overlooking Francis
Slocum with a great
view of the lake!
Lots of extras & the
kitchen is out of this
world! MLS#11-3131
$625,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
BACK MOUNTAIN
1215 Mountain Rd.
Well maintained
ranch home set on
2 acres with apple
trees on property.
This home offers 3
bedrooms, sunroom
& enclosed porch.
Lower level with
brick fireplace. 2
car garage.
$172,500
MLS# 11-2436
Call Geri
570-696-0888
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
BACK MOUNTAIN
Cape Cod, with
detached 2 car
garage on 2 acres
of country living!
Dallas School
District. $137,500
MLS# 11-4446
Call Christine Kutz
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search featured
homes in Tunkhan-
nock. $275,000. For
appointment, call:
570-310-1552
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
Meadow Run Road
Enjoy the exclusive
privacy of this 61
acre, 3 bedroom, 2
bath home with
vaulted ceilings and
open floor plan. Ele-
gant formal living
room, large airy
family room and
dining room and
gorgeous 3 season
room opening to
large deck with hot
tub. Modern eat in
kitchen with island,
gas fireplace,
upstairs and wood
burning stove
downstairs. This
stunning property
boasts a relaxing
pond and walking
trail. Sit back
and savor
the view
MLS 11-3462
$443,900
Sandy Rovinski
Ext. 26
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
1360 Lower
Demunds Rd.
A grand entrance
leads you to this
stunning Craftsman
style home on 11+
acres complete with
pond, stream &
rolling meadows.
This dramatic home
is in pristine condi-
tion. The 2 story
great room with
stone fireplace &
warm wood walls is
one of the focal
points of this home.
Offers modern
kitchen/baths, for-
mal dining room &
family room.
Recently built 3 car
garage with guest
quarters above is a
plus. Youll spend
many hours on the
large wrap around
porch this Fall,
Spring & Summer
overlooking your
estate. Rarely does
a home like this
come on the mar-
ket. MLS# 11-1741.
$499,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
DALLAS
138 White Birch Ln
Charming two story
on nice lot features,
living room, dining
room with hard-
woods, modern Oak
kitchen, first floor
family room, 4 large
bedrooms, 2 full & 2
half baths. Deck
overlooking level
rear yard. 2 car
garage. Gas heat,
Central air. (11-3115)
$310,000
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
211 Hillside One
Enjoy the comforts
& amenities of living
in a beautifully
maintained town-
house, 3/4 Bed-
rooms, family room
with fireplace out to
deck. Bright & airy
kitchen, finished
lower level, Tennis,
Golf & Swimming
are yours to enjoy
& relax. Mainte-
nance free living.
PRICE REDUCED!
$210,000
MLS# 10-1221
Call Geri
570-696-0888
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
DALLAS
23 Rice Court
If you've reached
the top, live there in
this stunning 3,900
sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 4
bath home in a
great neighborhood.
Offers formal living
room, dining room,
2 family rooms, flori-
da room, and
kitchen any true
chef would adore.
Picture perfect con-
dition. The base-
ment is heated by a
separate system.
SELLER PROVIDING
HOME WARRANTY.
MLS#11-1005
$349,900
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
DALLAS
400 Shrine View
Elegant & classic
stone & wood
frame traditional in
superb location
overlooking adja-
cent Irem Temple
Country Club golf
course. Living room
with beamed ceiling
& fireplace; large
formal dining room;
cherry paneled sun-
room; 4 bedrooms
with 3 full baths &
2 powder rooms.
Oversized in-ground
pool. Paved,
circular drive.
$550,000
MLS# 11-939
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Charming 4 bed-
room, 3 bath
home situated on
1 1/4 acre on a
private setting.
Close to schools
and shopping. Liv-
ing room with
beautiful stone
fireplace and built
ins. Hardwood
floors throughout.
Master suite on
1st floor. Kitchen
has cherry cabi-
nets with tile
floors. Screened
porch. Detached
2 car garage.
$365,000
For appointment
570-690-0752
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DALLAS
Open floor plan,
raised ranch. Newly
rebuilt in 2009.
Located in nice
neighborhood close
to everything!
MLS# 11-2928
$109,500
Call Christine Kutz
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
NEW PRICE!
56 Wyoming Ave
Well maintained 4
bed, 2 bath home
located on large .85
acre lot. Features
open floor plan,
heated 3 season
room with hot tub,
1st floor laundry, 2
car garage and
much more. 11-3641
Motivated Seller!
$179,500
Call Jim Banos
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-991-1883
DALLAS
SCHOOL DISTRICT
100% Financing
Wooded and private
Bi-Level. This home
features 1 car
garage, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 bath &
nice updates. plenty
of room on your pri-
vate 2 acre lot.
100% USDA financ-
ing eligible. call for
details. REDUCED
PRICE $166,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
School District
100% Financing
Wooded and private
Bi-Level in Dallas
School District. This
home features 1 car
garage, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 bath
and nice updates.
Plenty of room on
your private 2 acre
lot. 100% USDA
Financing Eligible.
Call for details.
REDUCED PRICE
$166,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
DUPONT
167 Center St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath 2 story
home with
garage and
driveway.
Newer kitchen
and bath. For
more info and
phot os visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3561
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
DURYEA
314 Edward St
Wonderful neigh-
borhood, 4 bed-
room, 10 year old
home has it all!.
Extra room on first
floor, great for
mother in law suite
or rec room. Mod-
ern oak kitchen,
living room, central
air, in ground pool,
fenced yard, att-
ached 2 car garage.
Great home! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3732. $239,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
548 ADAMS ST.
Charming, well
maintained 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
located on a quiet
street near Blue-
berry Hills develop-
ment. Features
modern kitchen
with breakfast bar,
formal dining room,
family room with
gas stove, hard-
wood floors in bed-
rooms, deck,
fenced yard and
shed. MLS#11-2947
$107,500
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
DURYEA
548 Green St.
Are you renting??
The monthly mort-
gage on this house
could be under
$500 for qualified
buyers. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 1st
floor laundry. Off
street parking,
deep lot, low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3983
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level. If
youre looking for a
Ranch, dont miss
this one. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DURYEA
Cute 2 story, 2 bed-
room 1 bath home.
$15,000
570-780-0324
570-947-3575
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry Ln
Blueberry Hills
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$319,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EDWARDSVILLE
192 Hillside Ave
Nice income prop-
erty conveniently
located. Property
has many upgrades
including all new
replacement win-
dows, very well
maintained. All units
occupied, separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit:www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3283. $89,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
EDWARDSVILLE
263 Lawrence St
Recently updated,
this 4 bedroom
home offers modern
kitchen with Oak
cabinets, 2 baths,
deck with a beautiful
view of the Valley,
fenced in yard and
finished lower level.
All appliances
included. A must
see. MLS#11-4434
$ 92,000
Call Christina @
(570) 714-9235
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
274 Hillside Ave.
PRICED TO SELL.
THIS HOME IS A
MUST SEE. Great
starter home in
move in condition.
Newer 1/2 bath off
kitchen & replace-
ment windows
installed.
MLS11-560.
$52,000
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
EDWARDSVILLE
122-124 SHORT ST.
OUT OF THE FLOOD
ZONE! Very nice dou-
ble-block on a quiet
street. Good income
property for an
investor or live in
one side & rent the
other to help with a
mortgage. #122 has
living room, dining
room, kitchen, 2
bedrooms and a full
bath. #124 has living
room, dining room,
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths & a
family room with
free-standing fire-
place. Off-street
parking on one side.
Taxes are currently
$1,516 on assessed
value of $68,700.
MLS#11-3694
PRICE REDUCED
TO $59,900
Mary Ellen &
Walter Belchick
570-696-6566
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
Lisa Perta
Susan Hines
Danielle McCoy
Len Mudlock
Darren Lowell
Eric McCabe
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22 2012 PAGE 17G
SMARTER.
BOLDER.
FASTER. Smith Hourigan Group
Shavertown
(570) 696.1195
Kingston
(570) 287.1196
Mountaintop
(570) 474.6307
Century21SHGroup.com
LOOKING FOR THE EASY WAY
TO FIND YOUR NEWHOME?
See LISTINGS immediately!
ANY HOUSE, ANY TIME, ANYWHERE!
CENTURY 21 Mobile App
Scan with your Smart Phone
to Download the App
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
1021 Wyoming Ave
2 unit duplex, 2nd
floor tenant occu-
pied, 1st floor unoc-
cupied, great rental
potential. Separate
entrances to units,
one gas furnace,
new electrical with
separate meters for
each unit. The 1st
floor apartment
when rented out
generated $550 per
month. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4247. $52,000
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
EXETER
105 Cedar Street
Price Reduced!
$50,000
Great starter home
in a great neighbor-
hood, off street
parking, upgraded
electric, newer roof,
replacement win-
dows & 2nd floor
laundry. MLS 10-4130
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
EXETER
Vinyl sided 4 bed-
room spacious
home with a great
eat in kitchen,
1 3/4 baths & much
more. Near the
local schools.
PRICE REDUCED
$119,900
MLS# 11-1144
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
44 Orchard St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath single,
modern kitchen
with appliances,
sunroom, hard-
wood floors on
1st and 2nd
floor. Gas heat,
large yard, OSP.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1866
$137,999
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
EXETER
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$123,000
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level home
on quiet street.
Updated exterior.
Large family room,
extra deep lot. 2
car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and covered
patio. For more
information and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2850
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Rd
Stately brick 2 story,
with in-ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace, wood
stove 3 car
attached garage, 5
car detached
garage with apart-
ment above.
MLS#11-1242
$719,000
Call Joe or Donna,
613-9080
Line up a place to live
in classified!
FORY FORT
Great Walnut street
location. 8 rooms, 4
bedrooms. wall to
wall carpet. Gas
heat. 2 car garage.
Deck & enclosed
porch. MLS 11-2833
$89,900
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER
Great multi-family
home. Fully rented
double block offers
large updated
rooms, 3 bedrooms
each side. Nice
location. MLS 11-
4390 $129,900
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP
187 South Street
3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, modern
kitchen, security
system, beautifully
landscaped patio,
pond & above
ground pool. Great
neighborhood!
Close to major high-
ways. MLS #11-2370
$124,500
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP
Modern 3 bedroom.
1 1/2 bath. Driveway.
Gas heat. Lease. No
pets. No smoking.
$750 + utilities. Call
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
10 Lyndwood Ave
3 Bedroom 1.5 bath
ranch with new win-
dows hardwood
floors finished base-
ment 2 car garage
and a finished base-
ment. MLS 11-3610
$154,900
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
27 Spring St
Great home. Great
location. Great con-
dition. Great Price.
MLS#11-4370
$54,900
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E DER DDD .
timesleader.com
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
PAGE 18G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Acclaim
(570) 629-6100
2920 Route 611,
Tannersville, Pa 18372
www.weichertrealtorsacclaim.com
PA USA Lic# RB065120
Own a Pocono Vacation Home
(Skiiing, water sports, outdoor recreation, lake fronts, farms and charming cottages)
5665 Pohopoco Dr.,
Lehighton, PA
Charming Farm house w/ approx.
12 acres of grandeur, near Beltzville
Lake, where swimming, boating
and fshing is available at your
leisure. Call Tiffanie Bailey-Romey
(718) 753-3911
Lic# RS289427
255 Summit Ave.,
Pocono Manor, PA
Reminiscent of the 1900s and the
MagicGarden, copiousstonework,
pine foors, secret passageways,
tree lined border with natural stone
walls. Partners are PA Real Estate
Agents. Call Charles Marzzacco
(570) 242-7744. Lic# RS068523A
993 Kunkletown Rd.,
Saylorsburg, PA
Custombuilt loghome on6.11acres
with an amazing view. Open foor
plan, h/w frs, private but yet close
to skiing, fshing, boating and much
more. Call Michelle Cappabianca
(570) 856-8448
Lic# RM-421500
$235,000 $289,900 $310,000
F
C
C
arey
rank
onstruction, Inc.
Where High Quality
Is Te Standard
New Residential
Construction
Custom Remodeling
Kitchen and Baths
Land Development
www. f r a n k c a r e y c o n s t r u c t i o n . c o m
Ofce: 570-655-2374
Direct: 570-237-1444
Lovely 3 bedroom 2400 sq. ft. Cape Cod with modern eat-in
kitchen, large sunroom and family room. Master bedroom with
master bath. Central air, gas heat and 2 car garage. Very well
landscaped with beautiful paver sidewalks. Quiet neighborhood.
Smith Hourigan Group
Smarter. Bolder. Faster.
Shavertown 570-696-1195
Ruth K. Smith
Shavertown $229,000
Call Ruth K. Smith 570-696-1195 / 570-696-5411
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
476 Wyoming St.
Nice 3 bedroom
single home. Gas
heat. COnvenient
location. To settle
estate. Reduced to
$34,900
Call Jim for details
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
HANOVER TWP.
577 Nanticoke St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 story
home in quiet
neighborhood. This
home features an
enclosed patio with
hot tub, enclosed
front porch, walk up
floored attic with
electric. 2 coal
stoves and much
more. All measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 10-4645.
$80,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
94 Ferry Road
Nice vinyl sided 2
story situated on a
great corner fenced
lot in Hanover Twp.
2 bedrooms, 2
modern baths,
additional finished
space in basement
for 2 more bed-
rooms or office/
playrooms.
Attached 2 car
garage connected
by a 9x20 breeze-
way which could be
a great entertaining
area! Above ground
pool, gas fireplace,
gas heat, newer
roof and All Dri
system installed in
basement. MLS #11-
626. $119,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
95 Pulaski St.
Large home on nice
sized lot. Newer
windows, walk up
attic. 3 bedrooms,
nice room sizes,
walk out basement.
Great price you
could move right in.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-4554
$39,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
HANOVER TWP.
Double block with
both sides having
nice secluded yards
and decks. Close to
area schools. Wood
floors just redone on
owners side. Won-
derful opportunity to
live in one side and
rent the other side
to help pay your
mortgage!
MLS#11-4537
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
HANOVER TWP.
Fantastic view from
the deck and patio
of this 4 bedroom,
2.5 bath vinyl sided
2 story home. Four
years young with so
many extras. A
dream home!
MLS# 11-2429
$299,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
KORN KREST
322 Spring Street
Out of the flood
area. 2 family
home. One with 2
bedrooms, the
other with 3 bed-
rooms. Needs TLC.
50x125ft lot. Walk-
ing distance to
schools grade 7-12,
kindergarten & 1st.
Reduced to
$45,000.
Kwiatkowski Real Estate
570-825-7988
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
LIBERTY HILLS
NEW ON THE
MARKET!
All brick & stone
English Tudor on
Corner Lot
Breathtaking
Views!
3 bedrooms,
finished lower
level, attached 2
car garage. In
ground pool. Gas
heat & central
air. Must See!
$385,000.
570-822-8704 or
570-498-5327
HANOVER TWP.
2 story in good con-
dition with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath,
eat-in kitchen, 2 car
garage, fenced yard
& new gas heat.
REDUCED TO
$39,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
REDUCED
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$175,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER
Multi-family. large 3
unit building, beauti-
fully updated apart-
ments. Two 3 bed-
room apartments &
one efficiency
apartment. Great
location also offers
street parking. This
is a must see.
$139,900. MLS 11-
4389. Call/text for
Details Donna Cain
570-947-3824
HANOVER TWP.
* NEW LISTING! *
3-story home with 4
car garage. Hard-
wood floors, sun
parlor with magnifi-
cent leaded glass
windows, 4 bed-
rooms, eat-in
kitchen with pantry,
formal dining room,
gas heat.
MLS #11-4133
$84,500
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
HARDING
2032 ROUTE 92
Great Ranch home
surrounded by
nature with view of
the river and extra
lot on the river.
Large living room
and kitchen remod-
eled and ready to
move in. Full unfin-
ished basement, off
street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
$78,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
Pole 165
Lakeside Drive
A truly unique
home! 7,300 sq.ft.
of living on 3 floors
with 168' of lake
frontage with
boathouse.
Expansive living
room; dining room,
front room all with
fireplaces.
Coffered ceiling;
modern oak kitchen
with breakfast
room; Florida room;
study & 3 room &
bath suite. 5
bedrooms & 4
baths on 2nd.
Lounge, bedroom,
bath, exercise room
& loft on 3rd floor.
In-ground pool & 2-
story pool house.
Air on 3rd floor.
$1,149,000
MLS# 10-1268
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$99,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP
1252 Main St.
3 Bedrooms,
1 Bath
Dry Finished
Walk-Out
Basement
Single Car
Garage
$60,000
Call Vince
570-332-8792
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP
2 Owen Street
This 2 story, 3 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath
home is in the
desired location of
Jenkins Township.
Sellers were in
process of updating
the home so a little
TLC can go a long
way. Nice yard.
Motivated sellers.
MLS 11-2191
$89,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
JENKINS TWP.
21 Spring St.
2 or 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath home. Large
fenced yard with
shed, 50x200 lot. 3
off street
parking spaces.
By Owner
$99,900
570-825-9867
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2012 PAGE 19G
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
4 Widener Drive
A must see home!
You absolutely must
see the interior of
this home. Start by
looking at the pho-
tos on line. Fantas-
tic kitchen with
hickory cabinets,
granite counters,
stainless steel
appliances and tile
floor. Fabulous
master bathroom
with champagne
tub and glass
shower, walk in
closet. 4 car
garage, upper
garage is partially
finished. The list
goes on and on. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-210
$389,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
KINGSTON
171 Third Ave
So close to so
much, traditionally
appointed 3 bed-
room, 3 bath town-
home with warm
tones & wall to wall
cleanliness. Modern
kitchen with lots of
cabinets & plenty of
closet space
throughout, enjoy
the privacy of deck
& patio with fenced
yard. MLS 11-2841
$123,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
KINGSTON
58 S. Welles Ave
Large charmer had
been extensively
renovated in the last
few years. Tons of
closets, walk-up
attic & a lower level
bonus recreation
room. Great loca-
tion, just a short
walk to Kirby Park.
MLS 11-3386
$129,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
KINGSTON
68 Bennett St
Great duplex on
nice street. Many
upgrades including
modern kitchens
and baths, plus ceil-
ing fans. Both units
occupied,separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3284. $74,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
KINGSTON
MOTIVATED SELLER
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Use your income
tax rebate for a
downpayment on
this great home
with modern
kitchen with granite
counters, 2 large
bedrooms,
attached garage,
full basement could
be finished, sun
porch overlooks
great semi private
yard. A great house
in a great location!
Come see it!
. For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-41
$119,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
40 N. Landon St.
Residential area,
4 bedroom plus 2 in
attic totaling 6. 1 1/2
baths. Half block
from schools. All
new rugs and
appliances, laundry
room, two car
garage, off street
parking, $119,900.
Call 570-829-0847
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
Spacious 4 bed-
room, 2 bath Brick
Cape Cod with
oversized 2 car
garage with loft for
storage.
MLS#11-4162
$179,900
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
KINGSTON
This charming 3
story has plenty of
potential and is
within 1 block of
Wyoming Ave. Put
in your own finish-
ing touches. Priced
to sell! MLS 12-48
$ 34,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
KINGSTON
SALE BY OWNER!
Charming, well
maintained. Front
porch, foyer,
hardwood floors,
granite kitchen, 4
bedrooms, living
room/large dining
room, 2 fire-
places, 2.5 baths,
sun room, base-
ment with plenty
of storage. Pri-
vate English style
back yard.
$195,000
570-472-1110
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
KINGSTON
290 REYNOLDS ST.
KINGSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Brick front 2-story in
a desirable Kingston
neighborhood. 4
bedrooms, 3 baths
will give you all the
room you need for
family, guests or just
room to spread out!
The living room has
a fireplace to enjoy
a cozy evening, for-
mal dining room &
large eat-in kitchen
for family dinners or
a quiet morning
breakfast. Many
upgrades were
done by the owner
prior to listing and
the house is freshly
painted inside and
the carpets were
cleaned. All you
need to do is move
in and enjoy the
upcoming holidays
and many more
years. Call today for
an appointment. For
more information
and photos, go to
prudentialreal
estate.com and
enter PRU2A8T2 in
the Home Search.
Price Reduced to
$148,900. The seller
is motivated and
says Make me an
offer. MLS#11-364
Reduced to
$148,900
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
LAFLIN
13 Fordham Road
Totally remodeled
custom brick ranch
in Oakwood Park.
This home features
an open floor plan
with hardwood
floors, 2 fireplaces,
kitchen, formal living
& dining rooms,
family room, 4 bed-
rooms, 4 baths,
office with private
entrance, laundry
room on first floor,
tons of closets and
storage areas,
walk-up attic, great
finished basement
with fireplace, built-
in grill, in-ground
pool, cabana with
half bath, an over-
sized 2-car garage
& a security system.
Renovations include
new: windows, gas
furnace, central air,
electrical service,
hardwood floors,
Berber carpeting,
freshly painted,
updated bathrooms
& much, much,
more. $399,700
Call Donna
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
210 Beechwood Dr
Rare brick & vinyl
tri-level featuring 8
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
family room with
fireplace, rear
patio, sprinkler
system, alarm sys-
tem & central air.
MLS#11-2819
$199,000
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
LAFLIN
24 Fordham Road
Lovely cedar shingle
sided home on large
corner lot in a great
development. 4 bed-
room, 2 1/2 baths, 1st
floor family room, fin-
ished lower level.
Hardwood floors
throughout, huge liv-
ing room & family
room. 1st floor laun-
dry room & office,
gas heat, nice deck,
above ground pool, 2
car garage. 11-3497
$295,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LAFLIN
5 Rooms, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath; cen-
tral air, rear patio;
1-car garage all on
a fenced lot.
$139,900
Call Donna
570-613-9080
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
LAKE NUANGOLA
Lance Street
Very comfortable
2 bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
Reduced $119,000
Call Kathie
MLS # 11-2899
(570) 288-6654
LUZERNE
330 Charles St.
Very nice 2 bed-
room home in
move in condi-
tion with updat-
ed kitchen and
baths. Nice yard
with shed and
potential off
street parking.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3525
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
S
O
L
D
LUZERNE
459 Bennett St.
Very nice 5 bed-
room, 2 story home
in nice area of
Luzerne. Off street
parking for 4 cars.
1st floor master
bedroom & laundry.
Replacement win-
dows on 2nd floor.
5 year young full
bath. Modern
kitchen w/breakfast
bar, oak cabinets.
Basement always
DRY! All measure-
ments approximate
MLS11-3745
$122,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
MOSCOW
331 Gudz Road
Private country
living, with easy
access to inter-
state. Relax and
enjoy this comfort-
able A-Frame
home. Jacuzzi,
large deck & gor-
geous pond. Great
for entertaining
inside and out. For
more photos and
info visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3285
$249,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
MOUNTAIN TOP
803 Aspen Drive
Brand new carpet in
lower level family
room! Hardwood on
1st floor dining
room, living room,
bedrooms & hall!
Large rear deck.
Master bedroom
opens to deck! Pri-
vate rear yard!
Basement door
opens to garage.
MLS #11-2282
$199,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
Greystone Manor.
Ten year old home
with attached apart-
ment. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Kitchen,
living room, dining
room & den. Apart-
ment has 1 bed-
room, bath, living
room, dining room,
private entrance. 3
car garage, front
porch, large decks.
Total 2,840 square
feet. On cul-de-sac.
Call BOB RUNDLE
for appointment.
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340,
Ext. 11
MOUNTAIN TOP
Meticulously main-
tained ranch home
in convenient Moun-
tain Top location.
Features include 3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, charming
foyer entrance,
bright & beautiful liv-
ing room, dining
room opens to mod-
ern eat-in kitchen,
new sun room addi-
tion, large family
room, manicured
lawn with beautiful
hardscape in front.
Large shed, large
unfinished base-
ment with half bath.
MLS#11-3607
$159,900
Chris Jones
570-696-6558
MOUNTAINTOP
29 Valley View Dr.
MOTIVATED SELLER
Raised ranch on
corner lot. Spacious
two car garage.
Modern kitchen &
bath, tile floors.
Energy efficient
Ceramic Heat.
MLS#11-2500
$174,900
Call Julio Caprari:
570-592-3966
MOUNTAINTOP
NEW LISTING
Beautifully redone
farmhouse with two
2 car garages, one
with a mechanic pit,
electric, water, and
studio apartment
above. New roof,
furnace, well,
wiring, kitchen, bath
& hardwood floors.
Beautiful views.
NOT A DRIVE BY!
$189,000
MLS#11-4420
Call
CHRISTINE KUTZ
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
NANITCOKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Nice opportunity for
a starter home or
investment proper-
ty. Needs work, but
columns, moldings,
and leaded glass
windows are intact.
MLS #12-133
$42,000
Call Christine Kutz
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
NANTICOKE
182 Robert Street
Nice single or
duplex. Gas heat.
Detached garage.
This home is high
and dry, and avail-
able for immediate
occupancy. Call
Jim for details.
Affordable @
$104,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
414 Grove Street E
Remodeled 2 story
with new oil furnace,
windows, electric
kitchen, bath, door,
flooring, paint. OSP.
Seller will pay 1st
year property tax.
MLS#11-2760
$85,500
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
NANTICOKE
East Noble Street
Nice two family on
the east side. Gas
heat. Detached 2
car garage. Afford-
able @ $69,500.
Call Jim for details
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E. CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
Reduced - $89,000
25 Shea St
CAPE ANN: Large
& Bright, 3 bed-
rooms, eat-in
kitchen, Carrara
glass bathroom, fin-
ished lower level,
family room (knotty
pine) with bar. Oil
heat, very large lot.
Estate. View the
mountains from the
front porch. #11-
2970. BIG REDUC-
TION! NEW PRICE
$89,000
Go To The Top... Call
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
PITTSON
NEW PRICE
8 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms & bath, eat-in
kitchen, formal din-
ing room, new win-
dows, gas heat.
MLS # 11-4369
$74,500
Call Donna
570-613-9080
PITTSTON
10 Garfield St.
Looking for a
Ranch???
Check out this
double wide
with attached 2
car garage on a
permanent foun-
dation. Large
master bedroom
suite with large
living room, fam-
ily room with
fireplace, 2 full
baths, laundry
room, formal
dining room,
vaulted ceilings
throughout and
MORE!
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-2463
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bedroom
home with 2 full
baths. 7 rooms on
nice lot with above
ground pool. 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$89,900
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
92 Tompkins Street
Totally remodeled
2-story; 7 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
2-car garage, deck,
rear fence.
MLS# 11-2770
NEW PRICE!
$99,900
CALL JOE OR DONNA
570-613-9080
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes From
$275,000-$595,000
(570) 474-5574
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$79,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$54,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON TWP
FOR SALE: $257,500
LUXURY TOWNHOME
New construction:
3 bedroom, 2.5
bath, large entry
with cathedral
ceiling, upstairs
laundry. Oak
kitchen cabinetry,
granite counters
& stainless steel
whirlpool appli-
ances. Open floor
plan is great for
entertaining.
Upgrades include
hardwood floors &
gas fireplace. Two
walk-in closets &
master suite with
private bath fea-
tures cherry/
granite double
vanity, jetted tub.
Attached garage,
full basement, a
great location;
minutes to I-81 &
Turnpike off 315,
7.5 miles north of
Mohegan Sun.
READY FOR OCCUPANCY
Call Susan at
877-442-8439
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$62,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$164,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
Large 4 bedroom, 1
bath home on extra
deep lot wit front-
age on 2 streets.
Multi family unit
(MLS #11-2244)
next door also for
sale. Possible com-
mercial use with
rezoning. $88,500
MLS# 11-2228
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PLAINS
3 unit income prop-
erty on extra deep
lot with frontage on
2 streets. Single
family home next
door (MLS#11-2228)
also for sale.
Possible commer-
cial use with
rezoning.
$73,000
MLS#11-2244
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PLAINS
NEW LISTING
3 bedroom Town-
house in Rivermist
with 2.5 bath, 1 car
garage & all new
carpeting & painted
interior throughout!
MLS#11-3153
$178,600
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PLAINS
1610 Westminster
Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own personal
retreat, small pond
in front of yard, pri-
vate setting only
minutes from every-
thing. Log cabin
chalet with 3 bed-
rooms, loft, stone
fireplace, hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with bonus
room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall
in your own cabin
in the woods.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
2 bedroom, 2.5
bath. Luxury 1,950
sq ft end unit
Townhome in
sought after River
Ridge. Gas heat,
CAC, Hardwood &
wall to wall. Mar-
ble tile master
bath with jetted
tub & separate
shower.
$199,500
Call 570-285-5119
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
41 Bank Street
Very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
situated on a large
lot on a quiet street
with off street park-
ing. Move-in condi-
tion. Don't miss this
one! MLS #11-4055
$69,000
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
PLAINS
46-48 Helen St
Well maintained
double block on
quiet street, great
nei ghbor hood.
Perfect home for
you with one side
paying most of
your mortgage, or
would make a
good investment,
with separate utili-
ties & great rents.
Vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl alu-
minum siding, walk
up large attic from
one side, lower
front & rear porch-
es, with two rear
upper enclosed
porches. $119,900
Call Ronnie
570-262-4838
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PLAINS
63 Clarks Lane
3 story Townhome
with 2 bedrooms, 3
baths, plenty of
storage with 2 car
built in garage.
Modern kitchen and
baths, large room
sizes and deck.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4567
$144,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
KEYSTONE SECTION
9 Ridgewood Road
TOTAL BEAUTY
1 ACRE- PRIVACY
Beautiful ranch 2
bedrooms, huge
modern kitchen, big
TV room and living
room, 1 bath, attic
for storage, wash-
er, dryer & 2 air
conditioners includ-
ed. New Roof &
Furnace Furnished
or unfurnished.
Low Taxes!
Reduced
$115,900
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
570-885-1512
PLAINS
REDUCED REDUCED
74 W. Carey St.
Affordable home
with 1 bedroom,
large living room,
stackable washer
& dryer, eat in
kitchen. Yard
with shed.
Low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4068
$34,900 $34,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
74 Mack Street
Modern 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 baths with a 1
car garage and
fenced yard. Combi-
nation living room/
dinning room with
hardwood floors.
Modern kitchen with
Corian counter tops
and tiled back-
splash. Modern tiled
bath. First floor
bonus family rooms.
New carpeting
throughout. Finished
lower level with 1/2
bath. Shed included.
MLS 11-4241
Reduced $109,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
906 Homes for Sale
PLYMOUTH
1 Willow St.
Attractive bi-level
on corner lot with
private fenced in
yard. 3-4 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths. Fin-
ished lower level,
office and
laundry room
MLS 11-2674
$104,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SCRANTON
RUNDLE STREET
Nice ranch in very
well maintained,
quiet neighborhood
with finished base-
ment, hardwood
floors, and big,
fenced back yard
with deck.
REDUCED PRICE
$94,900
MLS# 11-4025
Joseph P Gilroy
Real Estate
(570) 288-1444
Ask for
Holly Kozlowski
(570) 814-6763
SHAVERTOWN
4 Genoa Lane
There is much
attention to detail in
this magnificent 2
story, 4 bedroom, 2
full bath all brick
home on double
corner lot. Large
family room with
brick fireplace, all
oak kitchen with
breakfast area,
master suite, solid
oak staircase to
name a few.
MLS #11-3268
$525,000
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-07770
SHAVERTOWN
Enjoy the quiet life in
this spacious 3 bed-
room home on dou-
ble lot. Features
hardwood floor in
dining room, cov-
ered patio, over-
sized 2 car garage,
family room with
fireplace & finished,
walk out basement
with another fire-
place. MLS# 11-1873
$160,000
Michael Slacktish
570-760-4961
Signature Properties
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
SHAVERTOWN
* NEW LISTING! *
Great space in this
2-story coveted
Dallas neighbor-
hood! Lots of oak on
1st floor, door, mold-
ings, kitchen,
beams; finished
basement, 3-sea-
son room, bonus
room on 2nd floor
with computer nook.
4 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, 2 half baths,
office on 1st floor,
dual heat/air units.
MLS#11-4064
$349,900
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
SHICKSHINNY
408 Cragle Hill Rd.
This is a very well
kept Ranch home
on 6 acres, central
air, rear patio and 1
car garage. This is
a 3 parcel listing.
MLS 11-4273
$157,900
Jackie Roman
570-288-0770
Ext. 39
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
SWEET VALLEY
570 Grassy Pond Rd
Nice country bi-level
on 40 acres with 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, kitchen, living
room, family room,
office & laundry
room plus attached
oversized 2 car
garage with work-
shop, rear deck & 3
sheds. Borders
state game lands.
MLS 11-1094.
$319,900
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber St.
Nice Ranch home,
great neighbor-
hood.
MLS 11-3365
$109,000
Call David
Krolikowski
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber Street
Nice ranch home!
Great neighbor-
hood. MLS#11-3365
$109,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
SWOYERSVILLE
20 Maple Drive
An immaculate 4
bedroom split level
situated on a .37
acre manicured lot
in a quiet neighbor-
hood. Features
include a Florida
room with wet bar &
breakfast area, spa-
cious eat-in kitchen
with sliders to deck/
patio, formal living
room, dining room,
family room, central
a/c, & 2 car garage.
Many amenities.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #11-1374
$ 229,900
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
SWOYERSVILLE
New Listing!
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
home on double lot.
One car garage,
two 3 season
porches, security
system & attic just
insulated.
MLS #12-31
$90,000.
Call
Christine Kutz
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
PAGE 20G SUNDAY, JANUARY 22 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Commercial - Vacant Land -
Perfect downtown corner location near Coal
Street Exit. Ideal for many uses. MLS#12-
181
MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
Fire damaged
former restaurant tavern w/apt,
garage & parking lot. MLS#11-4410
JULIO ACOSTA 239-6408
Great business opportunity. 1st flr has 2
BR, Apt. Freshly painted exterior. Zoned
Community Business. MLS#11-4416
MATT 714-9229
900 SF Commercial space on
1st flr. 900 SF 2 BR apt on 2nd flr.
Billboard also available to rent on bldg.
MLS#10-4309
TINA 714-9251
Large 8000 SF building looking
for a new lease on life! Zoned Commercial.
MLS#11-4058
SANDY 970-1110 or DAVID 970-1117
Excellent opportunity-
Established Restaurant for sale in busy
shop ctr. Business only. MLS#11-2782
PAT G 788-7514
6000+ SF former furniture
store, plus apt. & lots more space. High
traffic area. Combined w/12 Davenport.
MLS#11-3865
RAE DZIAK 714-9234
2 bldgs zoned commercial.
1 consists of retail space & apts, the
other is a 2-story home. MLS#10-4056
MIKE JOHNSON
Multi-Purpose Bldg -
Convenient location on State St - Adjacent lot
available. MLS#10-4590
MARGY 696-0891 or MIKE J 970-1100
Nicely maintained offices
& garage. 2400 SF w/overhead door. Great
for many uses. Near highways. MLS#11-
4561
JUDY RICE 714-9230
Great corner property.
Ranch style home includes 2990SF
Commercial space. MLS#11-459
LISA 715-9335
Auto repair & body
shop w/state certified paint booth.
2nd flr storage. MLS#11-2842
ANDY 714-9225
Currently business on 1st
flr, 3 BR apt. on 2nd flr. Lg garage in rear
w/storage. Owner financing or lease
purchase available. MLS#11-4015
ANDY 714-9225
High traffic Route 11
w/6000 SF Showroom/Garage, &
Apt above. MLS#11-2106
ANITA REBER 788-7501
Established turn-key
restaurant w/2 apts. Business &
building priced to sell! MLS#11-130
ANDY 714-9225
Great location for professional
office. Private drive in rear. Zoned C-3.
Property being sold "as is". MLS#10-4362
TINA 714-9251
3 BR, Ranch w/gar+
attached bldg. Zoned HWY COMM. Ideal
for office or sm business. MLS#10-4367
RAE 714-9234
Prime location -
ZONED HWY COMMERCIAL- 4 BR Cape
Cod on 100x556 lot. MLS#11-229
RAE 714-9234
Great location on busy Rte
309! Office Bldg w/1500 SF of space
& 2270 SF warehouse. MLS#11-2094
ANITA REBER 788-7501
4 Sty brick office bldg, more
than half rented. High traffic area. 2 lots
included for pkg. MLS#11-1045
ANDY 714-9225 or MARGY 696-0891
Established restaurant/bar.
Equip & liquor license included + 3 Apts.
MLS#11-3896
MIKE 970-1100 or BETTY 970-1119
Well built 2 story - 8000 SF bldg.
Prime location/high traffic area. Addl pkg
available. 1st flr office/commercial space &
2 apts on 2nd flr. MLS#11-508
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
5700 SF in Prime downtown
location. Suitable for office/residence. Full
basement, private parking, Zoned C3.
MLS#11-345
MARGY 696-0891
- MOVE-IN READY - MOTIVATED
SELLER. Use the entire bldg or rent space
out. 10 offices, 3 baths, OSP. MLS#11-4371
TRACEY 696-0723 or JUDY 714-9230
Lg Commercial warehouse &
office space w/over 3.5 acres. Owner
financing or lease purchase available.
MLS#11-4014
ANDY 714-9225
Outstanding brick
bldg! Parking for 7-10 cars.
MLS#08-2790
PEG 714-9247
Turnkey restaurant/bar.
Liquor license & inventory included + 3 Apts.
MLS#11-3895
MIKE 970-1100 or BETTY 970-1119
Creative business
investment opportunity. 10,000 SF
bldg on 3 acres. MLS#11-3121
SUSAN LONGO 714-9264
3.895
Acres on W-B Blvd- 700
front feet provides
excellent exposure.
Utilities, access road,
possible KOZ
opportunity. MLS#11-
1346
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-
9371
Commercial
opportunity awaits your
business. Main flr is
10,000 SF w/offices,
reception area & rest rms.
2nd flr storage. Plenty of
pkg on this 4.62 acre
parcel. MLS#10-1110
JUDY 714-9230
Prime
location - former
Convention Hall.
Wonderful opportunity
for professional offices.
Pkg for 100+ cars.
Zoned Hwy Business.
MLS#11-3654
MARGY SIMMS 696-
0891
32,000SF,
30+ parking, including trailer spaces
MLS#08-1305
VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Rental space - office &
warehouse, 500SF to 15000SF. MLS#09-
2115
MATT 714-9229
Attractive office space
in excellent condition.