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HIMALAYA YOGA RETREAT COURSE BOOK & CD www.taichibali.com/yoga.php Written and Compiled by DAVE WEST
10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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3 Nights 4 Days Luxury Hotel 3 Mountain Treks to Lakes and Waterfalls

Meditation in Nature Canoing Hot Springs 10 Yoga Classes with Qualified Instructors Yoga Retreat Course Book and CD Transport Service USD 495 per person USD 750 for couples

H I M A L A Y A Y O G A M O U N T A I N R E T R E A T is hidden deep in the foothills of the volcanic rainforest, where the cool mountain air of North Bali is the perfect environment to relax and rejuvenate, deepen your Yoga practice, explore the tropical countryside, and refresh yourself with natural healing energy. The aim of this retreat is to cut through the commercialism that now clouds the real meaning of Yoga, and reconnect you with the Source; The Helaing Power of Nature Beyond the postures and exercises, the teachings of Yoga show us the path to . freedom, direct realisation of Truth, and loving union with the Divine. During the 3 nights and 4 days a natural force field develops within you that recharges your whole being with positive energy and vitality. Awakening your inner strength inspires you to develop a daily spiritual practice and holistic lifestyle that creates positive changes in all aspects of your life. International instructors guide you through the course and mountain treks. Classes and retreats can be modified for all ages and levels. For more information contact the instructor or visit our website. Hari Om

10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS

Copyright 2008

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WELCOME TO HIMALAYA YOGA MOUNTAIN RETREAT


Authentic wisdom and training from ancient India, China and Tibet for living in health and harmony with the natural world

HIMALAYA YOGA MOUNTAIN RETREAT is hidden deep in the foothills of the volcanic rainforest, where the cool mountain air of North Bali is the perfect environment to relax and rejuvenate, deepen your Yoga practice, explore the tropical countryside, and refresh yourself with natural healing energy. The aim of this retreat is to cut through the commercialism that now clouds the real meaning of Yoga, and reconnect you with the Sourse; Helaing Power of Nature Beyond the postures and exercises, the teachings of Yoga The . show us the path to freedom, direct realisation of Truth, and loving union with the Divine. During the 3 nights and 4 days a natural force field develops within you that recharges your whole being with positive energy and vitality. Awakening your inner strength inspires you to develop a daily spiritual practice and holistic lifestyle that creates positive changes in all aspects of your life. International instructors guide you through the retreat, written assignments, and mountain treks. Classes and Treks can be modified for all ages and levels. For more information please email our instructors directly: i n f o @ t a i c h i b a l i . c om
10 YOGA CLASSES, RETREAT COURSE BOOK and CD are included in the Retreat Price. Topics include Yoga Philosophy, Asana, Pranayama, Yoga Nidra, Kirtan, Mantra, Meditation in Nature. 3 MOUNTAIN TREKS through tropical rainforests to rivers, lakes and waterfalls are included in the Retreat Price. These Mountain Treks vary from 1 to 3 hours walking along gentle ascents and descents (See Map: Trek 1, 2, 3) CLIMATE AT THE MOUNTAIN RETREAT Temperature:15-25C Rainfall: High Humidity: High MOUNTAIN RETREAT SURVIVAL KIT A selection of practical items and trekking comforts to enhance your Mountain Retreat experience are included in the Retreat Price, and may vary subject to availability. THE HOTEL is located 2 hours north of Ngurah Rai International Airport. You will be staying at an altitude of 1300 metres near Bedugul, North Bali. The Hotel offers a combination of modern comforts, friendly professional service, and private lumbung rooms surrounded by natural gardens and scenic mountain views. Several paths lead through the rainforest to waterfalls, vanilla, clove and cocoa plantations. 3 nights accommodation are included in the Reteat Price. THE RESTAURANT offers a choice of European, Indonesian, Balinese and Chinese cuisine at reasonable prices. Upon arrival special meal requests (vegetarian) may be given to the Hotel Manager and are subject to availability. Several other inexpensive restaurants are located nearby in the village 20 minutes walk. 3 Hotel Breakfasts are included in the Retreat Price, so is a Cetificate and Closing Lunch at the Alamkoe Pizza Restaurant on the last day of the retreat. LUNCH & DINNER are not included in the Retreat Price and will be charged in addition at menu price. You will need to bring enough money for 5 meals. Restaurant prices are inexpensive and the food is delicious. WHAT TO BRING Yoga Mat Raincoat Trekking Shoes Comfortable Clothes Water Bottle Smiles. ECO - MORALITY CONSERVATION AGREEMENT The following agreement is a requirement for all guests, students and staff attending Tai Chi Bali classes and retreats: To protect and preserve the natural world To promote life of all plants, trees, insects, birds, fish, animals and humans To take all your rubbish back to the hotel To cultivate moral character, civilization and manners To deveolop unity and modesty through correct guiding thoughts To work hard to develop one skills s To refrain from taking intoxicating substances To refrain from sexual misconduct To be truthful, friendly and opened hearted to all

ALL PAYMENTS ARE NON-REFUNDABLE.

FULL AMOUNT IS DUE AT THE MEETING POINT.

1 MONTH ADVANCED DEPOSIT = USD 200. BALANCE = USD 295. TOTAL PRICE = USD 495.

If you agree to all the above should you send your Deposit of USD 200 to our bank in Bali, Indonesia. Upon receipt of your Deposit your place is reserved until full payment is made at the meeting point on Thursday 1pm at BALI BUDDHA CAFE, JALAN RAYA SEMER, KEROBOKAN, 15 minutes west of Kuta. Ask for a Bluebird Taxi from your hotel. For the RETREAT INFO PACK and APPLICATION FORM please email: info@taichibali.com
10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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YOGA RETREAT SCHEDULE


DAY 1 THURSDAY
06.00-06.30

06.30-08.00

08.00-09.00 09.00-12.00

DAY 2 FRIDAY MANTRA MEDITATION Om Mani Padme Hum Followed by silent meditation and Universal Prayer ASANA Complete Yogic Breathing Surya Namaskar 12 Postures Yoga Nidra BREAKFAST TREK TO WATERFALLS Meet in the Lobby 09.00 Meditation in Nature Pranayama in Nature

DAY 3 SATURDAY MANTRA MEDITATION Om Mani Padme Hum Followed by silent meditation and Universal Prayer ASANA Complete Yogic Breathing Surya Namaskar 12 Postures Yoga Nidra BREAKFAST TREK TO LAKES Meet in the Lobby 09.00 Meditation in Nature Pranayama in Nature

12.00-13.00 13.00-16.00 16.00-16.30

13.00 Lunch at Bali Buddha 14.00 Depart from Bali Buddha 16.00 Arrive at Yoga Retreat Check-in and relax

DAY 4 SUNDAY MANTRA MEDITATION Om Mani Padme Hum Followed by silent meditation and Universal Prayer ASANA Complete Yogic Breathing Surya Namaskar 12 Postures Yoga Nidra BREAKFAST CLOSING KIRTAN Dhyana Slokas Jaya Ganesha Maha Mrtyunjaya Universal Prayer

LUNCH RELAX PRANAYAMA Ujjayi Nadi Shodhana Maha Mrtyunjaya Universal Prayer ASANA Complete Yogic Breathing Surya Namaskar 12 Postures Yoga Nidra Universal Prayer DINNER YOGA PHILOSOPHY Five Points of Yoga MANTRA MEDITATION Trataka Om Mani Padme Hum Universal Prayer REST

LUNCH RELAX PRANAYAMA Ujjayi Nadi Shodhana Maha Mrtyunjaya Universal Prayer ASANA Complete Yogic Breathing Surya Namaskar 12 Postures Yoga Nidra Universal Prayer DINNER YOGA PHILOSOPHY The Healing Power of Nature MANTRA MEDITATION Trataka Om Mani Padme Hum Universal Prayer REST

12.30 Check-out and meet in the lobby 12.30-14.00 Lunch at Alamkoe & Certificates 14.00 Depart from Yoga Retreat 16.30 Arrive at Bali Buddha

16.30-18.00

18.00-20.00 20.00-21.00

STRETCH AND RELAX 17.00-18.00 Easy asana class & relaxation to help you unwind & release the tension & stress of travelling (optional) DINNER OPENING KIRTAN Dhyana Slokas Jaya Ganesha Maha Mrtyunjaya Universal Prayer REST

21.00-06.00

* DISCLAIMER AND NON-REFUNDABLE POLICY - TAI CHI BALI IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY INJURY, ILLNESS, ACCIDENT, DELAY, CANCELLATION, LOSS OR DAMAGE OF VALUABLES, OR OTHER UNSCHEDULED EVENTS OR CHANGES BEFORE, DURING OR AFTER THE MOUNTAIN RETREAT. ALL DEPOSITS AND PAYMENTS ARE NON-REFUNDABLE. WE STRONGLY ADVISE THAT YOU PURCHASE ADEQUATE TRAVEL AND MEDICAL INSURANCE BEFORE DEPARTURE FROM YOUR COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE. 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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RETREAT TRAINING PROGRAM


Himalaya Yoga Retreat is a foundation in personal development based on the ancient secrets of Yoga, Meditation and Relaxation. The aim of this retreat is to cut through the commercialism that now clouds the real meaning of Yoga, and reconnect you with the Sourse; The Helaing Power of Nature Beyond the . postures and exercises, the teachings of Yoga show us the path to freedom, direct realisation of Truth, and loving union with the Divine. Over the course of 3 days and 4 nights we will be studying, practising and experiencing over 30 techniques from the science of Yoga, including Asana, Pranayama, Meditation, Relaxation and other Tantra techniques listed below. Our qualified international instructors will guide you through the course and treks, and have studied Yoga, Tai Chi and Chi Kung with masters from India, China, Thailand, USA, Canada and UK. This special Retreat Training Programme, combines ancient and modern wisdom for your mental, physical and spiritual health. In this retreat you learn about your own body and mind, your potential and limitation. This assists you in developing a personal practice and holistic lifestyle, providing a strong foundation for advanced practice. It teaches to be mindful of all your thoughts, speech and action. This allows you to create love, wisdom and compassion in every second, of every minute, of every day. In this way, you not only succeed in yoga, but you have truly succeeded in life, in reaching your full potential as a human being. This retreat allows you to take time from the hectic pace of modern living to experience the stillness of nature and the silence of meditation, and awakens the mind to the potentials that are present in each and every one of us. When we open our mind to meditation, change becomes possible, and problems dissolve as deeper wisdom emerges. Himalaya Yoga is inspired by the great yogi masters of India, China, Nepal and Tibet. It is a gentle blend of Sivananda Yoga, Bihar School of Yoga, Tibetan Yoga and Kundalini Tantra. This results in a comprehensive guide to the classical yoga and meditation techniques and philosophies from the Himalayas. Himalaya Yoga covers a range of yogic techniques and philosophies, including the essence of yoga contained in the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness . By exercising every part of the body, toning the muscles and joints, the spine, the entire skeletal system, the internal organs, glands and nerves, all systems are restored to radiant health. Powerful breathing techniques recharge the whole system with prana - life force energy. Relaxation, meditation and the chanting of sacred mantras bring stillness and tranquility to the mind, allowing you to explore higher realms of consciousness. Regular practice of these techniques revitalises the body and mind by removing energy blockages and improving circulation. They release tension and stress, promoting strength and vitality, weight loss, and resistance to disease. They develop love, wisdom and compassion inspiring self-discipline and spiritual living. The regular practise of Himalaya Yoga brings health, happiness and inner peace to your mind, body and spirit and illuminates the path of self-discovery and enlightenment. * Himalaya Yoga is undiluted by the demands of commercialism and egoism. For the deep purification benefits of yoga to become truly effective it is recommended that all students engage in a holistic and moral lifestyle. This includes becoming mindful of all thought, speech and action, and reducing sexual activity and the consumption of animal products, alcohol and tobacco.
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YOGA PHILOSOPHY
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INTRODUCTION TO YOGA p126 Yoga is a component of Tantra, and is one of the six orthodox systems of Indian philosophy. It has been practised for thousands of years and is the oldest system of personal development in the world, encompassing body, mind and spirit. In India, it is regarded as the divine science of life, and is concerned with freedom from spiritual disturbance Yoga is the gentle process of cleansing the consciousness to gradually reveal one true identity as a spiritual being. Through yoga the soul s becomes perfectly tranquil and serene. Without yoga the soul is constantly subject to disturbance. THE BHAGAVAD GITA p166 Often called the fifth Veda, this ancient text is one of the most sacred scriptures in yoga. In the Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krsna tells Arjuna the means to live a spiritual life while in the midst of daily stress, conflicts and problems. This is Sadhana, which means any spiritual practice that aids the aspirant to realise enlightenment, universal consciousness, or God. It is a path to attain the goal of life. Without Sadhana no one can achieve the goal. Sadhana differs according to taste, temperament and capacity. In the stillness of meditation your true path to liberation shall be revealed. According to the ancient yogic text, the Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krsna states that you can realise the goal of life by four different paths. FOUR PATHS OF YOGA p118 There are four paths of yoga that can help us reach the goal of liberation are; Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Raja Yoga and Jnana Yoga. The yoga presented in this retreat focuses on Raja Yoga and Hatha Yoga, although integration with other branches of yoga is essential. Raja Yoga is the path of meditation, which includes; Patanjali Yoga, Hatha Yoga, Kundalini Yoga, Mantra Yoga, Dhyana Yoga and Kriya Yoga. Traditionally Raja Yoga is preceded by the purification techniques of Hatha Yoga, which also has many variations including Iyengar Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga, Bikram Yoga and Sivananda Yoga. EIGHT LIMBS OF RAJA YOGA p133 The earliest and most profound study of Raja Yoga is found in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, containing insights into the human psyche, the enigma of human existence and techniques for spiritual evolution. Patanjali organised the vast yogic literature of ancient India into an accessible system for daily practice. Since its completion around 200 B.C. it has become the keystone text in yogashrams and yoga teacher training programs worldwide. The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali show how, through the practice of Raja Yoga, we can transform ourselves, gain mastery over the mind and emotions, and overcome obstacles to our spiritual evolution. Only then is it possible to remove the veil of illusion and attain the goal of yoga; liberation from the bondage of worldly desires and actions, leading to union with the divine, the supreme universal spirit. FIVE POINTS OF HATHA YOGA p138 The first step on the noble path of yoga is purification of the gross body. Without cleansing of the physical system we will not gain maximum benefits from our practices. Any system within yoga that emphasises purification of the mind and body by the balancing of the lunar and solar forces, ida and pingala, can come under the branch of Hatha Yoga. Hatha Yoga is a discipline whose aim is to ensure perfect health through the control of the body and concentration of the mind, using physical and mental purification techniques to purify and balance the pranic energy channels. To clarify the science of yoga and make it accessible to the majority of seekers, Swami Vishnudevananda extracted its essence and presented it in five universal principles for physical and mental health, as well as spiritual growth. 6

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TWENTY IMPORTANT SPIRITUAL INSTRUCTIONS p119 These twenty spiritual instructions from Swami Sivananda are for seekers of Truth, dedicated to the path of enlightenment and contain the very essence of all Yoga Sadhana. Karma, Bhakti, Jnana, and Raja Yoga will all come to one who follows them whole-heartedly. They are the unfailing keys to quick and effective development and culture of the physical, mental, moral and spiritual self of man.

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ASANA
PAWANMUKTASANA p37 The Pawanmuktasana Series is a group of simple movements and stretches that are designed to remove blockages that prevent the free flow of energy in the body and mind. They are extremely useful in preparing the body for sitting in meditation for extended periods of time. These techniques have become an integral part of the Yoga Retreat, and should be practised regularly by beginners for several weeks. Pawanmuktasana is also an excellent way to release the daily build up of mental and emotional tension and stress, removing many physical blockages and energies the whole system by improving circulation and metabolism. It promotes strength and stamina in the legs and back, which are essential in developing the ability to sit comfortably for extended periods of time in meditation. SURYA NAMASKAR p39 The ancient secrets to health and happiness and modern medical research agree that regular exercise is essential in maintaining a healthy heart, lungs, digestion, circulation, muscles, bones and joints. All systems in the mind and body require regular exercise in order to achieve optimum health and freedom. Surya namaskar is first mentioned in the Riga Veda and Yajur Veda, the ancient scriptures of India. Surya namaskar is a dynamic sequence of twelve positions that are synchronised with the breathing. It is not a part of traditional yoga, but because it is such a wonderful practice it has been adopted into the techniques of yoga by many gurus, teachers and students. This has led to many new variations. Presented here is the surya namaskar I learned from the Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Centre, Vrindavan, India. ASANA p43 Asana is a series of physical stretches and steady postures that have been inspired by meditation and the close examination of nature. Asana works on all levels; physical, mental and spiritual. The body, mind and spirit can all come into balance and harmony with the practice of asana. According to Maharishi Patanjali, asana is the third limb of Raja Yoga. In his famous work, The Yoga Sutras, Patanjali describes asana as, that position which is comfortable and steady. In this context, asana is practised to develop the ability to sit comfortably in meditation for an extended period of time. Hatha Yogis believe that when held for sufficient periods of time, with deep concentration and awareness, they help to direct prana (vital life-force energy) to different parts of the body depending on which asana is being practiced. If practised regularly the whole system can be toned and revitalised. A well structured asana program exercises every part of the body, stretching and toning the muscles and joints, the spine and the entire skeletal system, working, not only on the body frame, but also on the internal organs, glands and nerves, restoring all systems to radiant s health. YOGA NIDRA p89 Yoga nidra means yogic sleep For absolute relaxation you must remain aware. When practised . with full awareness it is a powerful technique in which you learn to relax yourself consciously, releasing all mental, physical and emotion tension and stress on a very deep level. Yoga nidra is a state of sleepless sleep where one is on the borderline between sleep and wakefulness. It is a
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systematic method of inducing complete physical, mental and emotional relaxation. During yoga nidra one appears to be asleep, but the consciousness is functioning at a deeper level of awareness and is often described as psychic sleep or deep relaxation with inner awareness. In this threshold state between sleep and wakefulness, contact with the conscious and unconscious dimensions occur spontaneously.

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PRANAYAMA
COMPLETE YOGI BREATHING p68 According to Maharishi Patanjali, pranayama is the fourth limb of Raja Yoga and must be controlled and manipulated for the attainment of vibrant health, mind control and superconsciousness. Swami Satyananda Saraswati describes prana as, the vehicle or medium of consciousness. In ancient China it was known as chi or ki. In the ancient scripture, Chandogya Upanishad, prana is described as the internal and external matrix of energy referring to the , cosmic energy that lies both within the mind-body complex and outside permeating the entire universe. It is this aspect that we are interested in during the practice of pranayama. Complete Yogic Breathing is an excellent technique for absorbing and storing huge amounts of prana, using abdominal, intercostal and clavicular lung expansion and compreission. UJJAYI PRANAYAMA p86 Ujjayi pranayama is a powerful yogic technique that leads to deep states of meditation. The Sanskrit word ujjayi means victorious or freedom from bondage It is also known as . psychic breathbecause of its profoundly relaxing effect on the psychic level. It involves gently contracting the glottis in the throat producing a slight hissing sound. The technique presented in this retreat is suitable for beginners, and is most commonly practised in conjunction with khechari mudra. Khechari mudra is Sanskrit for one who moves the sky The practice of khechari mudra involves . rolling the tongue up towards the back of the throat, inducing a state of calm and stillness. Ujjayi pranayama has a powerful tranquilising and heating effect on the body, which may produce a profuse, purifying sweat that detoxifies muscles and organs. It is used in yoga therapy to soothe the nervous system and calm the mind for meditation. It removes insomnia and may also be practised in the corpse pose before sleep. NADI SHODANA PRANAYAMA p72 This pranayama technique, also known as Anuloma Viloma, purifies the energy channels in the body and mind. It brings about a state of equilibrium in the mind, balancing the solar and lunar energies, in preparation for deep meditation. It develops the virtue of equanimity by scientifically training the mind and body to be in harmony and balance, internally and externally.

MEDITATION
10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS p63 The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness are just a few of the many thousands of techniques that can assist us in training the mind. This particular collection is taken from some of the great philosophies and traditions of the world, including Yoga, Zen and modern medical research. They are very powerful ways to transform our life in a positive direction, by giving us the chance to reflect on who and what we are and where we are heading. Most important, they systematically help us to apply the changes that are necessary to take place within us. The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness guide us through the many obstacles that beginners usually face when we first sit down to meditate. These techniques are designed to train our mind and body to relax, remove blockages, accept discomfort, concentrate, and to develop great
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compassion by cherishing others. They also help us to make positive changes in our lives, with our family, community and the environment. By developing loving-kindness with daily action, we can progress on the path to inner peace. We can implement a pure heart that cherishes all living beings without bias or partiality. We can transform our life, fulfil our true human potential, and find lasting peace and happiness. By regularly practising the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness we can reach this goal. OM p147 Chanting OM creates a very powerful healing vibration, and has a tremendous influence on the mind. If chanted correctly, it is one of the most powerful meditation techniques for rapidly relaxing the mind and body. It quickly brings mental peace, and helps to prevent and soothe many psychosomatic disorders. Chanting OM arouses and transforms every atom in the physical body, setting up new vibrations and conditions, and awakening the spiritual centres. Correctly chanting OM will eventually reunite the individual human spirit with the Supreme Universal Spirit. TRATAKA p99 Trataka means steady gazing, and is one of the Shatkarmas Six Internal Cleansing Techniques of Htha Yoga. Trataka acts as a stepping stone between physical and mental practices and leads to deep meditation and higher states of awareness. By stimulating bhrumadhya - the eyebrow centre, candle gazing activates the mahanadi the great energy channel in the head. This leads to the awakening of the ajna chakra, the spiritual centre in the midbrain. It is an excellent preparation for meditation. If you fix your eyes on a single point, the mind too, becomes one pointed. The eyes are the doorway to the mind. When the eyes are fixed and unmoving, the mind becomes the same. The thinking process automatically ceases as concentration increases. Trataka is one of the most powerful methods of controlling the tempestuous mind and its thought waves.

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KIRTAN
Kirtan is singing the Lord name. It is a powerful mental tonic and the surest way to attain God. In s this Bhakti Yoga technique, a special power comes from the Indweller in your heart, purifying the mind and heart, giving you strength to face the difficulties in the battle of life. DHYANA SLOKAS p161 Dhyana Sloka is chanted at the beginning of any class, lecture or personal sadhana to tune the mind to the divine in its different aspects. It asks for divine guidance to help remove the tamasicrajasic ego before commencing yoga practice. JAYA GANESHA p159 Chanting Jaya Ganesha invokes all the different aspects and functions of God, and creates a strong feeling of devotion and a very pure spiritual vibration throughout the day. MAHA MRTUNJAYA MANTRA p162 This is a life-giving mantra, warding off negative energy and has a curative effect for diseases. It is the mantra of Lord Shiva that bestows health, long life, liberation and prosperity. It should be chanted three times everyday. UNIVERSAL PRAYER p165 Written by Swami Sivananda (below), this chant expresses the sentiment that God is One whatever name we call Him by, or in what ever form we perceive Her. It is a prayer that may be recited by followers of any religion, speading positive energy to all beings throughout the world.

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Meditation is the return to Truth and Love. Swami Shyam Yogi


Guru of Dave West

This book is dedicated to the lineage of teachers who preserve the ancient wisdom for the spiritual evolution of mankind.

10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS

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PREPARATION
NAMASTE PREFACE by Martin F. Moore FOREWARD
ONENESS WITH NATURE INTRODUCTION TO MEDITATION Relevance of Meditation Today Ten Benefits from Daily Meditation What is Happiness? Opening the Heart Journey of Self-discovery GENERAL NOTES FOR THE MEDITATOR Before Beginning Positive Thinking and Determination Discipline Personal Health and Hygiene Healthy Diet Vegetarianism Fasting Exercise Sex Sleep Meditation Room Regularity Sitting Position Mudra Duration Pain Expectations Progress Retreats Advanced Yogic Meditation Higher Consciousness Lifestyle Mindfulness throughout the Day Searching OBSTACLES ON THE PATH Proper Guidance A Good Place to Practise Make Time to Practise Limitations Distractions Ego Unhealthy Diet Negativity and Depression Desires Doubt 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008

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Fear Dark Thoughts Bad Company Bad moral Conduct Late Nights Laziness and Inertia Fatigue Avoid Heated Discussions and Debates Talkativeness Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Abuse STRETCHING BEFORE MEDITATION Exercise for Health Pawanmuktasana SURYA NAMASKAR Salutations to the Sun Surya Namaskar Chart Physical Postures Breathing Awareness Mantra Relaxation Advice and Precautions Guidelines for Surya Namaskar ASANA Stretching with Awareness Sensitivity Yogasana Chart Vinyaysa Tristhana Each Posture is Ever Evolving Advice and Precautions Guidelines for Asana RELAXATION Muscular Tension Mental Tension Emotional Tension Deep Relaxation Guidelines for Relaxation PRANAYAMA Prana Pranayama Techniques Puraka Kumbhaka Rechaka Granthi Bandha Advice and Precautions Guidelines for Pranayama TRAINING THE MIND Movement of the Mind and Conceptual Thought Being in the Present Moment Vipassana Meditation Samadhi Meditation Contemplation Meditation Compassionate Meditation Visualisation Meditation Meditation is Awareness Mindfulness throughout the Day Successful Meditation Guidelines for Meditation
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REGULAR SYSTEMATIC PRACTICE


10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE & HAPPINESS Part One Sitting Quietly in Meditation Part Two Mindfulness throughout the Day 10 Meditations Affirmation/Technique Chart Opening Prayers 1. PERSISTENCE Complete Yogic Breathing 2. ACCEPTANCE Chanting Om 3. EQUANIMITY Purifying the Energy Channels 4. PATIENCE - Stillness 5. CONCENTRATION Mindful Breathing 6. LOVE Heart Chakra Awareness 7. KINDNESS Generating Kindness 8. COMPASSION Generating Compassion 9. WISDOM Offering and Receiving 10. ENLIGHTENMENT - Palming Concluding Prayers 10 ADVANCED MEDITATIONS MINDFUL WALKING YOGA NIDRA EARTH HEALING OM AH HUM UJJAYI PRANAYAMA WITH KECHARI MUDRA CANDLE GAZING LOCATION OF CHAKRAS SONG OF THE BREATH FLOWERING LOTUS EMPTINESS COMPLETE SEQUENCE AND DURATION SUMMARY 63

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10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNERand distributed free. It is meant to provide2008 Copyright guidancewww.taichibali.com/yoga.php practise. 13 This book is created with love PEACE AND HAPPINESS and counsel for those who wish to

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PHILOSOPHY
APPENDIX 1 APPENDIX 2 APPENDIX 3 APPENDIX 4 APPENDIX 5 APPENDIX 6 APPENDIX 7 APPENDIX 8 APPENDIX 9 APPENDIX 10 APPENDIX 11 APPENDIX 12 GLOSSARY REFERENCES ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Vedic Astrology and the Spiritual Evolution of Mankind 115 The Law of Karma Sadhana 20 Spiritual Instructions from Sri Swami Sivananda The Teachings of Buddha Yoga: The Divine Science of Life Nadi - Chakra - Kundalini Mantra - Yantra - Mandala Three Gunas - Three Doshas Teachers - Students - Practice Kirtan BHAGAVAD GITA The Divine Song of God 118 120 121 124 127 141 147 151 154 159 167 170 173 177 180

HIMALAYA YOGA

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10This book is created with love PEACE AND HAPPINESSmeant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise. MEDITATIONS FOR INNER and distributed free. It is Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php 14

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No-one has a harder struggle than the man who is striving to overcome himself; and it should be our business to overcome ourselves, and every day to get the upper hand over our old nature, and to show some progress and improvement. Thomas Kempis 1427

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NAMASTE
It does not matter which religion or philosophy you follow. The important thing is the flow of spiritual energy through Truth, Love and Good Karmas. Swami Shyam Yogi

Namaste is the traditional way of greeting in India and Nepal. Everyone can say namaste. You can use namaste as in good morning, good night, thank you or welcome, and it can be used generously. The action of bowing the head and joining the palms of both hands together in front of the chest, over the heart, symbolises I recognize the God in you. It is the philosophy of oneness - You and I are One in heart and mind opening the heart to spread love and peace, and the ability to offer our help and service to each other. Yoga is an exercise that brings all levels of our existence, including the physical and intellectual, into balance. The gesture of namaste is yoga in itself, and many yogic activities begin and end with the performance of this deeply spiritual gesture. The practice of namaste with clear intentions develops faith in ahimsa - non-violence.
Ahimsa Paramo Dharma Non-violence is the greatest path

PREFACE
I read a book by Osho, a little while ago, that said, Never believe anything you read nor believe any words you hear, they are all lies words are only concepts, a substitute for the real thing. This book is no exception. Dave West has compassionately put this book together to explain a sequence of movements and meditations, in his own way, to help show you an understanding, a way for you to enhance your life. This sequence of movements and step by step meditations can show you a way. But it is no use just to read about them, explore the way he was taught in the Himalayas, his understanding, part by part, movement by movement, and for you to experience the results for yourself. Take what you need and leave the rest behind. If you are expecting instant results, you will be disappointed, you may be surprised, but the secret is to accept whatever you get. Dave West explains that you are limited only by your own imagination. However, you must accept your current limitations and capacity, and gradually over time your stretching will get easier, your understanding will come, as will your energy. In these times of instant fix it, it will be hard, but again a quote from Osho, To me, only in your loneliness (meditation) will you be able to know the Truth because you are the Truth Through these meditations you can find your own Truth. Start the journey now, and every day take another step Martin F. Moore Meditation Instructor
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FOREWORD
A long time ago, while walking on the banks of the river Ganges near Rishikesh, my guru told me that I have to be strong if I am going to choose the path of yoga. Some of the places he is going to take me; some of the things he is going to show me; I am going to need strength and I am going to need to trust him.

After travelling extensively in the Himalayan Mountains for three years, I discovered many ancient secrets to inner peace and happiness. Many of these teachings had been preserved for thousands of years in remote valleys and villages by yoga masters and rishis. They told me that the modern teachings of yoga in the West had become distorted by over emphasis on the physical aspect, resulting in attachment to the body. They instructed me that the time had come for these ancient healing techniques to re-emerge in their true form as the divine science of life. The information in this book is based on my understanding of the wisdom I received from several gurus, and from personal insights gained through meditation. I cannot offer you what I do not know or what I do not understand at this time. I hope this book may save you some time from all the searching and wandering that is common when one first steps on to the path. These pages have been a long time in the making. They have been written after fifteen years of studying yoga and meditation in different countries. This book is a compilation of great works from the masters. Its purpose is to put meditation back into the heart and soul of yoga practice and inspire higher consciousness in daily activities. It contains non-commercial yogic instruction and is designed to provide simple straightforward illustrated guidance for beginners. This book is not meant to replace the teacher, or the first hand instruction given in classes. For safe and effective practice it is recommended that you undertake proper instructions from a qualified yoga and meditation instructor, and proceed at your own pace, according to your own experiences and intuition. Yoga has recently become an internationally accepted health system. However, people have a tendency to over-simplify things and make definitions fit into their parameters of thinking. Yoga has also become a casualty of such thinking. In today's fast-paced world, with its quick-fix solutions for everything, yoga is more and more being branded as a health regime or a solution for all weight problems, something exciting from the exotic east. In the over-zealous attempts to spread yoga, its centuries-old meaning and true purpose is being diluted no nutrients, just calories. In India my guru explained, Modern yoga in the West can be compared to having a three course dinner in a nice restaurant. But most people just order the starter over and over again. It might be very delicious and nutritious but they are missing out on the main course and dessert. What he meant by this is that people are focusing too much on asana (starter) and not practising meditation (main course) and therefore missing out on the fruit of meditation (dessert) which is inner peace, happiness and enlightenment. A closer look at the original teaching reveals that yoga is the science of bringing mindfulness into every thought, speech and action. The poses came later as a spontaneous expression of that centred state. This book has been compiled primarily to educate people across the world that yoga is meditation, and to dispel existing misconceptions. In the light of so many dilutions and variations found in the world today, I here present direct access to the main points that were passed on to me from the enlightened masters of the Himalayas. This book is a drop of nectar from the ocean of their wisdom.
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Many passages in this book have been reproduced directly from the works of Lord Buddha, Maharishi Patanjali, Sri Tirumalai Krishnamacharya, T.K.V. Desikachar Sri Swami Sivananda, Swami Satyananda Saraswati, Bhodidharma, Swami Shyam Yogi, Stephen Levine, Eckhart Tolle, Erich Schiffmann, Robin S. Sharma, Merta Ada, Martin Moore, Achaan Chaa and Geshe Kelsang Gyasto. I have referenced their work to help expand the wisdom I received in the Himalayas. Although I did not have personal contact with some of these masters, I believe they have been with me in spirit throughout the writing of this book. I have felt their presence and guidance. I have tried to combine their wisdom with my own understanding for your benefit. I pray that this new collection reaches you with their blessings, and the blessings from all the holy beings, and assists you towards perfect health, inner peace and happiness. In the process of compiling this book, I have tried to keep in mind the words of the Venerable Myokyo-ni in her Zen classic Gentling the Bull When we read modern meditation ; manuals, the do-it-yourself type, they read like instructions for home improvement. Or like cooking recipes, they instruct: place the mind here, now place it there, now lift it up from here and place it there now place your mind nowhere, and just stay like this for an hour or so. It all sounds so easy until you try to do it. I hope I have at least succeeded in making this book as interesting as a cooking recipe and less confusing than home improvement instructions. As Bhodidharma taught, The ultimate Truth is beyond words. They are not the Way. The Way is wordless. Words are illusions. Meditation is the art of mindfulness. When you are mindful of all your thoughts, speech and action and can create love, wisdom and compassion in every second, of every minute, of every day, then you have not only succeeded in yoga, but you have truly succeeded in life, in reaching your full potential as a human being. However, do not practise meditation for selfish reasons, but in order to know and understand yourself, and thus be able to teach others how to live peacefully and wisely. I here offer guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise and reach this goal. It is without any doubt in my heart and mind, that the regular and diligent practice of these meditations, by everyone on the planet, would produce a significant global reduction in violence, crime, poverty, disease and deterioration of the natural environment. I encourage you to take time from the hectic pace of modern living to experience the silence of meditation, combined with regular classes from an experienced instructor. Integrate these teachings with your personal practice, discoveries and insights. Find your own Truth, and let the light of love shine clear in your heart. Dave West Bali 2008

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This book is created with love and distributed free. It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.

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PREPARATION
YOU MUST BE THE CHANGE THAT YOU WISH TO SEE IN THE WORLD MAHATMA GHANDI

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ONENESS WITH NATURE

Take a walk in nature, away from the traffic and bustle of city life. Walk slowly and appreciate the beauty and harmony of the natural world. As you walk take deep gentle breaths and absorb the natural healing energy of your surroundings. After walking deep into the heart of Mother Nature, find a place on the ground, perhaps soft grass where you can sit undisturbed to meditate. You can even lean against a tree or lie down. Find a place that feels right for you. Close your eyes and relax for a few minutes. Let your breathing become comfortable and quiet. Let your thoughts settle. Notice how the ground supports you. Put your palms down on the ground and sense the mass under you. Feel the breeze on your skin, feel the temperature. Notice how you breathe in the air and then expel it out again. Become aware of the exchange with nature that is always going on. Listen to the sounds of nature. Can you hear the wind in the trees, birds chirping, insects. Allow yourself to experience how you are part of this scene, not separate from it but one with nature, one with the universe. Can you experience the ongoing exchange between you and the world without thinking anything about it? Let go of any thoughts about yesterday or tomorrow. Bring yourself to this moment without any purpose or goal. For this moment, don think about yourself. Set aside your usual concerns. t Be fully in the present moment of being an integral part of the outdoors. Can you be completely here, in nature, in the now? Simply observe the purity and tranquillity of this moment. Feel relaxed, feel safe, Experience the energy you are made of. Feel what it is like to be you. Experience yourself as the infinite mind that you are, Free and fearless, healthy and happy, Experience a renewal of optimism that will clarify your priorities and aspirations. Your life will acquire new meaning as you establish the inner conviction that you live in a friendly, non-threatening, purposeful universe. Hold this awareness for a few minutes or longer. Slowly open your eyes. Join your hands over the heart and bow your head. Give thanks for nature, our greatest teacher. Give thanks for the gift of life.
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INTRODUCTION TO MEDITATION
Stop gathering information from the outside and start gathering it from the inside. Dan Millman

Meditation traditions of the world are centred on the quest for freedom from sorrow, liberation and enlightenment. The practice of meditation requires striving to purify the mind and body, and the intention to turn the mind inwards with techniques that assist us on a journey of self-exploration, self-discovery and self-realisation. This has a profound effect on the way we think, speak and act. It peels away the veil of delusion revealing the true majestic nature of our innermost Self in all its glory. Love, compassion, generosity, dispassion, caring and friendliness all naturally blossom in everyday life. The fruit of meditation is inner peace, happiness and complete harmony with the rhythm of nature. Meditation is a way to see the world directly, as it is, without any judgement or mental conditioning. It is awareness. It is silence, stillness in the mind; its natural state of being. This is when the mind ceases its constant vacillation between worry over the future and regrets of the past, when the whole awareness returns to the present moment. Such beauty and fullness is found here! Also termed by athletes as being in the zone this natural state of awareness accompanies , peak performance in all fields of human endeavour. This presence is stillness inside, alertness, clarity of mind and peace, even in the midst of dynamic activity. Thus, the human nervous system is far more effective, responsive, and action far more powerful. Yoga masters of the Himalayas recognise that every human being evolves in a different way according to temperament and capacity. They advocate everyone to emphasise the practice of certain healing techniques over others, depending on individual requirements. They taught me how to combine meditation with different forms of yoga. This, they said, all helps to make the purification process deep-rooted and ensures a healthy body, mind and spirit, a prerequisite on the path to inner peace and happiness. These instructions have been firmly rooted in this book. TEN BENEFITS FROM DAILY MEDITATION 1. 2. Meditation can transform your life in a positive way. Meditation can help you to understand and experience what real happiness is and to truly enjoy life. 3. Meditation can energise you, filling you with vitality and strength. 4. Meditation can reduce stress and anxiety. 5. Meditation can help you to sleep better. 6. Meditation can help you to become patient and to remain calm in any situation. 7. Meditation can help to develop your intuition, your sixth sense. 8. Meditation can increase wisdom. 9. Meditation can help you to understand the nature of impermanence. 10. Meditation can help to reveal your true nature and attain enlightenment.

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RELEVANCE OF MEDITATION TODAY The enlightened masters of the Himalayas taught me that being spiritual is not about locking ourself away on a mountain top for thirty years, chanting and eating nettles. The path to enlightenment is mindfulness; being aware of the present moment and living a higher consciousness lifestyle with our families, friends and enemies, in our home, at work, in the community and environment. It about creating love and compassion in our normal everyday s lives, working together, playing together and meditating together. As Bhodidharma, the founder of Zen Buddhism, taught, To find Buddha (awakened mind), you have to see your nature. Whoever sees his nature is a Buddha. If you don see your nature, t invoking Buddhas, reciting sutras, making offerings and keeping precepts are all useless. Invoking Buddhas results in good karma, reciting sutras results in a good memory, keeping precepts results in good rebirth, and making offerings results in future blessings - but no Buddha. Being spiritual simply means, being in the present moment and mindful that our thoughts, speech and actions are pure, untainted and filled with love. But as cool and romantic as it may seem, meditation and being spiritual is not about wearing hippy clothes and jewellery from India, or hanging cosmic mandalas in our living-room, sitting cross-legged and tuning in, turning on and dropping out. Meditation takes place on the inside and requires regular, diligent practice with patience and determination before results are noticed on the outside. Buddha believed that the mind is our greatest resource, and that meditation is the method that develops the mind correctly to bring about clarity of understanding. This is as relevant today as it was thousands of years ago. Meditation helps us now, as it did then, to begin to understand ourselves better, which in itself is a great achievement, because it is our misunderstanding of ourselves that leads us to disharmony. Meditation is an ideal way of performing a self-examination, working through unknown obstacles that are disturbing our life on account of which we are unable to progress. This requires effort, just like anything we set our heart on to achieve cannot be attained without struggle or effort from our side. The struggle is for the perfection of one thoughts, words and deeds. The s effort is towards attaining balance in the different facets of one personality. s Sri Swami Sivananda of Rishikesh taught, To live harmoniously the mind, body and spirit must develop in a balanced way according to individual temperament and capacity. This means that the head, heart and hand must synchronise if we want to realize our goals, whether they be material, spiritual or both. Meditation provides a suitable environment for this metamorphosis to take place. A place to accept inherent weaknesses and blemishes, change our outlook and opinion, and improve ourselves. WHAT IS HAPPINESS? All of us seek inner peace and happiness because this is what we lack in our lives. William Hart writes, We all want to be happy; we regard it as our right. Yet happiness is a goal we strive toward more often than attain. At times we all experience dissatisfaction in life, agitation, disharmony, and suffering. Even if at this moment we are free from dissatisfactions, we can all remember a time when they afflicted us and can foresee a time when they may reoccur. Eventually we must all face the suffering of death. Geshe Kelsang Gyasto asks, What is the ultimate supreme goal of human life? What is real happiness? What do you wish for, strive for, or daydream about? Do you want material possessions, such as a large house with all the latest luxuries, a fast car, or a well paid job? Or is it reputation, good looks, power, excitement, or adventure? Do you try to find the meaning of your life in relationships with your family and circle of friends? All these things can make us happy for a short while, but they can also cause us much worry and suffering. They can never give us the perfect lasting happiness that all of us, deep in our heart, long for.
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Bhodidharma taught, Once you stop clinging and let things be, you be free, even of birth ll and death. You transform everything. However, our ordinary view is that I am the centre of MY ll universe and that other people and things derive their significance principally from the way in which they affect ME. It is this view that is the source of all our selfish intentions and suffering. It is this view that prevents us from letting go. We need to free ourselves from the illusion that we are nothing more than this physical body and mind. When we are free from the illusionary sense of self that governs what we think, say and do, we free ourselves from the fear that is the consequence of this illusion. This also frees us from the suffering we unconsciously inflict on ourself and others. Geshe Kelsang Gyasto answers, The only thing that will never deceive us is the attainment of full enlightenment. This means living a higher consciousness lifestyle, with love, wisdom, compassion and non-violence at the centre of our thought, speech and action. Only then will we be free from desires and delusions, faults and distractions, and possess the qualities necessary to help all living beings. Through this understanding we can clearly see that the attainment of enlightenment (higher consciousness lifestyle) is the real meaning of our precious human life. The path of meditation allows us to reach this supreme goal. OPENING THE HEART Mother Teresa said, Everybody today seems to be in such a terrible rush, anxious for greater developments and greater riches and so on, so that children have very little time for their parents. Parents have very little time for each other, and in the home begins the disruption of peace of the world. Opening the heart, cultivating love and kindness, and awakening the compassionate spirit inside our self is the key to inner peace and happiness and the essence of spiritual progress. Love is a natural occurrence in the world, but bringing it to the forefront of our daily thought, speech and action involves cherishing others more than we cherish ourself. This can be achieved through the regular practice of compassionate meditation. Here we can control our ego, eliminate selfimportance and selfishness, and consider the happiness of others throughout our daily activities. S. N. Goenka believes, When one experiences truth, the madness of finding fault with others disappears. We all need to heal our life, to understand our sickness, or to heal past traumatic experiences, for example - family, romantic partners, teachers, and other important relationships. Meditation is the ideal place where we can examine these experiences and attitudes, and replace negative attitudes with more positive ones. Swami Satyananda Saraswati wrote, Self-exploration though regular meditation allows us to recognise that the faults and failures in our daily life are not in the difficult situations that confront us, or in the people with whom we have to interact. The problems we face arise from within. Circumstances only act as a catalyst to bring them to the surface. This means that everything we feel, think, say, or do is coming up from deep within. Meditation gives us the chance to reflect on this, and apply the necessary changes to take place within us. By letting go of our ego reactions and practising forgiveness and acceptance we begin to s experience pure and perfect love. We learn to gladly allow the energy of love to circulate and shine through, unobstructed by fear, pain and hatred. Erich Shiffmann wrote, The deeper we explore, the more we come to realise a very simple truth: Loving thoughts feel good, and unloving thoughts feel bad. Unloving thoughts are like self-inflicted poison darts, whereas loving thoughts are the natural response to reality when it is clearly perceived. This simple understanding will initiate a natural change of mind that will culminate in the most important theme of yoga and meditation: Learning to love and be loved. In this way we can begin to discover that suffering is our greatest teacher, and that the suffering in everyday life gives us many opportunities to live the ideal way. When we experience our own suffering it is a difficult time, and we tend to become overwhelmed with grief. But this is
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also a great opportunity to become stronger, adapt and evolve. In the depths of our suffering we can learn from the past, accept the difficult present and become stronger for the future. However, when we help others to feel less suffering, less distress from the inevitable negatives of life, the tragic losses and frustrations, the moment we do a positive thing for others without thought or concern for ourselves, in these moments suffering and enlightenment are one. This teaches us not to live apart from the world, but to live a real and active part of it. We discover that enlightenment is not some great cosmic peace trip for monks in caves; it is actually found right in the midst of our daily existence, and that the ultimate ideal of universal compassion can be approached in small ways, not just as all or nothing. JOURNEY OF SELF-DISCOVERY T.K.V. Desikachar wrote, The journey of self-discovery through meditation takes each of us in a different direction. As we go deeper and deeper into meditation, we begin to discover our own truth, our own experience of the soul, life, creation and the cosmos, and eventually it will bring us to the ultimate truth and divinity of all things. And this is the happiness, freedom and enlightenment that we all seek. This book has offered limited explanation on the actual experience of meditation. This is because everyone is different and will have a different experience, different thought patterns and interpretations. As Bruce Lee said, I cannot teach you, only help you to explore yourself. Nothing more. This is the journey you must make yourself, your own discoveries, your own realisations, your own Truth. When we begin our journey on the path to enlightenment it is important to re-evaluate our lifestyle and the direction we are heading with our life. We should examine all activity as it happens, and how our mind observes and perceives its thoughts, speech and actions, how it responds, creates and reacts according to different outside or inside stimuli. It is important to slow down the mind and actually be in the present moment, focusing fully in the here and now. Robin S. Sharma wrote, In the midst of everyday activities, the mind is kept continually distracted with details. People move from one thing to the next without a pause. Even at the end of the day when the mind could take some time to reflect, most people fill their leisure hours with structured activity. Daily tension and stress does not have any way to release or disperse. They continue to build and store up within us. Stillness in meditation directly relaxes the mind, releases tension and stress, and awakens it to the potentials that are present in each and every person. In meditation we discover how thoroughly our life is shaped by our thoughts and the way we interpret what going on. Every s thought, feeling and emotion manifests itself in one form or another in our body and in our life. We notice this with surprising clarity as we become more sensitive to the inner feeling of who we are. When we open our mind to meditation, change becomes possible. Problems dissolve and deeper wisdom emerges. Meditation carries us directly to the depths, steering through the continuous flow of conscious thought, navigating into calm seas, and revealing reality in its crystal-clear reflection. Meditation helps us to experience emptiness and undergo a profound transformation of our experience of the world. It is a firsthand method; nothing can substitute for the personal exploration of our own mind. By regularly practising we can delve into our own consciousness with meditative exploration and come to our own profound and meaningful understandings. As Sir Isaac Newton once said, To myself I am only a child playing on the beach, while vast oceans of truth lie undiscovered before me. After the regular and diligent practice of meditation considerable changes begin to take place in the mind, brain and nervous system. New nerve-currents, new cells, new vibrations, new avenues and new channels are formed. The whole mind and nervous system become remodelled. We will have a new mind, a new heart, new sensations, new feelings, new mode of thinking and
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acting and a new view of the universe. Diligent practice and persistence with meditation produces results that are permanent and abiding. The greatest minds of our time, including Gandhi, Osho, Paramahansa Yogananda and Einstein, have all emphasised that the journey of self-discovery and spiritual evolution is man s greatest adventure, and should be pursued as the ultimate supreme goal of human existence.

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GENERAL NOTES FOR THE MEDITATOR


Mental health and positive thinking are the cures for many modern diseases. Swami Shyam Yoga

The principle goal of meditation is self-realisation. This means understanding our true nature as a spiritual being, the nature of impermanence and the attainment of enlightenment. But meditation on any philosophical theme could be a powerful constructive aid on the path of personal development. It is generally believed that meditation promotes stillness of the mind through concentration and heightened awareness, whereby a greater receptivity is attained and previously unknown depths of consciousness can be penetrated. Meditation also leads to increased ability to think clearly, to make fullest use of imagination and will power, and ultimately to inner strength and peace. Meditation is the ideal place where we can empty our mind from all the programming and brain-washing in the world today, and fill it with an inspiring and enlightened presence. With a clear mind we can then contemplate our life and make positive changes and conscious decisions towards attaining our full human potential. The following are certain practical points regarding the basic techniques and lifestyle necessary for success. They are meant as guidelines for the meditator in the absence of a spiritual guide or meditation instructor. BEFORE BEGINNING Before diving straight into meditation be aware that it is a long term process. It involves incorporating a holistic lifestyle, not just sitting quietly for a few minutes each day. This means reevaluating all areas of your life and making positive changes where possible, at this time, little by little. Changes may include moral discipline, diet, cleanliness, truthfulness, non-violence. Before starting meditation and yoga the stomach, bowels and bladder should be empty. For best results do not begin meditation or yoga until at least 4 hours after a heavy meal. Early morning practice is
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recommended. Taking a cold shower before you begin can make you more alert and greatly enhance the effect of your practice. Wear loose and comfortable clothes made from natural fibres. Remove all jewellery, watches and spectacles/glasses. Start your meditations on a new moon to incorporate the natural flow and cycles of the universe. POSITIVE THINKING AND DETERMINATION There are many obstacles on the path of meditation. It is extremely important to have a strong determination to succeed while maintaining a positive mental attitude. Positive thinking promotes mental health and helps to remove negative thoughts, avoiding anxiety and depression through life ups and downs. However, most people are only positive on the surface, with 90% of their s thoughts being negative, for example - fear of failure. Although we appear positive on the outside it is this underlying negativity that we ultimately attract. Buddha said, All that we are is the result of what we have thought. Our thought is our own making and it affects all our succeeding thoughts. It decides the trend of our mind towards integrity or weakness, good or ill. We are the sum total of all our karma; thought, speech and action. Every moment we are changing the aspect of our existence. Every moment we are creating our self. We are responsible for our own future and for the future of mankind. Determination includes awareness of all thoughts, speech and actions, and maintaining a high standard of morality. Be positive. Attract positive energy, now! (See Earth Healing Meditation). DISCIPLINE To succeed in meditation one must have discipline. Regular, systematic practice is essential. Discipline also means restraints on behaviour through universal moral commandments, selfpurification and spiritual discipline. Swami Sivananda says To achieve the goal of yoga one must have constant spiritualisation of all activities and cultivation of virtues such as non-violence, truthfulness and celibacy. If you are non-spiritual, try to maintain mindfulness by constantly being in the present moment, aware of all thoughts, speech and actions. Discipline yourself to apply your best effort in all things throughout the day. PERSONAL HEALTH AND HYGIENE The Greek philosopher Hippocrates said, Natural forces within us are the true healers of disease. Despite more medical knowledge, technology and health care facilities than ever before, the health of the Western world is deteriorating at an alarming and ever quickening rate. What most of us fail to realise is that it is what goes into our bodies (that which we absorb from the air, our food and water) that affects the internal environment of our bodies and determines the rate at which we age, and our overall level of health. Toxins absorbed through our external environment (as well as self administered) include: Exhaust and factory emissions. Chlorinated, fluoridated and other pollutants in water. Chemical sprays and fertilisers. Smoking, caffeine, alcohol. Hormone enhanced meat and dairy products. Processed foods, high sugar and high fat junk food. Mental, physical and emotional tension and stress.

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Toxins then build up within the body, disrupt the pH level, and cause blood and tissue toxicity. As these toxins accumulate in our cells, they break down and inhibit the body immune system, and s over time damage organs, tissues, arteries, joints and glands. When the body becomes overloaded and unable to keep up the fight, it is then that disease creeps in. Almost all illness and diseases are directly related to the health and condition of our body internal environment. Toxicity creates a s
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breeding ground for germs and viruses, allowing them to penetrate a weakened immune system. Avoiding and removing toxicity from the body is paramount, if we are to regain and maintain vibrant health, reduce the effects of premature ageing, and ward off illness. In our world today, it is virtually impossible to avoid toxic contamination. However, with environmental awareness and yogic training, combined with minor lifestyle changes, such as food and cleanliness, it is possible to drastically reduce the harmful effects, increase the length and quality of life on this planet, and live free from sickness and disease. HEALTHY DIET Eat slowly, consciously absorbing prana from your food. Eat a nourishing and well balanced diet, based on natural foods. Avoid over-eating. Avoid over-fasting. Avoid over-processed foods. Eat only foods that are freshly prepared and easily digestible. This keeps the body light and supple and the mind calm, giving a high resistance to disease. It is essential to drink plenty of water between meals, especially during periods of intense practice to avoid dehydration and to support healthy bodily function. Take natural remedies according to your requirements; Ayurveda, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Homeopathy, Western Herbalism. Avoid pharmaceuticals and synthetic medicines except in emergencies. Warning: Consult your medical advisor before making any major dietary changes. A daily diet should be prescribed according to the nutritional requirements of your individual constitution. VEGETARIANISM It is assumed by many that vegetarianism is an integral part of meditation and yoga practice. This belief is only partially true, for while yoga views vegetarianism as the most beneficial system of nutrition, it does not insist that all practitioners of yoga become vegetarians. Non-vegetarians are heartily accepted as practitioners of yoga. This book, however, is not interested in arguing the pros and cons of meat verses vegetarianism, but simply to instruct that vegetarianism is the preferred nutritional system of yoga and meditation. This is because total body health can be obtained with a vegetarian diet which is beneficial in preparation for higher forms of meditation and yoga. Many modern food types as well as meat have a tendency to be a greater repository of toxins and waste products than vegetarian food and may be detrimental to the purification process of the mind and body. The ancient gurus and rishis of yoga advise but do not preach vegetarianism. One of the basic aims of yoga is to tune the body to a high degree of sensitivity and this is more easily achieved by abstaining from meat. Remember, yoga aims to bring about mental peace and tranquillity as well as physical relaxation, which is more easily obtained if one does not eat meat. If you are not sure whether you can obtain all your nutritional needs of the body from a vegetarian diet, then you should not become one. But if you study any charts given on this subject you will clearly see that all the body requirements fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins and minerals - are obtained s in more than adequate quantities in vegetarian foods. It is recommended that advanced students should consider a purely vegetarian diet to enhance spiritual progress. Manu, the codifier of laws in ancient India, summed up the most sensible approach to the whole subject when he said, There is no wrong in eating meat or drinking wine, but the abstention therefrom gives many benefits. FASTING Digestion is a process which requires considerable energy. Fasting relies on the body having sufficient vitality to initiate its own cleansing process once the digestive load is removed. It is a very powerful cleansing technique and should be used with caution. According to Umasvati, the second century A.D. Jain philosopher of India, fasting has six beneficial effects: you will become free from all desire, you will not desire a longer life, you will not desire a shorter life, you will not
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desire the company of friends, you will not desire any pleasures of the senses, you will not desire approval. A fast may last from one day to six weeks. There are many different ways to fast that produce various physical and mental benefits; water, food, juices, brown rice, urine, as well as practising non-attachment through abstinence. How and when to fast is a personal choice. How and when to break the fast is also extremely important. Seek proper guidance. It is not just a matter of starving yourself for a few days. Over-fasting weakens the body. Medical science has proved that short fasts cleanse the whole system and promotes rejuvenation. The philosophy of yoga recommends fasting once per month on the eleventh day of the new moon (or according to your religion). EXERCISE Regular exercise is essential for a healthy heart, lungs, digestion, muscles and circulation. Regular exercise relieves tension and stress and induces a good night sleep. Exercise may include yoga, s jogging, swimming, cycling, sports, or walking in nature. For general health purposes the American College of Sports Medicine suggests a minimum of 20 to 60 minutes per day of increased cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular activity, 3 to 5 days per week. Light exercise before meditation can loosen up the back, neck, hips, knees and ankles, and increases the circulation of blood and prana. It is far easier to practise meditation when the body is healthy and can sit quietly, without pain or discomfort, and is fully charged with vitality and strength. In yoga, proper exercise is given by surya namaskar and asana, which work systematically on all parts of the body, stretching and toning the muscles and ligaments, keeping the spine and joints flexible, improving circulation and the flow of prana. This brings steadiness and lightness to the body and mind. Never exert undue force, as pain is a signal to stop the practice. Warning: To avoid injury always consult your medical doctor before commencing any health program. The amount of physical activity you perform should be safely within your physical limitations. Proceed with a suitable and structured program. SEX The philosophy of yoga advises the reduction of sexual activity and thoughts, so that sexual energy can be conserved and used for spiritual progress. This is the true interpretation of celibacyfor the average practitioner. Complete sexual suppression is not necessary, but it should be reduced and controlled as much as possible. This will save huge amounts of energy and considerably decelerate the ageing process. It will also help in reducing the great attachment that people have with sex and the material world. Advanced students may choose to completely abstain from sexual activity and thoughts. SLEEP Sleep is a periodic, natural, reversible loss of consciousness. The optimum amount of sleep varies with each individual and age, with children requiring more sleep than adults. The National Sleep Foundation maintains that eight to nine hours of sleep for adults is optimal and that sufficient sleep benefits alertness, memory, problem solving and overall health, as well as reducing the risk of accidents. The University of California, San Diego, found that people who live the longest sleep for six to seven hours each night. The University of Pennsylvania has confirmed that the more one works, the less one sleeps, and that work is the single biggest factor troubling sleep. Many people have trouble sleeping, which may stem from a number of issues, including: Uncomfortable sleep furnishings. Stress from family, job, personal issues. Environmental conditions: heat, cold, pollution, noise, bright light. Environmental surroundings: tidiness of room, odours, cleanliness. Poor body positioning.
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Illness. Pain. Medicine and drugs: some medications may cause insomnia, or result in dependency on a drug to fall alseep; others, including recreational drugs, are stimulants that may make sleep difficult or impossible. Improper sleep timing: outside the rhythms of nature. The philosophy of yoga recommends early to bed and early to rise. For the average practitioner, this is approximately 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. This is ample time to get a good night sleep and gives you s enough time in the morning for meditation and yoga. The regular practice of yogic techniques, such as corpse pose and yoga nidra, greatly enhances the relaxation and rejuvenation of the mind and body, and promotes restful sleep. (See Advanced Meditations) MEDITATION ROOM For success in meditation, it is best to have a proper attitude and environment. The place of meditation, schedule, physical and mental state should all reflect a readiness to turn inward. Try to have a separate room for meditation. If this is not possible designate an area especially for meditation only. Keep your meditation room simple and clean. For inspiration, a simple focus point may be set up in the room including fresh flowers, or objects and symbols according to your personal beliefs. As meditation is repeated powerful vibrations will be lodged in the room. In six months the peace and purity of the atmosphere will be felt. REGULARITY The regularity of practice is very important. It is difficult to focus the mind when it wants to jump about as soon as you sit down for concentration. Meditating at a fixed time every day conditions the mind to slow down its activities with the minimum of delay. Not having time or not making the time to meditate indicates the lack of commitment and you may want to re-evaluate your lifestyle before continuing. The most effective times to meditate are at sunrise and sunset. The mind will settle down more quickly when a regular time and place have been established.

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Sit on a small cushion with the legs crossed. Adjust the sitting position until comfortable. Close the eyes. Relax the face,shoulders, arms, stomach and legs.

Keep the spine and head straight, as if the top of the head is being pulled up to the sky. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind.

There are many different hand positions. This one rests the hand on the knee with the thumb and index finger joined in chin mudra.

SITTING POSITION In his rules for Zazen, Mumon Yamada Roshi states, There are four meditation postures: walking, standing, sitting and lying down. The sitting posture is the most quiet of these four To sit on this
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very ground is to become one with this whole universe... The Roshi suggests to commence meditation training in the sitting position. Enlightenment is extending the meditation beyond quietly sitting alone, by maintaining the awareness while going about our daily life, being mindful of all thought, speech and action. By regularly sitting in meditation you will, through experimentation, find your most comfortable position. A cushion is a valuable tool in maintaining a comfortable position. A cross-legged position provides a firm base for the body and makes a triangular path for the flow of energy. If this is not possible try sitting on a chair. It is not important to sit in the lotus at this stage. Just try to be comfortable without damaging your knees. More important is having a good posture in the upright position. The spine and head should be straight but not tense. Feel as though the top of your head is being pulled up to the sky. You may like to choose the above suggested sitting position with one of the many thousands of mudras. Gently rest the tongue against the roof of the mouth. Once you have established a comfortable position and relaxed breathing do not move the body unless it is absolutely necessary. This helps to steady the mind and encourage concentration. Metabolism, brain waves and breathing will slow down as concentration deepens due to a steady sitting position. Before starting, the body should be relaxed and calm. Command the mind to be quiet. At first the mind will wander and jump around, but will eventually become concentrated, along with the concentration of prana. If the mind persists in wandering do not force it to be still. Simply disassociate from it, and observe it as though you are watching a movie. It will gradually slow down. Be the witness, but without judgement. MUDRA The Sanskrit word mudra means psychic, emotional or devotional gesture and attitude It is also . described as a seal , short-cutor circuit by-pass Yogis have experienced mudra as attitudes of . energy flow intended to link individual pranic force with universal or cosmic force. Mudras are a combination of subtle physical movements which alter mood, attitude and perception, and which deepen awareness and concentration. A mudra may involve the whole or part of the body in combination with asana, pranayama, bandha and visualisation techniques or it may be a simple hand position. Mudras can be categorized into five main groups. Between them these groups engage substantial areas of the cerebral cortex: Hasta hand mudras Mana head mudras Kaya postural mudras Bandha lock mudras Adhara perineal mudras Ancient statues and carvings of yogis and sages have been found depicting a characteristic mudra. Mudra has symbolic meaning and neuro-psychic implications. If the individual dwells on and tries to experience the meaning contained within a mudra, he can develop the power to invoke forces within. In this way it is possible to experience inner forces which otherwise remain hidden and dormant. Though we cannot normally detect this more subtle aspect of our being, prana is nevertheless continually flowing within the physical body. For example, the position of the hands while practicing meditation is very important. Some of the prana is discharged from the tips of the fingers. The hand mudras are methods of redirecting the prana inwards. The fingers and the hands in contact with the knees close some of these circuits. The prana is kept within the body instead of being lost. At first it may seem to be an insignificant aspect of meditative practice, yet it has been found by the rishis and yogis throughout the ages, that the wrong position of the hands can affect your meditation. Advanced mudras are introduced after some proficiency has been attained in asana, pranayama and bandha, and gross blockages have been removed. Mudra is a higher practice which leads to the awakening of the kundalini. Seek proper guidance.
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DURATION Beginners may start meditating for only 10 or 15 minutes. This gives time for the body and mind to adapt and evolve to the new demands being placed upon it. As strength and stillness increase so too should the length of time spent in meditation. Gradually increasing by 5 minutes each week is a great way to train yourself in meditation. Beginners should aim to sit quietly and still for one hour, with good awareness. This may take a few months to achieve depending on the capacity and time available. Do not give up. The 10 Meditations to Inner Peace and Happiness will guide and support you through many of the ups and downs that beginners usually face when first attempting meditation. Persist and you will succeed. PAIN Pain teaches us about suffering, acceptance and compassion, and is an indication that we are going/have gone beyond our current limitation and capacity. Beginners may experience pain in the body during and after meditation. This is quite normal in the beginning and should not stop you from continuing your practice. Pain, discomfort or stiffness may be experienced in the knees, ankles, thighs, buttocks, back, neck or shoulders. Simple discomfort will soon disappear, usually after a few weeks of daily practice. As you train the body to sit quietly, the muscles and joints necessary to hold the body in meditation will develop and strengthen with regular practice. Experiment by meditating in different positions; lying down or sitting in a chair, but always meditate everyday without fail. The practice of asana contains several good stretches that can certainly help you through these first challenging stages of meditation. Massaging the painful parts of your body before and after meditation with pure coconut oil can help improve circulation and strengthen your body. Headaches, tensions and depression during or after meditation may also indicate incorrect practice. If you experience extreme pain anywhere in the body then you should terminate your practice immediately and seek medical advice before continuing. In TIME Asia, Pamela Paul wrote, Over the past three years, 13,000 Americans were treated in an emergency room or doctor office for yoga-related injuries, according to the Consumer Product s Safety Commission. EXPECTATIONS Do not expect overnight results. Disappointment may result from not understanding basic concepts and theories. It may take many years of discipline to achieve success, and in time you will understand the need for patience and persistence. Meditation is a skill that responds well to practice. Be Patient with yourself. As Milarepa, the great Tibetan yogi said, Do not entertain hopes for realisation, but practise all your life. At the beginning even if your meditation does not seem to be going well, remember that by applying effort to training in meditation you are creating the mental karma to experience inner peace in the future. So even if you feel that you are not making any progress, you are at least sowing the seeds of future happiness. Mumon Yamada Roshi states, One inch of sitting, makes one inch of Buddha. If we sit while one inch of incense burns, our spirit naturally becomes clean. After you have been regularly and correctly practising meditation for only one month you will already begin to notice a deep sense of peace and harmony emanating from inside you. After several years of regular meditation considerable changes take place in the mind, brain and the nervous system. The whole mind and nervous system becomes remodelled. You will have a new mind, a new heart and a new view of the universe. PROGRESS Nelson Mandela once said, After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. Progress can be ascertained in different ways. The first sign of progress is waking up early and practising regularly at the same time every day. Other signs of progress are sitting for one hour in meditation, sitting for three hours in meditation, etc. But progress also depends on
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the quality of practice, not just duration. Correct practice involves a well structured and systematic program designed for individual requirements. Each of us has a different starting point depending on temperament and capacity. We begin where we are and how we are, and whatever happens, happens. We should not compare or compete with others. We should celebrate our individuality and accept our personal starting point. The actual practice of meditation takes each person in a different direction. Each of us is required to pay careful attention to the direction we are taking, so that we know where we are going and how we are going to get there. This careful observation will allow us to discover something new about ourselves. When we gain more understanding of ourselves and reach a point we have personally never been before, that is progress. The more we progress, the more we become aware of the holistic nature of our being, realising that we are made of body, breath, mind, and more. Reaching our full potential as complete human beings means incorporating all aspects of ourself, emphasising all aspects of human life, including our relationships with others, our behaviour, our health, our breathing and our meditation. RETREATS Meditation retreats are extremely beneficial to our lives, especially if taken two or three times per year. They are usually held in a specially designed facility, located in a quite and beautiful natural environment. They help us to take a break from the hustle and bustle of daily activity, and the stresses and strains of work and family life. Retreats are a powerful way of programming our minds and bodies to develop good habits and routines that, upon our return home, help us through the ups and downs of our normal everyday lives. Usually, all cooking and cleaning is organised by the retreat manager, giving us the chance to eliminate mundane tasks and concentrate on the object of the retreat. Light and nutritious vegetarian meals are the usual diet at retreats. Noble Silence the principle of minimum communication is a powerful technique practised at most authentic retreats to promote inner awareness. Before undertaking any kind of retreat, participants must be prepared to develop an attitude of commitment and resolve to turn their minds inwards for the full duration. Meditation retreats are a time for self-discovery and selfrealisation, where many participants experience profound personal insight and spiritual progress. Three day retreats are very useful for cleansing and recharging our whole being with determination, strength and guidance. This may include inspirational and relaxing techniques, as there is not enough time to go deep into the subconscious, and root-out and destroy our demons. A seven to ten day retreat is required for learning advanced techniques, deeper self-purification, and taking our commitment and devotion to the next level. Correct preparation and inner strength must be developed before undertaking thirty day retreats and longer. ADVANCED YOGIC MEDITATION Central to the philosophy of yoga is the belief that divinity or God is already inside us, but has remained dormant, veiled by the illusion that happiness can be found in achieving material possessions and desires. Yogis believe that meditation is the art of controlling the mind in order to gradually awaken and reconnect us to the divinity within. Initially this brings inner peace and happiness to our life, but with regular practice the layers of the mind are peeled away, allowing us to discover for ourselves deeper realms of consciousness. Advanced Tantra Yoga meditation techniques involve unblocking and purifying the energy channels and energy centres in the prana body. This can be symbolised by the awakening of the creative energy sleeping in the base of the spine. It is then raised up through the spine to the crown of the head, which is the seat of pure consciousness. The fruit of meditation is the union of this creative energy with pure consciousness, resulting in complete absorption with the Divine. This process unveils the spiritual potential of man, releasing us from our attachment to the physical world. By transcending the mental and physical worlds we attain the realisation known as samadhi, where there is no separation, no duality between the individual human spirit and the Supreme Universal Spirit, or God. We are One
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with the Universe. This is the supreme goal of human life - enlightenment being aware of the ultimate truth of all things at all times. Depending on the karma, capacity and devotion of the individual, this may take many years of diligent practice. It may take a second. HIGHER CONSCIOUSNESS LIFESTYLE Those who truly wish to support and advance their meditation and reach their full potential as spiritual beings should choose to lead a higher consciousness lifestyle. (See Appendix 3 & 4). This requires greater self-discipline and may include a strictly vegetarian diet, reducing the hours of sleep and conservation of energy. Morality plays an important role in spiritual evolution, i.e. not killing, not stealing, not lying, not committing sexual misconduct and not taking intoxicating substances. Truly enlightened people, those who experience happiness daily, are prepared to put off short-term pleasure for the sake of long term fulfilment. They tackle their weaknesses and fears head on, even if at first the unknown brings discomfort. They resolve to live a higher consciousness lifestyle, improving every aspect of themself ceaselessly and continuously. In time things that were once difficult become easy. Fears that once prevented them from all the happiness, health and prosperity they deserve fall away. As Albert Einstein said, True religion is real living; living with all one's soul, with all one's goodness and righteousness. Cultivating a spiritual life is enhanced by giving less importance to the physical world such as materialism, desires and pleasures of the senses. However, do not meditate so much that you neglect your obligations to family and employer. Instead incorporate meditation and wisdom into your daily life, creating peace and harmony. As you become more adept at meditating, extend your meditations beyond quietly sitting alone. Throughout the day be aware of your thought, speech and action. Observe your happiness, your suffering, your pleasure and pain. Observe with a peaceful mind, without reacting. Tune in to your higher consciousness and live a more meaningful life. MINDFULNESS THROUGHOUT THE DAY At the end of sitting meditation it is recommended that you lie down and simply observe the beauty and joy of the present moment. This is the feeling of inner peace and happiness. While meditating we are practising being in balance and harmony, so that we have a good idea of where we are heading and what it is meant to feel like. The goal is to train the mind to maintain this awareness in every moment, so that we are mindful throughout the ups and downs of daily life, and spontaneously create compassion and kindness, peace and happiness in all our activities. (See Advanced Techniques Mindful Walking Practice makes perfect. Contemplate this for a few ). moments before finishing your sitting meditation. SEARCHING Bhodidharma taught, The fools of this world prefer to look for sages far away. They don't believe that the wisdom of their own mind is the sage . . . the sutras say, Mind is the teaching But people . of no understanding don't believe in their own mind or that by understanding this teaching they can become a sage. They prefer to look for distant knowledge and long for things in space, buddha-images, light, incense, and colours. They fall prey to falsehood and lose their minds to insanity. Too much searching is a common obstacle and may be caused by doubt, confusion, greed, fear, etc. Searching is an improtant part of choosing the right path according to your temperament and capacity. Searching may include reading, attending lectures and classes, travelling abroad as well as smelling the flowers in your own garden. It is a personal choice which path you take, which guru you follow, which system you practise. It may include untrodden paths, new avenues, or personal beliefs combined with world religions and philosophies. It is different for everyone. We are all different important, aspects of creation, part of the supreme universal consciouness, and therefore require to satisfy our own understanding and perceptions. The main thing is to find what works for you, what is suitable for you, what motivates you to get out of bed
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every morning and practise. You must decide. It is the regular and systematic practice of this path that will eventually lead you to spiritual progress. Chopping and changing: this style today, that style tomorrow, this spiritual guide today, that one tomorrow, is a sure combination for slow progress. Practising different techniques every day with no thread is the long way round to achieve success. There is too much searching, wondering, and questions. Changing paths must be kept to a minimum. As Aldous Huxley said, Man approaches the unattainable truth through a succession of errors. Therefore, learn from your mistakes. Use the techniques that are available to you. They are like road maps. They show the most direct way to get where we want to go. Take your time and make a choice. Question what you are doing and why. Know why you have chosen this path. Have faith. As you go along make changes according to your individual requirements and realisations. Keep asking questions, keep exploring and observing. Developing a daily personal practice is the key to success.

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OBSTACLES ON THE PATH


The problems we face arise from within. Circumstances only act as a catalyst to bring them to the surface. Swami Satyananda Saraswati

In the Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krsna tells Arjuna, Out of many men, few strive for perfection, and out of those who strive for perfection only a few succeed. This is because there are many obstacles on the path of yoga and meditation that all students are faced with right from the beginning of their yogic career. Those who seriously take up the spiritual path and begin to do systematic daily practice will soon come face to face with certain peculiar difficulties and disappointing experiences that at first tend to dismay and discourage. Failure is the pillar of success. This again stresses the importance for proper guidance from a qualified instructor. Serious students will of course make every effort to overcome these difficulties, but there are also those who are not ready for the physical, mental and spiritual evolution offered by the science of meditation. Meditation is not separate from the rest of life. All situations provide opportunity to practice, to grow in wisdom and compassion. The right effort is for us to be mindful in all circumstances without running away from the world, and to learn to act without grasping or attachment. The foundation of spiritual life is virtue and morality, and are a fundamental part of meditation. Take care with the basics such as moderation in eating, sleeping and speech. These help bring the inner life into peace. A life of excess is difficult soil for the growth of wisdom. Do not imitate the way others practice or compare yourself to them. Learn to use your own breath (See Meditation 5 and everyday life as the place of meditation and you will surely grow in wisdom. ) All meditators are advised to study with a qualified yoga instructor to avoid misunderstanding of fundamental principles, and to follow a purely yogic lifestyle by practising non-violence, truthfulness and purity. The following guidance is for obstacles that are commonly encountered on the path of yoga and meditation. PROPER GUIDANCE The search for peace and enlightenment requires correct understanding. Many people get lost on the path through incorrect views and miscomprehension. Successful progress is limited without
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proper guidance. Books, CDs and DVDs can be very useful, but can never replace individual guidance from a qualified and experienced teacher. Basic principles and techniques must be fully researched and understood. With correct guidance your own understanding and inner wisdom will emerge through self study and diligence.

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A GOOD PLACE TO PRACTISE Beginners are advised to find a clean and quiet place to practise, sheltered from extreme wind, heat and cold. Advanced meditators should be mindful throughout the day in all places and all situations. MAKE TIME TO PRACTISE Wake up earlier and practise before your busy schedule. It is suggested that meditation and relaxation techniques can also be practised in lunch breaks and in the evening before sleep. LIMITATIONS If you are in pain and must move your body, then you may quietly lie down and continue meditating, but do not fall asleep. Over-practising produces mental tension and tiredness that weaken the mind and body. 1-2 hours of yoga and 1-2 hour of sitting meditation per day is optimum for achieving safe results. Rushing produces poor results and may cause injury. Seek proper guidance. DISTRACTIONS Newcomers to meditation may find that their mind is easily distracted by a variety of things including, noise, light, pain, uncomfortable position, insects and thoughts including regret, fear, doubt, planning and daydreaming. It is important to do your best to remove all distraction before you begin. This may include finding a quiet place to meditate, closing the curtains, taking a few minutes to relax into a comfortable position, and covering yourself with a light blanket. When you realise that your attention has been distracted away from the technique, try your best to simply observe the distraction, but without becoming attached to it. Acknowledge that you were distracted and gently return to the technique. This can be quite challenging for beginners, but with persistence and regular practice, the mind learns to become immediately calm and focused as you settle into a daily meditation routine.
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EGO The ego can be a huge obstacle on the path to enlightenment. Self-importance, self-cherishing and selfishness all need to be conquered and reversed in order to make spiritual progress. To equalize self and others is to cherish others as much as we cherish ourself. Until now we have only cherished ourself. Shantideva wrote, All the suffering there is in the world arises from wishing ourself to be happy. Therefore, if we wish to be truly happy we must become selfless, i.e. by giving up the ego. But if I am not me, then who is the thinker? Who eats the dinner? Who is reading this book? The self cannot imagine the self not existing. The idea of giving up our ego seems at first quite frightening. After all, you are all you have! But the self is an illusion. You can wake up from this illusion. Giving up the ego actually comes as a big relief. When the ego falls away a freedom exists that is absolutely wonderful. This concept is beyond where you are at the present time. Understanding can only be found through regular meditation and regular acts of compassion and kindness. BAD DIET A bad diet can have a serious detrimental effect on your general health as well as on your progress in meditation. For optimum health eat locally grown vegetarian foods that are fresh and clean. Seek proper guidance in determining the best diet for your constitution. NEGATIVITY AND DEPRESSION I hear many people tell me that they can do yoga because they are overweight, or that they can t t meditate because they can sit still for a single minute. The whole point of t practising yoga and meditation is to improve from wherever we are, and to become healthier and happier. Negativity and depression drain prana. Correct practice of yoga and meditation makes us strong, cheerful and healthy. Humour is a rare gift of nature. It removes depression and brings joy and cheerfulness. Attract positive energy. DESIRES Unfulfilled desires bring sorrow. The mind that lusts after many things is not concentrated on one object. Be positive, specific and realistic in manifesting your goals and dreams. DOUBT Doubt is a common disease that plagues the foundation of personal progress. Yoga and meditation are scientific techniques to perfect health of mind and body. This means that with correct practice they have been medically and historically proven to work. With regular practice, inner strength and peace will emerge removing all doubt and confusion. FEAR Fear drains prana and eats away at the heart of man. Robin S. Sharma writes, Fear is a mental disease. It is a controlled response. It is a life-sucking disease that can easily consume your energy, creativity and spirit. When fear rears its ugly head, beat it down quickly. The best way to do that is to do the thing you fear. Understand the anatomy of fear. It is your own creation, and is as easy to tear down as it is to erect. Methodically search for and then destroy every fear that has secretly slid into the fortress of your mind. Be fearless! This will give you enormous confidence, happiness and peace of mind. DARK THOUGHTS Dark thoughts may arise once you begin meditation and yoga. They are deep-rooted karmas coming to the surface. Do not be afraid. Keep practising and you will purify your entire being. Just practice in the right direction and leave the rest to your karma.

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BAD COMPANY Bad company disturbs the tranquility of the mind and body. Avoid noisy, dirty and unfriendly places and people. Choose your friends carefully. However, do not fear places where many things come into contact with the senses, if you must be there. Enlightenment does not mean deaf and blind. Just be mindful and do not be fooled. BAD MORAL CONDUCT Virtue and morality are the mother and father of spiritual cultivation, providing us with the proper nourishment and direction. Pra Rajaprommajarn, Director of Vipassana for Northern Thailand wrote Golden and silver rays in the sky precede the sunrise. In the same way the dawn of the noble path is preceded by morality. Bad moral conduct disturbs the tranquility of the mind and body and produces negative karma. Live a pure life, with a clear conscience. LATE NIGHTS Late nights drain prana, weakens the mind and body and disrupts yogic routine. Adults should try and maintain regular sleeping hours from 10pm to 6am. LAZINESS AND INERTIA Daily exercise and meditation is essential for a healthy mind and body. There is no room for laziness on the path to inner peace and happiness. It is always hard at first to get the ball rolling. Every effort must be made to get into a good routine. After one month, routine becomes habit. Plenty of effort is required to make progress. FATIGUE Fatigue is harmful to the mind and body. Avoid over-exertion. Too much work, food, sex and sleep are not conducive to success in meditation and yoga. Practicing when tired weakens the body further. When you are tired lie down and practise relaxation techniques. When you are sick lie down to practise mediation and observe your sickness. (See Vipassana Meditation ). AVOID HEATED DISCUSSIONS AND DEBATES Heated discussions and debates drain prana. Only insecure minds need to justify their methods. If you know Truth your mind is at peace. Accept everyone as a unique and wonderful being, but do not worry if you disagree with them. Try to help them by sharing your wisdom but do not get caught up in trying to convert them. They will find their own way eventually. TALKATIVENESS Listening is a great virtue on the path of wisdom. Talkativeness drains prana and disturbs the tranquility of the mind. Showing off drains prana, inflates the ego and may cause injury. TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE These oppose the purification process of yoga and meditation. They disrupt the flow of prana and destroy the inner strength and vitality of the mind and body. They can cause serious mental and physical illness.

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www.taichibali.com/yoga.php YOGA RETREAT EDITION COPYRIGHT 2008 MADE IN BALI


This book is created with love and distributed free. It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.

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STRETCHING BEFORE MEDITATION


Yoga will emerge as a mighty world power and will change the course of world events. Swami Satyananda Saraswati

EXERCISE FOR HEALTH The ancient secrets to health and happiness and modern medical research agree that regular exercise is essential in maintaining a healthy heart, lungs, digestion, circulation, muscles, bones and joints. All systems in the mind and body require regular exercise in order to achieve optimum health and freedom. Physical exercise is also an excellent way to release the daily build up of mental and emotional tension and stress. It is just as important to stretch the body before sitting in meditation, as this removes many physical and mental blockages and energizes the whole system by improving circulation and metabolism. It promotes strength and stamina in the legs and back, which are essential in developing the ability to sit comfortably for extended periods of time. There are many physical fitness and health systems available today such as Yoga, Pilates, Five Tibetan Rites, Chi Kung and Tai Chi, as well as aerobics, jogging, swimming, cycling, sports and walking in nature. Hippocrates said, Walking is man's best medicine. However, it will be up to you to choose a physical exercise routine that inspires and motivates you, and suits your constitution and capacity. The following meditation warm-ups are a gentle way to prepare the mind and body for meditation. The classic yoga techniques of surya namaskar and asana may also be practiced, according to your constitution and capacity. Seek proper guidance.

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PAWANMUKTASANA
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The Bihar School of Yoga, Munger, India, recommends the following Pawanmuktasana Series. They are a group of simple movements and stretches that are designed to remove blockages that prevent the free flow of energy in the body and mind. They are extremely useful in preparing the body for sitting in meditation for extended periods of time. These techniques are clearly described in Asana Pranayama Mudra Bandha by Swami Satyananda Saraswati, (See References a book that meets university text requirements. These techniques have become an ), integral part of Himalaya Yoga, and should be practised regularly by beginners for several weeks. Toe Bending Padanguli Naman Ankle Rotation Goolf Chakra Ankle Crank Goolf Ghoornan Knee Bending Janu Naman Knee Rotation Janu Chakra Hip Rotation Shroni Chakra Waist Rotating Pose Kati Chakrasana Half-butterfly Ardha Titaliasana Full Butterfly Poorna Titali Gesture of Psychic Union Yoga Mudra Crow Walking Kawa Chalasana Wind Releasing Pose Vayu Nishkasana Abdominal Stretch Udarakarshanasana Animal Relaxation Pose Shaithalyasana Chopping Wood Kashtha Takshanasana Salutation Pose Namaskarasana Wind Releasing Pose Vayu Nishkasana Neck Movements Greeva Sanchalana Palm Tree Tadasana Swaying Palm Tree Tiryaka Tadasana Dynamic Energy Pose Druta Utkatasana Universal Spinal Twist Shava Udarakarshanasana Rocking and Rolling Jhulana Lurhakanasana Leg Lock Pose Supta Pawanmuktasana Boat Pose Naukasana Corpse Pose Savasana

Warning: To avoid injury, always consult your medical doctor before commencing any health program. The amount of physical activity you perform should be safely within your physical limitations. Proceed with a suitable and structured programme.

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SURYA NAMASKAR
The sun is a symbol of rebirth into spiritual consciousness and immortality, just as the sun dies each evening so it is reborn each morning. Swami Satyananda Saraswati

SALUTATIONS TO THE SUN The Sanskrit word surya means , and the word sun namaskar means salutations or worship Therefore this practice is known as . salutations to the sun It is first mentioned in the . Riga Veda and Yajur Veda, the ancient scriptures of India. Surya namaskar is a dynamic sequence of twelve positions that are synchronised with the breathing. It is not a part of traditional yoga, but because it is such a wonderful practice it has been adopted into the techniques of yoga by many gurus, teachers and students. This has led to many new variations. Presented here is the surya namaskar I learned from the Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Centre, Vrindavan, India. The sun has been adored since time immemorial. Ancient people worshipped the sun with awe, knowing that the sun generates the heat and light necessary to sustain life. They knew that without it there would be no life. But the sun was not only worshipped because of its material nature and power. The sun itself is a symbol. It symbolises spiritual illumination, wisdom and knowledge, the light in the darkness of ignorance. It represents the essence, the spirituality which exists in all material things. The sun is a symbol of rebirth into spiritual consciousness and immortality. The twelve cyclic positions of surya namaskar represent the twelve phases of the sun each year as it passes through each of the signs of the zodiac. Recognising the symbolism of the sun is a stepping stone to spiritual awareness. Traditionally the yogis of the Himalayas performed twelve rounds of surya namaskar each morning before meditation, or before breakfast. It is recommended that this should become an essential and integral part of your health program, and combined with other yogic techniques. Surya namaskar is a powerful way to warm up the mind and body before meditation. Consciously moving and breathing through the twelve positions of surya namaskar revitalises the whole body, removes all signs of sleep and is excellent for preparing the body and mind so that maximum benefits can be derived from the subsequent meditation practices. It loosens all the joints, flexes all the muscles of the body, massages the internal organs, activates the respiratory, circulatory and digestive systems, as well as helping to tone all the other systems of the body, harmonising the whole mind-body complex. Surya namaskar is a priceless physical and mental workout for all those people who live in cities and towns and who find insufficient time and opportunity to take adequate exercise. People in the country automatically exercise their bodies and relax their minds, as well as feel an intimate relationship with everything around them. It is urban people who suffer from the majority of diseases. The main reason is lack of peace of mind and exercise. If performed correctly with full awareness and co-ordination with the breath, there is no other exercise that surpasses it. Surya namaskar consists of five essential aspects which must be performed correctly to gain optimum results from the practice: Physical Postures There are twelve physical positions. Although these positions can vary from school to school, the basic structure of surya namaskar is the same. These twelve positions flow gracefully and rhythmically into one another. Each position is an asana in its own right, although here they are only held for a few seconds, where as true asana is held for 3 to 5 minutes. The twelve positions
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BREATHING The whole movement of surya namaskar from start to finish is synchronised with the breathing, and extra time should be spent perfecting this co-ordination. Each position is associated with either inhalation, exhalation or retention of breath. Nothing is forced or unnatural, for the breathing naturally corresponds to the movement of the body. Each breath is smooth and deep, using all the lungs. Surya namaskar may be performed in conjunction with ujjayi pranayama. (See Advanced Techniques). AWARENESS Awareness of the body, mind and breathing must be maintained throughout the practice. Direct all your positive thoughts to yourself. Without awareness the many beneficial results are reduced. MANTRA There are specific mantras - mystical words or sounds of power - for each of the twelve positions. These will be taught to you when your yoga instructor feels you have perfected the positions, breathing, synchronicity, rhythm and awareness. The mantras are evocative sounds and through their power of vibration have subtle, yet powerful and penetrating effects on the mind and body. The mantra may be repeated silently or aloud, but with full awareness. RELAXATION This is not strictly part of surya namaskar. However, it is a necessary supplementary practice that should be performed without fail on completing surya namaskar. Any relaxation technique can be adopted, but the most effective is to relax in the corpse pose. (See Advanced Techniques). ADVICE AND PRECAUTIONS People suffering from sciatica, slipped disc, high blood pressure, coronary ailments and any other serious illness should seek professional medical advice before commencing surya namaskar. Although surya namaskar is traditionally practised at sunrise facing east and at sunset facing west it can be practised at almost any time of day and in any place. No special preparations are necessary except that the stomach, bowels and bladder should be empty. If you feel tired during the day, a few rounds of surya namaskar will quickly restore the lost vitality, both mentally and physically, helping to remove emotional disturbances. The twelve positions constitute half a complete round. One full round consists of twentyfour positions. This is because the first twelve positions are repeated except that in the second half of the round the left leg is extended backwards instead of the right leg. The breathing and mantras remain unchanged. You should first familiarise yourself with the twelve positions, concerning yourself with only mastering the sequence of physical movement. Only when all the movements are performed automatically are you ready to begin synchronising them with the breathing. Later the mantras can be learned and synchronised with each position. In the final form, surya namaskar consists of awareness of physical movement, breathing and the mantras, all welded together in an integrated whole. Surya namaskar is ideally practised before asana and meditation, as it helps to remove any sleepiness and loosens up the body in preparation for all subsequent practices. The number of rounds performed depends entirely on the health of the individual and the time available. Beginners should start with two or three rounds per day, increasing by one round every week, gradually becoming adjusted to the increased exercise. Twelve is the optimum as more than this number makes the body tired, but without extra benefit. At the slightest signs of
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systematically stretch and massage all the muscles and joints, as well as all the internal organs in the body.

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exhaustion stop the practice and relax the body. Do not strain yourself by doing more rounds than your body will comfortably handle. Pain should never be endured with the practice of surya namaskar. Pain is treated as a stop signal. Seek professional guidance. You may do surya namaskar as fast or as slow as you choose, as long as you can remain aware of the positions, breathing and mantras. Shallow breathing and incorrect mantras should be avoided as these may be signs of going too fast. Eventually you will find a natural tempo that will come automatically after several weeks of practice. It is best to practise in the open air and on a mat or blanket. Face the sun at sunrise or sunset to absorb the healing energy of the sun. It is not advisable to do surya namaskar before sleeping because it activates the entire body which is the opposite of the desired effect for sleeping. There are no sex or age limitations. However, women should not practise surya namaskar after their fourth month of pregnancy, but it can be continued after childbirth. Women are advised to reduce the number of rounds of surya namaskar during menstruation as a precautionary measure, although its ability to massage the internal organs is extremely therapeutic. Do not practise surya namaskar if you are ill because at this time all the energy in the body needs to be internalised to heal and remove the ailment. Surya namaskar is a powerful method for removing toxins from the body. This process must be done slowly to avoid any symptoms that may result from rapid elimination. If fever or boils occur, reduce the number of rounds. Plenty of water should be consumed to avoid dehydration and to support healthy bodily function. Warning: To avoid injury always consult your medical doctor before commencing any health program. The amount of physical activity you perform should be safely within your physical limitations. Proceed with a suitable and structured program.

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GUIDELINES FOR SURYA NAMASKAR


1. Professional guidance is essential, especially in correctly understanding and applying fundamental principles. Teachers are very useful especially for beginners in helping them stay on the path and avoid misunderstandings. 2. Always practise surya namaskar in a clean and quiet place in nature, sheltered from excess heat, cold and wind. 3. Before you begin ensure that the stomach, bladder and bowels are empty. 4. Wear loose and comfortable clothes made from natural fibres. Remove all jewellery, watches and spectacles/glasses. 5. Be gentle. Do not perform more rounds than you can comfortably complete. If you practise every day then you may choose to start with 3 rounds for the first month. Increase by adding 1 round per week, slowly building up to 12. Do not strain. Do not over-stretch your limit. 6. Breathe gently, smoothly and completely through the nose. Do not strain. Do not rush. 7. Direct all your positive thoughts to yourself. Awareness of the body, mind and breathing must be maintained throughout the practice. Without awareness the many beneficial results are reduced. 8. Be patient. After completing surya namaskar, lie down in corpse pose and completely relax for a few minutes, or until your breathing and heartbeat have returned to normal. 9. Surya namaskar is designed to warm up and loosen the whole body. Always practise surya namaskar before your asana and meditation session. 42

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SURYA NAMASKAR OF SIVANANDA YOGA


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ASANA
Sensing where your edges are and learning to hold the body there with awareness, moving with its soft subtle shifts, can be called playing the edge . Erich Schiffmann

STRETCHING WITH AWARENESS According to Maharishi Patanjali, asana is the third limb of Raja Yoga. In his famous work, The Yoga Sutras, Patanjali describes asanaas, that position which is comfortable and steady. In this context, asana is practised to develop the ability to sit comfortably in meditation for an extended period of time. However, in the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, Swami Swatmarama writes that it means something more. The hatha yogis found that specific body positions open the energy channels and psychic centres within the body. They found that developing control of the body through these practices enabled them to control mind and energy. This means that asana is a tool to higher awareness, providing the stable foundation necessary for the exploration of the body, breath, mind and higher states. It should therefore be practised first on the path towards spiritual progress. Although many people practise asana only for physical health, they are primarily intended to gain full awareness and control of the body. They prepare the body to sit relaxed and comfortable without pain or discomfort for extended periods of time, promoting deep meditation. Asana is a series of physical stretches and steady postures that have been inspired by meditation and the close examination of nature. Asana works on all levels; physical, mental and spiritual. The body, mind and spirit can all become steady with the practice of asana. When held for sufficient periods of time, with deep concentration and awareness, they help to direct prana (vital life-force energy) to different parts of the body depending on which asana is being practiced. If practised regularly the whole system can be toned and revitalised. A well structured asana program exercises every part of the body, stretching and toning the muscles and joints, the spine and the entire skeletal system, working, not only on the body s frame, but also on the internal organs, glands and nerves, restoring all systems to radiant health. T.K.V. Desikachar writes, A good yoga practice is not haphazard, but instead follows certain principles. The principles that give our practice an intelligent structure are:
v

Begin where you are. Warm up and loosen the whole body at the start of the session. Before you perform an asana make sure you know and can perform an appropriate counter pose. Practise an asana dynamically before holding it. Practise the counter pose immediately following the main asana. Make sure the counter pose is simpler that the main asana. Traditionally there were 84,000 asanas. Approximately one hundred are in use today, of which thirty may be of benefit to the average practitioner. The selection presented in this book is designed to give the reader only a visual indication. They are not meant for general use. Thousands of books have already been written about stretching, asana and physical health. The purpose of this book is to put meditation back into the heart and soul of yoga practice. Therefore,
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no detailed asana techniques have been included. Asana techniques are clearly described in Asana Pranayama Mudra Bandhaby Swami Satyananda Saraswati. It is suggested that you join a yoga class to fully experience the precautions and benefits of these techniques. After studying yoga in many countries for over fifteen years, I have found that asana is being taught and practised mainly in three ways: Dynamic Asana This technique has been successfully taught by T.K.V. Desikachar in India, and is highly recommended for beginners. It is performed by gently moving into the asana combined with the breath. The body and breath is held for 2 seconds and then released. This may be repeated 5 to 10 times depending on the capacity of the individual. This is useful in gently warming up the body when first attempting asana, and in gaining control over the rhythm of the breath. Static Asana - According to Maharishi Patanjali the traditional meaning is when each asana is held for as long as it is comfortable. The breath is not held, it is smooth and deep. All positive thoughts are directed inwards, either on the breath, a specific chakra or body part. Beginners usually start by holding the asana for only 30 seconds to 1 minute. For optimum benefit the asana is held for 3 to 5 minutes which is attained over several years. This facilitates removal of blockages and deeper opening of the energy channels, as well as promoting stamina and endurance. Sequenced Asana Similar to surya namaskar, this involves moving into an asana while taking one complete breath, and then holding it for about 2 seconds before moving and breathing into the next asana in the sequence. This technique has been incorporated into many modern styles of yoga mainly due to the teachings of Sri Krishnamacharya and Sri Pattabhi Jois. Sequenced asanas are usually performed in conjunction with ujjayi pranayama and mantras to increase body heat, purification and concentration. VINYASA The Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute in Mysore, India, states that in order to perform asana correctly one must incorporate the use of vinyasa. As in surya namaskar, Ashtanga Yoga involves synchronising a sequence of movements, breath control and focus points with asana. Vinyasa is a breathing and movement system. The purpose of vinyasa is for internal cleansing. For each movement, there is one breath. Synchronising breathing and movement in this way heats the blood, allowing it to circulate more freely. Improved blood circulation relieves joint pain and removes toxins and disease from the internal organs. This process produces intense internal heat and a profuse, purifying sweat that detoxifies muscles and organs and eliminates the six poisons. The result is improved circulation, a light and strong body, and calming of the mind in preparation for meditation. TRISTHANA The Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute in Mysore, India, states that in order to perform asana correctly one must also incorporate the use of tristhana. Tristhana consists of three integrated actions: asana, pranayama, drishti. They cover the three levels of purification: the body, nervous system and mind and are always performed in conjunction with each other: Asana - There are three levels of sequenced asana. The Primary Series - yoga chikitsa detoxifies and aligns the body. The Intermediate Series - nadi shodhana - cleanses and opens
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Pranayama - The breath technique employed in vinyasa is known as ujjayi pranayama - the freedom from bondage breath. This technique involves gentle breathing combined with slightly contracting the glottis in the throat. It produces a sound similar to the soft snoring of a sleeping baby. This has a heating and tranquilising effect on the mind and body. Drishti - Concentrating the gaze to a fixed place during asana is called drishti. Drishti purifies and stabilises mind functioning. There are nine drishti points: 1. Nose, 2. Between the eyebrows, 3. Navel, 4. Thumb, 5. Hands, 6. Feet, 7. Up, 8. Right side, 9. Left side. Mind focusing on breath and drishti attains a deep state of concentration. This opens up the path of practice of dharana and dhyana. (See Raja Yoga ). ERICH SCHIFFMANN AND ASANA
Your skill in yoga has little to do with your flexibility or where your edges happen to be... It about s how sensitively you play your edges, no matter where they are... This is a very freeing idea... Normally we have an idea of how the asana should be... We have a rough idea of how deep we should be able to go into a stretch, what we should look like while we are there, and how long we should be able to stay... We are often more aware of where we aren than of where we are... This gap produces a feeling of conflict and t frustration, that where you are and who you are is insufficient, and that if you were truly doing yoga properly and were a good and evolved person, then you would be somewhere other than where you are now... If this is the case, your asana practice will be permeated with the effort of going somewhere else... It will be future orientated, the present being only a stepping stone to the future You will miss being present... You will miss the harmonious flow of prana and the benefits will be limited... A large part of the art and skill of asana is sensing just how far to move into a stretch... If you don t go far enough there is no challenge to the muscles, no intensity, no stretch, and little possibility for opening... Going too far, however, is an obvious violation of the body, increasing the possibility of both physical pain and injury... Somewhere in between these two points is a degree of stretch that is in balance: intensity without pain, use without abuse, strenuous without strain... You can experience this balance in every asana you do... This place in the stretch is called your edge... The body edge in asana is the place just before s pain, but not pain itself... Pain tells you where the limits of your physical conditioning lie... Edges are marked by pain and define your limits... How far you can fold forward, for example, is limited by your flexibility edge, to go any further hurts and is actually counterproductive... The length of your stay in an asana is determined by your endurance edge... Your interest in an asana is a function of your attention edge The ideal state for practising asana is to be as willing and relaxed as possible, as non-resisting as possible, so that one part of you is not in opposition to another... You can then comfortably press your edges open... This practice becomes one of being relaxed and willing at your deeper edges. This isn necessarily easy... It difficult to t s stay relaxed in the midst of a high-intensity stretch... This is a large part of what you should be aiming for in your asana practice... Sensing where your edges are and learning to hold the body there with awareness, moving with its soft subtle shifts, can be called playing the edge ... The process of sensitively playing with your edges and achieving perfect energy flow is not merely the means to achieve the pose, it is the pose... This is what asana, the physical aspect of yoga, is fundamentally all about... Your body is limited in its movement not only through its genetic makeup, but also through the conditionings that have accrued through the years... Asana is a way of exploring these limits... As a by-product of this exploration, your edges and limits will change in a positive way. You will change...

Excerpts from:

Yoga: The Spirit and Practice of Moving into Stillnessby Erich Schiffman 1996 Pocket Books New York USA

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energy channels purifying the nervous system. The Advanced Series - sthira bhaga - integrates and consolidates the practice.

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EACH POSTURE IS EVER EVOLVING


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Our current state of physical health, including our degree of flexibility, is determined by two important factors: The condition of our body at birth What has happened to our body since birth

According to the Law of Karma (Appendix 2), our previous life has determined the starting point of this life. This includes which parents we have, where we are born and whether we are healthy at birth, or not. There is nothing we can do about this now because the Law of Karma states that the fruits of our past actions must take affect. From birth to the present day we are also subject to the Law of Karma from our previous life that takes fruit in this, and all the different actions, events and circumstances that have happened to us in this life. These include diet, exercise, personal beliefs, work, environment, disease, accident and ageing. From this moment on we are also creating our condition of health for the future. The way we are sitting to read this book, lighting, thoughts, our next meal. As you can see we are ever changing and evolving according to the results of our past and present actions. Our bodies are constantly changing, rejuvenating, growing older, and eventually dying. Yoga is a science. This means that the regular and systematic practice of yoga will have a positive effect on our mind and body, if practised correctly. This is fact. Like the slow changes in nature, yoga is designed as a gentle process that leads to growth, expansion, propagation, removal of blockages, flexibility, optimum weight and health. The faster changes in nature are often destructive and catastrophic. The human body responds well to evolution, not revolution. The gentler and longer it takes to change, the deeper and longer lasting is the healing. Asana is a gentle and deep method for promoting optimum health, and for holding back the effects that time and ageing have on our body. As our bodies change, so does each asana. Therefore, there is no such thing as a completed or ideal asana. Each posture is an ever evolving, constantly moving energy phenomenon that is different from day to day, moment to moment, and person to person. This is the science of asana. ADVICE AND PRECAUTIONS The following advice and precautions should be carefully observed before practising asana. It is highly recommended to study asana with a qualified and experienced yoga instructor. Though any person may start to practise asana, they are only truly effective and beneficial if practised correctly and in the proper manner, and after correct preparation. It is recommended that you warm-up the body with surya namaskar or dynamic stretches before practising asana. This will loosen up the body, remove simple physical blockages and can greatly enhance your asana and meditation session. Regular, systematic practice with patience, gentleness and determination is essential for success. It is advised that you take it really slowly at first. Asana practice should be sensible and well structured. Each asana should be performed slowly with complete awareness of the body, breathing and mind. Inverted and advanced asanas should be practised with caution to avoid negative side-effects. Warning: People suffering from sciatica, slipped disc, high blood pressure, coronary ailments and any other serious illness should seek professional medical advice before commencing asana. To avoid injury always consult your medical doctor before commencing any health program. The amount of physical activity you perform should be safely within your physical limitations. Proceed with a suitable and structured program.
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GUIDELINES FOR ASANA


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1.

2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7.

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12. 13.

Professional guidance is essential, especially in correctly understanding and applying fundamental principles. Teachers are very useful especially for beginners in helping them stay on the path and avoid misunderstandings. Practice asana regularly in a clean and quiet place in nature, sheltered from excess heat, cold and wind. Before you begin ensure that the stomach, bladder and bowels are empty. Wear loose and comfortable clothes made from natural fibres. Remove all jewellery, watches and spectacles/glasses. For stability, always practise on a yoga mat or blanket, but not on a thick or large spongy mattress. Make sure you have plenty of space to freely move around. Do not practise under a ceiling fan or near furniture. Always warm up and loosen the whole body at the start of a session with dynamic stretches or surya namaskar. Asana is practised to gain alertness, lightness and steadiness of the body and the ability to remain comfortable in a pose, in preparation for prolonged periods of time sitting in meditation. Asana practice should be sensible and well structured. Choose asanas that are within your capability. Practise easy asana for several months before attempting advanced variations. Do not over-stretch your limit. Do not strain. Be gentle and avoid injury. Direct all your positive thoughts to yourself. Each asana should be performed slowly with complete awareness of the body, breath and mind. Without total inner awareness the many benefits are reduced. Learn the awareness point for each asana, whether it is part of the body, one of the corresponding chakras or energy channels, the breath, oneness, or emptiness. Always breathe gently, smoothly and completely through the nose. Do not strain. It is extremely important to co-ordinate the asana with the breath. Each breath affects the intensity of the asana. Forward bending poses lend themselves to holding the breath following exhalation. Backward bending poses lend themselves to holding the breath following inhalation. To keep the body balanced and avoid negative side-effects, always do the correct counterpose for each main asana: a forward bend followed by a backward bend. To avoid creating more tension make sure that the counter-pose is simpler than the main asana. Accept your starting point and progress gradually with a suitable and structured program. Avoid contortionism and gymnastic competition. If you feel tired at anytime, rest in corpse pose. At the end of your asana practice always relax in corpse pose for 10 minutes.

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12 BASIC POSTURES OF SIVANANDA YOGA


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RELAXATION
Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential. Winston Churchill

Proper relaxation and release from stress and tension should be one of your chief health concerns. If the mind is tense, the stomach will also be tense. And if the stomach is tense, the whole circulatory system will also be tense. It is a vicious circle of events resulting in sickness and ill health. Whether you think too much or you do not think at all, you accumulate tensions. If you work physically or you do not work at all, you accumulate tensions. Whether you sleep too much or you do not sleep at all, you accumulate tensions. Whether you eat a heavy protein diet, a carbohydrate diet, or a vegetarian diet, you accumulate tensions. These tensions amass in the different layers of the human personality. They accumulate in the muscular, emotional and mental systems. The inner tensions of the individual contribute to collective psychological tensions which can manifest in unhappy family life, chaos and disorder in social life, and aggression and warfare between communities and nations. Many religions have failed to give peace of mind to the individual. Law, police, armies and governments have failed to establish harmony between people. The texts of yoga state that peace can only be found within. Therefore if we wish to create a more peaceful world, we must first learn to relax and harmonise our own body and mind. Swami Satyananda Saraswati writes, There are three basic types of tension, which are responsible for all the agonies of modern life. They are: MUSCULAR TENSION These are related to the body itself, the nervous system and endocrine imbalances. These are easily removed by the physical relaxation attained in the state of yoga nidra. (See Advanced Techniques). EMOTIONAL TENSIONS Tensions which stem from various dualities such as love/hate, profit/loss, success/failure, happiness/unhappiness, are more difficult to erase. This is because we are unable to express our emotions freely and openly. Often we refuse to recognise them, so they are repressed, and the resulting tensions become more and more deeply rooted. It is not possible to relax these tensions through ordinary sleep or relaxation, but a method such as yoga nidra can tranquilise the entire emotional structure of the mind. MENTAL TENSIONS These are the result of excessive mental activity. The mind is a whirlpool of fantasies, confusions and oscillations. Throughout our life, the experiences registered by our consciousness are accumulated in the mental body. From time to time these explode, affecting our body, mind, behaviour and reactions. When we are sad, angry or irritated, we often attribute that condition of the mind to some superficial cause. But the underlying cause behind man abnormal behaviour s lies in the accumulated tensions on the mental plane. Yoga nidra is the science of relaxation which enables each of us to dive deep down into the realms of the subconscious mind, thereby releasing mental tensions and establishing harmony in all facets of our being.
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Sleep is not regarded as relaxation. Most people do not know how to sleep. They fall asleep thinking over some problem or anxiety. In sleep their mind runs on and their body is tense. They wake up feeling lethargic and un-rested and doze on for half an hour longer. We should learn the scientific way of sleeping, i.e. practise yoga nidra just before sleeping; it will relax the whole body and mind. The sleep will be deep; fewer hours will be needed, and upon waking up we will feel refreshed and energetic. YOGA NIDRA Yoga nidra means yogic sleep When practised with full awareness it is a powerful . technique in which you learn to relax yourself consciously. People feel they are relaxing when they collapse in an easy chair with a cup of coffee, a beer or a cigarette, and read a newspaper or switch on the television. These are only sensory diversions. True relaxation is actually an experience far beyond all this. For absolute relaxation you must remain aware. Yoga nidra is a state of sleepless sleep where one is on the borderline between sleep and wakefulness. It is a systematic method of inducing complete physical, mental and emotional relaxation. During yoga nidra one appears to be asleep, but the consciousness is functioning at a deeper level of awareness and is often described as psychic sleep or deep relaxation with inner awareness. In this threshold state between sleep and wakefulness, contact with the conscious and unconscious dimensions occur spontaneously. When you are completely relaxed in this way, the physical centres of the body become introverted. This the fourth limb of Patanjali Yoga Sutras pratyahara withdrawal of the mind s from external influences. When the mind is fixed on a centre, blood and energy are drawn to it and this causes withdrawal of the senses at that centre. In the deep state of relaxation that results, tension is released, the mind becomes clear and thoughts are more powerful. In this state of psychic sleep we can contact our inner personality and change our attitude towards others and ourselves. It is a method of introspection that has been used by yogis since time immemorial to bring them face to face with the inner self. Meditations 1 and 2 are gentle relaxations for beginning your meditation, and are sufficient for general relaxation purposes. For deep relaxation that can help remove more serious stress and tension related imbalance, see Yoga Nidra in Advanced Meditations .

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GUIDELINES FOR RELAXATION


1. Professional guidance is essential, especially in correctly understanding and applying fundamental principles. Teachers are very useful especially for beginners in helping them stay on the path and avoid misunderstandings. 2. Always practise relaxation in a clean and quiet place in nature, sheltered from excess heat, cold and wind. 3. Before you begin ensure that the stomach, bladder and bowels are empty. 4. Lie down on a yoga mat or bed, in a comfortable position with the back and neck straight. 5. Let go and relax your whole being. Let gravity take your body. Relax your breathing. Relax your mind. Do not allow yourself to fall asleep. Be relaxed, but alert. 6. Direct all your positive thoughts to yourself, consciously relaxing yourself with full awareness for 10 to 20 minutes. 7. When the technique is over, do not get up straight away. Gently become aware of the ground and your surroundings. Gently move the fingers and toes. Bend the knees and slowly roll over to one side. Gently open the eyes and when you are ready, sit up.
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PRANAYAMA
Pranayama is the means by which the yogi tries to realise within his individual body the whole cosmic nature, and attempts to attain perfection by attaining all the powers of the universe. Sri Swami Sivananda

Many people have misinterpreted the word pranayama to simply mean breath control . But as you will see, it means much more. The Sanskrit term pranayama literally translates as control and regulation of the life force According to Maharishi Patanjali it is the fourth limb of . Raja Yoga and must be controlled and manipulated for the attainment of vibrant health, mind control and super-consciousness. Swami Satyananda Saraswati describes prana as, the vehicle or medium of consciousness. In ancient China it was known as chi or ki. In the ancient scripture, Chandogya Upanishad, prana is described as internal and external matrix of energy referring the , to the cosmic energy that lies both within the mind-body complex and outside permeating the entire universe. It is this aspect that we are interested in during the practice of pranayama. PRANA Prana or vital life-force is found in all forms, from the lowest to the highest, from the ant to the elephant, from an amoeba to a man, from the elementary form of plant life to the developed form of animal life. It is prana that shines in your eyes. It is through the power of prana that the ears hear, the eyes see, the skin feels, the tongue tastes, the nose smells, the mind thinks. In the smile on the face of a child, in the radiance of a fire, and in the fragrance of a flower, from the digestion of food to the melody in music, all these and many more have their origins in prana. According to yogic philosophy, the human framework is comprised of five bodies, which account for the different aspects or dimensions of human existence: Annamaya kosha - Food/material body Manomaya kosha - Mental body Pranamaya kosha - Bioplasmic/vital energy body Vijnanmaya kosha - Psychic/higher mental body Ananadmaya kosha - Transcendental body These five bodies function together to form an integral whole. The practice of pranayama works mainly with pranamaya kosha, the vital energy body. (Pranamaya kosha is also made up of five major pranas known as the panca pranas that govern different areas of the body). Prana can be supplied to human beings in many ways such as food, water, air, love, solar energy. The supply of prana to the body and mind is particularly abundant in the breath and is received by the nervous system and nadis subtle energy channels in the body. The excess of prana is stored in the brain, chakras and nerve centres and is supplied to the body as required. Prana is expended by thinking, talking, moving, writing, loss of semen and other energy draining dynamics. Prana is the link between the physical and astral body - spiritual body. When prana is cut off or absent, the astral body separates from the physical body resulting in death. The prime purpose of pranayama is to absorb and store up as much prana as possible by the regular practice of specific pranayama techniques, just as the storage battery stores up electricity by regular charging. The man who has in his store an amazingly large supply of prana
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radiates vitality and strength all around. By pranayama you can also increase mental energy and develop thought control and thought-culture. It is therefore extremely important to learn and perfect the techniques of controlling prana. This is achieved by controlling the food we eat, the amount of sleep, sex and exercise we have, and especially by controlling the breath with specific breathing exercises. If we can control the breath we can control the prana. If we can control the prana we can easily control the mind. This is because there is an intimate connection between the breath, the mind and prana. If the breath is unsteady, the mind is unsteady. If the breath is steady and calm, the mind is steady and calm. A steady mind is the prerequisite for concentration, meditation and spiritual evolution. However, just as it takes a long time, patience and perseverance to tame a lion, tiger or elephant, so too will you have to tame this prana, and the mind, gradually. PRANAYAMA TECHNIQUES In the Himalayas I discovered hundreds of pranayama variations including; Bhastrika, Kapalbhati, Nadi Shodhana, Ujjayi, Bhrahmari, Surya Bheda, Sheetali and Seetkari. All have different energizing, purifying and controlling effects on the body and mind. Some pranayama techniques may also be used in conjunction with other techniques including asana, mudra and bandha. The pranayama techniques in this book are relatively simple and do not require a lot of preparation. Beginners should start very slowly increasing gradually over periods of months and years. The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness utilises five pranayama techniques. Whereas pranayama techniques 1, 2 and 5 utilise the breath to control and regulate the flow of prana, pranayama techniques 3 and 4 are similar to mudra, utilising mental awareness to visualise the subtle movement of prana along the nadis - energy channels. (See Appendix 7). Prana can be visualised as a stream of silver liquid, cool and smooth. Feel its life-giving energy revitalising and strengthening your mind, body and spirit as it circulates and is absorbed throughout your entire being. PURAKA KUMBHAKA RECHAKA The most important aspect of a pranayama breathing technique is the four distinct processes of control and regulation; Puraka - Inhalation Rechaka - Exhalation Antar Kumbhaka - Internal retention breath Bahir Kumbhaka - External retention breath The ratio of inhalation, retention and exhalation varies according to the strength and capacity of the practitioner. By controlling and regulating the breath the mind becomes quite steady, and a state of higher consciousness supervenes, Regulation of the breath, and especially retention, are of tremendous help in the practice of relaxation, concentration and meditation. Sri Swami Sivananda wrote, There is neither rhythm or harmony in the breathing of worldly-minded persons. A yogi practises regulation of breath to establish harmony. When the breath is regulated, when there is harmony, the breath will be moving within the nostrils. The fruit of regulation of breath is kumbhaka. The breath stops by itself when kevala kumbhaka - absolute and pure retention of breath, follows. The mind becomes quite steady. Then samadhi - super conscious state, supervenes.

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Granthi means knot Ancient yogic texts speak of the three knots called the brahma, . vishnu and rudra granthi. These represent psychic and mental blocks that prevent an individual from soaring into the realms of meditation. These knots and blocks have to be removed if one wants to know the experience of higher awareness. In yogic philosophy the granthi prevent the flow of prana into the main pranic passage of the body the sushumna. When they are released, prana immediately begins to flow through sushumna nadi, which leads to increased receptivity of the mind and in turn higher experiences. They can be removed permanently or temporarily. Granthi are located in the following parts of the body: Rudra Granthi - Ajna charka - centre of the head Vishnu Granthi - Anahata chakra - centre of the chest Brahma Granthi - Mooladhara chakra - base of the spine These knots are in the psychic body, not the physical body, but physical manipulations such as bandha can unlock them. Each level of manifestation has repercussions on other levels. It is not realistic to separate the physical body, pranic body and the mind body. They are all interconnected and part of the whole. They are only divided or categorised for convenience of explanation. Therefore the physical body, mind body and psychic body all influence each other. By developing your own sensitivity you will find this out for yourself. BANDHA The technique of bandha is particularly effective in breaking open or removing the three granthis, at least for a short period of time. This temporary removal helps to eliminate these blocks permanently. Bandha is a small but very important group of advanced pranayama techniques and are usually combined with other yogic techniques. The word bandha means to hold tighten or lock and this exactly describes the physical action required to perform , to to , these practices. Specific parts of the body are gently contracted and tightened. This has vast repercussions. First of all various parts of the physical body are controlled. Organs, muscles, nerves and physical processes within the body are massaged, stimulated and brought under the will of the practitioner. The physical contraction or lock in turn has an extensive influence on the psychic body - pranic body, having a profound effect in removing blockages in the nadis and chakras. The flow of prana that continuously streams through our subtle body is redirected and even stopped. This has direct influences on the mind. The whole body and mind is tranquilised and made receptive to higher states of awareness. Such is the power of bandhas when they are practised correctly. There are only three techniques of bandha: Jalandhara Bhanda - contracting the area of the throat Uddiyana Bhanda - contracting the area of the stomach Mooldhara Bandha - contracting the area of the perineum If all three are performed simultaneously then it is known as mahabandha. Bandha, like all other yogic techniques, act on and influence different levels of individual being. They have profound effects on the physical, mental and pranic levels. Bandha should never be attempted without guidance from a qualified instructor. ADVICE AND PRECAUTIONS The following advice and precautions should be carefully observed before commencing pranayama. Most important is that the practise of pranayama, as well as meditation, should be in
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a well-ventilated room, where it is calm and quiet. The air in the room should be fresh so that you may freely breathe oxygen. If outside, choose pleasant surroundings with flowers and trees. Do not practice in a strong wind, in the cold, or in air that is dirty, smoky or smells bad. Throughout the practice of pranayama and meditation the body should be as relaxed and calm as possible. Keep the body still without jerking. Remember to keep the spine, neck and head erect and centred to assist the flow of prana along the spine. Strain should be avoided. The breath should not be retained for longer than is comfortable. This is very important as the lungs are very delicate and any misuse may easily cause them injury. If you feel dizzy, faint or chest pains at any time, stop practising and rest. Then seek proper guidance. Do not twist the face muscles while holding the breath. Relax the face as much as possible throughout the practice. Do not take a bath or shower for at least half an hour after finishing pranayama exercises. Warning: It is extremely dangerous to practice pranayama during illness, or while smoking cannabis, tobacco or any other intoxicating material. People suffering from heart disease, respiratory dis-orders, blood pressure disorders, arteriosclerosis, mental problems or any other serious illness should seek medical advice before commencing pranayama.

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GUIDELINES FOR PRANAYAMA


1. Professional guidance is essential, especially in correctly understanding and applying fundamental principles. 2. Always practise pranayama in a clean and quiet place in nature, sheltered from excess heat, cold and wind. 3. Before you begin ensure that the stomach, bladder and bowels are empty. 4. Sit in a comfortable position with the back and neck straight. Relax your whole being, but maintain a good posture, as if the top of your head is being pulled up to the sky. 5. Be gentle. Do not jerk the body. Do not contort the face muscles. Do not over-extend your lung capacity by straining during inhalation, exhalation or retention. 6. Direct all your positive thoughts to yourself. Feel the vital life force energy filling your entire being with vitality and strength, purifying the body and mind. 7. Completely relax after each technique, ensuring that the breathing, heartbeat and awareness have returned to normal before continuing.
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TRAINING THE MIND


All that we are is the result of what we have thought.

MOVEMENT OF THE MIND AND CONCEPTUAL THOUGHT

Buddha Shakyamuni

During meditation we learn to develop a highly refined sensitivity of the relationship between the movement of the mind and conceptual thought. By observing and contemplating our mental phenomena we can see its basic characteristics: endless flux, stress, tension, joy, sadness, dissatisfaction, emptiness, etc. When we examine the mind we see a conglomeration of mental elements. For example, when pleasurable contact takes place with the six senses, the mind is carried away by the sensation and unable to notice how it happened. When the mind is stirred up in this way, various mental formations, thought constructions and reactions start arising from it, building and proliferating continually. The mind becomes occupied only because it misunderstands and is deluded by these conditioned phenomena. This agitation is the common mental process of the untrained mind and is a slave to the senses. The trained mind, however, is at rest and allows all sense contact to pass over without getting involved. Ultimately things are just as they are only our comparisons cause the mind to fluxuate. The pure mind knows these mind objects clearly, knows they are not substantial and does not get carried away by every whim and desire. It remains neutral, calm and wise. Observing your own mind removes it from the act of controlling mental activity. There is only observation of the information received from the senses and non-judgemental acceptance. Similar to the spectator comfortably seated at the cinema watching a movie, so too does the movement of the mind begin to settle, giving rise to stillness. Here we can realize that there is no separation between movement and stillness. In the same way the art of walking and meditation are one, the art of eating and meditation are one. For deep-rooted and lasting inner peace we must train ourself in mindfulness, not just in sitting meditation but also in the garden, in the city, in the home. Other terms to describe this process are; awareness, witnessing, acknowledging. Practice begins in the controlled and quiet environment of the sitting position. With regular practice these insights and qualities develop into a new way of thinking and acting, and are gently incorporated into everyday life. They are practised while getting up from the sitting position, while walking out of the meditation room, while having breakfast, going to work. We become mindful of our thoughts, speech and action throughout our whole day. BEING IN THE PRESENT MOMENT The present moment is immensely important to meditation practice. Dan Millman suggests When you truly are in the here and now you will be amazed at what you can do and how well you can do it, and discover, There are no ordinary moments. Acknowledging the body and mind in the present moment develops and strengthens momentary concentration. Without acknowledgement of the present moment, meditation practice cannot progress because momentary concentration cannot occur. It must be continuous. Once we rest, after sitting in meditation, we may do some work or talk without mindfulness. When that happens the mind, not acknowledging, wanders away, gets distracted, and thus the momentary concentration which has been developed will weaken. By being mindful and acknowledging all our daily activities, not just
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while sitting in meditation, we can live a higher consciousness lifestyle from the moment we wake up till falling asleep at bedtime. Eckhart Tolle wrote, Nothing ever happened in the past. It happened in the Now. Nothing will ever happen in the future. It will happen in the Now. What you think of as the past is a memory trace, stored in the mind, of a former Now. When you remember the past you reactivate a memory trace - and you do so now. The future is an imagined Now, a projection of the mind. When the future comes, it comes as the Now. When you think about the future, you do it now. Past and future obviously have no reality of their own. This illusion traps the mind in time, living almost exclusively through memory and anticipation, creating an endless preoccupation with past and future. This causes an unwillingness to honour and acknowledge the present moment. This is because you formed your identity from the past, and occupy your mind with hoping for happiness in the future. But if you maintain momentary concentration in the present moment you are free of time, and free of much sorrow. Soyen Shaku states, Enlightenment is enlightenment because it enlightens all our motives, desires, whims, determinations, impulses and thoughts. In an enlightened mind, a feeling or thought as it occurs is purified and freed from the taints of ignorance and egoism. There are many meditation traditions being taught and practised in the world today that can assist us in achieving stillness in the mind and train us to be mindful in our daily activities. They all require us to be continually mindful of the present moment. One of the main differences between these traditions is where and how to focus the mind. Concentration withdraws the attention from all sides to one point. In open awareness we not only pay attention to that one point, but also observe all the thoughts, speech and actions without judgement. Whichever technique we choose it is important not to wrestle with the mind, but to slowly tame it by being a witness to all its activity. Ultimately things are just as they are only our comparisons cause us to suffer. Meditation trains us to develop present moment higher consciousness. This allows us to become aware of the qualities of the mind and how it works. Achaan Chaa said, Of course there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. Meditation techniques are designed to bring about a positive change in all facets of our being, physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually, and can lead to living a healthy, happy and more meaningful life. Remember: the awake, aware mind is already there. All people need to do is attune to it through devotion to meditation. Nothing else is needed. VIPASSANA MEDITATION This is one of the most popular techniques in the world today and will be discussed in detail. Also known as insight meditation, these techniques involve open awareness, generating a deep sense of relaxation and calm. Acknowledging is the heart of insight meditation. It is the continual work of mindfulness to be aware and acknowledge. Insight meditation through the Four Foundations of Mindfulness (See Appendix 5) focuses on the body, feeling, the mind and mind objects. 1. 2. 3. 4. Mindfulness of the body is to contemplate on bodily actions or sensations. Mindfulness of one feelings is to contemplate on the feelings of happiness or suffering. s Mindfulness of the mind is to contemplate on one thought or the quality in the thought. Mindfulness of mind-objects is to contemplate recognition of other volitional activities.

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The goal of insight meditation is to gain a clear, complete understanding of the three obvious characteristics: impermanence, suffering and non-self. Having gained an insight into the three characteristics, the meditator realises that everything in this world is transient, subject to suffering and uncontrollable because it is not-self. Thus, the mind abandons the desire to acquire, the desire to have and the desire to be. Lord Buddha gave five purposes for practising insight meditation:
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To purify the mind To get rid of sorrows and lamentation To get rid of physical and mental sufferings To understand the truth of life To extinguish suffering and gain nirvana

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All actions, thoughts, speech, sensations and feelings are observed and studied. Penetration to their origin reveals the nature of their existence and the true nature of things. This introspection and self-realisation leads to the comprehension of suffering, impermanence and the nature of emptiness. Open awareness leads us into observing the present moment throughout our day. Meditations that directly help us to achieve awareness throughout our daily activities include; Asana, Karma Yoga, Zen tea ceremony, flower arranging, calligraphy, gardening, walking meditation, as well as spending the day without talking. SAMADHI MEDITATION One-pointed concentration, also known as samatha, placement, or calm abiding meditation, is the principle of training the mind to concentrate on a single point or object, for a defined length of time. Objects of concentration are used to assist us to achieve control of the mind. These include a candle, a religious symbol, an object in nature, a mantra, etc. What they all require is nonjudgemental awareness. The key is to focus on the object while keeping emotions and thoughts at a distance. Concentration on a single object directs our awareness to that object in the present moment. Maintaining awareness of that object trains us to observe everything that is experienced at the time it actually happens. Awareness means being mindful, to notice, to feel, to experience, but without reacting, without getting involved, without becoming distracted away from the present moment experience. Osho called it witnessing. He said, Witnessing simply means a detached observation, unprejudiced; that the whole secret of meditation. In this way any s distractions we experience also become part of the training. The barking dog outside is the teacher. The pain in the knee is the teacher. The distracting stressful thoughts of money, relationships, work, these are the teachers. Observation with detachment from these distractions train us to be aware of what is actually happening in the here and now, not in the past or the future. The key is to observe all but without getting involved and blindly reacting as we always ve done in the past. In this way we learn mindfulness; to pay close attention to every detail of each new moment but without reacting. This is how to become patient and develop tolerance, acceptance, persistence and non-judgement. It is one reason to keep absolutely still in sitting meditation and not to react to every moan and grumble of the mind or body, but simply to acknowledge it. We cannot stop them, but with time their distracting power diminishes. As we become more focused, our attention will not be easily led off track by distractions. Filling the mind with the activity of deep concentration on a single object can also help us find our centre, becoming calm and alert. This is the seventh limb of Patanjali Yoga Sutras dhyana deep s concentration. With regular and diligent practice the mind becomes highly concentrated and we become totally absorbed in the object. We discover what it is not. We can witness its reality, its pure existence. We can discover its ultimate truth and the ultimate truth of existence. This is the eighth limb of Yoga Sutras of Patanjali Samadhi: one-pointedness, identification. This can develop into a greater understanding or ourself, our environment and of our existence. These experiences may take time to occur depending on the individual, but eventually they enable us to progress along the path to perfection, allowing us to reach our full potential. CONTEMPLATION MEDITATION Contemplation is another part of the seventh limb of Patanjali Yoga Sutras dhyana. Also known s as analytical meditation, this technique involves contemplating the meaning of a spiritual instruction, mantra or affirmation that we have heard or read. As in Jnana Yoga, through deep contemplation we reach a definite conclusion or cause a specific state of mind to arise. We then
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concentrate on this conclusion or virtuous state of mind for as long as possible to become deeply acquainted with it. Next time you meditate take yourself on a journey of self-discovery by exploring; Who is feeling this pain in my knee? Is it my body, my mind? I am feeling this pain, but who am I? Am I the leg, the mind? Where does the body end and the mind begin? Where does the mind end and the I begin? Where is the I? Bhakti Yoga may also be described as contemplation meditation. Through deepest devotion, the aspirant identifies with a specific divine personality, i.e. Lord Krshna. The holy name of this divine personality is repeatedly chanted causing a specific state of mind to arise, aspiring to spiritual heights of ecstasy and illumination. COMPASSIONATE MEDITATION Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress. Generosity, open-heartedness and loving-kindness are all wonderful qualities and virtues that can be developed through daily meditation. This begins with regular re-programming of the mind by learning to love ourself on the inside, opening your heart and being kind, compassionate and loving to ourself. This develops into a greater understanding of human existence and leads to generating love outside the self by cherishing others more than we cherish oursleves. In this way we can cultivate a compassionate spirit inside and all around. Compassionate meditation is also known as metta loving-kindness, and is often practised at the beginning of vipassana meditation. VISUALISATION MEDITATION Visualization is the process of creating mental images to manipulate energy or consciousness. This gives us the ability to attract exactly what we want. Visualisation techniques allow us to become aware of higher states of consciousness by manipulating the different forces and systems within us. Any stimulation or manipulation of the nervous system will also have an effect on the mind, for all the nerves in the body are directly or indirectly connected to the mind. As we become more sensitive, we also become more aware of subtle energies and channels, which can then be controlled and manipulated to our benefit. These techniques included kundlaini yoga, yoga nidra, shamanic journey and positive thinking. STEVEN LEVINE AND AWARENESS It is here (sitting meditation) that we can discover for ourselves the subtleties and impermanence of this mind, this body We realise that the mind is made up of wants, desires, judgements, plannings and measurings Seeing the scope of our wanting shows us how deeply and subtly dissatisfaction has created our personal world, and this seeing frees us from much grasping, from thinking that all our wants have to be satisfied... We realise that we do not have to compulsively respond to everything that arises in our mind... We see that things can be a certain way without needing to be acted upon or judged or even pushed aside They can simply be observed... When there is wanting in the mind, that moment feels incomplete, such as boredom, desires, regrets... Wanting is seeking elsewhere... Completeness is being right here in the now ... When we experience the depth of wanting in the mind there follows a great joy This is because we see how wanting obscures the present... We also realise that there is nothing that brings lasting satisfaction Excerpts from: Levine, Stephen. 1979. A Gradual Awakening. USA: Anchor Books. When we start interrupting the normal flow of thought by actually observing the thought, not by stimulus or response and that automatic reaction, but by observing the effect it takes, then we are no longer the body-mind conscious emotional person that is responding to its environment as if it is automatic. By training to be still and observe the present moment we break out of the normal pattern of accepted reality. We develop a new field of perception. The philosophy of yoga teaches we are blinded by Maya the veil of illusion. It deceives us from the true nature of existence which can only be perceived through the enlightened mind. Meditation allows us to see clearly that the universe is in constant change and that all things are temporary, and teaches us to work towards our goals with love and gentleness, but without expectation or attachment.
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Bodhidharma taught, The most essential method, which includes all other methods, is beholding the mind The mind is the root from which all things grow. If you can understand the mind, everything else is included. As a by-product of this new perception we naturally relax the mind and body, and a huge amount of potential energy is released. This allows our natural pure state of being to re-surface. At this moment we automatically tune into our higher consciousness, which naturally makes positive decisions that create harmony and balance; to think, speak and act with love, wisdom and compassion. SUCCESSFUL MEDITATION
When you meditate you may see images of snow or smoke. You may feel a gust of wind or a wave of heat. Lightning may seem to flash. These are signs that you are travelling on the road to God. Gradually your health will improve, your body will lose weight, your skin will glow, and your voice will become clear and resonant. These show that you are making progress. Svetasvatara Upanishad

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God does not compel or induce us to practise meditation. He exerts no effort on our behalf. We are free to practise meditation, or not to practise meditation, as we wish. Success depends entirely on our own efforts. At first, meditation practice is not easy. It is frustrating, painful, time-consuming, irritating and sometimes it feels almost unbearable. Sometimes the last thing in the world we feel like doing is sitting still with ourselves. But once we start sitting, we get glimpses of the no-self who is sitting and we slowly start to realize the delusion of self. Slowly our true nature becomes visible, and the nature of all things peeks out. Slowly, with much dedication, much toil, and much joy, we wake up. It is irrelevant if you had good meditationor bad meditation as I often hear people a a , say after class. When you are in meditation and it feels as if you cannot concentrate, or it is too difficult, or painful, or boring, just try to observe those feelings. Acknowledge the pain, the boredom, the distractions whatever they are. They are part of the meditation. They are the teaching. They are the path to enlightenment. Each experience brings new insight on the path to enlightenment and we are simply the witness, observing the Truth without expectation or reaction, whether we had good concentration or not. As the Tibetan Master Tilopa once said, No thought, no reflection, no analysis, no cultivation, no intention; let it settle itself. Meditation is not about showing off to your friends the cosmic experiences you had in your morning practice. Instead, observe the impermanence of this feeling by quietly accepting that you are feeling in harmony at this time. Be prepared for the feeling of disharmony that you may experience in the future, and again, observe disharmony, observe the impermanence. Bhodidharma taught, Many roads lead to the Path, but basically there are only two: reason and practice. Realising that we are not perfect human beings and setting our hearts and minds on improving ourselves with positive thinking and action is half the battle. We are only limited by our own imagination. The teachings, techniques and motivation are all available to us. Success is implementing suitable techniques into our daily lives, learning from our mistakes, living with patience, persistence and gentleness and making lifestyle changes to support our spiritual growth. Success in meditation is the act of regularly sitting and practising correctly. As Sri Patthabi Jois states, Do your practice and all is coming. The experiences and results are simply observed and accepted, whatever they may be. Success in meditation will be apparent when we notice our life coming into alignment with the flow of nature and we see ourself living gracefully and harmoniously, when all our demons have surfaced and been defeated, and when our karmic debt from past and present lives has been burned in the fire of simply sitting.

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When you are mindful of all your thoughts, speech and action and can create love, wisdom and compassion in every second of every minute of every day, then you have not only succeeded in meditation, but you have truly succeeded in life, in reaching your full potential as a human being. As Merta Ada once said, When this happens, please SMS me. Warning: People suffering with medical conditions of the mind and other mental problems, should seek professional medical advice before practising meditation.

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GUIDELINES FOR MEDITATION


1. Professional guidance is essential, especially in correctly understanding and applying fundamental principles. Teachers are very useful especially for beginners in helping them stay on the path and avoiding misunderstandings. 2. Always practice meditation in a clean and quiet place in nature, sheltered from excess heat, cold and wind. 3. Beginners should meditate when the stomach, bladder and bowels are empty. This dispels tiredness and promotes concentration. 4. Wear loose fitting clothing. Sit in a comfortable position with the back and neck straight. Relax your whole being, but maintain a good posture, as if the top of the head is being pulled up to the sky. Rest the tongue against the roof of the mouth. 5. The awareness should be so completely centred on the technique that the awareness of the external environment is lost. The untrained mind may become distracted, whether it is by a thought, pain or a sound. If this happens simply acknowledge that you were distracted and then gently return to the meditation technique. Each time you are distracted renew your effort to stabilize your concentration until it becomes clear again. 6. Do not strain your mind by trying too hard. Moderate your practice and avoid becoming tired or tense from exerting too much pressure. The effort you apply should be relaxed and steady. The more you meditate the more natural it becomes. 7. Be in the present moment. Be the observer without judgement. Do not cling to anything, neither desire nor aversion. Do not become attached to the blissful experience that meditation brings. Meditation is not escapism, it is the direct perception of Truth. Simply observe, acknowledge, let go. This process should be natural and effortless. Plant the seed, cultivate your spiritual garden and let the tree grow in its own time. In this way your practice will be at peace. 8. The mind is both the thinking process and the knowing. The key is to know the mind, know how it is when it meets sense objects and how it is when it is apart from them. When the one who knows observes the mind in this way, wisdom arises. 9. To see things clearly and find the True path depends upon first correcting our views. We must investigate the very root of suffering, the very truth of our life. We must come to know the reality of conditioned phenomena, the way things are. Only then can we have peace in the world. 10.The purpose of meditation is to gain personal experience of all stages of the path to enlightenment. You can share these insights in the way you live your life. Although it is far easier to be in harmony when you are sitting quietly alone, your meditation will be worthless if you do not put your experiences to practical use in daily activities. Be mindful throughout the day.

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REGULAR SYSTEMATIC PRACTICE


DO YOUR PRACTICE AND ALL IS COMING SRI PATTHABI JOIS

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10 MEDITATIONS
FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS

PREPARATORY PRAYERS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. PERSISTENCE ACCEPTANCE EQUANIMITY PATIENCE CONCENTRATION LOVE KINDNESS COMPASSION WISDOM ENLIGHTENMENT

CONCLUDING PRAYERS

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10 MEDITATIONS
FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS
The mind is our greatest resource, and meditation is the method that develops the mind correctly to bring about clarity of understanding. Buddha Shakyamuni

The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness are just a few of the many thousands of techniques that can assist us in training the mind. This particular collection is taken from some of the great philosophies and traditions of the world, including Yoga, Zen and modern medical research. They are very powerful ways to transform our life in a positive direction, by giving us the chance to reflect on who and what we are and where we are heading. Most important, they systematically help us to apply the changes that are necessary to take place within us. Osho once said, Techniques are helpful because they are scientific. You are saved from unnecessary wandering and groping. If you don know any techniques, the growth, the flowering of meditation t will take longer The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness guide us through the many obstacles that beginners usually face when we first sit down to meditate. These techniques are designed to train our mind and body to relax, remove blockages, accept discomfort, concentrate, and to develop great compassion by cherishing others. They also help us to make positive changes in our lives, with our family, community and the environment. By developing loving-kindness with daily action, we can progress on the path to inner peace. We can implement a pure heart that cherishes all living beings without bias or partiality. We can transform our life, fulfil our true human potential, and find lasting peace and happiness. By regularly practising the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness we can reach this goal. His Holiness the Dalai Lama states, We can never obtain peace in the outer world until we make peace with ourselves. The 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness support this view. Peace and happiness can be achieved by practising in two parts, on the inside by sitting quietly in the meditation room, and on the outside while going about our daily activities. This will eventually become one continuous meditation. PART ONE - SITTING QUIETLY IN MEDITATION
This involves the practice of awareness, being in harmony, relaxation, pranayama, affirmations, contemplation and concentration techniques.

When sitting in meditation we can train our self to be in harmony. We can train the mind to be content, to liberate itself from desire, to accept the ever changing universe as it is - this is happiness. Being in the present moment, experiencing each and every moment with full awareness - this is inner peace. And these we can not buy with all the money in the world. These we must earn through the daily practice of meditation and experience it for our self. Each of the 10 Meditations has a specific affirmation to be contemplated and repeated three times. These affirmations help us to develop 10 virtues which are necessary for inner peace, happiness and spiritual growth. Each affirmation is accompanied by a meditation or pranayama technique and has a specific awareness technique. Without straining or tension, try your best to concentrate on this object. At first your mind may become distracted. If the mind wanders off following a thought, simply acknowledge that you were distracted and then gently return to the
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technique. During meditation if you observe a state of tranquility and serenity, do not disturb the mind. Do not try to get up from your seat. Try to prolong your awareness of this sensation for as long as possible, observing the joy and harmony of inner peace. Remember, meditation is awareness, being in the present moment. Everything we need is already inside us. As Jesus Christ said 2000 years ago, The kingdom of heaven is within. Meditation is simply the process of training ourself to observe the mind, peeling away the layers and re-connecting with our higher consciousness. It is waiting for us to re-discover it. Diligent practice and persistence with meditation produces results that are permanent and abiding. Before beginning carefully read the section General Notes for the Meditatorand Training the Mind For success, it is necessary to practise sitting meditation every morning before . breakfast and then again in the evening before sleep. PART TWO MINDFULNESS THROUGHOUT THE DAY
This involves incorporating into our daily life the training and insights attained in sitting meditation, by maintaining mindfulness, compassion and peace throughout the day.

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By becoming more adept at meditating, we can begin to extend our training beyond quietly sitting alone. This can be achieved by training ourself to maintain a peaceful mind while going about our daily life, becoming aware of our thought, speech and action, observing our happiness, our suffering, our pleasure and pain. Albert Einstein stated that; True religion is real living; living with all one's soul, with all one's goodness and righteousness. Permanent inner peace and happiness can only be attained by persistent training, thus conquering doubt, hatred, laziness, lust and worry, and by living a virtuous life with morality, acceptance, love, wisdom and compassion. Meditation helps us to reach this goal by training the mind to maintain the awareness of itself in every moment. By extending the meditation beyond sitting, we can observe ourself and the world around us with an awakened mind, with wisdom and compassion. By observing the mind as it reacts to information from the senses, with likes and dislikes, desires and aversions, we can become aware of the conditioned mental process that has kept us ignorant and in darkness. This daily mindfulness requires a tremendous amount of training and discipline and begins with small actions in your daily routine. Osho suggested, Start with very simple actions like walking. You can walk and you can become aware that you are walking each step can be full of awareness. Eating just the way they drink tea in Zen monasteries they call it the tea ceremony because sipping the tea, one has to remain alert and aware. , As you become more and more accustomed to awareness and it becomes just like the natural process of breathing, you will find that you do not have to make any effort anymore. It becomes spontaneous. Then, in any act, any work you can be aware. But it takes training and discipline throughout all your daily activities for this spontaneous awareness to occur naturally. Osho emphasises, Remember the condition, it has to be effortless; it has to out of spontaneity. Tuning in in this way allows our higher consciousness to guide us to live a more meaningful life, by paying attention with awareness to the details of the present moment, instead of blindly reacting to every contact from the senses. By applying the 10 affirmations as we experience the ups and downs of daily life, we can train ourself to create a positive reaction to an unpleasant situation. We can use the correct affirmation to create inner peace and harmony in that situation. For example: when we feel our self getting angry, repeat the affirmation from Meditation 4; Patience is the destroyer of anger. This promotes patience to come to the surface as our mental programming kicks in with the training from the sitting meditation. The more we practise, the easier it gets to create patience. The more it becomes our natural state of being. Remember, the fault is not in the difficult situation that confronts us, or in the people with whom we have to interact. The problems we face arise from within. Circumstances only act as a catalyst to bring
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them to the surface. Everything we feel, think, say, or do is coming up from deep within. Regular meditation and positive daily action can heal these obstructions and help us to develop a caring and meaningful life. In this way enlightenment can be found right here in the midst of our daily existence. Everyday life gives many opportunities to recognise and experience the inter-connected relationship of all things. Each individual part is intimately part of the whole, with each system meaningfully reflecting the others. In a practical sense, we do not prepare and prepare until we get to another place known as enlightenmentsomewhere down the road. Instead, living our lives in the nowis a reflection of enlightenment, the thread of the fabric. Nelson Mandela once said, A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination. A trained mind and compassionate heart are not easily lost when they are clear and focused in the present moment. Everyday problems no longer distract us from the path because they are the part of it. The observing mind is enlightened, freed from selfish desires and petty concerns. It is the impassive observer of all, with the welfare of others paramount in our heart. So cherish the peak moments, which can be mini-enlightenments while continuing to be mindful of the details of our everyday lives. Meditation is the tool to help us understand the true nature of happiness and sadness. This understanding evolves as we experience how meditation is more than just a method. When practised well, we as the meditator are no longer separate from the act of meditating. Immersed in the moment, we and the world become One. When we can feel Oneness in ourselves our everyday life is truly enlightened. Meditation 1, 2. Always start with a personal prayer and these two techniques, as they help us to become centred and relaxed, ready for meditation. Meditation 3, 4, 5. These techniques are the core meditations for purifying and focusing the mind, and developing inner peace. They guide us into a deep state of concentration and awareness. Meditation 6, 7, 8. These techniques are the core meditations for generating love, kindness and compasssion. They should only be practised with pure intentions in heart and mind, and after having been prepared by the preceding techniques. Meditation 9, 10. Always finish with these techniques and a personal prayer to close the session. In the beginning start with just 15 minutes meditation every day and follow the recommended schedule below, until you can regularly and consistently meditate for one hour on a daily basis: First month start with 15 minutes meditation every day: Meditations 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 10. Second month add 4, 7 , for 30 minutes meditation every day: Meditations 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10. Third month add 5, 8, for 45 minutes meditation every day: Meditations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Fourth month extend each meditation by a few more minutes until you can regularly practise for 60 minutes daily. After one year of regularly practising the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness, you may be ready for advanced meditation techniques. (See Advanced Meditations Ask your 10 ). meditation instructor for advice on how to proceed.
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10 MEDITATIONS
FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS
Dave West Yoga 2008 AFFIRMATION 1. PERSISTENCE Persistence is applying the best effort in all things throughout the day. 2. ACCEPTANCE Acceptance is observing discomfort and distraction without reacting. 3. EQUANIMITY Equanimity is maintaining harmony and balance throughout the day. 4. PATIENCE Patience is the destroyer of anger. 5. CONCENTRATION Concentration is holding the mind on an object for a defined length of time. 6. LOVE Love is the true nature of the universe. KINDNESS Kindness is the joyful heart of abundance. 8. COMPASSION Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress. 9. WISDOM Wisdom is the destroyer of doubt and confusion. 10. ENLIGHTENMENT Enlightenment is being in the present moment, mindful of all thought, speech and action.
MINDFUL BREATHING PURIFYING THE ENERGY CHANNELS Pranayama 2

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TECHNIQUE
COMPLETE YOGIC BREATHING Pranayama 1

CHANTING OM

STILLNESS

HEART CHAKRA

7.

GENERATING KINDNESS

GENERATING COMPASSION

OFFERING & RECEIVING Pranayama 3 PALMING Pranayama 4

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PREPARATORY PRAYERS
On this path effort never goes to waste, and there is no failure. Even a little effort toward spiritual awareness will protect you from the greatest fear. Bhagavad Gita

Prayer is a powerful way of affirming your intentions, showing gratitude, or seeking guidance and blessings. You can pray to someone or something. You can pray to outside of your being, or inside. You can attract from the outside towards yourself, or you can awaken from the inside. It is all connected. However you perceive this higher power is up to you. Every individual will have a different experience and definition, whether you call it God, Spirit, Divine Mother, or Universal Supreme Consciousness. If you don believe in anything, then use this time to confirm t your intentions and action before beginning the meditation. You can use the following traditional Sanskrit prayers from ancient India, or you may wish to compose your own preparatory prayers according to your personal belief and philosophy. Namaste You and I are one in heart and mind. I open my heart to spread love, and peace, and offer my help and service to all. Om Om Om O Creator of the universe, may thy divine healing energy fill us with light and love. May our mind, body and spirit unite in complete harmony with nature and the cosmic vibration. Om Ah Hum From the hearts of all the holy beings, may streams of nectar and light flow down, granting blessings and purifying our thoughts, speech and actions.

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1
PERSISTENCE
Persistence is applying the best effort in all things throughout the day. Govinda Pahir lived in a peaceful valley east of Darjeeling, India. He told me that this Hatha Yoga technique is very useful if performed at the start of meditation, as it calms the mind and body from the hustle and bustle of daily life. It distributes a rich supply of oxygen and lifeforce energy into the whole being and stretches and relaxes the upper body. Govinda taught me that it is necessary to straighten and strengthen the back and neck to encourage good posture. This meditation develops the virtue of persistence. Persistence is not the effort to make something particular happen. It is the effort to be aware and awake in each and every moment, to overcome laziness and immorality. It is the effort to make each activity of our day meditation. Deep breathing and stretching up is the object of concentration. Breathing in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 (8-10 seconds) Hold the breath 1 2 (2 seconds) Breathing out 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 (8-10 seconds) Hold the breath 1 2 (2 seconds) COMPLETE YOGIC BREATHING Pranayama 1 Take a few moments to find a comfortable and stable meditation position. If you can not sit cross legged on a cushion, then you may want to use a chair. Relax the body but always keep the spine and head straight, Feel as if the top of the head is being pulled up to the sky, keeping you perfectly straight. Rest the hands in the lap or on the knees. Close the eyes. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Make a silent prayer according to your own religion or personal belief. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Persistence is applying the best effort in all things throughout the day. Repeat the following technique 3 times. Take a deep slow inhalation through the nose. Breathing in should take about 8 to 10 seconds.
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Be sure to completely fill the lower part of the lungs, middle and upper chest with air. As you breathe in, feel your whole being renewed with vitality and strength. When you are completely full of air, but without strain, hold for two seconds 1 2 Now slowly exhale, all the way out, completely empty all of the lungs, Empty the chest, middle and the lower lungs. Breathing out should also take about 8 to 10 seconds. As you breathe out, feel your whole being releasing negativity, distraction and disease. When you are completely empty, but without strain, hold for two seconds 1 2 Repeat this 2 more times. Then relax for a few moments. Feel your whole being relax and calm. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Now repeat the following technique 3 times. Take a deep slow inhalation through your nose. Be sure to completely fill the lower part of the lungs, middle and upper chest with air. As you breathe in slowly stretch your arms up as high as you can. Straighten the arms upwards and join your hands above your head. As you breathe in feel healing energy rising up through your body, revitalizing your whole being. Breathing in should take about 8 to 10 seconds. When you are completely full of air, hold for two seconds 1 2 Now slowly exhale, all the way out, and lower your arms down to your side. Completely empty all of your lungs, the chest, middle and the lower lungs. Breathing out should also take about 8 to 10 seconds. Hold for two seconds 1 2 When you have finished raising the arms 3 times return to your meditation position, relax your body and keep still but not tense. Feel your breathing slowing down. Feel your whole being relaxed and refreshed. You may even feel light headed. This is the prana flowing around your body, rejuvenating and revitalizing your entire being. Relax as much as possible allowing this process to complete. Hold this awareness of the body lightness for a few minutes, or longer. s Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Persistence is applying the best effort in all things throughout the day. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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2
ACCEPTANCE
Acceptance is observing discomfort and distraction without reacting. This Mantra Yoga technique was given to me by a sadhu known as Guruji. He lived very simply in a Shiva temple near Asi Ghat in Varanasi, India. This technique helps to further relax the body and breath, and focus the mind. Chanting OM promotes a deep sense of relaxation and release. It prepares the mind and body for meditation. Guruji told me not to underestimate the power of OM. When OM is chanted correctly the three syllables of A U M are distinctly pronounced. OM is the object of concentration. OM may be replaced by your personal mantra. This technique develops the virtue of acceptance by realizing that we do not have to compulsively respond to everything that arises in the mind. We see that things can be a certain way without needing to be acted upon, judged or even pushed aside. They can simply be observed. Breathing in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 (8-10 seconds) Hold the breath 1 2 (2 seconds) Breathing out AAAAUUUUMMMMM (8-10 seconds) Hold the breath 1 2 (2 seconds) CHANTING OM Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Acceptance is observing discomfort and distraction without reacting. Continue to deeply relax the whole body but without moving. Relax the feet, relax the legs and relax the hips. Relax the stomach muscles and feel the whole abdomen drop. Relax the chest, relax the shoulders, relax the arms and hands. Check your spine and head are straight, but not tense. Relax the face. Relax the head. Relax the whole body. Relax the breathing. When you are completely relaxed, take a smooth, deep inhalation through the nose, for about 8 to 10 seconds. Hold for 2 seconds Then, gently release the breath in a long, slow exhalation. Softly chant AAAAUUUUMMMMMMMM for about 8 to 10 seconds. Chanting should come from deep within, from the bottom of the lungs. When you chant use all the breath, but do not strain. When the breath is empty stop the chant and hold for 2 seconds. This is 1 round. Repeat this 12 times. When you have finished chanting be still,
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Observe any feelings or sensations with a calm mind. Feel the vibration in your heart, in your whole body, in your mind. Feel a deep inner release from tension and stress, Allow the body, mind and spirit to become quiet, calm and refreshed. Keep still and observe this feeling of inner peace. If you become distracted simply observe it, but without thinking about it any more deeply than acknowledging it. Be still, calm and relaxed. Hold this awareness for a few minutes or longer Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Acceptance is observing discomfort and distraction without reacting. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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EQUANIMITY
Equanimity is maintaining balance and harmony throughout the day. I first learned this technique at the Patanjali Yoga Centre in Kathmandu, Nepal. It has many variations that become progressively more advanced. Here is a simple variation for beginners. This pranayama technique, also known as nadi shodhana, purifies the energy channels in the body and mind. It brings about a state of equilibrium in the mind, in preparation for deep meditation. It develops the virtue of equanimity by training the mind and body to be harmony internally and externally. For pranayama, as well as meditation, it is extremely important to sit with the spine and head straight, but not tense. Feel as though the top of your head is being pulled up to the sky. If one of the nostrils is blocked perform jala neti or breath balancing exercises before beginning. (Seek proper guidance). For beginners the length of breath inhalation, retention and exhalation should be equal to a ratio of 1:1:1. This means that if you breathe in for the count of 8 seconds, you must hold for 8 seconds, and then breathe out for 8 seconds. Practise five rounds for the first month, increasing to ten rounds in the second month, and 15 rounds in the third month, until you can practise comfortably for 20 minutes. At this point bandha may be introduced. (Seek proper guidance). The point where the fingers touch the forehead at the eyebrow centre, while counting the length of each breath, is the object of concentration. PURIFYING THE ENERGY CHANNELS Pranayama 2 Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Equanimity is maintaining balance and harmony throughout the day. Raise the right hand to the face and hold the nose-tip position: Gently rest the index and middle fingers on the forehead at the eyebrow centre. Place the thumb next to the right nostril and the ring finger next to the left nostril. The thumb and ring finger control the flow of breath by gently blocking and releasing each nostril in turn. The little finger is completely relaxed. The left hand rests on the left knee with the fingers ready to count the number of rounds. Keep the head straight. Do not allow it to drop down during this technique. This is the starting position, known as the nose-tip position.

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Begin by closing the right nostril with the thumb. Smoothly and softly breathe in through the left nostril. Breathing in should be quiet and gentle and should take about 8 to 10 seconds. Do not rush. Do not strain. As you breathe in start to count, in your mind, from 1 to 8. When you reach 8, try to have your lungs completely full, but without straining. Now close the left nostril with the ring finger, so that both nostrils are firmly closed. Hold your breath and count, in your mind, from 1 to 8. Then, keep the left nostril closed and open the right nostril with the thumb. Smoothly and softly breathe out through the right nostril. Breathing out should be quiet and gentle and should take about 8 to 10 seconds. Do not rush. Do not strain. As you breathe out start to count, in your mind, from 1 to 8. When you reach 8, try to have your lungs completely empty, but without straining. Now smoothly and softly breathe in through the right nostril. Breathe quietly and gently. As you breathe in count, in your mind, from 1 to 8. When you reach 8, try to have your lungs completely full, but without straining. Now close the right nostril with the thumb, so that both nostrils are firmly closed. Hold your breath and count, in your mind, from 1 to 8. Keep the right nostril closed with the thumb and open the left nostril with the ring finger. Smoothly and softly breathe out through the left nostril. Breathe quietly and gently. As you breathe out count, in your mind, from 1 to 8. When you reach 8, try to have your lungs completely empty, but without straining. This is one round. Begin with 5 rounds. Count the number of rounds on the fingers of your left hand. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Equanimity is maintaining balance and harmony throughout the day. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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PATIENCE
Patience is the destroyer of anger. Martin Moore taught me this simple technique during one of our many sessions. It is a Zen technique that helps the mind and body to become completely still and silent. This variation develops the virtue of patience by training the mind and body to relax and wait for things to settle in their own time, without having to automatically respond with unvirtuous reaction. It develops awareness of the crown chakra and is a good preliminary exercise for the practice of Emptiness meditation. (See Advanced Meditations Maintaining the stillness of the water is the object of ). concentration. STILLNESS Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Patience is the destroyer of anger. Keep absolutely still, relaxed and alert. Imagine there is a small bowl balancing on the top of your head. In the bowl is water. Keep the water completely still and without ripples so that the surface is like a mirror. The slightest movement of the body will create ripples and disturb the surface of the water, so keep the body absolutely still. The tiniest thought will create ripples and disturb the surface of the water, so keep the mind completely focused on maintaining the stillness of the water. The awareness should be so completely centred on the water that the awareness of the body and the external environment is lost. At first the mind may be very busy, and you might even feel that the meditation is making the mind busier; but in reality you are becoming aware of how busy the mind actually is. If you discover that the mind has wandered and is following your thoughts gently bring your concentration back to the water. Keep the water completely still by not moving or thinking. Be patient. Keep absolutely still, relaxed and alert. Stay with the stillness of the water for a few minutes or longer. Now imagine that you are sitting on the bank of a calm, clear lake. Imagine that the surface of the lake is like a mirror. Completely smooth, completely still.
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Feel the stillness inside your body, mind and spirit. Feel your whole being becoming quiet, calm and refreshed. As a cloud drifts past, see its reflection in the lake. As the cloud passes imagine the lake becoming clear again. Keep reflecting clouds that pass, but always return to the clear lake. After a time, the clouds clear and the lake reflects the vast blue sky. Completely smooth, completely still. Feel the stillness inside your body, mind and spirit. Feel your whole being deeply relaxed and refreshed. Stay with the stillness of the clear lake for a few minutes or longer. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Patience is the destroyer of anger. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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CONCENTRATION
Concentration is holding the mind on an object for a defined length of time. This technique was first given to me by Maya, a yogini who lived near Milarepa cave in s Manang, Nepal. She said it is an ancient Buddhist technique that helps to develop concentration and mindfulness, and is usually practised at the start of vipassana meditation. It relaxes and focuses the mind, bringing the awareness into the present moment. It is not a breathing technique. It is a concentration technique. The breathing should be completely involuntary throughout the practice. Simply witnessing the breath in this way develops the virtue of concentration and mindfulness of the present moment. This continuous momentary awareness is essential for meditation to occur, and is a powerful tool on the path to higher consciousness. The defined length of time is 5 minutes for the first month, 10 minutes for the second month and 15 minutes for the next month, and so on. Observing the breath is the object of concentration. MINDFUL BREATHING Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Concentration is holding the mind on an object for a defined length of time. Relax the breathing, allowing the body to breathe naturally on its own. Become aware of the nose. Observe the sensation of breath as it comes in and out. Do not try to control the breath, just observe it. Let each breath remind you to stay centred and present in the now. Be in the present moment with the breath. Breath to breath, moment to moment. The awareness should be so completely centred on the breath that the awareness of the body and the external environment is lost. Now begin counting the breaths backwards from 50 down to 20. As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 50, As you inhale observe the breath and mentally count 49, As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 48,
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As you inhale observe the breath and mentally count 47, Keep counting your breaths but without controlling the breathing. Just observe the breath as it passes through the nostrils and simply count. Be the witness of your breath, but without judgement. If you catch the mind drifting away from the counting, gently bring it back. When you reach 20 start counting only when you exhale. As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 19, As you inhale observe the breath. As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 18, As you inhale observe the breath. As you exhale observe the breath and mentally count 17, As you inhale observe the breath. Keep counting the breaths until you reach zero, but do not control it. When you reach zero stop counting, but continue to observe the breath. Observe each breath as it goes in, and as it comes out. Continue to observe the breath as it passes through the nostrils, but do not count the breaths. Do not try to control it, just observe it. Let each breath remind you to stay centred and present in the now. Feel the sensation of air as it comes in and pushes out through the nose. Be in the present moment with the breath. Breath to breath, moment to moment. If you catch the mind drifting away, gently bring it back. Be the witness of your breath, but without judgment. You may find yourself naturally relaxing. Your breathing may become deeper and slower. Allow this process to take place naturally. Continue the awareness of the breath for a few minutes or longer. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Concentration is holding the mind on an object for a defined length of time. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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LOVE
Love is the true nature of the universe. This universal technique is known in yoga as hridayakasha dharana, which means heart space consciousness The variation presented here develops the awareness of the love energy . inside us by rediscovering that our whole being is Love - every cell, every molecule and every particle in our mind, body and soul. Generating love inside us reunites us with the true nature of the universe. By contemplating the affirmation we can realise that the present and future happiness of all beings in the universe depends upon loving one another. By developing our own inner love we can generate an abundance of outer love to cherish others, and we will naturally perform virtuous actions that will cause them to be happy. There is no higher purpose in life. In this way we can develop a radiant loving spirit all around. Love circulating through the centre of your chest is the object of concentration. HEART CHAKRA AWARENESS Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Love is the true nature of the universe. Become aware of your heart in the centre of your chest. This is your heart chakra, the centre of your love energy. Your centre of pure love, kindness and compassion. The centre of love for yourself and for others. The awareness should be so completely centred on the heart chakra that the awareness of the body and the external environment is lost. Feel your heart breathing in and out, freely and easily. As you breathe, feel the heart centre expanding and contracting. As attentively as you can, note the change in sensations in the area of your heart that accompanies each breath. Let each breath remind you to stay centred and present in the now.
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Do not think about your breaths, or the meaning of love. Simply experience what is there to be experienced. Do not think, only feel. Observe what is happening in the area of your heart. Be especially on the look-out for pleasurable sensations of warmth, expansion, or spaciousness. Notice how the movement of breath seems to fan and increase these sensations. As you breathe in absorb into your heart as much love energy from your surroundings as you can. With each breath feel more and more love energy entering your heart and body, circulating, healing. Feel your heart centre expanding, filling your whole being. Feel the love energy inside and all around you. Feel as if you are glowing all over with love. Do not think about your breaths, or the meaning of love. Simply experience what is there to be experienced. Acknowledge this radiant glow of pure love, inside and outside. Hold your awareness of this radiant glow of love for a few minutes or longer. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Love is the true nature of the universe. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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KINDNESS
Kindness is the joyful heart of abundance. Metta is the ancient Buddhist name for meditations that assist us in developing lovingkindness to all beings. These techniques have been successfully taught by vipassana centres around the world. The variation presented here is based on the teachings of Merta Ada. It develops the virtue of kindness by training the heart and mind to cultivate a generous nature. Everything we possess is only ours through the kindness of others. By contemplating the affirmation we can realise this, and that the more we help those around us to be happy, the happier we become ourself. Even the small wisdom that we possess to discriminate what is beneficial and what is harmful is a worthwhile kindness. This will motivate us to engage in positive action and create the cause for future happiness. Kindness emanating from the centre of your chest is the object of concentration. GENERATING KINDNESS Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Kindness is the joyful heart of abundance. Become aware of your heart in the centre of your chest. This is the centre of your love energy. Pure love and kindness. Feel this loving-kindness as a powerful healing energy in the centre of your chest. The centre of loving-kindness for yourself and others. Acknowledge this powerful centre of pure love and kindness. Now send out your loving-kindness to the twelve directions: From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to your whole being. May I be happy, From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything in this room. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything outside this room.
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May all beings be happy.


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From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything above you. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything below you. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything to the right of you. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything to the left of you. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything in front of you. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything behind you. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything on the earth. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to everything in the sky. May all beings be happy. From your heart send out your loving-kindness energy to the whole universe. May all beings be happy. Hold this awareness of kindness for a few minutes or longer. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Kindness is the joyful heart of abundance. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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COMPASSION
Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress. This is also an ancient Buddhist technique known as metta The variation presented here . is also based on the teachings of Merta Ada. It focuses the heart and mind on cultivating a compassionate spirit towards all beings. It improves personal relationships with our parents, friends, workmates and people we dislike. By contemplating the affirmation we naturally feel compassion towards everyone who is less fortunate than us, and become motivated to help them in any way we can. This encourages us to cherish others and reminds us of the importance of continually improving our consideration, respect and love for them. Compassion emanating from the centre of your chest is the object of concentration. GENERATING COMPASSION Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress. Become aware of your heart in the centre of your chest. This is the centre of your love energy. Pure compassion and love for the helpless and the weak. Feel a desire to help the suffering and the sick people of the world. Feel a deep need to help them in any way you can. Feel this compassion in the centre of your chest. Acknowledge this powerful centre of loving-kindness and compassion. May all beings be happy. Now send out your loving-compassion energy: From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your whole being, May I be healthy and happy. May I develop love, wisdom and compassion. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your family, May they be healthy and happy. May they develop love, wisdom and compassion. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your friends,
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May they be healthy and happy. May they develop love, wisdom and compassion. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to neutral people, May they be healthy and happy. May they develop love, wisdom and compassion. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to people you dislike, May they be healthy and happy. May they develop love, wisdom and compassion. Now in reverse order. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to people you dislike, May they be healthy. May they be happy. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to neutral people, May they be healthy. May they be happy. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your friends, May they be healthy. May they be happy. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your family, May they be healthy. May they be happy. From your heart, send out your loving-compassion energy to your whole being, May I be healthy. May I be happy. May all beings be happy. If you get lost in thought or distracted, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (p109) for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. Hold this awareness of compassion towards all beings in the universe for a few minutes, or longer. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Compassion is the essence of spiritual progress. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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WISDOM
Wisdom is the destroyer of doubt and confusion. This preliminary Kundalini Yoga technique, also known as prana mudra or shanti mudra, awakens the dormant prana shakti creative energy, in the root chakra at the base of the spine. It distributes prana throughout the body and mind, uniting it with shiva pure consciousness, in the crown chakra at the top of the head. It develops awareness of the most important energy channel in the body, the sushumna nadi, located along the spine (See Appendix 7). By contemplating the affirmation we can realise that through the intelligent application of knowledge we can establish the inner conviction that we live in a friendly, non-threatening, purposeful universe. This develops the virtue of wisdom by motivating us to make higher consciousness choices throughout the day. The object of concentration is the movement of prana along the sushumna nadi raising the prana shakti from the root chakra to the crown chakra, offering and receiving, then returning it to the root chakra. OFFERING AND RECEIVING Pranayama 3 Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Wisdom is the destroyer of doubt and confusion. Place the hands on the ground in front of the body and in line with the spine. The palms should be facing the body and the finger tips should be almost touching. In the root chakra at the base of the spine, imagine gathering the prana into the hands. As the hands are raised up in front of the body, imagine raising the prana up the sushumna nadi from the root chakra at the base of the spine, up through the centre of the body to the top of head. As the hands are slowly raised, gently breathe in, smooth and slow. Briefly acknowledge the prana passing up though each of the chakras along the sushumna nadi, but do not stop, Keep raising the prana up to the crown chakra. At the top of the head open the hands upwards and the arms wide. The hands should be roughly in line with the side of the head. Imagine joining the prana with the pure consciousness in the crown chakra. Imagine a sphere of pure white light surrounding the head.
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Offer your prana to the universe, Feel it joining with your pure consciousness, Hold for a brief moment without breathing and acknowledge this higher consciousness experience. This spiritual energy is your higher self, your full potential as a spiritual being. Now place the hands in front of the forehead. As the hands are slowly lowered down the front of the body gently breathe out, smooth and slow. Briefly acknowledge the prana passing down though each of the chakras along the sushumna nadi. As the hands reach the floor imagine the prana returning to the root chakra at the base of the spine. Throughout the practice the awareness should be so completely centred on the movement of prana that the awareness of the external environment is lost. This is one round Do 3 times. After the third time, return you hands to their normal meditation position and completely relax. Observe your higher self, your higher consciousness. Experience yourself as the infinite mind that you are, an enlightened being. This is your full potential, your true nature. Experience a renewal of optimism that will clarify your priorities and aspirations. Your life will acquire new meaning as you establish the inner conviction that you live in a friendly, compassionate and purposeful universe. Hold this awareness for a few minutes or longer. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Wisdom is the destroyer of doubt and confusion. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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This book is created with love and distributed free. It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.

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ENLIGHTENMENT
Enlightenment is being in the present moment, mindful of all thought, speech and action. I spent many months with Swami Shyam Yogi. He lived at a yoga centre by the lake in Pushkar, India. Although he taught me hundreds of yogic exercises, we always finished the lesson in prayer, followed by this simple technique. Palming accumulates and concentrates the life-force energy into the hands, which can then be placed over the eyes and over the whole body. It distributes healing energy to the eyes, enlightening the mind and revitalising our whole being. By contemplating the affirmation we can develop the virtue of enlightenment. As we end our sitting meditation we are reminded to be mindful of all thought, speech and action throughout the day. Enlightenment is maintaining this higher consciousness awareness throughout the ups and downs of daily life, spontaneously creating love, wisdom and compassion in all activities. Prana is the object of concentration. PALMING Pranayama 4 Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Mentally repeat and contemplate the affirmation 3 times. Enlightenment is being in the present moment, mindful of all thought, speech and action. Vigorously rub the palms of the hands together until are hot. Gently place the palms over the eyes. As you take a deep breath, feel the warm healing energy being transmitted from the hands to the eyes, head and whole body. Feel the healing energy being transmitted to the mind. Feel the mind becoming enlightened. Hold for a few moments and gently breathe out. This is one round. Repeat 3 times. At the third time feel the healing energy being transmitted from your hands to your eyes and then to your head. Feel the healing energy being transmitted to the mind. Feel the mind becoming enlightened. Feel the healing energy being transmitted to the soul. Feel the divinity awakening in the soul. Feel love all around, inside and out. Feel inner peace and happiness. Hold this awareness for a few moments or longer.
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Slowly open your eyes and gently lower the hands down the face, letting the light in slowly. Rub your hands over your whole body. Feel the body becoming healthy and strong. Feel the healing energy circulating around the whole body, healing all sickness and pain. Feel stronger, healthier, happy and refreshed. Observe this feeling for a few moments. Join your hands over the heart and slightly bow the head as you mentally repeat the affirmation 3 times. Enlightenment is being in the present moment, mindful of all thought, speech and action. Feel calm and refreshed. Always finish with a prayer according to your personal philosophy.

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CONCLUDING PRAYERS
Do not entertain hopes for realisation, but practise all your life. Jetsun Milarepa, Tibetan Yogi

Always finish the meditation by joining your hands over the heart, gently bowing your head and quietly saying a prayer according to your personal belief and philosophy. Or you may wish to say one of the following traditional Sanskrit prayers from ancient India: Namaste You and I are one in mind and heart. I open my heart to spread love, and peace, and offer my help and service to all. Om Asato maa, Sadgamaya, Tamaso maa Jyortirgamaya, Mrityormaa Amritam Gamaya, Om Shanti Shanti Shanti. From the many untruths, may we find the One Truth. In the darkness may we find the brightness of Divine Knowledge. Our bodies will die, but our soul is immortal. May there be peace, perfect peace. At the end of meditation it is recommended that you lie down and simply observe the beauty and joy of the present moment. This is the feeling of inner peace and happiness. Sitting meditation is practising being in balance and harmony, so that we have a good idea of where we are heading and what it is meant to feel like. The goal is to train the mind to maintain this awareness in every moment, so that throughout the ups and downs of daily life, we spontaneously create peace and harmony in every way. Practise makes perfect. Contemplate this for a few moments before you finish.

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10 ADVANCED MEDITATIONS

MINDFUL WALKING YOGA NIDRA EARTH HEALING UJJAYI PRANAYAMA WITH KHECHARI MUDRA OM AH HUM CANDLE GAZING LOCATION OF CHAKRAS SONG OF THE BREATH FLOWERING LOTUS EMPTINESS

10 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES When you can successfully complete the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness, you may wish to add these advanced techniques to your practice. They go beyond the basic principles of the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness and introduce more complex philosophy and practise. The deeper you explore the mind, the longer the duration of your meditation. Presented here is a selection of ancient, yet effective techniques used to powerfully relax the body, focus the mind and heal emotional and psycho-physiological disorders. They should be used with caution. Be prepared for positive change. The regular practice of these techniques are life-transforming. When first practised it is recommended to do so under the guidance of a qualified instructor. Whether you choose to practise all 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness, or in combination with the advanced techniques, it is recommended that you always finish with Meditations 9 and 10, and your concluding prayers.

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MINDFUL WALKING
Are you aware of what you are doing? When you are eating, are you aware of it? Cows in the field eat all day but they do not know they are eating. There is no self-awareness. If you are eating, know that you are eating. Be aware of every morsel, taste, texture. If you are talking, know that you are talking. This awareness must be developed in everything you do, whether working, playing, gardening, in the bathroom or during meditation. Mindful walking can be used to awaken your awareness. (See Vipassana Meditation ). Mindful Walking is a very useful technique for those people who are doing intense and prolonged meditation. If you experience stiffness or discomfort during sitting meditation try this simple method of maintaining onepointedness of the mind that also loosens up the whole body. The variation presented here is known in yoga as Chankramanam which means , wandering , roaming without effort and without distraction from inner thoughts or the external environment . It is intended to induce and maintain a state of mindfulness while moving the body, and in all activities throughout the day. Walking meditation has been practised for thousands of years by yogis and monks to maintain good health and continuous momentary awareness. It can be practised for as long as you wish, but for the purpose of meditative practise 10 to 20 minutes daily is sufficient, or until stiffness is removed. Chankramanam revitalises the body reactivating the blood flow. It removes sleepiness and introversion getting lost in one own thoughts. Most important is that this s technique develops awareness of the present moment reducing the tendency to brood about the past or the future. MINDFUL WALKING Start walking slowly. Relax into a comfortable walking rhythm. You can either walk in a circle or to and fro according to space available. Imagine that the body is moving by itself like a clockwork toy. Your head should lean forward so that you are looking in the direction of your feet. You should look but not see. The eyelids should be lowered, not looking at anything specifically. The eyes should be vacant. You can also focus on the space between the nosetip and the ground. If you wish you can start to chant a mantra. If you have your own mantra, then use that. If not, use Om. You can practise whispering or mentally chanting the mantra. Synchronise your chanting with the movement of your feet. As you move your right foot forward chant your mantra once. As you move your left foot forward again chant the mantra. Be aware of your movement. Be in the present moment. Feel each movement of the body as you maintain concentration and chant your mantra. Imagine you are outside of your body, watching the body moving automatically. Feel that it is separate from yourself. If you start to get lost in your thoughts and forget your mantra, do not worry. Bring your awareness back to the mantra and begin observing the movement of the body. Imagine you are outside of your body, watching the body moving automatically. Feel that it is separate from yourself. Continue in this way for as long as you have time.
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Then return to your sitting position. Gently return to your sitting meditation technique. When you get up, return to walking meditation. Continue in this way for as long as you have time.

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YOGA NIDRA
This ancient yogic technique has many variations that become progressively more advanced. Here is a simple variation for beginners in the style of Swami Satyananda Saraswati of the Bihar School of Yoga. The traditional name for this deep relaxation technique is Yoga Nidra , which means yogic sleep However, in this technique you are not allowed to sleep. You must . remain awake, relaxed and alert throughout the practice. When practised successfully, it is more restorative than sleep. Yoga nidra is practised lying down in savasana - corpse pose. (See photo above). This is the classic yoga position for relaxation. It looks deceptively simple, but it is in fact one of the most difficult techniques to do correctly. This variation of yoga nidra involves rotating your awareness around the body to develop a state of deep relaxation. This is achieved by concentrating on individual parts of the body, part by part, and then consciously relaxing them. In this way your whole being begins to release tension and stress, creating an environment of enhanced relaxation. Beyond the simple variation presented overleaf are advanced yoga nidra techniques including: Visualisation Journey an inspiring and harmonious story filled with healing images and symbols, designed to release deeper blockages. Resolve - a simple statement planted deep into the subconscious which promotes personal change on all levels. Yoga nidra has a direct effect on reducing high blood pressure, diabetes and nervous disorders. It relaxes the spine and helps with many back problems. It reduces physical, mental and emotional tension and stress. It revitalises the whole system, promoting restful sleep and rejuvenation. It is best practised after light exercise, before meditation or before sleep. Many important physiological changes take place, reducing the body's energy loss, removing stress, lowering respiration and pulse rate, and resting the whole system. As you enter deep relaxation, you will feel your mind grow clear and detached. Often during yoga nidra repressed material from the conscious and sub-conscious layers of the mind surfaces. This happens when psychological and neurological blocks and barriers have been removed because of the induced relaxation. It is at such times that you may clearly see the solution to such repressions. That is why people arise from yoga nidra feeling that a great burden has been removed from within.
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YOGA NIDRA Before beginning you may like to cover your body with a blanket to keep warm. When you first lie down in savasana, make sure that your hands are palms up and are about 15cm from the body, and your legs are about 30cm apart. The spine and head should be straight. Close your eyes and gently roll your head from left to right a few times, until you find a comfortable central position. Begin to relax your whole being. Relax your body. Relax your breathing. Relax your mind. Loose and relaxed. Allow the body, mind and spirit to become quiet, calm and refreshed. Take a few minutes to settle into savasana. Take your awareness to the right leg. Lift it 5cm from the ground. Powerfully tense the whole leg from the thigh down to the foot. Tense the whole leg for 2 seconds. Now drop the leg by completely releasing it, allowing it to fall to the ground loose and relaxed. Take your awareness to the left leg. Lift it 5cm from the ground. Powerfully tense the whole leg from the thigh down to the foot. Tense the whole leg for 2 seconds. Now drop the leg by completely releasing it, allowing it to fall to the ground loose and relaxed. Take your awareness to the right hand. Make a fist with the right hand. Lift arm and hand 5cm from the ground. Powerfully tense the arm from the shoulder down to the fist. Tense the whole arm for 2 seconds. Now drop the arm by completely releasing it, allowing it to fall to the ground loose and relaxed. Take your awareness to the left hand. Make a fist with the left hand. Lift arm and hand 5cm from the ground. Powerfully tense the arm from the shoulder down to the fist. Tense the whole arm for 2 seconds. Now drop the arm by completely releasing it, allowing it to fall to the ground loose and relaxed. Gently roll the head to the right and to the left 3 times. Find a comfortable central position for you head. Now completely relax your whole body. Feel a deep sense of relaxation coming over your whole being. Hold this relaxed awareness for a few moments. Now you are ready to start the yoga nidra technique. Let gravity embrace your body. Feel your weight pulling you deeper into relaxation, melting your body into the floor. Take a few deep breaths by breathing deeply and slowly from the abdomen, sinking deeper with each exhalation. Feel how your abdomen swells and falls. As you enter deep relaxation, feel your mind growing clear and detached. Now begin the rotation of awareness of the whole body. Spend a few moments relaxing each part of your body in more detail. Start by relaxing the right side of your body.
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Take your full awareness to your right hand Relax it and mentally repeat, right hand is relaxed My Mentally touch it with the mantra OM. Take your full awareness to your right arm Relax it and mentally repeat, right arm is relaxed My Mentally touch it with the mantra OM. In this way continue to gently rotate around the whole body, spending a few moments consciously relaxing each part. My right shoulder is relaxed, OM. My right chest is relaxed, OM. My right stomach is relaxed, OM. My right hip is relaxed, OM. My right leg is relaxed, OM. My right foot is relaxed, OM. Now relax the left side of your body. My left foot is relaxed, OM. My left leg is relaxed, OM. My left hip is relaxed, OM. My left stomach is relaxed, OM. My left chest is relaxed, OM. My left shoulder is relaxed, OM. My left arm is relaxed, OM.. My left hand is relaxed, OM.. My lower back is relaxed, OM. My upper back is relaxed, OM. My neck is relaxed, OM. My head is relaxed, OM. My face is relaxed, OM. My whole body from the tip of the toes to the top of the head is relaxed, OM. Feel Om vibrating in your whole body. Feel the vibration soothing your whole being. Relaxing and healing. Hold this awareness for a few moments longer. Now fix your full awareness on the eyebrow centre, behind the forehead. Mentally touch it with the mantra OM. Feel the continuous gentle vibration of OM at this point. OM OM OM. Keep mentally chanting OM for a few minutes or longer. This is the end of one round. If you have time repeat another round. If you get lost in thought or distracted at any time, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (Meditation 5) for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. To finish this technique gently become aware of your breathing. Become aware of your whole body from your feet to your head. Become aware of the floor. Become aware of your surroundings. Gently begin to move your fingers. Gently move your toes. Gently begin to move your arms and legs.
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Practice Palming (Meditation 10) by rubbing the hands together and making them hot. Place the warm hands over the eyes and absorb the healing energy into your eyes. Gently open the eyes and lower the hands down the face, letting the light in slowly. Lie quietly for a few moments with your eyes open. Slowly bend your knees and then roll over to one side. When you are ready, sit up.

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EARTH HEALING
POSITIVE THINKING AND GLOBAL WARMING In this age of global warming and Earth changes, positive thinking and meditation is needed more than ever. We must accept that we cannot change the past. We can, however, change the present and the future. We are not all in positions of political leverage but changes can be made on a personal and community level. Economy, efficiency and consumer choices must all be foremost in our hearts and minds, if we are to truly have an effect in providing a safe and healthy environment for our grandchildren. It is an ethical and moral embarrassment to every government, community and person on the planet, that we, as a race, have taken the natural world for granted and abused our human potential, by carelessly polluting the world we live in. Scientists have proved that CO2 emissions caused by fossil fuels are three times higher than 11,000 years ago, the last Ice Age. Over the next 100 years the temperature of the Earth is going to rise, is rising. Natural cycles are being seriously affected by global warming, destabilizing the wind and ocean current patterns that have formed since the last ice age. Arctic melting, floods, droughts, hurricanes and typhoons are all being witnessed as the highest and strongest in recorded history. This global crisis is direct evidence that all our actions are being accounted for, and proves the existence of karma. The Law of Karma states that the universe is subject, without exception, to the endless process of cause and effect. All we have done, thought and said, sooner or later takes effect. The Earth has now entered a time of consequences, bad karma, for the actions of mankind. This we cannot change. This we must accept. The severity of these consequences will be equal to the greed and selfish insensitivity that mankind has purged on our home planet. But positive thinking and action, good karma, can also have a powerful effect on the present and the future. We are what we think. We are the creators of our own universe. We can create the world we want to live in. If we all think that the Earth changes are coming and we are all doomed, then we will be. But if we have a positive attitude we can make a big difference, even right now while you are reading this book. Stop for a few minutes. Do this meditation, now! After each sentence, close your eyes and follow the instructions.
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EARTH HEALING Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Gently rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Imagine all the governments of the world banning the use of fossil fuels and all CO2 emissions. Imagine them changing to eco-friendly sustainable fuels. Imagine this having a positive effect on the natural world. Imagine global warming is slowing down, Imagine global temperatures are returning to normal and that the natural cycles in the world have re-stabilied. Imagine the Earth as a healthy and vibrant eco-system, Where humans live in peace and harmony with the natural world. Now see yourself following through with this goal by making positive eco-friendly choices in all areas of your life. See yourself filling the tank of your car with eco-friendly fuel. See yourself in the supermarket buying eco-friendly products. See your house running energy-saving appliances. See yourself following through with this goal of creating the perfect environment for the future, by making positive choices in the present, Even if you have to make a few sacrifices in the beginning. Imagine the perfect world, clean, healthy and vibrant, See yourself in balance and harmony with nature. Observe this Earth healing awareness for a few moments or longer. Congratulations! You have just created the future of this planet. This simple and effective technique can be applied to any situation you want to change, whether it is personal health, employment, relationships or terrorism. Positive thinking can get us what we want, although it usually provides us with what we need. Meditations like this need to be repeated daily for several months before results manifest. They are long term techniques for long term solutions. There is no magic here. Ask and you shall receive. Incorporating wisdom and techniques like these into our daily meditation can have a powerful effect on our lives and on our environment. This is how to attain the happiness we all seek. This is enlightenment.

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UJJAYI PRANAYAMA
I first studied this technique at the Yog Nikatam Ashram in Rishikesh, India. Ujjayi pranayama is a powerful yogic technique that leads to deep states of meditation. The Sanskrit word ujjayi means victorious or freedom from bondage It is also known as . psychic breath because of its profoundly relaxing effect on the psychic level. It involves gently contracting the glottis in the throat producing a slight hissing sound. The technique presented here is suitable for beginners. But it may also be used in conjunction with other yogic techniques especially surya namaskar, asana, bandha and tantric meditations such as mantra japa, ajpa japa and Kriya Yoga. Before beginning this technique it is essential that you read and understand the Guidelines for Pranayama. (See Pranayama). Ujjayi pranayama is most commonly practised in conjunction with khechari mudra. Khechari mudra is Sanskrit for one who moves the sky The practice of khechari mudra involves . rolling the tongue up towards the back of the throat. This stimulates a number of pressure points located at the back of the mouth and nasal cavity which influence the whole body. This induces a state of calm and stillness. It preserves the vitality of the body and promotes inner healing. My teachers in the Himalayas explained that the advanced practice of khechari mudra prevents amrit the elixir of life, secreted by bindu at the top back portion of the head (See Appendix 8), from reaching the stomach. Khechari mudra allows the amrit to be collected at vishuddhi chakra leading to immortality. Ujjayi pranayama has a powerful tranquilising and heating effect on the body, which may produce a profuse, purifying sweat that detoxifies muscles and organs. It is used in yoga therapy to soothe the nervous system and calm the mind. It removes insomnia and may also be practised in the corpse pose before sleep. It is useful in slowing down the heart and in reducing high blood pressure. Ujjayi pranayama alleviates fluid retention and removes many disorders from the body and mind. People who are too introverted by nature should not perform this technique. Those suffering from heart disease should consult there medical advisor before commencing this techniques. Practising ujjayi pranayama for 10 to 20 minutes every day is recommended. Advanced practice involves combining it with kumbhaka, asana, bandha and mudra. This can be a very useful and powerful yogic technique if performed correctly and under the right conditions. Seek proper guidance. KHECHARI MUDRA Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Keep the body absolutely still throughout the practice. Fold the tongue upwards and backwards so that the lower surface is in contact with the upper palate. Stretch the tip of the tongue backward as far as is comfortable. Do not strain.
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Breathe slowly and deeply through the nose. Slowly reduce the rate of respiration to 5 or 6 breaths per minute. The more you practise, the less the irritation in the upper throat. When the tongue becomes tired, relax it for a few moments and then repeat the practice. When khechari mudra can be comfortably performed for 10 minutes without irritation, begin ujjayi pranayama. UJJAYI PRANAYAMA - Pranayama 5 Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Perform khechari mudra for the full duration of ujjayi pranayama. Take the awareness to the nostrils and allow the breathing to become calm and rhythmic. After a few minutes, transfer the awareness to the throat. Imagine that the breath is being drawn in and out through the throat and not through the nostrils, Feel as if the breathing is taking place through a small hole in the throat. As the breathing becomes slower and deeper, gently contract the glottis. This should produce a sound similar to the soft snoring of a sleeping baby. Do not contract the throat too strongly. The contraction should be light and continuous throughout the practice. If it is practiced correctly there should be a simultaneous contraction of the abdomen. This happens by itself without any effort being made. Do not contort the face muscles. Try to relax the face as much as possible. Both inhalation and exhalation should be long, slow and controlled. Each breath should be of equal length, rhythmic and smooth. Concentrate on the sound of the breath in the throat. The sound of the breath should not be very loud. It should be only loud enough for you alone to hear it. Keep practising this technique with full awareness of the throat and gentle sound of the breath. Continue this technique for 10 to20 minutes. If you get lost in thought or distracted, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (p110) for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. At the end of this technique simply observe the tranquility and clarity of your whole being. Feel your mind completely relaxed and clear. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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HUM - mantra of the mind AH - mantra of the speech OM - mantra of the body

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OM AH HUM
Om Ah Hum - From the hearts of all the holy beings, may streams of nectar and light flow down, granting blessings and purifying all our thoughts, speech and actions.

Lamaji lived on the banks of the river Indus in Ladakh, India. I used to visit him while I lived and studied at the Mahabodhi International Meditation Centre near Leh. He told me that many Tibetan Buddhists believe that all mantras are contained within these three syllables, OM AH HUM. If we recite this mantra with motivation and awareness we shall receive, from all the Enlightened Ones, many blessing upon our body, speech and mind. Lamaji said that this mantra can also be substituted by OM MANI PADME HUM, which represents the six perfections in Buddhism. If you are not a Buddhist, you may choose to receive this blessing according to your own belief by using your personal mantra. (See Appendix 8). OM AH HUM can be chanted mentally or aloud 108 times every morning and evening at sunrise and sunset. The mantra may also be sung in an ascending melody roughly corresponding to D, F, G. (The D is just above middle C). If you do not have time to chant 108 then you may chant 54 or 27 times. The mantra maybe chanted fast or slow, but with full awareness on the heart, throat and head. A mala containing 108 beads maybe used to count the repetitions. It is held in the right hand, resting on the right knee. Lamaji taught me that sincerely chanting OM AH HUM 108 times produces many good results. All thought, speech and action are purified. It has a powerful effect on balancing and harmonising our whole being. It calms the mind and causes our distracting conceptions to subside. It strengthens the heart and increases our lifespan by protecting us from premature death. It attracts many good qualities and blessings into our lives, promoting moral discipline, concentration and wisdom. Breathing in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Hold the breath 1 2 Breathing out OMMM AHHH HUMMMM Hold the breath 1 2 (8-10 seconds) (2 seconds) (8-10 seconds) (2 seconds)

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OM AH HUM Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Before you begin chanting, establish a deep relaxed breathing pattern. Gently breathe in, in your mind, counting to 8. Hold for 2 seconds. Gently breathe out, in your mind, counting to 8. Hold for 2 seconds. This is one round. Do five rounds before you begin chanting. Now begin chanting the mantra. The awareness should be so completely centred on the mantra that the awareness of the body and the external environment is lost. Breathe in deeply and slowly through the nose while, in your mind, counting to 8. Hold your breath in for 2 seconds, 1 2 Breathe out gently through the mouth while slowly chanting the mantra OMMM AHHH HUMMMMMMMM. This should also last for the count of 8. Feel the vibration of OM purifying your chest and heart,. Feel the vibration of AH purifying your throat and speech. Feel the vibration of HUM purifying your head and mind. . Hold your breath empty for 2 seconds, 1 2 Breathe in deeply and slowly through the nose, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Hold your breath in for 2 seconds, 1 2 Breathe out gently, OMMM AHHH HUMMMMMMMM. Feel the vibration of OM purifying your heart. Feel the vibration of AH purifying your speech. Feel the vibration of HUM purifying your mind. Hold your breath empty for 2 seconds, 1 2 Breathing in 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Hold your breath in for 2 seconds, 1 2 Breathing out, OMMM AHHH HUMMMMMMMM. Feel it calming, strengthening and enlightening your whole being. Feel your heart growing pure and true. Feel your voice growing pure and sweet. Feel your mind growing pure and clear. Hold your breath empty for 2 seconds, 1 2 Breathing in deeply through the nose, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Hold your breath in for 2 seconds, 1 2 Breathing out, OMMM AHHH HUMMMMMMMM. This should also last for the count of 8. Feel the vibration of OM purifying your heart. Feel the vibration of AH purifying your speech. Feel the vibration of HUM purifying your mind. Feel it calming, strengthening and enlightening your whole being. Hold your breath empty for 2 seconds, 1 2 Continue chanting OM AH HUM for 27 times. If you have more time you may choose to do 54 or 108. If you get lost in thought or distracted at any time, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. When you have finished chanting, observe the tranquillity and clarity of your heart, speech and mind. Hold this awareness for a few moments or longer. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed
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Ajna Chakra

Mahanadi

Bhrumadhya

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CANDLE GAZING
This is one of the many techniques I learned from Swami Shyam Yogi in Pushkar, India. The traditional name for this Hatha Yoga technique is Trataka which means steady gazing, and is one , of the Shatkarmas. It acts as a stepping stone between physical and mental practices and leads to deep meditation and higher states of awareness. Trataka consists of three different modes of practice: Bahir outer trataka only Antar outer and inner trataka Dharana Inner trataka only

The candle flame is probably the most common and effective object used to gaze upon. However, it should be noted that any steady object may be used. Those who dislike gazing at a bright light, either through personal preference, eye problems or epilepsy may chose a different object, as discussed later. If using a candle it should be placed on a table or box so that the candle flame is at eye level when you are in the sitting in position. It should be approximately 1 meter, or arm length, from the eyes. Make sure there are no drafts that could make the flame flicker. s Beginners should gaze for 1 or 2 minutes only. For general purposes 10 minutes is sufficient. Avoid undue strain. The ability to keep the eyes open without blinking should be developed gradually with consistent practice. For spiritual purposes or to rectify an eye defect, trataka may be performed for extended periods of time, but only after consulting a qualified yoga teacher. Those who suffer from insomnia are recommended to practice for 10 to 15 minutes before sleeping at night. Traditionally, trataka is be practised after asana and pranayama and before advanced meditation. I have included it at the end of the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness as a prelude to advanced meditation techniques. However, it may also be practised at the start, directly after the preparatory prayers. Swami Shyam Yogi told me that trataka may be practised on any object of personal choice. He advised me not to practise on the moon, a crystal ball, a mirror or darkness as the experience may be too powerful to handle. Do not practice on the sun as this may damage the eyes. Ideally, once an object has been chosen for regular practice, do not change it, as the mind will have to start from the beginning again to assimilate the new object. Choose carefully and then stick to your choice. Be sure that your object will not move. This is especially important if you are practising outside.
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By stimulating bhrumadhya - the eyebrow centre, it activates the mahanadi the great energy channel in the head. This leads to the awakening of the ajna chakra, the spiritual centre in the midbrain. It is an excellent preparation for meditation. If you fix your eyes on a single point, the mind too, becomes one pointed. The eyes are the doorway to the mind. When the eyes are fixed and unmoving, the mind becomes the same. The thinking process automatically ceases as concentration increases. Trataka is one of the most powerful methods of controlling the tempestuous mind and its thought waves. Physically, trataka corrects weakness and certain defects of the eyes, such as short-sightedness. Trataka practice makes the eyes clear and bright by stimulating the brain via the optic nerve. It balances the nervous system, relieving nervous tension, anxiety, depression and insomnia. Mentally, it improves the memory and helps develop good concentration and strong willpower. There is no danger in the simple form of trataka presented here. Avoid undue strain in the beginning. The ability to keep the eyes open without blinking will be developed gradually with practice. Trataka is an excellent method for clearing accumulated complexes, problems and suppressed thoughts from the mind, enabling the practitioner to witness what is surfacing. However, it is also possible for these problems to manifest too quickly and cause mental disturbance. If this occurs, stop the practice and seek advice from a qualified yoga teacher. Those suffering from eye ailments such as eyestrain, myopia, astigmatism or early symptoms of cataract should not use a candle flame. Those suffering form epilepsy should avoid flickering lights and should use a steady object. CANDLE GAZING Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Relax the body, especially the eyes. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Be aware of the steadiness of the body. Keep the body absolutely still throughout the practice. When you feel calm and relaxed, open the eyes and gaze steadily at the candle. Gaze at the tip of the candle wick. Be aware that the candle flame may flicker slightly but the tip of the wick will remain steady. Try not to blink or move the eyeballs in any way, but do not strain as this will cause tension and the eyes will flicker. The awareness should be so completely centred on the candle wick, that body awareness is lost. If the mind wanders, gently bring it back to the practice. After a minute or two, or when the eyes become tired or begin to water, close them gently. Gaze at the after-image of the flame in the space behind the forehead, at bhrumadhya, the eyebrow centre. If the image moves up or down, or from side to side, observe it and try to stabilise it. Concentrate on the after-image of the flame. After a few minutes or when the image can no longer be retained, gently open the eyes, Once again gaze at the object and repeat the practice. You may continue in this way 3 or 4 times or for 10 to 20 minutes. If your eyes feel tired or strained, then this might be an indication to stop the practice. If you get lost in thought or distracted at any time, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (Meditation 5) for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. After the final round of gazing, practise Palming (See Meditation 10) before opening the eyes. Stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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Anahata

Manipura

Swadhisthana Mooladhara

LOCATION OF CHAKRAS
This Kriya Yoga technique is based on the teachings of Swami Satyananda Saraswati and has been practised by yogis for thousands of years to discover and harmonise the grand chakra system in the astral body. It is widely known throughout the world and used in various types of healing methods. The Sanskrit name for this technique is chakra anusandhana and utilises the ascending psychic passage arohan - from mooladhara to bindu, and the descending psychic passage awarohan - from bindu to mooladhara. This psychic passage does not flow directly through the chakras. It flows through the chakra trigger points known as kshetram. Each kshetram develops awareness of a specific chakra and directly activates it. Together they form an elliptical psychic circuit around the body that is not imaginary. It actually exists as a subtle passage of vital life force energy. The more you practise, the more you will develop a subtle perception of all the kshetrams in the arohan and awarohan psychic passages. This technique assists in locating the chakras and balancing the prana that flows through them. During this meditation the rotation of awareness should flow through all the chakras trigger points in the psychic passages, noting each kshetrum and mentally saying its name as you pass through. As you return to mooladhara count each round using a mala. (See Appendix 8). Sahasrara at the crown of the head is not utilised in this technique. Breathe normally. Do not synchronise the breath with the flow of awareness through the psychic passages. A good knowledge of chakras is recommended before commencing this technique. (See Appendix 7). LOCATION OF CHAKRAS Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Keep the body absolutely still throughout the practise. Breathe normally. Fix your awareness on the mooladhara kshetram at the base of the spine. This is the starting point for each round. Acknowledge this trigger point and mentally repeat; Mooladhara, moolahara, mooladhara. Let your awareness ascend the arohan passage, the frontal passage, passing through each kshetrum, mentally saying each one; Swadhisthana. Manipura.
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Anahata. Vishuddhi. Bindu. After reaching the bindu kshetram you should immediately let your awareness descend through the awarohan passage to mooladhara kshetram. Let your awareness pass through each kshetrum, mentally saying each one; Ajna. Vishuddhi. Anahata. Manipura. Swadhisthana. Mooladhara. This completes one round. Immediately begin the second round by mentally saying; Mooladhara, mooladhara, mooladhara. Move your awareness upwards through the arohan passage, passing through each kshetrum, mentally saying each one. Do not make any tense efforts to locate the kshetrum. Let your awareness flow through each centre without effort. You can imagine that each kshetram is a railway station and that your awareness is like a train that passes through them without stopping. Or, you can imagine your awareness as a thin silver serpent travelling in an elliptical path within the body. Do 9 rounds. If you get lost in thought or distracted at any time, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (Meditation 5) for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. At the end of this technique stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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Mooladhara

SONG OF THE BREATH


This Kriya Yoga technique is based on the teachings of Swami Satyananda Saraswati, and has been practised by yogis for thousands of years to unite Shiva and Shakti. Thus, merging the individual consciousness with the supreme universal consciousness and leading to deep transcendental experiences. This technique is traditionally known as Song of the Breath . However, the Sanskrit name is sabda sanchalana meaning , rotation of word consciousness and , is the sixth stage of ajapa japa. (See Appendix 8). Here, the word is the mantra SO HAM which means am Shiva (pure consciousness). It is a mantra that arises automatically with each and I every breath. It is the sound that corresponds with the natural rhythm of breathing. Ujjayi pranayama with kechari mudra should be practised throughout (See Advanced Techniques). Hold the breath for a few seconds with awareness at mooladhara. Inhale while ascending the arohan passage and chanting SO. Hold the breath for a few seconds with awareness at bindu. Exhale while descending the awarohan passage and chanting HAM. If your mind is disturbed let the SO HAM be quite loud and the breathing faster. If the mind is relaxed and reasonably one-pointed let SO HAM be more subtle and the breathing slower. In this technique do not worry about the meaning of SO HAM. Only be aware of rotating SO HAM through the psychic passages synchronising the sound with the breath. If your mind is ready and your aspiration strong then there can be a transcendental explosion of the meaning of SO HAM. If you are ready the meaning may show itself like a flash of lightning. Do not expect anything. Practise diligently with non-attachment and accept whatever you receive. It is recommended to practise this meditation for at least thirty minutes everyday. Before attempting this meditation it is recommended that the previous meditation is performed for several weeks and fully understood. SONG OF THE BREATH Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Keep the body absolutely still throughout the practice. Practise ujjayi pranayama with kechari mudra throughout this meditation. Exhale deeply with eyes open and bend the head forwards. Become aware of the mooladhara chakra.
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The first round stars here. With ujjayi pranayama breathe in and up the arohan passage. Hear the sound SO and feel it piercing each kshetram in turn. Do not mentally repeat the names of the chakras when ascending, only awareness. When your awareness travels between the vishuddhi and bindu kshetrams slowly raise your head. Your head should be upright as you reach bindu. The SO mantra and inhalation should end when your awareness reaches bindu. Close your eyes and be aware of the bindu for a few seconds. Then breathe out with ujjayi down the awarohan passage. Hear the mantra HAM and feel it piercing each kshetram in turn. Do not mentally repeat the names of the chakras when descending, only awareness. Your exhalation and HAM mantra should end when you reach mooladhara. As you exhale slowy bend your head forwards. Maintain awareness of the mooldhara chakra for a few moments and then open the eyes. This is the end of the first round. Immediately begin the next round by inhaling, raising the head and closing the eyes while hearing the SO mantra. Continue for 59 rounds. If you get lost in thought or distracted at any time, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (Meditation 5) for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. When you finish stay alert and relaxed, but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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FLOWERING LOTUS
This Kriya Yoga technique is based on the teachings of Swami Satyananda Saraswati, and has been practised by yogis for thousands of years in dedication to Shakti, the wife of Shiva. She is known by many names including Shambhavi, which is the traditional Sanskrit name for this technique. She symbolizes creative energy and the manifested world, while Shiva represents pure consciousness. They are two sides of the same coin. One can not exist without the other. This simple variation is known as Flowering Lotus and aims to unite Shakti with Shiva in sahasrara at the top of the head. In this meditation you should visualise a lotus growing in the spine, with its roots in the mooladhara and its flower in the sahasrara. Gaze into the chidakasha - the space of consciousness - which is situated in front of the closed eyes. Feel that the space pervades everywhere, both inside and outside your body. Here you should imagine the lotus growing up through the spine from its roots to the flower, symbolizing the union of Shiva with Shakti at the crown of the head. To gain the most from this practise it is necessary to keep the body completely still and maintain one-pointedness of the mind. Practise ujjayi pranayama and kechari mudra throughout. Hold the breath while visualising the roots of the lotus. Inhale as you ascend the stem. Hold the breath while visualising the opening and closing of the flower. Exhale as you descend the stem back to the base of the spine. Be aware of the entire lotus; roots, stem and flower. Simultaneously be aware of the breathing process. To correctly perform eleven rounds this technique can take up to fifteen minutes. Be relaxed and alert. Do not stain or hold the breath for longer than is comfortable. This meditation should be performed naturally and effortlessly, and without expectation. Before attempting this meditation it is recommended that the previous meditation is performed for several weeks and fully understood. FLOWERING LOTUS Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Keep the body absolutely still throughout the practise.
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Do kechari mudra. Try to visualise the lotus growing in the spine. The roots are white or transparent green and they spread out from the region of the mooladhara chakra. The long, thin green stem rises upwards along the entire length of the spine. The lotus flower at the top of the head is closed like a bud. In the chidakasha, the space behind the closed eyes, try to visualise the whole lotus from the roots to the stem. Feel as though it is growing in the spine. Exhale deeply. Fix your awareness at the mooladhara chakra. Visualise the roots of the lotus. Inhale with ujjayi pranayama and let your awareness gradually ascend the stem of the lotus in the spine. Imagine that you are moving up the inside cavity of the stem. As you inhale your awareness slowly climbs the stem. At the end of inhalation your awareness should have reached the top of the stem just below the bud. Hold your breath. Fix your awareness at sahasrara. The flower is closed, but slowly it opens and the petals spread out to show the full blossom of the beautiful lotus flower. As it opens fully you can see the yellow tipped stamen in the centre. The flower slowly closes again and then begins to open. You must try to feel as though you are perceiving the lotus flower from both the inside and the outside. Continue to watch the lotus until the flower ceases to open and close, remaining in bud form, or until you have to exhale. Then exhale with ujjayi letting your awareness slowly descend the stem down the spine to the mooladhara. Exhalation should end when you reach mooladhara. This is one round. Immediately begin the second round by holding your breath for a few moments while visualising the roots spreading out from mooladhara. Then inhale with ujjayi and ascend the lotus stem again. If you get lost in thought or distracted at any time, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (Meditation 5) for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. Do 11 complete rounds. Then relax but do not move or change your sitting position. Feel calm and refreshed.

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EMPTINESS
Where the water of meditation is clear and calm, the mind-jewel will naturally be visible. Mumom Yamada Roshi

I first learned this technique at Daitoku-ji, Temple of Great Virtue, in Kyoto, Japan. My friend and translator, Hiro-san, told me that the Zen master was explaining how early Zen Buddhists were scientists of the mind. They came up with specific practices that would encourage the mind to unfold and open to the true nature of reality, like a flower opening to the sun. Zen is a school of Buddhism that aims to achieve enlightenment through meditation in all daily activities. Zazen was designed to assist us towards enlightenment. is the Japanese word Za for sitting cross-legged . Zen means calmly concentrate one mind Zazen is the sitting to s . meditation practice that prepares us for standing meditation, walking meditation and lying down meditation, which cover the four basic daily activites of the body and mind. Jacky Sach wrote, Life happens now, not somewhere down the the road. It happens while we wash the dishes, scoop the litter, change the diaper, drive to work, blow your nose, mow the grass, and watch television. Zen teaches that enlightenment is found in the present moment through mindfulness in everyday activites. The classic Zazen technique presented here is probably the most advanced meditation in this book. Although it appears to be a very basic technique, it strips the practice of meditation down to the essentials. There is nothing to cling to, nowhere to go and nothing to be. It is what you experience reality to be, not the illusions and tricks that the mind has played on you all your life. Here we experience what really exists, not what we invent with our ego, our fears, our notions, not intellectual or rational, but pure, real, no-thing. The essence of Zen is to walk along the razor edge of the present moment, to be so completey present that no problem, no suffering, s nothing that is not Truth can survive. Through regular practice and experiential intuition comes self-realisation and awakening to the absolute truth of reality. C. Alexander Simpkins wrote, Everyday mind can fill like a muddy pond, stirred up by thoughts, plans and worries. Emptiness is the pathway that many forms of meditation take to reduce these distractions. Clear mind, also refered to as the Buddha mind, is the cornerstone of Zen. Clear mind is a limitless perspective, the meditative perspective, and is the foundation for inner work. It is beyond words.

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EMPTINESS Sit quietly and comfortably with the eyes closed and the spine and head straight, but not tense. The eyes may be closed or half open as in traditional zazen. Relax the body. Relax the breathing. Relax the mind. Keep the body absolutely still throughout the practice. Chant the following mantra 12 times: Form is emptiness and emptiness is form. As you chant, relax and direct your attention to the mantra. Think about what these words really mean. What is the significance? For a few moments contemplate emptiness. After you have contemplated for some time, let go of any thoughts you have about it. With nothing in mind, simply sit quietly without thought. Breathe comfortably and stay with the moment to moment experience. Now imagine that you sitting on the shore of a pond. The pond is alive with activity. Frogs croak, crickets sing, birds fly overhead, and a fish jumps out of the water feeding on insects. Wind whips over the water stirring up the muddy bottom. All is movement. Then gradually as the day passes, conditions begin to shift. The wind dies down; the crickets are silent, birds perch silently in the trees. The pond is quiet. The murky rippled surface calms as the mud sinks to the bottom. The water becomes crystal clear, reflecting the natural surroundings. All is still. As the water becomes clear, so too your mind becomes clear of all thought. If a thought does arise, notice it and then dismiss it, returning to you calm, clear mind. Observe any thoughts or sensations that arise in the mind, but do not become attached to them. Simply observe them without judgement. Be the witness. Be calm. Be still. Become empty. No thought. No judgement. For a few moments contemplate emptiness. Contemplate the idea that everything is empty. Consider this in regard to yourself. You know that you are real, of course, but you are more than just a definition or concept of yourself. You are always growing, always changing. Learning to have a flexible self-concept is a hallmark of a healthy personality. Now let go of your self-concept and simply be at one with others. Each moment is unique because there is no expectation, No judgement. All is emptiness. By continuing to do this over time, you will find that thoughts intrude less and less and that your concentration becomes natural and profound. If you get lost in thought or distracted at any time, come back to the nose and do mindful breathing (Meditation 5) for a few minutes, or until your mind is clear again, and then resume this technique. Before finishing simply observe the tranquility and clarity of your mind for a few moments or longer. Feel calm and refreshed.
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Spending many hours in this way is the key to bringing about an enlightened state of consciousness that continues to develop. The purpose is to see things as they are, to observe things as they are, to let go of trying to contol everything, to just let it go As we drop distinctions and judgements, we see clearly how our small minds have limited us. As we witness our existence we become empty. We realise that things can simply without being acted upon. That we can be simply . Emptiness meditation helps us to discover a new found sense of ourself, centred in be our intuition. Eventually we experience a special calm and quiet awareness that comes from somewhere unknown within us. This emptiness leads to fullness, where we are filled with the essence of buddha-nature. Eckhart Tolle wrote, When you become conscious of Being, what is really happening is that Being becomes conscious of itself. When Being becomes conscious of itself - that Presence s Presence is needed to become aware of the beauty, the majesty, the sacredness of nature. Zen philosophers often teach that emptiness is similar to bamboo, which has form on the outside but is hollow or empty on the inside. Quantum physics has also come to a similar understanding. Matter is not solid like our senses tell us, but is actually comprised of energy; atoms, electrons, neutrons, etc. Even though things are not solid we continue to experience them that way. The same logic applies to our personal self. We hold our feelings of self to be real and enduring. But actually the self does not exist. It is merely a collection of traits that in their true essence are empty just like everything else. In fact we all share the same nature. John Hagelin, Ph.D. said, The deepest level of truth uncovered by science, and by philosophy, is the fundemental truth of unity. At that deepest sub-nucleur level of our realty you and I are one. We are all one. We should therefore have compassion towards others, as well as the objects and creatures of the world. The philosophy of yoga teaches us to indentify the self, transcend the veil of illusion and reunite the individual human spirit atman, with the Supreme Universal Consciousness. Zen, on the other hand, teaches no-self anatman, through emptiness is revealed the ultimate truth of existence, vastness and the unity of all. The concept of Zen may be beyond where you are at this time, but it is where you are heading, where all meditators are heading: to the Truth.

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COMPLETE SEQUENCE AND DURATION


Few are those who see with their own eyes and feel with their own hearts. Albert Einstein

If you choose to practise all the techniques offered in this book, then they should be performed in the sequence below. You may also select only the techniques that appeal to you and your individual requirements. These may be added to your personal practice. The duration of each technique will depend upon your progress, and the amount of time you can dedicate to daily meditation and yoga. TIME IN MINUTES PER DAY 20 to 60 20 to 60 5 to 10 15 to 60+ 60 to 120+ 5 to 10

DAILY PRACTICE Light Exercise Oneness with Nature Preparatory Prayers 10 Meditations For Inner Peace and Happiness 10 Advanced Meditations Concluding Prayers

Beginner times are indicated by the first number Advanced times are indicated by the second number Where do you find time for all this practice? Well, that is a good question. It will be different for each of us depending on our schedule, family and employment commitments, etc. The answer is to start little by little, and see how you go. Begin practising meditation for 15 minutes each day, and increase until you are able to sit for one hour straight through. It is recommended to practise sitting meditation twice per day, at sunrise and at sunset, but in the beginning just do whatever you can. My teacher in India sat in meditation for 3 hours every morning before we arrived for class. During meditation, if the state of tranquility prevails, do not disturb the mind. Do not try to get up from your seat. Try to prolong the meditation for as long as possible, observing the stillness and harmony of inner peace, but do not become attached to bliss. Meditation is not escapism. Simply observe and let go. It is possible to complete the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness, with full awareness, in one hour. However, if your time is limited, then a gentle alarm clock or timer may be set for the allocated duration. When the time is up, it doesn matter where you are in the t meditation, just calmly accept that you are out of time. Always finish with Meditations 9 and 10 and concluding prayers.

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SUMMARY
To live harmoniously the body, mind and spirit must develop in a balanced way according to individual temperament and capacity. This all helps to make the purification process deep-rooted and ensure success. Sri Swami Sivananda

Nothing in this book is original except for the way in which it is presented. It is an effective collection of some of the ancient principles and techniques that our ancestors have passed down through the ages. They are long-term techniques. Quick-fixes are like headache tablets: they may get you through the immediate suffering, but they do not investigate the cause of the headache and do not offer a long term solution to the problem. All lasting inner change requires time and effort. Meditation is the solution, but in the beginning it is also hard work. Sitting for hours with full awareness, without judgement, concentrating on being in the present moment, and accepting pain and discomfort is not easy for beginners. Persistence is the mother of personal change. It is applying the best effort in all things throughout the day. This does not mean that it will take years to make profound changes in your life. If you diligently apply these principles and techniques of mindfulness every day for only one month, you will be astonished at the results. You will begin to tap into the highest levels of your capacity and begin to enter the realm of the spiritual path and holistic lifestyle. Do not get hung up on the outcome. Instead, enjoy the process of personal expansion and growth. The less you focus on the end result, the quicker it will come. Persist and spend longer and longer periods exploring these meditations. Do not worry if you do not understand the technique or if you are making progress or not. As the Zen saying goes, If you understand, things are just as they are... If you do not understand, things are just as they are. After a week or two you should be able to meditate for twenty minutes without your mind wandering onto other subjects. This will be your first indication that you are taking back control of the fortress of your mind. It will then focus only on what you command it to focus on. It will then be a wonderful servant, able to do extraordinary things for you. Remember, either you control your mind, or it controls you. However, if you want to become truly enlightened then you need to know exactly what you want out of life, emotionally, materially, physically and spiritually. Do not let the past remind you of what you are not now. Create good karma right now. Aim for the stars and create your own universe exactly as you dream it to be. You are only limited by your own imagination. Positive thinking is a powerful tool on the path of meditation and yoga, and in succeeding in life. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote, Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it. Begin it now. You can start by following this simple exercise on a daily basis, or including it as part of your concluding prayers after meditation. Be grateful for all that you have in your life. Visualise your goals and your dreams. Implement an action plan to manifest your goals and dreams. Receive, accept and be grateful for what you have attracted into your life.

Dr. Jon Dispenza suggests, Wake up every morning and consciously create your day exactly the way you want it to happen It may take a little time for your mind to settle down and to get to the point where you are actually intentionally creating your day When, out of nowhere, little things happen that are so unexplainable, you will know that they are the result of your own
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creation. And the more you do this the more you build a neural net in your brain that accepts that this is possible. This gives you the power and the incentive to do it the next day. Having clearly defined priorities and goals for every aspect of your life will offer you guidance and refuge when the seas become rough. Lasting happiness comes from steadily working towards your goals and advancing confidently in the direction of your life purpose, with morality, s love and compassion. Robin S. Sharma wrote, Happiness comes through the progressive realisation of a worthy objective. When you are doing what you truly love to do you are bound to find deep contentment. It may require you to step out of your comfort zone. Change is always a little uncomfortable at first, and a little risky. But it is the surest way to design a more joyful future. Once you master your body, mind and character, happiness and abundance will flow into your life almost magically. But for this to happen you must spend some time working on yourself daily, even if for only ten or fifteen minutes. At first you will notice that regular meditation makes you feel far calmer. This is because you have taken a significant step towards erasing the worry habit that plagues most of the population and you will begin to enjoy more energy and optimism. Most importantly, you will observe a sense of love and joyfulness entering your life along with an ability to appreciate the many gifts that surround you. Benjamin Franklin once said, Life's Tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late Lost time is never found again. Therefore, each day, no matter how busy you get or how many challenges you might face, return to your meditation. It is your oasis. It is your silent retreat. It is your island of peace. Never forget that there is power in stillness and silence. Stillness is the stepping stone to connecting with the universal source of intelligence that pulses through every living thing. We must use time wisely and forever realise that the time is always ripe to do right. As Padmasambhava taught, You may try to support your family and friends, but at the time of death all other actions besides the virtuous practices of Dharma activities (the path of Truth) will have been pointless. So constantly apply yourself to spiritual practices in thought, word, and deed! The purpose of meditation is to gain personal experience of all stages of the path to enlightenment. You can share these insights in the way you live your life. Although it is far easier to be in harmony when you are sitting quietly alone, your meditation will be worthless if you do not put your experiences to practical use in daily activities. (See Advanced Techniques Mindful Walking Persist with Hatha Yoga for the purpose of general health, but pursue meditation as the ). source of Truth and happiness. The key is to discipline yourself to practise correctly and regularly, to be your higher consciousness in all your daily activities, and to open your mind to your potential for living a life rich with possibilities. There are twenty-one meditations in this book. You are encouraged to use them as a guide, a lantern to light the way. Ultimately, meditation comes from within. Be patient and enjoy the journey.

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PHILOSOPHY
NO ONE IS WISE BY BIRTH, FOR WISDOM RESULTS FROM ONE'S OWN EFFORTS. SRI KRISHNAMACHARYA

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APPENDIX 1
VEDIC ASTROLOGY AND THE SPIRITUAL EVOLUTION OF MANKIND
Vedic astrology has been a recognised science in India from the earliest times and is a vast subject. In addition to its main body of literature, the Vedas contain six ancillary sections, one of which is Joytish, meaning light, and is designated to the study of astronomy and astrology. Presented here is a summary of vedic astrology in relation to the spiritual evolution of mankind.

In contrast to the Western concept of linear time, the Vedas view reality from the perspective of cycles called yugas. Our current cycle of history is seen as one of the many stages that recur eternally. Ages turn into new ages and then back again. Nature teaches us that throughout life the seasons repeat themselves, day turns to night and returns to day. Creation leads to destruction which creates something new. Yoga masters and rishis throughout time have observed that as the planets revolve around the sun, so too is the sun orbiting around a grand centre in the universe. They have observed that the spiritual development of mankind is directly related to the sun orbit around this grand s centre. One orbit of the sun around its grand centre takes 24,000 years to complete. This period of time is known as Daiva Yuga, or one day of Brahma. The grand centre of the sun orbit is the seat s of the creative power Brahma, the universal magnetism. Brahma regulates Dharma, the mental virtue of all creation. It takes 12,000 years for the sun to travel from the nearest point to the grand centre to the farthest point. (See diagram). The 12,000 years of the ascending arc of the sun orbits s represents man increasing spiritual development. The 12,000 years of the descending arc of the s sun orbit represents man declining spiritual development. Each of these periods of 12,000 s s years brings a complete change, both externally in the material world and internally in the intellectual and spiritual worlds. The four ages of ascending and descending spiritual evolution of mankind are: Satya Yuga the highest stage of human spiritual development. Tirta Yuga the third stage of human spiritual development. Dwapara Yuga the second stage of human spiritual development. Kali Yuga the lowest stage of human spiritual development. When the sun reaches the farthest point from the grand centre, the mental virtue of man comes to such a reduced state that we cannot comprehend anything except the gross and material world similar to the instincts of animals: food, sex and shelter. This lowest point in man s spiritual development is known as Kali Yuga. Due to the astrological influence of the sun, it is the most difficult age for man to reach enlightenment, but not impossible. From the lowest point it takes 1,200 years to emerge into the next age of spiritual development. In 2008 A.D. we are currently in the second stage of the spiritual evolution of mankind, known as Dwapara Yuga. This will last 2,400 years. In this age, as you can see from the advancement of science, the human intellect can comprehend the fine matters or electricities and their attributes which are the creating principles of the external world.
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When the sun moves closer to the grand centre we will enter the third stage of spiritual evolution, known as Treta Yuga, which lasts 3,600 years. Here, the mental virtue of mankind will have increased to the ability to comprehend divine magnetism, the source of all electrical forces on which creation depends for existence, and a deeper understanding of the universe, compassion and purpose. When the sun is nearest to its grand centre, Dharma, the mental virtue, becomes so much developed that man intellect can easily comprehend all the mysteries of Spirit, even God the s Spirit beyond this visible world. This golden period in man spiritual development is called Satya s Yuga and lasts 9,600 years. This is the Age of the Gods, and completes the full development of human evolution. At the end of this age, mankind intellect begins to deteriorate, and so begins the s descending 12,000 years of our spiritual decline. At the writing of this book in 2008 A.D. the position of the Sun is 1,508 years past the farthest point and 308 years into the ascending Dwapara Yuga. The sun is gradually returning towards its grand centre and with it comes the comprehension of subtler energies and greater spiritual awareness. This can be proved by studying the recent history of man. The Dark Ages (500 B.C. to 1500 A.D.) represented the low point in man spiritual evolution and can be seen by the wars, famine, s chaos and disorder of that time. It was at this time that Buddha, Jesus and other holy beings came to our help, to guide us through man darkest days. s According to the calculations of Swami Sri Yukteswar Giri the dark age of Kali Yuga is over, and for the last 308 years we have entered Dwapara Yuga, a period of rapid development in all departments of knowledge. You can see this for yourself with the discovery of gravity and electricity, the inventions of railways, computers and space travel. There is progress in the political world where people have begun to respect themselves and civilizations have begun to advance in many ways. Ancient wisdom and healing techniques are coming out of secrecy and finding their way to the forefront of education and leisure. Many resorts, spas and educational institutes now offer natural therapies and spiritual philosophies. Holistic living is becoming more popular as we slowly become aware of the essential qualities of life, with meditation and yoga classes becoming widely available at fitness centres and health spas around the world. According to the cycle of yugas, the current international and climate crisis will improve as man mental virtue increases with the ascending arc of the sun. Quantum physics has already s begun to understand the unity of existence, the power of thought and the source of God power. s Within the next 10,000 years mankind will once again reach its full human potential and create a harmonious world. Such is the great influence of Time which governs the universe. Jnanavatar Swami Sri Yukteswar Giri taught that no-one can overcome this cosmic influence, except those blessed with pure love and who can comprehend creation with enlightened minds. The stars may guide man through the many opportunities in life, but the cosmic flow of space and time reigns supreme over the spiritual evolution of mankind. This is the philosophy of Joytish, the science of light. Note: The information presented here is based on the enlightened work of Jnanavatar Swami Sri Yukteswar Giri, the fully realised yogi of Serampore, India. However, many Hindu scholars believe that we are still in Kali Yuga, lastng 432,000 years. As Sri Yukteswar Giri remarked, A daunting thought! This mistake crept in around 700 B.C. when the Indian King Yudhisthira and all his wise men, upon realising the dawn of Kali Yuga, retired to solitude and meditation in the Himalayan Mountains. This left none in the court of Raja Parikshit, his heir, who could correctly understand the principle of calculating the ages of the several yugas. However, as Sri Yukteswar Giri calculated, we are already 308 years into the second stage of human spiritual evolution, in the ascending age of Dwapara Yuga.
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APPENDIX 2
THE LAW OF KARMA
Good and bad are distinct. Cause and effect are clear. But fools do not believe and fall straight into a hell of endless darkness without even knowing it. What keeps them from believing is the heaviness of their karma. They are like blind people who don't believe there's such a thing as light. Even if you explain it to them, they still don't believe, because they are blind. How can they possibly distinguish light? Bhodidharma Founder of Zen Buddhism

WHAT IS KARMA? Karma is a Sanskrit term meaning actionor deed Any physical or mental action is karma. . Karma is the sum total of our acts, both in the present life and in the preceding births. Karma means not only action, but also the result of an action. There is a hidden power in karma termed adrishta, which brings in the fruits of karmas for the individual. The consequence of an action is really not a separate thing. It is a part of the action and cannot be divided from it. Breathing, eating, seeing, hearing and thinking are all karmas. Thinking is mental karma. It is the real karma. Mankind is threefold in his nature: Iccha desire/feeling Jnana thought/knowing Kriya willing/action These three fashion our karma. We know objects like chair, tree. We feel joy and sorrow. We will - to do this, or not to do that. Behind the action, there are desire and thought. A desire for an object arises in the mind. Then we think how to get it. Then we exert to possess it. Desire, thought and action always go together. They are the three threads, as it were, that are twisted into the cord of karma. Desire produces karma. We work and exert to acquire the objects of our desire. Karma produces its fruits as pain or pleasure. We will have to take births after births to reap the fruits of our karma and clear the karmic debt. Engaging in the correct actions necessary for the welfare of our future, in this life and the next, depends upon correct understanding of these actions and their effects. All our actions of body, speech and mind are causes and all our experiences are their effects. Geshe Kelsang Gyasto says, Karma explains why each of us has a unique mental disposition, a unique physical appearance, and unique experiences. Karma is why some enjoy good health while others are constantly ill. Some people have very beautiful bodies while others are very ugly. Some seem always happy, while others appear always sad. These are some of the various effects of the countless actions that each individual has performed in the past. The source of these non-virtuous actions is our own delusions such as anger, attachment and selfishness. Buddha said, A human rebirth comes from the practice of moral discipline, wealth comes from giving, a beautiful body comes from patience, inner peace comes from concentration, and liberation comes from wisdom.

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KINDS OF KARMA
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According to Sri Swami Sivananda there are three kinds of karma: Sanchita - accumulated works Prarabdha - fructifying works Kriyamana - current works Sanchita is all the accumulated karmas of the past. Part of it is seen in the character of man, in his tendencies and aptitudes, capacities, inclinations and desires. Prarabdha is that portion of the part of karma which is responsible for the present body. It is ripe for reaping. It cannot be avoided or changed. It is only exhausted by being experienced, by paying our past debts. Kriyamana is that karma which is now being made for the future. It is also called agami or vartamana. In Vedantic literature, there is a beautiful analogy. The bow-man has already sent an arrow; it has left his hands. He cannot recall it. He is about to shoot another arrow. The bundle of arrows in the quiver on his back is the sanchita. The arrow he has shot is prarabdha. And the arrow which he is about to shoot from his bow is kriyamana. Of these, he has perfect control over the sanchita and the kriyamana, but he must surely work out his prarabdha. The past which has begun to take effect he has to experience. Actions are of three kinds; good, bad and mixed. Good karmas make us a god or angel in heaven. Bad karmas throw us in lower wombs. Mixed actions give us a human birth. Every work is a mixture of good and evil. There can be neither absolute good work nor absolute bad work in this world. This physical universe is a relative plane. If we do some action, it will do some good in one corner, and some evil in another corner. We must try to do such actions that can bring the maximum of good and the minimum of evil. THE LAW OF KARMA The Law of Karma forms an integral part of Vedanta and Yoga. The Law of Karma is one of the fundamental doctrines not only in Hinduism, but also in Buddhism and in Jainism. As a man sows, so he shall reap. This is the Law of Karma. It expounds the riddle of life and the riddle of the universe. Fortunately, Westerners have also begun now to acknowledge its importance and truth. Even science has agreed with the Law of Karma, when over 300 years ago Sir Isaac Newton said, To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction. Therefore, every sensible person must accept the Law of Karma. A close study of this law gives encouragement to the hopeless man, to the desperate and ailing. Destiny is created by man's thoughts, habits and character. There is every chance for his correction and improvement by changing his thoughts and habits. The scoundrel can become a saint; the prostitute can become a chaste lady; a beggar can become a king. This mighty law provides for all this. Sri Swami Sivananda wrote, Blessed is the man who understands and lives in the Law, for he will soon attain God-consciousness and become one with the Law-giver! Then the Law will no longer operate on him. Only the Law of Karma can explain the mysterious problem of good and evil in this world. Only the Law of Karma can bring contentment, peace and strength to the afflicted and the desperate. It solves our difficulties and problems of life. It pushes a man to right thinking, right speech and right action. It brings a brilliant future for that man who lives according to this universal law. It brings solace, satisfaction and comfort to one and all. It is a self-evident truth. If all people understand this law correctly and discharge their daily duties carefully, they would rise to sublime heights in the ladder of spirituality. They will be moral and virtuous, and have a happy, peaceful and contented life.

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Sri Swami Sivananda continues, If you follow the Law of Karma there will not be any room for complaint when you see the inequalities in birth, fortune, intelligence and capacities. There will be heaven on earth. All will rejoice even in suffering. Greed, jealousy, hatred, anger and passion will vanish. Virtue will reign everywhere. We will have a glorious Satya Yuga now with peace and plenty everywhere.

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APPENDIX 3
SADHANA
All major religious traditions carry basically the same message, that is love, compassion and forgiveness. The important thing is that they should be part of our daily lives. His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Sadhana means any spiritual practice that aids the aspirant to realise enlightenment, universal consciousness, or God. It is a means to attain the goal of life. Without sadhana no one can achieve the goal. Sadhana differs according to taste, temperament and capacity. In the stillness of meditation your true path to liberation shall be revealed. Your Guru may also instruct you as to the sadhana most suited for you. According to the ancient yogic text, Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krsna states that you can realise the goal of life by four different paths. The four paths lead to the same goal: Karma Yoga - the path of selfless action and duty Bhakti Yoga - the path of devotion and love Jnana Yoga - the path of enquiry and self-analysis Raja Yoga - the path of meditation and introspection (Traditionally, Hatha Yoga is regarded as a preliminary practice for Raja Yoga, but has recently become separated and expanded). Each path blends into the other ultimately converging and becoming one. All yogas lead to union of the individual soul with the Cosmic Soul, fusing the limited consciousness with the Supreme Universal Consciousness. Progress on the path depends on various physical and mental qualifications in an individual that have to be gradually cultivated and awakened. These qualifications are listed in a yogic text called Gheranda Samita. They are: Shodhanam - body purification Dridhata - steadiness of the body Sthairyam - determination Dhairyam - patience Laghavam - lightness of the body and mind Pratyaksham - direct perception Nirlipta - non-attachment, unaffected by the woes of the world/life
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These practices and experiences are the means to achieve perfection. Sadhana helps to develop these required qualifications in the aspirant, enabling him or her to progress along the path to perfection. Sadhana is a tool and powerful method that helps propel the student along the path towards spiritual awakening and self-realisation. Sincere and regular practice will bring about direct perception as a prelude to the highest experience of life, union with the Divine, the Supreme Universal Spirit. Whichever path you take towards enlightenment, it is recommended to begin with Hatha Yoga. It is the foundation for perfection, as it greatly assists in the purification process that precedes higher practices. It is recommended that your sadhana consists of a selected number of the techniques from Hatha Yoga, and integrated with other paths of yoga such as Karma, Bhakti and Jnana Yoga, in order to bring about a total and integrated change in ones perception, understanding and being.

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APPENDIX 4
20 SPIRITUAL INSTRUCTIONS FROM SRI SWAMI SIVANANDA
This is the essence of all spiritual sadhana. It will lead you to liberation. All these spiritual canons must be rigidly observed. You must not give any leniency to the mind. Sri Swami Sivananda These twenty spiritual instructions are for seekers of Truth, dedicated to the path of enlightenment and contain the very essence of all Yoga Sadhana. Karma, Bhakti, Jnana, and Raja Yoga will all come to one who follows them whole-heartedly. They are the unfailing keys to quick and effective development and culture of the physical, mental, moral and spiritual self of man. 1. Brahmamuhurta Get up at 4 a.m. daily. This is brahmamuhurta which is extremely favourable for sadhana. Do all your morning spiritual sadhana during this period from 4 a.m. to 7 a.m. Such Sadhana gives quick and maximum progress. 2. Asana Sit in padmasana - lotus pose, siddhasana - accomplished pose, or sukhasana - any pose you like, for your Japa and meditation for half an hour, facing east or north. Increase the period gradually to three hours. Practice sirshasana headstand, and sarvangasana shoulderstand, for maintenance of health and brahmacharya. Take light physical exercises regularly, such as walking. Do twenty rounds of easy, comfortable pranayama - breathing exercises. Do not strain yourself while doing pranayama.

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3. Japa You can repeat any mantra - sacred syllable, such as pure Om or Om Namo Narayanaya, Sri Ram, Sita Ram, Sri Ram Jaya Ram Jaya Jaya Ram, Om Namah Sivaya, Om Namo Bhagavate Vasudevaya, Om Saravanabhavaya Namah, Hari Om, or Gayatri, according to your taste or inclination, from 108 times to 21,600 times daily. Devotees of Christ may repeat the name Jesus or Hail Mary, Mother of Jesus. Parsis, Sikhs and Muslims may select a name or Mantra from the Zend Avesta, Granth Sahib or Koran respectively. 4. Dietic Discipline Take sattvic food. (See Appendix 9). Give up chillies, tamarind, garlic, onion, sour articles, oil, mustard, asafoetida. Observe moderation in diet (mitahara). Do not overload the stomach. Give up those things which the mind likes best for a fortnight once or twice in a year. Eat simple food. Milk and fruits help concentration. Take food as medicine to keep the life going. Eating for enjoyment is a sin. Give up salt and sugar for a week or a fortnight. You must be able to live on rice, dhal and bread without any pickle. Do not ask for extra salt for dhal, or sugar for tea, coffee and milk. People taking a non-vegetarian diet should try their best to gradually give up flesh-eating as completely as possible. They will be immensely benefited. 5. Meditation Have a separate meditation room under lock and key. If this is not possible then a corner of the room should be set apart with a small cloth screen or curtain drawn across. Keep the room spotlessly clean. 6. Svadhyaya Study systematically the Gita, Ramayana, Bhagavatam, Vishnu-Sahasranama, Lalita-Sahasranama, Adityahridaya, Upanishads, Yoga Vasishta, Bible, Imitation of Christ, Zend Quran, the Tripitakas, the Granth Sahib and other religious books from half an hour to one hour daily, and have suddha vichara (pure thoughts). 7. Elevate the Mind Learn by heart some prayers slokas - prayer verses, stotras hymns, and repeat them as soon as you sit for meditation. This will elevate the mind quickly. 8. Brahmacharya Preserve the vital force; veerya - seminal energy, very, very carefully. Veerya is God in motion or manifestation (vibhuti). Veerya is all power. Veerya is all money. Veerya is the essence of life, thought and intelligence. This instruction is not for bachelors only. Householders also must follow it as far as possible. They must be extremely moderate in their marital connections with their spouse. This is very important. 9. Charity Do charity regularly, every month, or even daily according to your means. Never fail in this item. If necessary forego some personal wants but keep up this charity regularly. 10. Satsang Give up bad company, smoking, meat and alcoholic liquors entirely. Have constant satsang (association with holy people). Do not develop any evil habits. Deliberately exert to develop positive virtuous qualities. 11. Fast Fast on Ekadasi (11th day of the Hindu lunar fortnight) or live on milk and fruits only. Christians must fast on alternate Sundays, Muslims on alternate Fridays, and Parsis on a suitable day every fortnight.
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12. Japa Mala Have a japa mala rosary, around your neck or in your pocket or underneath your pillow at night. This will remind you of God. Twirl the beads during your leisure. You should repeat His Holy Name at all times, whatever task you may be engaged in. 13. Observe Mouna Observe Mouna (vow of silence) for a couple of hours daily. Do not make gestures and inarticulate noises during the period of silence. 14. Discipline of Speech Speak the truth at all cost. Speak a little. Speak sweetly. Always utter encouraging words. Never condemn, criticise or discourage. Do not raise your voice nor shout at little children or subordinates. 15. Be Content Reduce your wants. If you have four shirts, reduce the number to three or two. Lead a happy, contented life. Avoid unnecessary worry. Be mentally detached. Have plain living and high thinking. Think of those who do not possess even one-tenth of what you have. Share with others. 16. Practise Love Never hurt anybody. Ahimsa Paramo Dharmah (Non-violence is the highest virtue). Control anger by love, kshama (forgiveness) and daya (compassion). Serve the sick and the poor with love and affection. This is service to God. 17. Be Self-Reliant Do not depend upon servants. Self-reliance is the highest of all virtues. 18. Have Self-Analysis Just before retiring to bed, think of the mistakes you have committed during the course of the day (self-analysis). Keep a daily spiritual diary and self-correction register as Benjamin Franklin did. Maintain a daily routine and resolve-form. Do not brood over past mistakes. 19. Do Your Duty Remember that death is awaiting you at every moment. Never fail to fulfil your duties. Have pure conduct (sadachara). 20. Remember God Think of God (whatever you perceive this to be) as soon as you wake up and just before you go to sleep, and at all other times whether engaged in any work or not. Repeat His Holy Name always. Surrender yourself completely to God (saranagati).

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www.taichibali.com/yoga.php YOGA RETREAT EDITION COPYRIGHT 2008 MADE IN BALI


This book is created with love and distributed free. It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.

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APPENDIX 5
THE TEACHINGS OF BUDDHA
A true follower of Buddha shines among blind mortals as the fragrant lotus, growing in the garbage by the roadside, gives joy to all who pass by. Dhammapada

Buddha wisdom is as broad as the ocean and his spirit is full of great compassion. The s teachings of Buddha are recorded in over five thousand volumes and have been handed down for more than twenty five hundred years. The teachings extend beyond borders and racial barriers of the world, touching on all aspects of human life and bringing meaning to it. Buddha does not lead us to God. He showed us a path where we can develop our own understanding, through our own experience. He taught that the Truth is not to be found in books or scriptures but can be discovered in the workings of our own sense perceptions, our eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body and mind. To study these in an immediate and wakeful way and cultivate mindfulness is the path of insight prescribed by the Buddha. He urged us to work with our practice, not as an ideal but in our everyday life situations. It is here that we can develop strength to overcome our difficulties, and a constancy and greatness of heart. It is here that we can step out of our struggle with life and find the Middle Way, the inner meaning of right understanding, freedom from sorrow and peace. As Achaan Chaa said, The heart of the path is so simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. Buddha taught two levels of practice. Understanding these two levels is the basis of Buddhism: 1. FOUNDATION the development of virtue and morality in order to bring happiness, comfort and harmony among people. Virtue and morality are the mother and father of Dharma the path of Truth, that grows within us, providing us with nourishment and direction. 2. LIBERATION OF THE HEART the practice directed solely toward awakening, more intensive and unconcerned with comfort. This liberation is the source of wisdom and compassion and the true reason for the Buddha teaching. s Below is a brief summary of the most significant teachings of Buddha. They are powerful guiding tools for the seeker of Truth. The Three Jewels Buddha Dharma Sangha The Four Noble Truths Throughout life there is suffering. The cause of suffering is desire. Suffering can end. The Middle Way of the Eightfold Path leads to Nirvana.
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The Eightfold Path Right view Right thought Right speech Right effort Right behaviour Right livelihood Right concentration Right mindfulness The Five Precepts Do not destroy life. Do not steal. Do not lie. Do not commit sexual misconduct. Do not take intoxicating substances. The Four Great Vows Sentient beings are numberless; I vow to save them. Desires are inexhaustible; I vow to put an end to them. The Dharmas are boundless; I vow to master them. The Buddha Way is unattainable; I vow to attain it. The Three Divisions of the Path Wisdom Morality Mental discipline The Three Poisons Craving Hatred Ignorance The Six Perfections Concentration Giving Morality Patience Persistence Wisdom The Five Hindrances Doubt Lust Hatred Worry Laziness

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KARMA - CAUSE AND EFFECT Buddha taught that the Law of Karma serves as a moral compass throughout our lives. Karma is the force generated by action and intention that effects one quality of life in the next s life. Good intentions can lead to a good life via karmic implication. Negative intention can lead to a harder life. Everything we experience is the direct result of previous thoughts, speech and actions. We are the creators of our own universe. (See Appendix 2). THE FOUR FOUNDATIONS OF MINDFULNESS Human beings are living in suffering, chaos, oppression, destructiveness and wars because we cannot get rid of greed, aversion and delusion from our minds. If all individuals and leaders of each country can reduce their greed, delusion and aversion to some extent, the world will be a better place, wars may be ended and peace will flourish. To prevent human beings from doing evil deeds requires purification of the mind. A person whose mind has been purified will not commit any sin since the cause of evil, or defilement, has been eliminated. This can be achieved by continually practising mindfulness. (See Vipassana Meditation ). The foundation of mindfulness is the principle of practising mindfulness continually. We should be conscious of what we are doing in the present moment, both physically and mentally. We contemplate on the present only, not on the past or the future. Pra Rajaprommajarn, Director of Vipassana for Northern Thailand, taught that noble ones do what others cannot possibly do, endure what others cannot possibly endure and overcome what others cannot possibly overcome. Thus they achieve what others cannot possibly achieve. Make your mind like the land. If the mind is always treated like the land, no mind-object can affect it. When people litter the land with clean or dirty things, body waste and spit, the land neither minds nor is offended. If you can constantly keep your mind in this way no mind-object can dominate it. All the noble ones have reached enlightenment by way of the Four Foundations of Mindfulness; Mindfulness of the body the acknowledgement of bodily movement such as the rising/falling of the abdomen when breathing and the right or left foot when stepping. Mindfulness of feeling the acknowledgement of happiness or suffering which appears while we are concentrating on the rising/falling. When happiness or suffering happens we stop acknowledging the rising/ falling to acknowledge the feelings. For example, when we feel the pain in any part of the body, we acknowledge, "pain, pain, pain, for a while before we resume acknowledging rising/falling. Mindfulness of the mind the acknowledgement of our thoughts. While we are acknowledging rising/falling, our minds may think of work or home. We have to stop acknowledging rising/falling and acknowledge, "thinking, thinking, thinking," for a while before we resume acknowledging rising/falling. Mindfulness of mind objects the acknowledgement of the five hindrances: doubt, lust, hatred, worry, laziness. These exist in the minds of people of all nations. While we are concentrating on rising/falling, one of the hindrances such as pleasure may occur in the mind. We have to stop acknowledging rising/falling and acknowledge, "pleased, pleased, pleased," instead. If it is displeasure which occurs, we acknowledge, "displeased, displeased, displeased." If it is drowsiness that occurs, we acknowledge, "drowsy, drowsy, drowsy." If it is anxiety that occur, we acknowledge, "anxiety, anxiety, anxiety." If it is doubt that occurs, we acknowledge, "doubt, doubt, doubt." After we acknowledge the hindrances for a while, we resume acknowledging rising/falling.
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APPENDIX 6
THE DIVINE SCIENCE OF LIFE
Yoga teaches that the body is the temple of the living spirit and that in bringing it closer to a state of physical perfection, man removes the greatest obstacle to mental and spiritual progress. Michael Volin

YOGA

INTRODUCTION TO YOGA

Yoga is a component of Tantra and is one of the six orthodox systems of Indian philosophy. It has been practised for thousands of years and is the oldest system of personal development in the world, encompassing body, mind and spirit. In India, it is regarded as the divine science of life. Yoga is the gentle process of cleansing the consciousness to gradually reveal one true identity as s a spiritual being. In the Bhagavad Gita, Lord Krshna states that there are four branches of yoga. (See Appendix 3). My guru told me that yoga is concerned with freedom from spiritual disturbance. Through yoga the soul becomes perfectly tranquil and serene. Without yoga the soul is constantly subject to disturbance. This chapter is mainly concerned with Raja Yoga - the path of meditation, and Hatha Yoga - the path of purification, that precedes the practice of Raja Yoga. Yoga is a practical system and universal philosophy designed to help us return our body and mind to radiant health, promoting peace and harmony in our daily life. This is achieved by regularly practising yogic techniques in a systematic and progressive way, such as those suggested in this book. Under the guidance of an experienced yoga instructor we can develop a personal practice and discipline that purifies the body and controls the mind. In this way yoga is a valuable tool on the path to inner peace and happiness. According to medical science, yoga therapy is successful because of the balance created in the nervous and endocrine systems which directly influences all other systems and organs in the body. Yoga allows men, women and children of all ages to reach their full potential. This objective may only be achieved if there is balance and harmony between mind and body. The goal of yoga is to be one with the divine - in balance and harmony with the rhythm of nature, leading to a more spiritual and meaningful life. T.K.V. Desikachar states, Anything that brings us closer to understanding that there is a higher power, greater than ourselves, that is yoga. It does not matter what name we use for the divine. When we feel in harmony with that higher power, that is yoga. It is not necessary to subscribe to any particular idea of the divine in order to follow the path of yoga. Whether becoming one with the divine leads to a better understanding of yourself, to greater contentment, or to a new goal is a completely personal matter. ORIGINS OF YOGA The origins of yoga are shrouded in the mists of time. Legend has it that a long, long time ago in the Himalayan kingdom of Tibet, the Goddess Parvati was so distressed by all the human suffering in the world that she climbed to the top of Mount Kailash, to the abode of the snows, to find Lord Shiva. She pleaded with her divine husband, My Lord, isn there anything that can be t done to ease the suffering of our children? Shiva closed his eyes, entered into a state of deep 127

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meditation, and began to teach the science of yoga. Divine knowledge was pouring out from his lips as naturally and effortlessly as the Ganges flows to the sea. When he had finished, he opened his eyes and discovered that Parvati had fallen asleep. As he had been teaching from this deep state of meditation he could not remember what he had said. What a waste! Shiva said to himself. Fortunately, in a pond nearby, there was a very special fish who had listened with great attention to the whole discourse. He said to Shiva, Please do not worry my Lord, I remember everything! Shiva was so happy that he instantly liberated this great soul who had been the first recipient of this knowledge. He became Rishi Matsyendranath, and started a lineage of siddhis - perfected beings, who continue to study and teach yoga to this day. A BRIEF HISTORY OF YOGA Historical evidence suggests that yoga arose at the beginning of human civilisation over 10,000 years ago, when man first realised his spiritual potential and began to evolve techniques to develop it. Systematic yoga practice began around the time of the Aryan-Indus civilizations of Northern India over 4000 years ago after a synthesis of religions that became Hinduism. Enlightened yogis and teachers who saw the vast potential and practicality of yoga began to establish spiritual training centres known as ashrams and for hundreds of years passed on their teachings from guru to disciple in the oral tradition. At first, the ancient secrets of yoga were only available to Brahmins the high caste religious sector, and not for women, or the uncivilized and uneducated masses. Later, this ancient wisdom was recorded in the Tantric and Yogic Shastras giving guidance for peaceful, holistic and spiritual living, and the path to liberation and enlightenment. Yogic innovators such as Guru Goraknath, Maharishi Patanjali and Swami Swatmarama integrated the philosophy of the Upanishads with the practices of Tantras to create the system that we now call yoga. There are thousands of references to yoga in the Vedas holy texts of ancient India. However, the most clear and definitive text on Raja Yoga is the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, 200 B.C. Three other major classical treatises on Hatha Yoga are Shiva Samhita, Gheranda Samhita and Hatha Yoga Pradipika, which were all written within the last 700 years. It is primarily these four works that contributed to the foundation of modern yoga. A brief history is presented here in order to show the origins and development of yoga and meditation through time. There is no claim that this is the final chronological authority on yoga. All dates are approximations and have been compiled from democratic sources. Always bear in mind that the earliest date that something appears in written or archaeological sources does not necessarily correspond to the actual date of the thing in question; it simply points to the earliest provable date that can be assigned to it. 8000 B.C. Ancient artefacts and stone carvings have been found in the Indus Valley of Northern India dating back to this pre-vedic period. It may have been in these ancient and mythic times that Lord Shiva walked the earth, and gave the first teachings of yoga to mankind. 4000 B.C. The Mahabarata and Puranic Traditions assign the existence of Lord Krsna to this vedic period, and the first teachings of Bhakti Yoga and Karma Yoga. Lord Krsna is regarded in India as an incarnation of Lord Vishnu. 1500 B.C. The word yoga is first used in the oldest texts of ancient India, the Vedas. In the Rig Veda - a collection of more than a thousand divine hymns to be chanted by priests, yoga is defined as
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1000 B.C. Although it is believe to be much older, it was not until this time that Rishi Vyasa first recorded this ancient and sacred literature of India; The Bhagavad Gita. It is the divine account of Lord Krsna teaching Arjuna the highest principles of yoga. It states that one can realise the goal of life by four different paths: Karma Yoga - action, Jnana Yoga - knowledge, Raja Yoga - meditation, and Bhakti Yoga - devotion. Each path blends into the other ultimately converging and becoming one, leading to union of the individual soul with the cosmic soul, fusing the limited consciousness with the supreme universal consciousness. It was first translated into English by Charles Wilkins in 1785 A.D. after which its popularity began to soar outside of India. 800 B.C. In this pre-classical period, spiritual insights and instructions for the path to liberation began to be recorded in the Upanishads. They are regarded as the most sacred revelations in Hinduism. Upanishad means sit close to an enlightened being and experience the teachings The essence to . of the Upanishads concentrated on these basic truths: Your true essence: atman - the soul, is the same as Brahman the all pervading force of the universe. Everyone is subject to birth, death and rebirth. Your actions in this lifetime determine your next rebirth - Karma. You can reverse the effects of karma through spiritual practices such as yoga. 600 B.C. Lao-tzu dictates his poetic principles, Tao Te Ching, to a gatekeeper before disappearing into the peace and tranquillity of the countryside. He is regarded in China as the founder of Tao the Way, the force behind everything, the philosophy of living in balance with nature. 500 B.C. At the age of 40, Siddartha Gotama reached enlightenment and became known as Lord Buddha the Awakened One. He spent the rest of his life travelling through India and Nepal teaching the Middle Way of love, compassion, meditation and moral discipline. Although he rejected Hinduism, the teachings of Buddha shed new light on the philosophy of Jnana Yoga, Raja Yoga and Karma Yoga through self-experience and self-realisation. Buddha purpose was to put an end to violence, s material suffering and the animal sacrifice rituals of early Hinduism. He is regarded in India as an incarnation of Lord Vishnu. 400 B.C. Sage Kapila taught the radical and metaphysical school of Samkhya, developing a basis for the modern world view of yoga. Subsequent schools of yoga later rejected the Samkhya view of suffering and renunciation, but borrowed its larger world view of the reality of existence and the relationship between the seer and the seen, which remains in yogic philosophy today. 200 B.C. Dawning the classical period of yoga, Maharishi Patanjali correlated the yoga teachings of the Vedas into one of the most fundamental works on Raja Yoga in his famous Yoga Sutras. He defined yoga, described the mind and discussed the results of practice and final liberation.

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yoking and discipline but does not offer any accompanying techniques. In the Atharva Veda meditations and incantations for individual use, yoga is referred to as control of the breath .

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100 B.C. The Hindu view of social order is expressed most clearly in the laws of Manu that surfaced around this time. They are attributed to the mythical figure Manu, who appears in the Vedas. Their wider significance lies in their description of the four stages of human life, and the varying importance of knowledge and action at each stage. 0 After studying yoga in India for 20 years, Jesus Christ returned to Palestine where he taught the way of love, compassion, forgiveness and peace, healing the sick, and finally sacrificing his own life to reduce the karmic debt of mankind. The teachings of Christ combine the philosophy of Bhakti Yoga and Karma Yoga. He is regarded in India as the reincarnation of Lord Krshna, an incarnation of Vishnu. 200 A.D. Yoga Yajnavalkya, the oldest text on Kundalini Yoga was written by Sri Yajnavalkya describing the latent cosmic energy in the base of the spine that, when raised up through the sushumna nadi to the crown chakra, leads to enlightenment. 300 A.D. The Tantras were recorded in this post-classical period of yoga, containing spiritual insights and instructions for the path to liberation. They focused mainly on devotion and worship of the Goddess, stating that final liberation comes through physical and meditational techniques that unite the creative energy Shakti, with the pure consciousness - Shiva. Tantra means expand to one experience and awareness, to extend the frontiers of apprehension beyond the material s world, and hence attain spiritual knowledge and liberation In India, Yoga is considered a . component of Tantra. 475 A.D. Bodhidharma is widely regarded as the founder of the Zen Buddhism movement and martial arts, which have spread across South East Asia since this period. Bodhidharma taught that the awake, aware mind is already there. All people need to do is attune to it through devotion and meditation. 500 A.D. In India, Lord Caitanya chanted, danced, wept in ecstasy and flooded the world with philosophy, devotion and love of God. He inspired the world with Bhakti Yoga and Karma Yoga, heralding the return to Krsna consciousness. He is regarded in India as an incarnation of Lord Vishnu and the manifestation of Krsna and Radha. 650 A.D. After hearing the Diamond Sutra being recited, Hui-neng (Sixth Patriarch) became suddenly enlightened. He joined the Zen temple of Hung-jen, and led Zen in a new direction that is still followed today. Hui-neng taught that the mind is by nature pure, so by staying with the void in the midst of everything we live fully while remaining completely in tune with our original, true nature. 700 A.D. Shankara famous translation of the Upanishads was written about this time. His metaphorical s and impersonalistic interpretation has remained dominant today. He is regarded in India as an incarnation of Lord Shiva and the greatest of all Hindu philosophers.

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750 A.D. Padmasambhava - Guru Rinpoche, is regarded as the founder of Tibetan Buddhism. In his heroic life, this fully enlightened Tantric Master, spread the teachings of Buddha across Tibet, integrating the traditional Bon religion with the teachings of the Tantras. 800 A.D. Sage Nathamuni teaches Yoga Rahasya The Secrets of Yoga, defining Ashtanga Yoga, therapeutic yoga for illness and special reference to yoga for women. Sage Vamana Rishi, (origin unknown). who wrote Yoga Korunta (undated), is also regarded as the founder of Ashtanga Yoga. 900 A.D. Hatha Yoga first appeared in the Siddha Siddhanta Paddhati written by Guru Goraknath, breaking from the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali and introducing new elements for purification of the mind and body. 1200 A.D. Eisai Roshi returns from studying meditation in China and becomes the founder of Japanese Zen. His disciple, Dogen Roshi, became one of Japan greatest Zen masters. s 1350 A.D. Swami Swatmarama wrote Hatha Yoga Pradipika expanding the works of Guru Goraknath, and documenting the unique internal cleansing techniques known as Shatkarma, in preparation for Raja Yoga. 1400 A.D. The Yoga Upanishads surfaced around this time, expanding the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. It contains 21 secret teachings, many of which are still being used in yoga classes today. They included detailed techniques for the path to liberation: asana, pranayama, bandha, mudras, purification of the energy channels, chanting Om, as well as restraints for moral and spiritual discipline. 1700 A.D. Gheranda Samhita was written by Sage Gheranda, describing the moral and spiritual disciplines necessary for yoga. He outlined the purification system, 32 asanas, 25 mudras and devotion to the guru. 1850 A.D. Shiva Samhita, literally Shiva's Compendium was written by an unknown author. The Shiva , Samhita is considered the most comprehensive and most democratic treatise on Hatha Yoga. It outlines the intricacies of esoteric physiology, expanding to 84 asanas, 5 types of prana with specific techniques to regulate them, mudra and meditation. It emphasises that even a common householder can reach success in yoga. 1893 A.D. Swami Vivekananda becomes the first spiritual teacher from India to travel to America and lecture on the benefits of yoga. In the same year, D.T. Suzuki and Shaku Soen of Japan, introduced the Western world to Zen. 20th Century British visitors to India in the 19th century may have been the first Westerners to translate and document the yogic, gymnastic and wrestling styles of India. But it was not until the first half of the 20th century that Western countries began to experience and practise yoga in their own
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countries for the first time. This was mainly due to the advancement of travel and communications. Early visitors to the Indian sub-continent and the Himalayan Mountain region, such as W. Evan-Wentz, Theos Bernard and Peter Kelder, were among the first Westerners to bring back to the West the ancient secrets of yoga, laying the foundation of modern yoga. However, many scholars would agree that the yoga most practised today in the West was primarily influenced by the teachings of the great yogi masters Sri Tirumalai Krishnamacharya, Sri Swami Sivananda, Sri Swami Kuvalayananda and Sri Yukteshwar. These were followed by other Eastern traditions and their teachers including; His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Sri Yogendra, J. Krishnamurti, Sri Aurobindo, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Osho, Sai Baba, Indra Devi, Ram Dass and many more. FOUR GREAT YOGIS Sri Swami Kuvalayananda was born in Baroda, India, in 1883. He was a noted scholar, educationist and national freedom fighter. He was one of Paramahamsa Sri Madhavadasji Maharaj's two major students, the other being Sri Yogendra. Yogendra founded a yoga centre in Bombay, where Swami Kuvalayananda worked until 1932. He went on to establish several research and health centres, where he scientifically re-conceptualised the logic of physical education, physical fitness and yoga therapy. Swami Kuvalayananda became a famous Indian pioneer of the scientific study of Hatha Yoga. Sri Tirumalai Krishnamacharya was born in Mysore, India, in 1888. He found his guru in Tibet where he studied yoga for eight years. In 1930 he began teaching yoga in Mysore, influenced mainly by texts such as Yoga Sutras, Yoga Rahasya, Yoga Korunta, and the Sritattvanidhi an ancient text he found in the private library of Maharaja of Mysore. Krishnamacharya is considered the father of modern yoga and is responsible for pioneering the refinement of physical sequences combined with breath control known as the vinyasa system. Indra Devi, B.K.S. Iyengar and K. Pattabhi Jois all studied with Krishnamacharya as well as his own son T.K.V. Desikachar, going on to develop their own popular styles. Sri Swami Sivananda Saraswati was born in Pattamadai, Tamil Nadu, India, in 1887. While serving as a medical doctor in Malaya, he received yogic instruction from a wandering monk, which lead him to renounce his practice and go to Rishikesh. In 1924 he was initiated into Dashnami sannyasi by Swami Vishwananda Saraswati. He toured extensively throughout India, inspiring people to practice yoga and lead a divine life. He founded the Divine Life Society at Rishikesh in 1936, the Sivananda Ayurvedic Pharmacy in 1945, and the Sivananda Eye Hosital in 1957.During his lifetime Swami Sivananda guided thousands of disciples and aspirants all over the world and authored over 200 books. Sri Yukteshwar Giri was born in Serampore, India, in 1855. His pursuit of Truth led him to Lahiri Mahasaya of Varanasi, who extolled the sacred science of Kriya Yoga Meditation in the Bengali Tantric Tradition, as the most effective means of attaining God-realisation. Through his guidance Sir Yukteshwar soon achieved the supreme spiritual state of enlightenment. On his return to Serampore he began accepting disciples for spiritual training, and as promised in a vision of Babaji, he met and began training Paramahansa Yogananada, his greatest student. In 1920, Paramahansa Yogananda took these teaching to the West, establishing Self-Realization Fellowship Centres and making available to Truth-seekers around the world, a knowledge of the liberating science of Kriya Yoga.

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PHILOSOPHY OF YOGA In Indian thought everything is permeated by the Supreme Universal Spirit, of which the individual human spirit is part. However, the veil of illusion known as Maya has blinded the human spirit. Maya has lured us into believing that we are separate from God. This separation has turned us away from the path of righteousness, thus trapping us by our own karma - the law of cause and effect, to the cycle of death and rebirth. Karma is recorded and stored in the cosmic memory. The ripples of our everyday actions and reactions overlap into thousands of lifetimes until we can awaken our spiritual energy and learn the art of controlling the mind and transcend human existence. Yoga was originally designed to guide us along this path to liberation from death and rebirth, towards enlightenment. The Sanskrit word yoga means unite, to yolk Although popular belief is that yoga refers to . to union between body, mind and spirit, the traditional acceptance is union between the jivatman and paramatman, that is between one's individual consciousness and the Supreme Universal Consciousness. Yoga refers to a certain state of consciousness as well as to methods that help us reach that goal or state of union with the divine. Therefore, the true meaning of yoga is to bring about this change using systematic purification of the mind and body through spiritual, physical, mental and moral discipline. There are many techniques and philosophies that can help us to attain this goal. They can be found in the Bhagavad Gita, Dhammapada, Upanishads, Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Shiva Samhita, Bible, Koran, and many more. There are four branches of yoga that can help us reach this goal; Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Raja Yoga and Jnana Yoga. The yoga presented in this book focuses on Raja Yoga and Hatha Yoga, although integration with other branches of yoga is essential. Raja Yoga is the path of meditation, which includes; Patanjali Yoga, Hatha Yoga, Kundalini Yoga, Mantra Yoga, Dhyana Yoga and Kriya Yoga. Traditionally Raja Yoga is preceded by the purification techniques of Hatha Yoga, which also has many variations including Iyengar Yoga, Ashtanga Yoga, Bikram Yoga and Sivananda Yoga. Any system within yoga that emphasises purification of the mind and body by the balancing of the lunar and solar forces, ida and pingala, can come under the branch of Hatha Yoga.

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Raja Yoga: We can also understand Hatha Yoga as part of Raja Yoga, which is defined as the process in which prana gradually rises upwards using mind control. Hatha Yoga: Hatha Yoga is so named when our practice focuses on removing the division between and ; the purification of ida and pingala energy channels. ha tha Kundalini Yoga: When the emphasis is primarily on the concept of kundalini, and the removal of the obstacle at the base of the spine, then we speak of the practice as Kundaini Yoga. Kriya Yoga: We can understand Kriya Yoga when the emphasis is on action and the movement of awareness in rotation along fixed pathways, leading to deep states of relaxation until concentration becomes the spontaneous activity of consciousness. Tantra Yoga: This vast subject encompassing all the above, emphasises certain energies that are normally squandered being directed in such a way that they can reduce the blocks that stand in the way of the flow of prana.

Sri Swami Sivananda recognised that every human being possesses and identifies with each of the following elements in different ways: Intellect, heart, body and mind. He therefore advocated everyone to emphasize the practice of certain yogas over others, combining Hatha Yoga with other forms of yoga such as Bhakti Yoga and Karma Yoga, in accordance with individual temperament and taste. This allows us to recognise that each of us has a different starting point depending on constitution and capacity. We should therefore begin where we are and how we are, and whatever happens, happens. We should not compare or compete with others. We should accept our personal starting point and celebrate our individuality. T.K.V. Desikachar believes that the actual practice of yoga takes each person in a different direction. Each of us is required to pay careful attention to the direction we are taking, so that we know were we are going and how we are going to get there. This careful observation will allow us to discover something new about ourselves. When we gain more understanding of ourselves and reach a point we have personally never been before, that is yoga. The more we progress, the more we become aware of the holistic nature of our being, realising that we are made of body, breath, mind, and more. If we are to become complete human beings we must incorporate all aspects of ourselves, emphasising all aspects of human life, including our relationships with others, our behaviour, our health, our breathing, and our meditation. T.K.V. Desikachar translates the word yoga to mean come together and tie the to to strands of the mind together This means directing our thoughts towards the yoga session before . we take on an actual practice. Once those mental strands of the mind come together to form an intention, we are ready to begin the physical work. Yoga, therefore, also means acting in such a way that all our attention is directed toward the activity we are currently engaged in, attempting to create a state in which we are always present really present, in every action, in every moment. The advantage of attentiveness is that we perform each task better and at the same time are conscious of our actions. The possibility of making mistakes becomes correspondingly smaller the more our attention develops. When we are attentive to our actions we are not prisoners to our habits; we do not need to do something today simply because we did it yesterday. Instead there is the possibility of considering our actions fresh and so avoiding thoughtless repetition. The practice of yoga, therefore, requires us to act and to be attentive to our actions. This wisdom is found in many meditation traditions throughout the world. (See Training the Mind ).
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The following descriptions by T.K.V. Desikachar clarify the similarities and differences between the many paths found in modern yoga classes;

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EIGHT LIMBS OF YOGA


The essence of the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali Remote Practice

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Yama Abstinence: Moral discipline through universal morality ahimsa non-violence satya truthfulness asteya non-stealing brahmacharya self-control apavigraha non-selfishness Niyama Cultivation: Spiritual discipline through self-purification saucha purity santosha peacefulness tapas self-discipline svadhyaya self-study ishvara pranidhana surrender to God Asana Correct posture: Physical discipline though steadiness/cleansing Pranayama Correct breathing: Regulation of the vital life force Direct Perception Pratyahara Control of the senses: withdrawal from external influences Dharana Concentration: training the mind through mental purification Dhyana Meditation: contemplation, introspection Samadhi One-pointedness: identification, absorption Advanced Practice Kaivalya The Eight Limbs of Yoga lead to extraordinary powers, the intoxicating bliss of divine union and final liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth.

RAJA YOGA
Yoga is like a rainfall of pure clarity... It is the ability to direct the mind exclusively toward an object and sustain that direction without distraction... Thus the ability to understand the object fully and correctly is apparent... When the individual has reached complete understanding of his true self, he will no longer be disturbed by the distracting influences within and around him... Then, there arises a state of mind full of clarity concerning all things at all times... The mind can reach the state of yoga through practice and detachment... Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

Erich Schiffmann believes that in the early days when yoga was first being developed the primary practice was meditation. The poses came later as spontaneous expressions of that centred state. In combination they became known as Raja Yoga. The ancient yogis found that through the discipline of yoga they were able to access a new way of knowing and being, and thereby became more intuitive and effective in all they were guided to do. They discovered that
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intuitive revelation happens when the mind is focused in the present moment, and that this was the most direct way of experiencing firsthand the meaning of existence. Raja Yoga thus became the practice of awareness, wisdom and communion. The earliest and most profound study of Raja Yoga is found in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, containing insights into the human psyche, the enigma of human existence and techniques for spiritual evolution. Patanjali organised the vast yogic literature of ancient India into an accessible system for daily practice. Since its completion around 200 B.C. it has become the keystone text in yogashrams and yoga teacher training programs worldwide. The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali show how, through the practice of Raja Yoga, we can transform ourselves, gain mastery over the mind and emotions, and overcome obstacles to our spiritual evolution. Only then is it possible to remove the veil of illusion and attain the goal of yoga; liberation from the bondage of worldly desires and actions, leading to union with the divine, the supreme universal spirit. The first five steps of Raja Yoga practice abstinence, cultivation, correct posture, correct breathing and control of the senses have no value in themselves. Their value consists in their being the preparation for the final three steps. You cannot climb these final three steps without initially climbing the first five steps. In Raja Yoga, concentration means holding consciousness steady, in a single position. Meditation means allowing knowledge to flow without interruption through consciousness. Integration occurs when consciousness ceases to regard even itself as an object of consciousness. When there is concentration, meditation and integration, there is perfect knowledge; there is complete unity of consciousness, which is the soul, with God. The soul transcends time and place, and enters eternity and infinity. Those who have mastered the practice of yoga may enter this state of perfect unity whenever they wish. Patanjali taught that there are five kinds of disturbances that prevent freedom of the soul: Information from the senses - direct perception of objects through the senses, thinking about those objects and drawing conclusions about them, learning about objects from other people. Curiosity - arises from the false belief that knowledge of external objects is true knowledge. Concepts, theories and ideals - engenders goals that are false, which do not lead to freedom from disturbance. Depression - arises from the acceptance of evil as genuine and permanent, and hence the conviction that freedom from evil is impossible. Memory - turns perceptions of transient events and objects into permanent figments of the mind, causing people to confuse transience with permanence.

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The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali show the royal road for achieving enlightenment union with the divine. His work later became known as the Eight Limbs of Yoga, containing the essence of the Yoga Sutras. These eight limbs are so closely connected that practising one without the other loses its value. This is because to live harmoniously the mind, body and spirit must develop in a balanced way. Regular practice of these techniques will combat elements such as laziness, ignorance, inertia and over-excitement as well as increasing will power. They ensure agility, endurance and stamina, great vitality and defence against illness, eliminating tiredness and calming the nerves so that deep sleep becomes truly restful. By releasing physical and mental tension and stress vast resources of energy are liberated, revitalising the body, leaving you calm and refreshed. Only then is it possible to sit quietly and develop the power of concentration, undisturbed from external influences. This allows the mind to turn inwards with meditation. Dormant areas of the brain can then be awakened leading to super-consciousness, illumination and enlightenment. In this way the techniques of Raja Yoga make the purification process deeprooted and ensure success on the path to enlightenment. They bring joy, vitality and freedom. HATHA YOGA
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The first step on the noble path of yoga is purification of the gross body. Without cleansing of the physical system we will not gain maximum benefits from our practices. Without first eliminating toxins and impurities from the body we will not be ready for higher practices of yoga. Yogacharya Sriavneesh Tiwai states, That as it is necessary to clean a utensil before pouring milk into it, to live a good life it is equally necessary to clean our mind and body through shatkarma, asana, pranayama and meditation. Hatha Yoga is a discipline whose aim is to ensure perfect health through the control of the body and concentration of the mind, using physical and mental purification techniques to purify and balance the pranic energy channels of ida (lunar) and pingala (solar) nadis. These correspond to left channel and ha tha right channel, giving the name hatha (See Appendix 7). This . awakens the flow in the main pranic highway - the sushumna nadi, leading to spiritual evolution. These purification techniques prepare the student for meditation and higher states of consciousness. Hatha Yoga is the most widely practiced branch of yoga in the world today. Although it may come under a different name such as Ashtanga Yoga, Iyengar Yoga, Sivananda Yoga or Bikram Yoga, it is still basically Hatha Yoga. SHATKARMA Traditionally, Hatha Yoga was primarily aimed at the purification process that precedes the practice of other forms of yoga, mainly Raja Yoga. However, its unique techniques - the shatkarmas, six internal cleansing techniques - are rarely taught in the West. Some of these techniques are quite simple, although they may require careful preparation, and may be performed on a daily basis for the deep purification of the mind and body. You may wish to ask your yoga instructor to teach some of them to you, such as, kapalbhati, nauli, jala neti and sutra neti. This book has included a detailed description of trataka. (See Advanced Techniques). As documented by Swami Swatmarama in Hatha Yoga Pradipika, shatkarma are very important from the view of physical and mental health and are highly valuable in healing internal disorders. The six main groups of shatkarma are clearly described in Asana Pranayama Mudra Bandhaby Swami Satyananda Saraswati: 1. Neti - Jala Neti and Sutra Neti. A process of cleansing and purifying the nasal passage. 2. Dhauti - Antar Dhauti, including Varisara Dhauti, Vahnisara Dhauti, Vaman Dhauti, Vatsrar Dhauti, Vastra Dhauti, Sirsha Dhauti and Hrid Dhauti. A series of techniques for cleaning the whole alimentary canal from the mouth to the anus, including cleaning the eyes, ears, teeth, tongue and scalp. 3. Nauli - A very powerful method of massaging and strengthening the abdominal organs. 4. Basti - Techniques for washing and toning the large intestines. 5. Kapalabhati - Three simple techniques for purifying the frontal portion of the brain. 6. Trataka - The practice of intense gazing at an object in order to develop the powers of concentration and dormant psychic faculties which we all possess. Each of these six groups contains more than one practice. They are all excellent practices designed to purify the whole body and bring about first class health. It is recommended that beginners and advanced students practise these purification techniques on a regular basis, provided they are under the direct supervision of a qualified and experienced yoga instructor. Your yoga instructor will instruct you as to the number of days or weeks you must practise each technique and at which point to only practise them on a monthly basis. This all depends on the individual which is why professional guidance is essential. It is recommended that a selected number of the techniques of Hatha Yoga and Raja Yoga should be practised daily and integrated with other paths of yoga such as Karma, Bhakti and Jnana Yoga, in order to bring about a total and integrated change in one perception, understanding and being. s
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YOGA TODAY Since the early 1900 yoga has been developed, diluted and re-invented by thousands of s teachers. However, to be truly called yogait should ultimately aim to alleviate our suffering and bring about a state of meditation, so that the spiritual aspects within us can spontaneously reveal themselves. This weakens the five afflictions which are ignorance, egoism, likes/dislikes, and the strong aversion to fear of death. Most of us are so bound up in the causes of our own unhappiness that we cannot recognise them. The goal of yoga is to gently cleanse and purify the mind and body, to awaken our higher consciousness, gradually revealing our true identity as a spiritual being. Many of the yoga styles taught throughout the world today are variations of Hatha Yoga. This involves a variety of physical stretching, breathing, relaxation and meditation techniques. Regular practice of these techniques was traditionally designed to purify the mind and body in preparation for meditation and higher states of consciousness. However, these days most commercial yoga classes consist of sequenced stretching, and this is what most people think of when we talk about yoga The next question is usually; Which style of yoga? To which the . common answer is Ashtanga Yoga, Iyengar Yoga or Bikram Yoga; predominantly physical styles. It has, therefore, become necessary for commercial health centres and teachers to differentiate between a yoga class and a meditation class so that students attend the right class; purely physical, purely mental, or both. We end up with adverts such as Yoga and Meditation Please . note: whether sitting, standing, walking or lying down, it all requires continuous momentary awareness; Yoga! (Only if the style of meditation is not of yogic origin should there be any further classification). If the class is purely physical then it should be named; yogasana union through steadiness of the body. However, in many commercial yoga classes today, the term Indian stretching would be more appropriate, as the true spiritual objective of yoga is often completely absent. As the concept of what constitutes yoga is broadening as more people take it up, it is important for teachers to prioritise the true spiritual goal of yoga, instead of focusing on cosmetics and aesthetics, known as Hollywood Yoga- yoga for the stars. Although it is the physical benefits of Hatha Yoga that has brought on the recent popularity of yoga classes, it is also promoting our greatest obstacle - attachment to the body. Several contemporary and prominent teachers have successfully patented and attached their own name to these popular modern styles. Even though many teachers only emphasise the physical aspect, a lot of benefit is still getting through to the public. Rest assured, there are still many inspiring yoga teachers throughout the world offering guidance to divine knowledge for the sincere seeker of Truth. (See Appendix 10).

www.taichibali.com/yoga.php YOGA RETREAT EDITION COPYRIGHT 2008 MADE IN BALI


This book is created with love and distributed free. It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.

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Other traditions of purification include; Ayurveda, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Sweat Lodge, fasting, Amaroli - urine therapy. Seek proper guidance from a qualified medical advisor.

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4 HOUR HATHA YOGA PROGRAM DESIGNED FOR ME BY MY GURU IN 1993


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4.00 am Preparation - Sit in meditation pose - Siddhasana Chanting - Om Om Om Opening Prayers Gesture of Psychic Union - Yoga Mudra x 5 Body Steadiness - Kaya Sthairyam x 10 minutes Heart Chakra Awareness - Hridyakasha Dharana x 10 minutes Shatkarma - Internal Cleansing Short Intestinal Wash - Laghoo Shankhaprakshalana Elephant Action (water vomiting) - Gaja Karma Kriya Nasal Cleansing with water - Jala Neti Nasal Cleansing with thread - Sutra Neti Frontal Brain Cleansing - Kapalabhati x 5 rounds/20 breaths Bellows - Bhastrika x 5 rounds with 30 seconds retention Abdominal Massaging - Nauli x 10 rotations Relax in corpse pose - Savasana x 5 mins Surya Namaskar - Salutations to the Sun x 6 rounds Standing Asana - Hold each asana for 2 minutes Warrior 1, 2, 3 - Virabhadrasana Triangle 1, 2, 3 - Trikonasana Tree - Vrksasana Eagle - Garudasana Sitting Asana - Hold each asana for 2 minutes Celibate - Brahmacharyasana Half Spinal Twist - Ardha Matsyendrasana Cat - Marjariasana Forward Bending - Pachimottanasana Bridge - Setuasana Boat - Navasana Camel - Ushtrasana Cobra - Bhujangasana Crane (Crow) - Bakasana Bow - Dhanurasana Locust - Salabhasana Child - Balasana Headstand - Sirsasana Shoulderstand - Sarvangasana Plough - Halasana Fish - Matsyasana Two-legged Shoulder - Dwi Pada Kandharasana Half Wheel - Ardha Chakrasana Sleeping Gas Release - Supta Pawanmuktasana Relaxation - Relax in corpse pose - Savasana Yogic Breathing - Prana Shuddhi x 10 minutes Rotation awareness and visualisation - Yoga Nidra x 20 mins Pranayama - Sit in meditation pose - Siddhasana Cooling Breath - Sheetali x 10 rounds
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Purification of Energy Channels - Nadi Shodhana with Mahabandha x 20 rounds Psychic Breath - Ujjayi with Kechari Mudra x 10 minutes Activating the Digestive Fire - Agnisar Kriya x 3 rounds/30 Meditation - Sit in meditation pose - Siddhasana Mindful Walking - Chankramanam x 10 mins Inverted Psychic Attitude - Vipareeta Karani Mudra x 21 rounds Candle Gazing - Trataka x 20 mins Inner Space Consciousness - Chidakasha Dharana x 20 mins Location of Chakras - Chakra Anusandhana x 9 rounds Internal Chanting So Ham - Sabda Sanchalana x 59 rounds Flowering Lotus - Shambhavi x 11 rounds Concluding Prayers Chanting - Om shanti shanti shanti Palming x 3 Hari Om Tat Sat

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THE FIVE POINTS OF HATHA YOGA


Professional guidance is essential, especially in correctly understanding and applying fundamental principles. Teachers are very useful especially for beginners in helping them stay on the path and avoid misunderstandings. To clarify the science of Hatha Yoga and make it accessible to the majority of seekers, Swami Vishnu-devananda extracted its essence and presented it in five universal principles for physical and mental health as well as spiritual growth. These five principles constitute the essence of the teachings of Himalaya Yoga and Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Centres. 1. PROPER EXERCISE Our physical body is meant to move and exercise. If our lifestyle does not provide natural motion of muscles and joints, then disease and great discomfort will ensue with time. Proper exercise should be pleasant to the practitioner while beneficial to the body, mind and spiritual life. 2. PROPER BREATHING Yoga teaches us how to use the lungs to their maximum capacity and how to control the breath. Proper breathing should be deep, slow and rhythmical. This increases vitality and mental clarity. 3. PROPER RELAXATION Long before the invention of cars, planes, telephones, computers, freeways and other modern triggers of stress, the ancient rishis and yogis devised very powerful techniques of deep relaxation. Many modern stress-management and relaxation methods borrow heavily from this tradition. By relaxing deeply all the muscles we can thoroughly rejuvenate our nervous system and attain a deep sense of inner peace. 4. PROPER DIET Besides being responsible for building our physical body, the foods we eat profoundly affect our mind. For maximum body-mind efficiency and complete spiritual awareness, yoga advocates a lacto-vegetarian diet. This is an integral part of the yogic lifestyle. 5. MEDITATION Here is the most important point of all, we become what we think. Thus, we should exert to entertain positive and creative thoughts as these will contribute to vibrant health and a peaceful, joyful mind. A positive outlook on life can be developed by learning and practising the teachings of the philosophy of Yoga and Vedanta. The mind can be brought under perfect control by the regular practice of meditation.
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APPENDIX 7
NADI - CHAKRA KUNDALINI
The kingdom of heaven is within you. Jesus Christ

NADI
The healing process of yoga not only operates on the physical and mental levels, but also on the subtle or astral energy level. Central to Hatha Yoga is the cleansing and purifying of these subtle energy channels and awakening of the chakras through the movement of prana. Prana is the vital life-force energy that pervades the universe. (See Pranayama). Prana travels through the human body along thousands of subtle channels called nadis, which correspond to nerves in the physical body. Nadi means flow or current and they are made of astral matter. There are 72,000 nadis in the pranic body that cross at , thousands of junctions in the body called chakras The most important nadi in the body is the sushumna . nadi: Sushumna nadi joins the mooladhara chakra at the base of the spine, to the ajna chakra in the midbrain, behind the centre of the eyebrows. It is along this channel that the major chakras of the body are located and is the main highway for prana in the body. Either side of the sushumna nadi are two nadis, pingala and ida, which represent the equal and opposite forces within the body. It is these two nadis that give Hatha Yoga its name: Pingala nadi is represented by , the Sun, or solar force, having a warming effect and relating to the tha right nostril. Pingala coincides with the sympathetic nerves, speeding up the heart rate, dilating the blood vessels and increasing respiration. Pingala is active, extrovert and masculine. If pingala is dominant then the body will be restless. Ida nadi is represented by , the moon, or lunar force, having a cooling effect and relating to the left ha nostril. Ida coincides with the parasympathetic nerves, reducing the heart rate, constricting the blood vessels and decreasing respiration. Ida is passive, introvert and feminine. If Ida is dominant then the mind will be overactive. These two forces, ida and pingala, are directly connected to the flow of breath in the nostrils. Throughout the day we tend to operate either more mentally or more physically, with the flow of breath dominating in one nostril. This is a natural process. However, for perfect physical and mental balance both nostrils should flow for 12 hours per day. The balance of these two forces is essential and is the basic aim of Hatha Yoga leading to perfect health of mind and body. It is this period, when the flow in both nadis is equal (manifested by equal flow in both nostrils) that sushumna nadi begins to flow. However, the flow of prana in ida and pingala is completely involuntary until yogic techniques control it. (See Meditation 3). Together with each asana, pranayama and meditation technique a particular point in the body is recommended for concentration. It may be the breath, or a physical part of the body, or one of the chakras. By directing the mind to specific regions of the body the effect of the particular practice is greatly increased. By concentrating on one of the chakras while doing asana or other practices, prana is stimulated to flow through that chakra. The prime aim of Hatha Yoga is to bring about this balance in the flow of prana in the pingala and ida nadis, so that neither the mental or physical faculties are dominant. This is combined with unblocking and purifying the chakras, so that the flow of prana through the sushumna nadi becomes open and unobstructed, giving balance and health throughout. At this point Kundalini Yoga training may begin. Hatha Yoga is therefore a system of purification of all the energy channels in the body and mind. However it may take many years of dedicated practice and patience to purify the nadis and the chakras and awaken the sushumna nadi.
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CHAKRA Chakra meditations are beyond the scope of this book. Presented here is a brief guide for those new to meditation. Chakra is the Sanskrit word for wheelor vortex Chakras are vortices . of pranic energy at specific areas in the body, which control the circulation of prana permeating the entire human structure. These chakras contain our physical, mental, psychic and karmic history. On a physical level chakras correspond to the major nerve plexuses and endocrine glands in the body. In most people these chakras lie dormant or inactive. It is with the practice of yoga that these centres of energy may be awakened and cleansed, thus purifying and unblocking each chakras, allowing free movement of prana throughout the body. The chakras are then able to absorb and store greater quantities of prana, promoting vitality and strength. Each chakra corresponds to certain physical systems and the related organs. There is a direct relationship between the condition of the chakra and the corresponding physical organs that are closest to them. A chakra can be over-vitalised, under-vitalised, or in a state of balance. It can be open or blocked. Dysfunction, for example, of the reproductive system will usually manifest with obvious physical symptoms such as disrupted menstruation. The physical symptoms will be mirrored by dysfunction within the related energy network and the chakra itself. Creating change to restore the related energy system to a state of balance will create change at the physical level. Each chakra represents a different aspect of human existence and potential. They present us with the opportunity to establish a root relationship and to satisfy a deep soul desire. Chakras vibrate at different frequencies corresponding to the colours of the rainbow, and musical intervals used in Nada Yoga psychic sound. Each frequency holds the gift of a certain power, which enhances our human experience. As we tune in to this power, we are internally empowered to deal with the specific life challenges of that energy centre, which assists us in living more meaningful and fulfilling lives. Presented here is a brief description of the grand chakra system based on the teachings of Swami Satyananda Saraswati, of the Bihar School of Yoga, India. Bear in mind that sahasrara is not really a chakra. It is the culmination and sum of all the chakras, the highest abode of consciousness. SAHASRARA Location - At the top of the head is the abode of highest consciousness, Shiva, the Universal Supreme Consciousness - paramatma. Psychic Centre - It is in sahasrara that the mystical union of shiva and shakti takes place, uniting matter and energy, the individual soul with the supreme soul. This is the goal of yoga, attaining supreme knowledge and passing beyond birth and death. Physical Centre - At the crown of the head is the sum of all the chakras, mind, body and spirit, the centre of intoxicating bliss and enlightenment. Visualisation - Sahasrara means one thousandand is visualised as a shining lotus of one thousand petals, the symbol of pure consciousness. BINDU CHAKRA Location - At the top, back portion of the head is the source of the nectar of immortality known as amrit (soma). Psychic Centre - Bindu means 'pointor drop It is from where the nectar of the Gods is poured. . Physical Centre - Ageing, vitality, longevity, immortality. Visualisation - Visualise bindu as a tiny crescent moon on a dark night. AJNA CHAKRA Location - At the top of the spine in the middle of the head.
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Psychic Centre - Ajna is the centre of intuition and wisdom, the seat of the inner guru. Ajna means command where pingala nadi, and ida nadi converge at ajna chakra. It is here that these two forces responsible for the experience of duality unite with sushumna nadi the spiritual force. Physical Centre - The ajna chakra governs the pineal gland and is the bridge between the mental and psychic dimensions. Visualisation - It is visualised by the symbol Om \ surrounded by a tiny white light entering the chakra through the bhrumadhya eyebrow centre, allowing all thoughts to dwell on the inner guru. VISHUDDHA CHAKRA Location - In the spine near the back of the throat. Psychic Centre - Right understanding and discrimination, where the mystical amrit is tasted and processed. Physical Centre - Vishuddhi means purificationand governs the vocal chords, larynx, thyroid and parathyroid glands. Visualisation - It is visualised by a large white icy cold drop of sweet nectar falling down from bindu to this centre, giving the feeling of intoxicating bliss. ANAHATA CHAKRA Location - In the spine near the heart. Element Air Psychic Centre - Anahata means unstruck It is the centre of the primordial psychic sound, the . source of all sound, the pulse of the universe that is beyond this material world. Physical Centre - It governs the heart, lungs, circulatory and respiratory systems. Visualisation - A blue lotus with a tiny bright flame burning at the centre. Imagine it to be steady and unflickering like a flame in a windless place. This is jivatma the individual soul, the indwelling spirit of all beings which is undisturbed by the winds of the world. MANIPURA CHAKRA Location - In the spine near the navel. Element Fire Psychic Centre - Manipura means of jewels It is the centre of fire, self-assertion, dynamism city and dominance, like a lustrous jewel radiant with vitality and energy. Physical Centre - It governs all the systems in the digestive area. Visualisation - A blazing sun or a ball of fire. Experience energy in the form of light radiating from this point and permeating the whole region. SWADISHTHANA CHAKRA Location - In the spine near the sex organs, and just above the mooladhara chakra. Element Water Psychic Centre - Swadhishtana means one own abode the seat of the individual and collective s , unconscious. It is the storehouse of habitual conditioning and the most primitive deep-rooted instincts. Physical Centre - It governs the reproductive and excretion systems. Visualisation - A vast deep ocean with dark waves beneath a night sky. The tides of the ocean represent the ebb and flow of awareness.
MOOLADHARA CHAKRA Location - At the base of the spine in the perineum is the lowest of the major chakras. Element - Earth
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Psychic Centre - It is the seat of the primordial energy known as prana shakti, the source of all energy in mankind and the universe. The aim of yoga is to awaken this energy, raise it up through the chakras to sahasrara, leading to enlightenment and liberation from the cycle of birth and death. Physical Centre - Mooladhara means root centre and governs all the lower chakras and physical centres. Visualisation - A red inverted triangle that symbolises energy and solidity, to enhance inner stability and balance. Visualisation techniques can lead to the discovery and location of each chakra, in preparation for Kundalini Yoga and Kriya yoga. The chakras can evolve naturally over a long period of time as part of the development of the whole person. Some spiritual systems seek to educate the whole being, knowing that the chakras will change accordingly. It is also possible to quicken the pace of opening and to accelerate this evolutionary process. Other spiritual systems seek to awaken the chakras, knowing that this will accordingly affect the whole being. KUNDALINI YOGA In his remarkable book, Kundalini, The Evolutionary Energy in Man Gopi Krishna , described his kundalini experience as follows: Suddenly, with a roar like that of a waterfall, I felt a stream of liquid light entering my brain through the spinal cord. Entirely unprepared for such a development, I was completely taken by surprise; but regaining my self-control, keeping my mind on the point of concentration. The illumination grew brighter and brighter, the roaring louder, I experienced a rocking sensation and then felt myself slipping out of my body, entirely enveloped in a halo of light. It is impossible to describe the experience accurately. I felt the point of consciousness that was myself growing wider surrounded by waves of light. It grew wider and wider, spreading outward while the body, normally the immediate object of its perception, appeared to have receded into the distance until I became entirely unconscious of it. I was now all consciousness without any outline, without any idea of corporeal appendage, without any feeling or sensation coming from the senses, immersed in a sea of light simultaneously conscious and aware at every point, spread out, as it were, in all directions without any barrier or material obstruction. I was no longer myself, or to be more accurate, no longer as I knew myself to be, a small point of awareness confined to a body, but instead was a vast circle of consciousness in which the body was but a point, bathed in light and in a state of exultation and happiness impossible to describe. Excerpts from; Krishna, Gopi. 1970. Kundalini, The Evolutionary Energy in Man. USA: Shambala Books. WHAT IS KUNDALINI The common understanding of kundalini is that it is a latent cosmic energy that rests in the mooladhara chakra at the base of the spine. It is symbolised by a sleeping snake coiled three and half times around a shiva lingam. When it is awakened it rises up through the sushumna nadi to the crown chakra whereupon the practitioner experiences the super-consciousness state of enlightenment. However, according to T.K.V. Desikachar there are no historical or traditional references to support this view. Yogic texts such as the Yoga Yajnavalkya point to kundalini as an obstacle that must be burned up and removed. It is prana, in the form of prana shakti - primordial creative energy, that enters the sushumna nadi and rises to sahasrara, not kundalini.
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Patanjali also describes this obstacle as a form of avidya which is translated as , incorrect comprehension confusing the gross with the subtle. The key is to use clear perception to break , out of deep rooted habits in order to attain vidya correct understanding This is what is truly . meant by kundalini, the obstacle of ignorance that must be burned up before prana can enter the sushumna nadi, unobstructed. Common to all theories of kundalini is that when the mind is controlled, all the nadis are purified, all the chakras are open, and when prana is flowing freely up along the sushumna nadi and throughout the body, this latent cosmic energy, prana shakti primordial creative energy, can be awakened using specific advanced yogic techniques. It rises through the other chakras to the sahasrara, at the top of the head, where it joins with shiva the seat of pure consciousness. When shakti is permanently united with shiva in sahasrara, as Gopi Krishna described, it stimulates the dormant areas of the brain, resulting in the individual experience of higher planes of consciousness which are normally unobtainable. There are many similarities to this in other religions; the ritual of joining bread prana, and wine consciousness, in Christianity. Kundalini Yoga is beyond the scope of this book. It has only been necessary to include this additional information in order for the student to fully understand the ultimate goal of all yogas, which is self-realisation and union with the Divine. After several years of practising Hatha Yoga sincere students may wish to practise Kundalini Yoga. This is a very difficult process, requiring extreme discipline and proper guidance from an experienced teacher. Kundalini Yoga is for advanced students only and should never be attempted without guidance from a qualified instructor.

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Om Sacred Mantra of Yoga 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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APPENDIX 8
MANTRA YANTRA - MANDALA
Living with 24 hours a day spiritual awareness is the key to health, happiness and beyond... Swami Shyam yogi

MANTRA Mantra is a Sanskrit word meaning thought that liberates and protects A mantra is a the . word or group of words that contain powerful healing vibrations within the syllables of the words. Mantras are used to focus and concentrate the mind, and act as a pathway between normal states of consciousness and super consciousness. It is a very powerful way of approaching meditational states. Mantras are also used to invoke a particular deity that is being asked to bring physical, mental and spiritual healing. Many cultures and religions make use of mantras. One does not need to be a Hindu or a Buddhist to make use of a particular mantra. Sri Swam Sivananada suggests that devotees of Christ may use the name Jesus or Hail Mary, or Mother of Jesus. Parsis, Sikhs and Muslims may select a name or mantra from the Zend Avesta, Granth Sahib, or Koran respectively. The chanting of mantras activates and accelerates the creative spiritual force, promoting harmony throughout our whole being. The devotee is gradually converted into a living centre of spiritual vibration, which may be directed for the benefit of the one who uses it and for that of others. During the early stages of yogic practice, the chosen mantra should be repeated over and over again with effort of will and full awareness. This awareness and concentration prevents the mind from thinking of other things. Eventually after continuous and dedicated practice, the mantra is repeated automatically without strain or effort. The mantra spontaneously manifests itself and becomes an integral part of the mind. The mind vibrates with the sound of the mantra. It becomes an integral part of the individual being and needs absolutely no conscious effort. It s repeats itself spontaneously with every breath, day and night. This is a very powerful way of approaching meditation states, for the mind is rendered calm and concentrated. In this way the mantra acts as a pathway between normal states of consciousness and super consciousness. When first using a mantra it is best to repeat it aloud by co-ordinating the repetition with the breath. Later, and more potent, is to repeat the mantra mentally. If you do not have a personal mantra, speak to your yoga instructor, or Om may be used. Although mental repetition is stronger, the mantra may be repeated aloud if you become drowsy. Never change the mantra unless instructed to do so. Repetition will lead to pure thought, in which sound vibration joins with thought vibration and there is no awareness of meaning. If used correctly they can bestow many blessings on the practitioner. There are thousands of mantras in use today. Ask your spiritual guide which mantra is most suitable for you. Your mantra may also come to you in a dream or in meditation. A personal mantra is a spiritual tool and should not be discussed in general conversation, except with your spiritual guide. In this book I have suggested , Ham and Om So Om Ah Hum but this may be , exchanged for your personal mantra. The following is a selection of mantras that I have found to be widely used in yoga and meditation:

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Om Ah Hum From the hearts of all the holy beings, may we receive thy blessings on our body, speech and mind. So Ham I am Shiva, pure consciousness. Om Namah Shivaya Salutations to Lord Shiva, the prince of yogis. Om Mani Padme Hum May we receive the blessings of love, wisdom and compassion and reach self-realiSation like the jewel in the lotus. Namu Myoho Renge Kyo Glory to the Lotus Sutra and the teachings Buddha. Vajra Guru Padma Siddhi Hum Salutations to great guru Padmasambhava. By your blessings and gifts may we reach perfection and enlightenment. Hare Krshna Hare Krshna, Krshna Krshna Hare Hare, Hare Ram Hare Ram, Ram Ram Hare Hare Through our deepest devotion to the Lord God Krshna, may we be free from karma and reach enlightenment. Om Bhur Bhuvah Swaha, Tat Savitur Varenyam, Bhargo Devasya Dhimahi, Dhiyo Yo Naha Prachodayat O Creator of the universe, we meditate upon thy splendour. May thy radiant power illuminate our intellects, destroy our sins and guide us in the right direction. MEANING OF OM Om is the Sanskrit word meaning supreme infinite spirit or person It is the most . commonly used mantra in meditation and yoga. Students of yoga regard Om, represented by the symbol \ with great respect, for the whole essence of the teachings of yoga is compressed into this symbol. All yogic mantras begin with Om. Om is the all-pervading sound of the universe. It is believed to have emanated from the cosmic vibration. Sri Swami Sivananda writes, Om is all in all. Om is the mystic word of power. Om is the magic word of marvellous potency. Om is the voice of all creation. Om is the root of the entire universe. Om is the inner music of the soul. Om is the king of all sounds or words. Om is the ocean into which all rivers of names, sounds and words flow. Om is the priceless treasure to the student on the path of yoga. Like the Latin word Omne the Christian word , Amen and the Islamic word Ahimn the Sanskrit word Om means and conveys concepts of all omniscience , omnipresence and omnipotence The word Om can mean many different things to different people, although the . essence is the same. For example it can mean Welcome to the Gods or individual , My spirit is part of the Universal Supreme Spirit that permeates all creation and beyond or , Heavenly Father, my entire being is filled with love and light. We are one or , May the healing power of the universe flow through me, filling me with love and light If you meditate on the . word Om you will experience the meaning and power for yourself. The correct way to pronounce Om is AUM as in heart, as in moon, as in . A U M mother. AAAAAAUUUUUUMMMMMM. Only when said quickly does the AU become . This O is very important as the three letters have three meanings in one. signifies the physical world, A the mental world, and is the world which is beyond the reach of the intellect. U M AUM
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Om I am One with the Supreme Infinite Spirit.

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represents the past, present and future, the beginning, middle and end, ignorance, knowledge and enlightenment, the waking state - objective consciousness, the dreaming state - subjective consciousness, and the deep sleep state - cessation of consciousness. Chanting Om is a very powerful meditative technique and has a tremendous influence on the mind. If chanted correctly it is one of the most powerful methods of rapidly relaxing the mind and body. It quickly brings mental peace and helps to prevent and soothe many psychosomatic disorders. Chanting Om arouses and transforms every atom in the physical body, setting up new vibrations and conditions and awakening the spiritual centres. Correctly chanting Om will eventually reunite the individual human spirit with the Supreme Universal Spirit. As soon as you sit for meditation, chanting Om loudly and rhythmically for ten minutes with deep concentration and understanding will remove the chatter of the mind, shutting out all worldly thoughts, generating sublime and soul-stirring thoughts. Om should be chanted from the very bottom of your heart, knowing its profound meaning. Feel Om gush fourth with its true colour from every nerve, every vein, every cell, every atom, every molecule and every corpuscle in your body, filling your entire being with universal healing energy, bringing peace, harmony and wisdom. Om is usually chanted three times. At the beginning and end of all yogic sessions and especially at the start of meditation. Om may be synchronised with the breathing during many yoga and meditation exercises and may be mentally repeated throughout the day. MALA A mala is a string of 108 beads representing the Upanishads - 108 holy books that contain the essence of yogic wisdom. There is an extra bead called Mount Sumeru where the mala is tied. The beads are usually fashioned from sacred wood, seeds, bones or gemstones. A mala may be used to count the number of repetitions of your mantra, and also as an anchor to prevent daydreaming. Malas are powerful meditative tools that become spiritualised as the mantra is repeated and the beads are counted. The practice of the mala has therapeutic value because of its effect of concentrating the mind, directing the emotions, and focusing the body, all of which lead to the spiritual realm. A mala is combined with the practice of japa. Japa means rotate and to involves the continuous and rhythmical chanting of a mantra, synchronised with the rotation of a mala. Ajapa japa is when the mantra is so deeply planted in the mind and body that it repeats itself without effort, and spontaneous chanting occurs. There are three modes of japa, which may be interchanged freely according to the clarity of mind: Baikhari Japa - audible and articulated japa. The mantra may be chanted as loud as you like. It is suitable for beginners, and when we feel sleepy, depressed, angry, tense, or unhappy. Upanshu Japa - whispering and inarticulated japa. The lips are moved but they create no loud or external sound. Upanshu japa is the bridge to the subtler, more powerful manasik japa, and may be used during the quieter moments of the day. Manasik Japa mental japa. No audible sound is emitted, yet the mantra is clearly heard in the mind. This is the most subtle of of the three modes. It should be performed when the mind is calm and reasonably free of thoughts, promoting deeper realms of consciousness. MANDALA Mandala is the Sanskrit word for circle and represents the sacred space or microcosm of , reality. Mandalas are visual diagrams, that when meditated upon, unlock esoteric mysteries. They can be made from any material, including being drawn or painted on the ground and wall. The centre of the mandala is usually the bindu, a small dot representing the union of the cosmos and the mind, with concentric circles represents the levels of existence. A square fence around the
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circles with open gates protect the sacred space. The goal of one who meditates on a mandala is to travel to the centre, determined to attain the self-realisation that there is no difference between the individual human spirit and the universal supreme spirit, thereby reaching enlightenment. Mandalas are often composed of intricate mazes of triangles, squares and lotus petals, and are used to generate positive energy in all areas of life. In Tibetan Buddhism, a mandala is an imaginary palace that is contemplated during meditation. Each object in the palace has significance, representing wisdom and guiding principles. Tradition dictates the shapes, sizes and colours of these objects. There are many different mandalas, each with different lessons to teach. Most mandalas contain a host of deities as well as inanimate objects. The deities are represented as Sanskrit characters. These mandalas are usually displayed in two dimensions, and are commonly made from paper, textiles, and coloured sand. In a sand painting the sand is dyed and then carefully placed on a large, flat table. The construction process takes several days. The mandala is usually destroyed shortly after its completion, by offering it to the deity and then pouring it into the nearest river. If used correctly mandalas can bestow many blessings upon the practitioner.

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Buddhist Mandala Tibet

Sri Yantra India

YANTRA Yantra is a Sanskrit word meaning mystical instrument that restrains Yantra is a a . diagram representing the astronomical position of the planets over a given date and time, depending on the prescribed procedures defined under vedic astrology. They are considered auspicious in Hindu mythology. Yantras are made up of various materials such as paper, precious stones, metal plates and alloys. By meditating on the representation, it helps us reach enlightenment, and transcend this human existence. Just as the planets above have their peculiar gravity which governs basic emotions and karma, so too can yantras assist us to attain success and happiness through astrological guidance and assistance. If used correctly yantras can bestow many blessing upon the practitioner. Above is pictured is the Sri Yantra. It is the most well-known of all yantras and is a particularly powerful tool for inducing meditation. It acts as a powerful point of focus for spiritual aspirants. If your concentration is intense enough, then it can bring higher realisation. At first it is a mere geographical configuration, but by deep concentration and reflection you can be drawn through the centre. You may realise the nature of the yantra, and simultaneously the nature of yourself. All you have to do is concentrate on the yantra, plunge through the centre and learn from your own experience. Keep an open mind.
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APPENDIX 9
THREE GUNAS - THREE DOSHAS
Only experiencing for yourself can give you true faith. Achaan Chaa

THE THREE GUNAS The philosophy of yoga offers guidelines for all areas of life, especially in diet and behaviour, and can be explained with the three gunas. The Sanskrit word guna means qualities referring to qualities of the mind and the qualities of the universe The three gunas encompass . all existence, all actions: Sattva - purity, untainted Rajas - activity, passion, the process of change Tamas - darkness, inertia It is believed that in nature one quality of the three always predominates. On an apple tree, some of the fruit is ripe (sattvic), some ripening (rajasic) and some overripe (tamasic). But no matter which quality prevails, an element of each of the other two will always be present as well. Most of an individual apple will be ripe, but part will be rotten, even if the naked eye cannot see it, and part will be in the process of changing from one state to the other. If a man commits a robbery, the action is basically rajasic but the decision to rob and the motive may be predominantly tamasic, rajasic or sattvic, according to the situation. In all people one of the three gunas has superior strength and is reflected in all they do and think. The philosophy of yoga teaches that the gunas can be found in all beings and objects surrounding us, and that the yoga aspirant should always exert to increase sattva in their lifestyle. Only in enlightenment are the gunas completely transcended. One of the most dramatic changes that can be made is adjusting our diet. The yogic system of nutrition recognizes three types of food: Sattvic Food - This is the purest diet, the most suitable one for any serious student of yoga and meditation. It nourishes the body and maintains it in a peaceful state. It calms and purifies the mind, enabling it to function at its maximum potential. A sattvic diet thus leads to true health: a peaceful mind in control of a fit body, with a balanced flow of energy between them. Sattvic foods include cereals, grains, pulses, wholemeal bread, fresh fruit and vegetables, pure fruit juices, milk, butter and cheese, legumes, nuts, seeds, sprouted seeds, honey, and herbs. Rajasic Food - Foods that are very hot, bitter, sour, dry, or salty are rajasic. They destroy the mind-body equilibrium, feeding the body at the expense of the mind. Too much rajasic food will overstimulate the body and excite the passions, making the mind restless and uncontrollable. Rajasic foods include hot substances, such as sharp spices or strong herbs, stimulants, like coffee and tea, fish, eggs, salt and chocolate. Eating in a hurry is also considered rajasic.

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Tamasic Food - A tamasic diet benefits neither the mind nor the body. Prana is withdrawn, powers of reasoning become clouded and a sense of inertia sets in. The body's resistance to disease is destroyed and the mind is filled with dark emotions, such as anger and greed. Tamasic items include meat, alcohol, tobacco, onions, garlic, fermented foods, such as vinegar, and stale or overripe substances. Overeating is also regarded as tamasic.

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THE THREE DOSHAS According to Ayurveda the mother of holistic medicine from ancient India, the five fundamental elements that make up the universe also make up the human physiology. Akasha - space Vayu - air Agni - fire Apu - water Prithvi - earth These elements appear in man in three main combinations. Ayurveda describes these three combinations as doshas tridosha, which are biological humors or psycho-physiological energies: Vata Dosha - space and air Pitta Dosha - fire and water Kapha Dosha - water and earth (Each of these doshas is further divided into five sub-doshas). Restoring balance of tridosha is the central theme of the Ayurvedic approach to health. Vata Dosha - The term vata stems from the Sanskrit word vaayu which means , that which moves things Vata is composed of the elements space and air, the lightest and subtlest of the . five elements. It is considered in some ways to be the most influential of the three doshas because it is the moving force behind the other two doshas, which are incapable of movement without it. Vata dosha is responsible for all activities and sensations related to the body. It is the intelligence which channels perceptions - temperature, pressure, sweetness, lightening and music. The appropriate sensory organ converts them into internal psychological events, and then orchestrates the appropriate response via the organs of action. It is responsible for all movements in the mind and body: the movement of air in and out of the lungs, the flow of blood through the circulatory system, nutrients through the alimentary tract, and thoughts through the mind. Vata promotes a healthy balance between thought and emotion and gives rise to creativity, activity, and clear comprehension. Because vata regulates the nervous processes involved with movement, thoughts, emotions, eating, drinking, and our general functioning, its disturbance can often have far-reaching consequences. Pitta Dosha - The term pitta comes from the Sanskrit word pinj meaning shine It carries , to . the meaning of that which digests and is associated with the idea of being yellow-tinged or bilious. In its widest sense, Pitta digestive function includes all chemical and metabolic transformations in the body as well as processes which promote heat production. Pitta also governs our ability to absorb ideas and impressions and to perceive the true nature of reality. It stimulates the intellect and creates enthusiasm and determination. Pitta is often regarded as the fire within the body. Think of it as the energy stored in the chemical bonds of all the organic substances that make us up: it is encoded in our hormones, enzymes, organic acids,
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Kapha Dosha - The term kapha has its root in the Sanskrit words which means water and ka pha to flourish, and is commonly described as biological water Kapha is the force that . provides structure to everything from an individual atom or cell to the sturdy musculoskeletal frame. It gives strength, stability, and endurance, both physical and psychological. It promotes human emotions and capacities such as love, compassion, understanding, forgiveness, loyalty and patience. One very important function of the kapha dosha in the human body is that it governs immunity and resistance against disease; its energy promotes self-healing and the ongoing processes of self-repairs of which we are largely unaware. Where vata and pitta effects become active in the body, kapha acts to limit and control these two forces and prevent their excessive activity. It also governs the formation of all new cells and tissues of the body and imparts mind-body-spirit stability and resilience. Together, the two elements that compose kapha - water and earth, form the fundamental protoplasm of life.

TRIDOSHA In this way tridosha orchestrates all activities that occur within us. In Ayurveda the combination of the three doshas that we inherit at conception is called our prakriti or original constitution. Each of us has a unique doshic thumbprint. Most people have two doshas that are more or less equally dominant, with the remaining one less dominant. For good health and wellbeing to be maintained, the three doshas within us need to be in balance. This means that we need to maintain our original doshic make-up or prakriti through life as much as possible to maintain good health. Factors such as the dietary choices we make, the lifestyle we lead, the climate where we live, levels of environmental pollution, the work we do, the nature of our relationships with people and even just the passage of time can cause one of more of the doshas in our prakriti to increase or decrease from its original level in our constitution. This creates vikriti or imbalance. If this imbalance is not corrected, we eventually lose our good health. In order to recommend an individual program for restoring balance, an Ayurvedic healer can perform a pulse assessment to discover our unique doshic make-up and the exact nature of the imbalances. Yoga, meditation, diet, herbal formulas and lifestyle changes can all help restore and maintain balance.

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and neurotransmitters. Charaka Samhita, an ancient Ayurvedic text, teaches that pitta functions in digestion and heat production, providing vision, blood colour, and skin lustre.

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APPENDIX 10
TEACHERS - STUDENTS - PRACTICE
I cannot teach you, only help you to explore yourself. Nothing more. Bruce Lee

TEACHERS Yoga teachers are the guardians of spiritual wisdom. The word guru comes from the Sanskrit meaning darkness and meaning light. A guru is therefore someone who can guide gu ru you out of the darkness and into the light of divine knowledge. There are many people claiming to have this power, yet very few actually do. However, the role of any teacher is not to do it for you. It is to show you a way and offer guidance on the path that you have chosen. There may always be obstacles, but you will always have options. A guru will have the clarity and wisdom to assist you through these obstacles by showing you your options and giving you advice on how to proceed. Under the teacher guidance you must give away everything you have. This does not necessarily s mean material possessions. It means your ego, your misguided ideas about reality, your very thoughts. You must clear away the debris of a lifetime for a new way of living to emerge. But you must proceed alone, making the journey of self-discovery according to your own observations and experiences, finding your own Truth. Bhodidharma taught, To find a buddha all you have to do is see your nature. Your nature is the buddha. And the buddha is the person who's free: free of plans, free of cares. If you don't see your nature and run around all day looking somewhere else, you'll never find a buddha. The truth is, there's nothing to find. But to reach such an understanding you need a teacher and you need to struggle to make yourself understand... If you don't find a teacher soon, you'll live this life in vain. It's true, you have the buddha-nature. But without the help of a teacher you'll never know it. Only one person in a million becomes enlightened without a teacher's help. If, though, by the conjunction of conditions, someone understands what the Buddha meant, that person doesn't need a teacher. Such a person has a natural awareness superior to anything taught. But unless you're so blessed, study hard, and by means of instruction you'll understand. The holy texts of yoga state that only if a teacher is in union with the divine will he/she be able to guide you out of the darkness and into the light of divine knowledge. This is why it is essential to learn from someone who has practised yoga and meditation for many years and has achieved success in it. Students will have to face many difficulties and doubts, especially in the initial stages. The student must, therefore, have someone who is much more acquainted with the subject than himself, who can be easily approached to have all problems thoroughly discussed and cleared up. A qualified teacher will have perfect understanding of yogic philosophy and excellent knowledge of all the techniques of yoga and meditation. A good teacher will have a balanced mind, clarity, patience, wisdom, love and compassion. They will not be concerned with competition, gymnastics or contortionism. They will be available to anyone seeking help, and will offer help according to the needs of the individual and what the individual can receive. A good yoga teacher is inspiring and confident. When looking for a yoga teacher, do not be afraid to try out several classes before you to decide which teacher you prefer and are drawn to most. Speak to the teacher to see if you want what they have to offer. Make sure that the class is not too advanced for you. Do you respect the
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way they practise in all parts of their life? Some teachers are wonderful examples of compassion while living the holistic path in all ways. When you find a suitable teacher, it is very important to stay with them until you have perfected what they have to teach. Most Hatha Yoga teachers have reached a high level of physical flexibility and knowledge of yoga and may certainly be able to help you through beginner and intermediate stages. Most important is to find a teacher that you are happy with. Every teacher has a different style of teaching. Every student will get something different out of the same teaching. This is how it is. Yoga is creation. We all have different experiences based on our different background and perspectives. But whichever style and teacher we choose, it should introduce us to ways of seeing that create opportunities for us to recognise ourselves better. It should teach us the means by which we can make the changes necessary in our daily lives, helping each of us to attain what was previously unobtainable. There is no spiritual difference between yoga classes in a mountain cave or in a five star air-conditioned spa. The quality of any class is in the teacher, the teaching and the student. Western and Eastern teachers may differ considerably depending on tradition and level of spirtual evolution. Spiritual masters are not interested in making lots of money, only in the spiritual well being of the student. In gratitude, it is tradition to offer these true gurus, who have completely transcended material possessions, some kind of donation. However, there are many instructors whose yoga classes may be the only source of income for their family. Be aware of bogus teachers who charge large amounts of money yet do not possess any real knowledge or experience. These people may give incorrect information and possibly cause injury. Be aware of any sexual advances from your instructor, as this too may indicate a lack of self control and may become a distracting factor in your class and progress. It is said that when you are ready your guru will find you. This is a very special moment in your life. When this happens your guru will take you in and love you like his own child, and will always be with you, although he/she may put you through extreme hardships and rigorous tests to see how you are progressing. There are many sincere yoga instructors in the world, who genuinely possess and share this love, wisdom and compassion that we all seek. If you practise regularly and trust in your guru you will eventually succeed. INDIVIDUAL PRACTICE There are serious problems when presenting and teaching yoga as a standardised set of exercises and techniques, either mixed with some religious ideas or not. A personalised approach to yoga is primarily based on one fundamental premise: yoga can be practised and taught safely and effectively only if there is proper respect for the individual practitioner. This respect includes our current abilities and limitations, which are two sides of the same coin that we might call the dynamic balance of what we actually are, and our full potential that can be attained through regular systematic practice. In the following three principles Sri Krishnamacharya shows that the approach to yoga is a natural expression and exploration of our individuality. Everybody can practise yoga. There is a right yoga for everyone. Yoga should be adapted to the individual rather than the individual trying to fit in with a general yoga class. These three basic principles cover the most important truths about how we should approach yoga creatively, both as practitioners and teachers. This defines the whole methodology of transmitting yoga as the human activity of mutual caring between student and teacher. This philosophy follows the Krishnamacharya-Desikachar tradition of adapting yoga to the individual instead of the other way round, which, unfortunately, is still the most common way yoga is taught
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and practised in the modern world. Asana practice, for example, should be sensible, well structured and tailored for the individual. Choose asanas that are within your capability. Before attempting advanced variations, practise easy asanas for several months according to your individual capacity and progress. My guru once told me that, The construction of a personal practice by the selection of appropriate yogic techniques, can be compared to the herbal medicine all neatly labelled in jars on the shelf of the doctors surgery. The doctor selects the herbal combination that can most benefit the patient by bringing him into balance, and in what format and dosage the herbs are to be taken. In this way your yoga instructor can guide you to create your individual yoga programme. It also involves developing your intuition and sensitivity to positive and negative experiences to the therapy. This is the essence of yoga, uniting heart and mind on the journey of self-realisation. GROUP PRACTICE Since the start of the new millennium yoga classes have boomed in both Eastern and Western countries, making yoga the most popular and accessible fitness/relaxation system in history. Whether you choose the physical purification styles of Ashtanga Yoga, 105 Bikram Yoga, F Iyengar Yoga with its straps and blocks, or one of the many meditation techniques on offer today no matter where you look for a daily health programme, yoga will be there in one of its many commercial, colourful and adapted varieties. In fact, the common reasons people give for coming to a yoga class are rarely the deeper underlying reasons. Often it will only take a week or two for them to realise that they were not really wanting to do a yoga class to lose weight. They wanted to do yoga to be connected to the self, to feel well within themselves, to examine what is driving a destructive lifestyle or bad eating habits and the deeper root causes of ill health. All this so they can become truly happy again, youthful and fresh, full of life and spontaneity. For a long time many of us, yoga instructors and serious practitioners, have known that yoga is one of the most powerful self-healing systems in the world, and are not surprised at its sudden popularity. However, this popularity is mostly limited to its ability to make the body flexible, slim, sexy and desirable with a touch of (not too religious, please) spirituality, giving the practitioner an apparent aura of purity and inner peace, that healthy glow Thus, the real . purpose of practising yoga is being lost and turned upside down by incorrect instruction, sometimes unknowingly promoting attachment to our bodies and the five senses, rather than contentment, equanimity and awakening inner senses. Of course our physical health is important so that we can live a normal life, but in yoga the practice of asana is recommended: To promote the cleansing and purifying process that our whole being must undergo on the path to enlightenment. To promote a steady meditation posture that can be maintained for several hours without distraction from pain or discomfort. To promote mindfulness of the body in all activities. To promote health and longevity for the attainment of enlightenment. I believe that yoga classes should be taught as per needs of the individual, in a private class of small groups; 2 or 3 students. General classes should be taught only to give a bird eye view of s the philosophy and many techniques available in yoga, for example; 2 hour group yoga class should spend 10 to 20 minutes on each of the Eight Limbs of Yoga.

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INCORRECT PRACTICE
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Taking time from your busy schedule to check into a yoga or meditation class is the first step. Your initial reason for being there is a personal choice. Even if you just want to practise yoga to lose a little weight or quit smoking, the very act of being in this healing environment can lead to many positive experiences, benefits and insights. However, I like to share the following story. d A few years ago I was invited to teach an advanced yoga class at a popular yoga centre. The students displayed a good range of asana control and flexibility. They all looked fit and healthy, and all had the latest yoga clothing and equipment. But when it came to relaxation, pranayama and meditation, these students could not sit still for one minute. They were moving, scratching, looking around and checking their appearance. They had no patience, no acceptance and little concentration. They had only studied stretching. They had had no training in stillness, compassion or emptiness. They only had outer love, no inner love. They had no techniques for attaining liberation and enlightenment, only the physical aspect. They did not even seem interested in studying their missing education. They told me they only wanted the sweat and burn of sequenced stretching, that work-out buzz I wondered, Is it really yoga? . This kind of miscomprehension is quite common, especially in the West, where many commercial yoga classes have taken the original teachings of yoga out of context, focusing mainly on dynamic stretching. Although many benefits can be experienced from this physical workout, it reduces asana to a stretch and burnroutine, which can also promote attachment to the desire of having the perfect body. This attachment being contrary to the philosophy of yoga. Making gentle progress through regular systematic practice, with detachment and determination is what should be taught in a yogaclass. There is nothing wrong with the look good, feel goodapproach, as long as you remember to incorporate the higher purpose of Hatha Yoga as the prelude to Raja Yoga the path of meditation, integrated with your own spiritual insights. (See Obstacles on the Path ). The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali clearly describe this obstacle as a form of avidya - incorrect comprehension, confusing the gross with the subtle. The key is to use clear perception to break out of deep-rooted habits in order to attain vidya - correct understanding. This obstacle of ignorance must be burned up before prana can enter the sushumna nadi, unobstructed. This requires regular effort in meditation, as well as physical health. In a meditation class, for example, students should not be given an intellectual experience of yoga. Students should have an embodied cellular awareness of what it feels like to be in a yogic state, not just a physical burn state. They should go away with a felt awareness of is what it this feels like when I am in equanimity with myself If they have that and know what that feeling is, . when they go back into their everyday life they can recapture it. This is what it feels like to be in balance. This can be achieved in the stillness of meditation, by observing the Eight Limbs of Yoga and the Five Principals of Swami Vishnu-devananda. Not just focusing on the physical, but also the mental and spiritual techniques, as well as re-examining lifestyle and personal philosophy. EXTENDING YOGA BEYOND THE CLASSROOM Straight after participating in a traditional yoga class it is common to experience feelings of tranquility and calm. Group consciousness can be very powerful. Try to carry this feeling of bliss with you throughout your day and every day, spreading peace, harmony and happiness to everyone you come into contact with. Be mindful throughout your daily activities. (See Mindful Walking Make higher consciousness choices in all thought, speech and action. Try to remain ). calm in times of stress and anger. Practise your mantra or concentrate on your breath in times of hardship and unhappiness. If you are in a negative mood practise meditation and observe your negativity. If you cannot sleep practise yoga nidra and release your tension and stress. Remember that the teachings of yoga are a tried and tested method for human evolution, bringing health and
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happiness from within. Yoga classes give us the opportunity to learn and practice the way of health, happiness and love. If the techniques of yoga are practised every day, then eventually this state of mindfulness and equanimity becomes the normal everyday state of our being. After several years of diligent practice we may notice a profound sense of calm and inner peace, a wonderful sense of wellbeing, lasting happiness and a more loving relationship with everyone we come into contact with. Our body will be healthier and when sick, recovery will be swift. Our mind and emotions will be under control, without extreme reactions to life ups and downs. Our spiritual energy will s awaken, and our whole being will tend towards calm and quiet places and activities, aspiring to a life of meditation, higher consciousness, compassion and joy. SUCCESSFUL YOGA God does not compel or induce us to practise yoga. He exerts no effort on our behalf. We are free to practise yoga, or not to practise yoga, as we wish. Success depends entirely on our own efforts. T.K.V. Desikachar writes, When we gain more understanding of ourselves and reach a point we have personally never been before, that is yoga. Success in yoga is purifying the mind and body, releasing vast resources of spiritual energy, being mindful of every thought, speech and action, and being in the present moment with love, wisdom and compassion. There will be success and joy in life, over-flowing with positive thinking and humour, consciously making positive changes and virtuous choices in thought, speech, effort, livelihood and behaviour, and living a more meaningful and purposeful life. The purpose of yoga is to gain personal experience of all stages of the path to enlightenment. You can share these insights in the way you live your life. Although it is far easier to be in harmony when you are sitting quietly alone, your meditation will be worthless if you do not put your experiences to practical use in daily activities. When you are mindful of all your thoughts, speech and action and can create love, wisdom and compassion in every second of every minute of every day, then you have not only succeeded in yoga, but you have truly succeeded in life, in reaching your full potential as a human being. Yoga is an evolutionary process and like nature, if you study it long enough, you will come to understand that change is not a choice, it happens, and over time you are different. With patience, gentleness and determination yoga can make this change a positive one. Yoga introduces us to ways of seeing that create opportunities for us to recognise ourselves better. Yoga helps each of us to attain what was previously unattainable. Therefore, practise yoga every day with positive thinking and persistence under the guidance of a qualified yoga instructor. Yoga is a journey of self-realisation and self-discovery that cannot be bought by the hour in a yoga class. It must be earned through diligent self-practice. It cannot be given in a book or lecture; you must experience it for yourself.

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APPENDIX 11 KIRTAN
Kirtan is like a magnet, inviting and begging grace to enter our hearts and our lives. It is a most precious thing, something to be cherished and practiced with total gratitude, and those who learn how to enter into it will feel God grace and s presence as the closest of the close, the dearest of the dear our true beloved. Jai Uttal Kirtan is singing the Lord name. It is a powerful mental tonic and the surest way to attain God. In s this Bhakti Yoga technique, a special power comes from the Indweller in your heart, purifying the mind and heart, giving you strength to face the difficulties in the battle of life. Meditation doesn't come easy for many people. And that's where kirtan, an ancient participatory music experience, offers another method. Without the work of mentally quieting the mind, kirtan can carry us effortlessly to a place of quiet, to stillness. One of the oldest sacred music traditions of the world, the kirtan call-and-response chanting genre comes to us from India. Using ancient Sanskrit mantras, the kirtan calls upon sacred energies which serve to quiet the mind, remove obstacles, and bring us back to the center of our being. By repeating simple mantras over and over, faster and faster, the kirtan is an easy way for people to experience some freedom from the daily chatter of the mind. And while it is true that we can sing these chants in the solitude of our own home, there is nothing like the magic of chanting live with musicians and hundreds of participants-from kids to seniors-all adding their energy to the chant. People often say they feel "buzzed" for days following such a chanting experience. Kirtan goes beyond the music itself, it goes to a deeper experience of vibration. We all resonate at different frequencies, and these frequencies change according to what we are doing and thinking. So when we are all doing the same thing-chanting, breathing, and moving to the same rhythms-our vibrations begin to synchronize and the resulting experience is very powerful. The laws of vibration help us out here, because vibrations align themselves to stronger vibrations, so even if you're having a truly rotten day, it may be difficult to hold onto those feelings during the chant experience. If you were only to sit in the room without participating, you can still feel the shift. The energy begins to activate the spirit that exists within us all. Although kirtan involves music, the underlying art of kirtan chanting is not actually about musical ability or training. It is about the heart. Everyone can participate, regardless of age or cultural background. The purpose of this music is to get us out of our heads and into our hearts. Typically, the songs can last for 20-30 minutes each with a few moments of silence in between each song so you can soak it all up. The longer songs allow for deeper experience of the effects, and with the simple, repetitive lyrics. It's a chant. The powerful healing and transformational energies of these ancient chants can help to reconnect us to the Ever Present and Eternal Being that lies within us all. All the mantras, melodies, and instruments of kirtan are designed to lead us toward this meditative state. Kirtan allows people to sink into themselves, to relax and ground themselves during the chants. Most of us spend the day in our heads, running here and there, thinking about where we have to be and what we have to do next. Kirtan gives us a time to come back to our center. And when this happens, beautiful things begin to unfold. Feelings of inspiration, peace, and a sense of connectedness are common experiences. Kirtan helps the mind become quiet, and when the mind quiets, we can begin to perceive the mystical things, the sacred experiences, that are around us always. In the silence between the songs, when the song stops, you can feel something. And that something is you. There is no greater experience than the experience of one's Self. And that vibration is always within you, that vibration is you. That's the beauty of any chant experience. With little or no effort we can experience and enjoy the vibrations of peace, energy, healing and inspiration that are always within us.
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DHYANA SLOKAS Dhyana Sloka is chanted at the beginning of any class, lecture or personal sadhana to tune the mind to the divine in its different aspects. It asks for divine guidance to help remove the tamasicrajasic ego before commencing yoga practice.

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Gajananam bhuta ganadi sevitam Kapittha jambu phala sara bhakshitam Uma sutam shoka vinasa karanam Namami vighnesvara pada pankajam Shadanam kunkuma rakta varnam Mahamatim divya mayura vahanam Rudrasya sunum surasainya natham Guham sadaham sharanam prapadye Ya kundendu tushara hara dhavala Ya shubhra vastravrta Ya vina vara danda mandita kara Ya shveta padmasana Ya brahmachyuta shankarah prabhrtibhir Devaissada pujita Sa mam patu sarasvati bhagavati Nishesha jadyapaha Om namashivaya gurave Saccidananda murtaye Nishprapanchaya shantaya Shri Shivanandaya te namah Shri Vishnu-devanandaya te namah Om sarva mangala mangalye Shive sarvartha sadhike Sharanye tryambake gauri Narayani namo stu te, Narayani namo stu te Om saha naavavatu saha nau bhunaktu Saha viryam karavavahai Tejasvina vadhitamastu Maa vidvishavahai Om shanti shanti shantih

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JAYA GANESHA Chanting Jaya Ganesha invokes all the different aspects and functions of God, and creates a strong feeling of devotion and a very pure spiritual vibration throughout the day.

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Jaya Ganesha Jaya Ganesha Jaya Ganesha Pahimaam Sri Ganesha Sri Ganesha Sri Ganesha Rakshamaam (3x) Sharavanabhava Sharavanabhava Sharavanabhava Pahimaam Subrahmanaya Subrahmanaya Subrahmanaya Rakshamaam (3x) Jaya Saraswati Jaya Saraswati Jaya Saraswati Pahimaam Sri Saraswati Sri Saraswati Sri Saraswati Rakshamaam (3x) Jaya Guru Siva Guru Hari Guru Raam Jagad Guru Param Guru Sat Guru Shyaam Om Adi Guru Advaita Guru Ananda Guru Om Chid Guru Chidghana Guru Chinmaya Guru Om Hare Raama Hare Raama Raama Raama Hare Hare Hare Krishna Hare Krishna Krishna Krishna Hare Hare Sat Guru Natha Sri Guru Natha Jaya Guru Natha Sivananda Sivananda Sivananda Sivananda Sat Guru Devo Vishnu-devananda Vishnu-devananda Vishnu-devananda Sri Guru Natha Hare Raama Hare Raama Raama Raama Hare Hare Hare Krishna Hare Krishna Krishna Krishna Hare Hare
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Om Namo Narayanaya Om Namo Narayanaya Om Namo Narayanaya Om Namo Narayanaya Om Namo Bhagavate Vaasudevaya Om Namo Bhagavate Vaasudevaya Om Namo Bhagavate Sivanandaya Om Namo Bhagavate Sat Guru Nathaya Om Namo Bhagavate Vishnu-devanandaya Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Guru Nathaya Sri Raam Jaya Raam Jaya Jaya Raam Om Sri Raam Jaya Raam Jaya Jaya Raam Anjaneya Anjaneya Anjaneya Pahimaam Hanumanta Hanumanta Hanumanta Rakshamaam Dattatreya Dattatreya Dattatreya Pahimaam Dattaguru Dattaguru Dattaguru Rakshamaam Shankaracharya Shankaracharya Shankaracharya Pahimaam Advaita Guru Advaita Guru Advaita Guru Rakshamaam Krishnam Vande Jagad Gurum Sri Krishnam Vande Jagad Gurum Anandoham Anandoham Anandam Brahm Anandam I am Bliss I am Bliss Bliss Absolute Bliss I am Om Namah Sivaya Om Namah Sivaya Om Namah Sivaya Om Namah Sivaya

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Om Namah Sivaya Om Namah Sivaya Om Namah Sivaya Om Namah Sivaya

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MAHA MRTUNJAYA MANTRA This is a life-giving mantra, warding off negative energy and has a curative effect for diseases. It is the mantra of Lord Shiva that bestows health, long life, liberation and prosperity. It should be chanted three times everyday.

Om trayambakam yajamahe Sugandhim pushtivardhanam Urvarukamiva bandhanan Mrityor mukshiya mamritat (3x) Om sarvesham svasti bhavatu Sarvesham shantir bhavatu Sarvesham purnam bhavatu Sarvesham mangalam bhavatu Sarve bhavantu sukhinah Sarve santu niramayah Sarve bhadrani pasyantu Ma kaschid-dukha-bhag-bhavet Asato ma sat gamaya Tamaso ma jyotir gamaya Mrityor-ma amritam gamaya Om purnamadah purnamidam Purnat purnamudachyate Purnasya purnamadaya Purnamevavashishyate Om shanti shanti shantih
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ARATI This chant illuminates the intellect and fills the mind with divine light. It is a beautiful prayer for the individual soul to be reunited with the Universal Supreme Consciousness of God. Lights are waved and camphor is burned while the mantra is chanted.

Jaya Jaya Arati Vighnavinayaka Vighnavinayaka Sri Ganesha Jaya Jaya Arati Subrahmanya Subrahmanya Kartikeya Jaya Jaya Arati Venugopala Venugopala Venulola Papavidura Navanita Chora Jaya Jaya Arati Venkataramana Venkataramana Shankataharana Sita Rama Radheshyama Jaya Jaya Arati Gauri Manohara Gauri Manohara Bhavani Shankara Samba Sadasiva Uma Maheshwara Jaya Jaya Arati Raja Rajeshwari Raja Rajeshwari Tripura Sundari Maha Lakshmi Maha Saraswati Maha Kali Maha Shakti Jaya Jaya Arati Anjaneya Anjaneya Hanumanta
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Jaya Jaya Arati Adityaya Adityaya Bhaskaraya Jaya Jaya Arati Sanicharaya Sanicharaya Bhaskaraya Jaya Jaya Arati Shankaracharya Shankaracharya Advaita Gurave Jaya Jaya Arati Sadguru Natha Sadguru Natha Sivananda Jaya Jaya Arati Vishnu-devananda Vishnu-devanandaVishnu-devananda Jaya Jaya Arati Agastya Munaye Agastya Munaye Sri Rama Priyane Jaya Jaya Arati Ayyappa Swamiye Ayyappa Swamiye Dharma Shastave Jaya Jaya Arati Jesus Gurave Moses Gurave Buddha Gurave Jaya Jaya Arati Mohammed Gurave Guru Nanak Gurave Samasta Guru Bhyo Namah Jaya Jaya Arati Venugopala

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Jaya Jaya Arati Dattatreya Dattatreya Trimurti Avatara

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UNIVERSAL PRAYER Written by Swami Sivananda, this chant expresses the sentiment that God is One whatever name w call Him/Her by, and in what ever form we perceive Him/Her. It is a prayer that may be recited by followers of any religion, speading positive energy to all beings throughout the world.

O Adorable Lord of Mercy and Love Salutations and prostrations unto Thee Thou art Omnipresent, Omnipotent and Omniscient Thou art Satchidananda Thou art Existence, Knowledge and Bliss Absolute Thou art the Indweller of all beings. Grant us an understanding heart, equal vision, balanced mind, faith, devotion and wisdom. Grant us inner spiritual strength to resist temptation and control the mind. Free us from egoism, lust, anger, greed, hatred and jealousy. Fill our hearts with Divine Virtues. Let us behold Thee in all these names and forms. Let us serve Thee in all these names and forms. Let us ever remember Thee. Let us ever sing Thy glories. Let Thy name be ever on our lips Let us abide in Thee forever and ever. OM BOLO SAT GURU SIVANANDA MAHARAJA KI JAYA OM BOLO VISHNU-DEVANANDA MAHARAJA KI JAYA
OM BOLO SAT GURU SATYANANDA MAHARAJA KI JAYA OM BOLO SAT GURU SHYAM LAL MAHARAJA KI JAYA
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APPENDIX 12

The Bhagavad- Gita is considered by eastern and western scholars alike to be among the greatest spiritual books the world has ever known. In a very clear and wonderful way the Supreme Lord Krishna describes the science of self-realization and the exact process by which a human being can establish their eternal relationship with God. In terms of pure, spiritual knowledge the Bhagavad- Gita is incomparable. Its intrinsic beauty is that its knowledge applies to all human beings and does not postulate any sectarian idealogy or secular view. It is appproachable from the sanctified realms of all religions and is glorified as the epitome of all spiritual teachings. This is because proficiency in the Bhagavad- Gita reveals the eternal principles which are fundamental and essential for spiritual life from all perspectives and allows one to perfectly understand the esoteric truths hidden within all religious scriptures. Many great thinkers from our times such as Albert Einstein, Mahatma Gandhi and Albert Schweizer as well as Madhvacarya, Sankara and Ramanuja from bygone ages have all contemplated and deliberarted upon its timeless message. The primary purpose of the Bhagavad- Gita is to illuminate for all of humanity the realization of the true nature of divinity; for the highest spiritual conception and the greatest material perfection is to attain love of God! The Gita addresses the discord between the senses and the intuition of cosmic order. It speaks of the Yoga of equanimity, a detached outlook. The term Yoga covers a wide range of meanings, but in the context of the Bhagavad Gita, describes a unified outlook, serenity of mind, skill in action and the ability to stay attuned to the glory of the Self (Atman) and the Supreme Being (Bhagavan). According to Krishna, the root of all suffering and discord is the agitation of the mind caused by selfish desire. The only way to douse the flame of desire is by simultaneously stilling the mind through self-discipline and engaging oneself in a higher form of activity. However, abstinence from action is regarded as being just as detrimental as extreme indulgence. According to the Bhagavad Gita, the goal of life is to free the mind and intellect from their complexities and to focus them on the glory of the Self by dedicating one's actions to the divine. This goal can be achieved through the Yogas of meditation, action, devotion and
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knowledge. In the sixth chapter, Krishna describes the best Yogi as one who constantly meditates upon him[49] - which is understood to mean thinking of either Krishna personally, or the supreme Brahman - with different schools of Hindu thought giving varying points of view. In the eighteen chapters:Krishna summarizes the four paths of Yoga as: Bhakti Yoga - Devotion Karma Yoga - Selfless Action Jnana Yoga - Self Transcending Knowledge Raja Yoga - Scientific Mind Control (Meditation) While each path differs, their fundamental goal is the same - to realize Brahman (the Divine Essence) as being the ultimate truth upon which our material universe rests, that the body is temporal, and that the Supreme Soul (Paramatman) is infinite. Yoga's aim (moksha) is to escape from the cycle of reincarnation through realization of the ultimate reality. There are three stages to self-realization enunciated from the Bhagavad Gita: Brahman - The impersonal universal energy Paramatma - The Supreme Soul sitting in the heart of every living entity. Bhagavan - God as a personality, with a transcendental form.

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ESSENCE OF THE GITA The Gita again and again emphasises that one should cultivate an attitude of non-attachment or detachment. It urges repeatedly that an individual should live in the world like water on a lotus leaf. He who does actions, offering them to Brahman and abandoning attachment, is not tainted by sin as a lotus leaf by water V.10. Attachment is due to infatuation. It is the offspring of the quality of Rajas. Detachment is born of Sattwa. The former is a demoniacal attribute, the latter a divine one. Attachment is born of ignorance, selfishness and passion and brings with it death; detachment is wisdom and brings with it freedom. The practice of detachment is a rigorous discipline. You may stumble like a baby who is just learning to walk, but you will have to rise up again with a cheerful heart. Failures are not stumbling-blocks but steppingstones to success. Try to dwell always in your own Self. Abide in your centre. Think of the Self constantly. Then all attachments will die automatically. Attachment to the Lord is a potent antidote to annihilate all worldly attachments. He who has no attachments can really love others, for his love is pure and divine. Therefore, without attachment do thou always perform action which should be done; for, by performing action without attachment man reaches the Supreme III.19.
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EIGHTEEN CHAPTERS OF THE GITA:


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1. Arjuna requests Krishna to move his chariot between the two armies. When Arjuna sees his relatives on the opposing army side of the Kurus, he loses morale and decides not to fight. 2. After asking Krishna for help, Arjuna is instructed that only the body may be killed, as he was worried if it would become a sin to kill people (including his gurus and relatives), while the eternal self is immortal. Krishna appeals to Arjuna that, as a warrior, he has a duty to uphold the path of dharma through warfare. 3. Arjuna asks why he should engage in fighting if knowledge is more important than action. Krishna stresses to Arjuna that performing his duties for the greater good, but without attachment to results, is the appropriate course of action. 4. Krishna reveals that he has lived through many births, always teaching Yoga for the protection of the pious and the destruction of the impious and stresses the importance of accepting a guru. 5. Arjuna asks Krishna if it is better to forgo action or to act ("renunciation or discipline of action"[48] ). Krishna answers that both ways may be beneficent, but that acting in Karma Yoga is superior. 6. Krishna describes the correct posture for meditation and the process of how to achieve Sam dhi. 7. Krishna teaches the path of knowledge (Jnana Yoga). 8. Krishna defines the terms brahman, adhyatma, karma, atman, adhibhuta and adhidaiva and explains how one can remember him at the time of death and attain his supreme abode. 9. Krishna explains panentheism, "all beings are in me" as a way of remembering him in all circumstances. 10. Krishna describes how he is the ultimate source of all material and spiritual worlds. Arjuna accepts Krishna as the Supreme Being, quoting great sages who have also done so. 11. On Arjuna's request, Krishna displays his "universal form" (Vi var pa), a theophany of a being facing every way and emitting the radiance of a thousand suns, containing all other beings and material in existence. 12. Krishna describes the process of devotional service (Bhakti Yoga). 13. Krishna describes nature (prakrti), the enjoyer (purusha) and consciousness. 14. Krishna explains the three modes (gunas) of material nature. 15. Krishna describes a symbolic tree (representing material existence), its roots in the heavens and its foliage on earth. Krishna explains that this tree should be felled with the "axe of detachment", after which one can go beyond to his supreme abode. 16. Krishna tells of the human traits of the divine and the demonic natures. He counsels that to attain the supreme destination one must give up lust, anger and greed, discern between right and wrong action by discernment through Buddhi and evidence from scripture and thus act correctly. 17. Krishna tells of three divisions of faith and the thoughts, deeds and even eating habits corresponding to the three gunas. 18. In conclusion, Krishna asks Arjuna to abandon all forms of dharma and simply surrender unto him. He describes this as the ultimate perfection of life.

Sarva Dharnum Parityajya Mamekam Saranam Vraja Aham Twa Sarvepapyebhyo Moksha Ishyami Ma Shuchah

Abandoning all duties take refuge in Me alone. I will liberate thee from all sins, grieve not.
BHAGAVAD GITA XVIII 66

10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS

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HIMALAYA YOGA
Transform your life with yoga, meditation and loving-kindness. Dave West

DEVELOPMENT OF HIMALAYA YOGA After travelling extensively in the Himalayan Mountains I discovered many ancient secrets and wisdom hidden in remote valleys and villages. I used this knowledge to develop what I call Himalaya Yoga. By combing traditional yoga techniques with a transforming spiritual philosophy from the heart, a powerful healing system for 21st century mankind was formed. The essence of these teachings and techniques is compiled into this book. It is an effective collection of the ancient principles and techniques that our ancestors have passed down through the ages. They are long-term techniques. The time has come for these ancient secrets to re-emerge in their true form. The yoga masters of the Himalayas taught me that to live harmoniously the mind, body and spirit must develop in a balanced way. They recognised that every human being evolves in a different way according to temperament and capacity. They advocated everyone to emphasise the practice of certain yogas over others, depending on individual requirements, by combining Hatha Yoga with other forms of yoga. This all helps to make the purification process deep-rooted and ensure success. I was warned about ego and attachment to the body, money, sex, food and sleep. I was taught to focus on health, loving-kindness, compassion, morality, wisdom and meditation. Himalaya Yoga is inspired by the great yogi masters of India, Nepal, Tibet and China. It is a gentle blend of Sivananda Yoga, Bihar School of Yoga, Tibetan Yoga and Kundalini Tantra. This results in a comprehensive guide to the classical yoga and meditation techniques and philosophies from the Himalayas. Himalaya Yoga allows you to learn about your own body and mind, your potential and limitation. This assists you in developing a personal practice and holistic lifestyle, providing a strong foundation for advanced practice. It teaches to be mindful of all your thoughts, speech and action. This allows you to create love, wisdom and compassion in every second, of every minute, of every day. In this way, you not only succeed in yoga, but you have truly succeeded in life, in reaching your full potential as a human being. The regular practise of Himalaya Yoga brings health, happiness and inner peace to your mind, body and spirit and illuminates the path of self-discovery and enlightenment. Himalaya Yoga covers a range of Himalayan techniques and philosophies including the 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness. By exercising every part of the body, toning the muscles and joints, the spine, the entire skeletal system, the internal organs, glands and nerves, all systems are restored to radiant health. Powerful breathing techniques recharge the whole system with prana - life force energy. Relaxation and meditation techniques bring inner peace to the mind allowing you to explore higher realms of consciousness.
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Regular practice of these techniques will revitalise the body and mind by removing energy blockages and improving circulation. They release tension and stress, promoting strength and vitality, weight loss, resistance to disease. They develop love, wisdom and compassion inspiring self-discipline and spiritual living. Himalaya Yoga is undiluted by the demands of commercialism and egoism. For the deep purification benefits of yoga to become truly effective it is recommended that all students engage in a holistic and moral lifestyle. This includes becoming mindful of all thought, speech and action, and reducing the consumption of animal products, alcohol and tobacco. For maximum effectiveness practice is best made early in the morning, each day around sunrise, one hour before breakfast, or in the early evening during the hour surrounding sunset and before eating the evening meal. For comfort practice should take place in loose, comfortable clothing, and in a clean and quiet environment. If there are health issues, or medical conditions present, please consult your health adviser before commencing this program. Himalaya Yoga can bring you health, happiness and inner peace. Your mind, body and spirit will be lifted as you make your journey towards self discovery and enlightenment.

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PRIMARY INFLUENCES OF HIMALAYA YOGA Tibetan Yoga Teachings of Buddha Shakyamuni and Padmasambhava Dhammapada Kadam Lamrim Lojong Tsig Gyema Five Tibetan Rites Raja Yoga Teachings of Maharishi Patanjali and Sri Krishnamacharya Eight Limbs of Yoga Siva Samhita Hatha Yoga Sadhana Bihar School of Yoga Teachings of Swami Sivananda and Swami Satyananda Saraswati Kriya Yoga Karma Yoga Sangha Holistic lifestyle
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HIMALAYA YOGA COURSE OVERVIEW


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Himalaya Yoga provides authentic Himalayan wisdom and yoga training, for your health and happiness, and for the spiritual evolution of mankind.

LEVEL 1 - BEGINNERS - Vitality and Awareness Philosophy: Introduction to Yoga, Five Principles of Yoga, Bhagavad Gita, Holistic lifestyle: Lifestyle re-evaluation, Developing patience, persistence and gentleness Pawanmuktasana: Removing simple energy blockages in the mind and body Asana: Basic mobility and flexibility, Surya Namaskar Yoga Nidra: Physical, mental and emotional relaxation Pranayama: Correct breathing and equanimity Meditation: Developing stillness and awareness, Kirtan, 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness , LEVEL 2 - INTERMEDIATE - Being in Harmony Philosophy: Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Eight Limbs of Yoga, Hatha Yoga Pradipika Holistic lifestyle: Simple living high thinking, Developing concentration and compassion Shatkarmas: Six internal cleansings Asana: Steadiness of the mind and body Yoga Nidra: Deep relaxation, withdrawal from the senses Pranayama: Basic control and regulation of the life-force energy Meditation: Mantra, Chakra awareness, Kirtan, 21 Tibetan meditations LEVEL 3 - ADVANCED - Path to Enlightenment Philosophy: 20 important Spiritual Instructions, Kundalini Tantra Holistic lifestyle: Physical, mental, spiritual and moral discipline Karma Yoga: Selfless service Asana: Specific body positions to open energy channels and psychic centres Pranayama: Advanced control and regulation of the life-force energy Meditation: 20 Kriya meditations, kirtan
For more information about Himalaya Yoga, 10 Meditations for Inner Peace and Happiness, or to book retreats and workshops in your area please contact our website: www.taichibali.com/yoga.php
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GLOSSARY
acharya: great teacher, master, spiritual guide adharma: untruth, disharmonious; path of disharmony ahimsa: non-injury, consideration, love ajna chakra: command; energy centre located at the top of the spine in the mid-brain amrit, (soma): nectar of immortality that flows drop by drop from bindu amaroli, (shivambhu kalpa vidhi): water of life, water of Shiva; urine therapy, techniques used in Ayurveda, Tantra and Hatha Yoga that utilise urine to regenerate the body anahata chakra: unstruck; energy centre located in the spine near the heart ananda: state of transcendental bliss attained through yoga anatman: no-soul, no-self antara: within, internal arohan: psychic passage ascending the front of the body that passes through the kshetrums from mooladhara to bindu asana: posture; technique to attain steadiness and purification of the body in preparation for meditation ashram: spiritual learning centre for the study of yoga and Vedanta ashtanga: eight limbs Ashtanga Yoga: path to attain divine union based on the teachings Sri Patthabi Jois, variation of Raja Yoga developed in southern India emphasising purification through vinyasa, tristhana, asana and the six poisons attachment: absence of freedom; fear of change; cause of sorrow atman: soul, self avatar: one who descends from his abode; enlightened being, spiritual teacher avidya: incorrect knowledge, ignorance, darkness; cause of desire and grasping awareness: witnessing, non-judgemental observation, acknowledging awarohan: psychic passage descending the back of the body that passes through the kshetrums from bindu to mooladhara Ayurveda: natural healing system originating from India, herbal science combined with yogic practices bandha: lock, technique to remove blockages Bhagavan: God; intimacy with God; transcendental bliss; one who possesses the six primary opulences: strength, beauty, wealth, fame, knowledge, renunciation bhakti: devotion, love; song, poetry Bhakti Yoga: path to attain divine union through love and devotion to God bhrumadhya: eyebrow centre; meditation on the space between the eyebrows that activates the mahanadi and leads to the awakening of the ajna chakra Bihar School of Yoga: yogic research institute in northern India emerging from Sivananda Yoga, based on the teachings of Sri Swami Satyananda Saraswati emphasising Kriya Yoga and ashram life in the traditional gurukul system Bikram Yoga: variation of Raja Yoga based on the teachings of Choudary Bikram, developed in North America emphasising purification through physical and mental discipline in a 40% humidity, 105 heated room F bindu: point, drop; source of amrit located at the top back portion of the head blessing: transformation of mind to a positive state through inspiration from holy beings such as spiritual guide, saintly person or deity bodhisattva: enlightened person who delays his own death in order to save all sentient beings Brahma: first created being; Hindu god who presides over the mode of creation and passion, the Creator brahman: being, eternality; understanding of God as an all pervading force; awareness of eternality realised through Jnana Yoga brahmacharya: one who has attained control of the senses, celibacy brahmin: one who is motivated by knowledge; priest, highest caste of Hinduism buddha: awakened one, fully enlightened being, one who has removed the veil of illusion and knows truth buddha-nature: our true original nature, that which is in us that gives us the ability to attain enlightenment Buddhism: religious tradition originating form India which emphasises that man emancipation from suffering is his s own responsibility and can be achieved through morality, moderation and meditation chakra: wheel, vortex; energy centre, intersection of nadis chankramanam: roaming without effort or distraction, mindful walking; technique to attain mindfulness in all thought, speech and actions 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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chidakasha dharana: space of consciousness; meditation on the space in front of the closed eyes Chi Kung (Qi Gong): energy exercise; natural healing system originating from China in 3000 B.C.; component of Traditional Chinese Medicine used to balance internal energy, vitality, mind expansion and spiritual cultivation compassionate meditation: technique that generates love outside of oneself by cherishing others more than oneself, cultivating a compassionate spirit all around, metta contemplation meditation: technique that explores the meaning of a spiritual instruction, mantra or affirmation, becoming deeply acquainted with it, thus causing a specific state of mind to arise, jnana concentration: undivided attention, process of holding the mind on an object for a defined length of time consciousness: the knowing faculty of the mind, innate awareness of being darshana: epiphany, vision of the divine, blessing received from a great saintly person dharma: protection, duty; Buddhist path of truth and ethical value dharma wheel: Buddhist symbol for the cycle of death and rebirth containing eight spokes representing the Eightfold Path dharana: concentration, mental purification dhyana: meditation, contemplation, introspection dhyanam: incantation; devotional songs, chants and mantras used in Bhakti Yoga to induce a state of meditation and ecstacy diksha: transfer of spiritual knowledge, initiation, ceremonial rites divine: highest, celestial; one perception of God s dosha: psycho-physiological energy, biological humor; combination of elements within the body used as diagnostic in Ayurveda drishti: concentrated gaze; technique to stabilize the mind during asana ego: self; self-importance, self-cherishing; illusion of separateness Eightfold Path: Buddhist path to purification and liberation Eight Limbs of Yoga: path to attain divine union as stated in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, central teaching of Raja Yoga emptiness of self: basic understanding that there is no one, no self to whom all experience is happening and that we are simply a changing process enlightenment: permanent mindfulness; seeing the truth; detachment from mind; experience beyond words fasting: techniques for purifying the body and mind through abstinence; reduction of digestive activity Five Tibetan Rites: sequence of dynamic stretching originating from Tibet; five techniques to attain physical endurance and wellbeing granthi: knot, blockage guna: quality of the mind; quality of the universe guru: form darkness to light, guiding light; spiritual teacher hatha: ha - sun (pingala nadi), tha - moon (ida nadi) Hatha Yoga: path to attain divine union by balancing the flow of prana in pingala and ida, based on the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, Gheranda Samita, and Siva Samita; regarded as the foundation for success in Raja Yoga Hatha Yoga Pradipika: classic text of Hatha Yoga by swami Swatmarama describing the path to attain divine union through purification of the mind and body by balancing solar and lunar energies Himalaya Yoga: natural healing system based on wisdom from the Himalayas; integration of several branches of yoga and emphasising traditional philosophy of India, Nepal and Tibet, i.e. meditation, loving-kindness and moraity Hinduism: religious tradition originating in India that regards the Vedas as the authoritative and supreme knowledge of God hridayakasha dharana: space of heart; meditation on the space in the centre of the chest ida nadi: lunar energy channel in the spine that terminates at the left nostril illumination: brightness of divine knowledge; spontaneous absence of ignorance impermanence: basic truth that all conditioned phenomena that arise must pass integration: absorption, process of consciousness ceasing to regard even itself as an object of consciousness insight: experience, process of attaining divine knowledge, vipassana Iyengar Yoga: path to attain divine union based on the teachings of B.K.S. Iyengar, variation of Raja Yoga developed in southern India emphasising the Eight Limbs of Yoga and alignment of the physical body using blocks and straps japa: rotate; repetition of mantra jivataman: individual consciousness jnana, (gyana): inquiry, knowledge Jnana Yoga: path to attain divine union through enquiry and self-analysis; realisation of Brahman Joytish: light; Vedic science of astronomy and astrology kaivalya: freedom; union with the divine, ultimate state of yoga kapha: that which flourishes; dosha responsible for the force that provides structure consisting of water and earth used as diagnostic in Ayurveda karma: action; force generated in the present moment by thought, speech and action that affect one quality of life s in the future Karma Yoga: path to attain divine union through selfless action and duty 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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kechari mudra: one who moves the sky; tongue lock; technique to preserve the vitality of the body and promote inner healing knowledge: absence of ignorance; conjunction of concentration, integration and meditation kriya: action; movement; meditation Kriya Yoga: path to attain divine union through action, movement and meditation kshetrum: trigger-point in the psychic passages used to locate the chakras kumbhaka: retention of breath kundalini: obstacle at the base of the spine symbolised by a sleeping snake coiled 3 times around a shiva lingum Kundalini Yoga: path to attain divine union by removing the obstacle at the base of the spine, originating from India with the teachings of Sri Yajnavalkya loka: plane of existence; level of existence, dimension, world; level of awareness lotus: symbol of one journey towards enlightenment s love: kindness, compassion, ability to cherish others more than oneself; basis for a harmonious world mahanadi: great energy channel located between the bhrumadhya and the ajna chakra mala: garland; rosary beads, a string of 108 beads representing the 108 Upanishads (sacred literature of India) used to count repetitions of a mantra mandala: circle; sacred space of reality; visual diagram used in meditation to unlock esoteric mysteries manipura chakra: city of jewels; energy centre located in the spine near the naval mantra: sacred sound that liberates and protects; used to focus the mind and invoke a deity, incantation Mantra Yoga: path to attain divine union through meditation and mantra Maya, (Durga), (Kali): that which is not enduring, material existence; Hindu goddess (Mayadevi) who creates the veil of illusion that blinds one from the source of all existence, spiritual counter-part of Yogamaya meditation: awareness; stillness; technique to detach oneself from mind; ability to observe oneself as a witness; experience unaffected by the senses mental discipline: meditation on right effort, mindfulness and concentration metta: loving-kindness; technique to purify the mind through conceptual thought; component of vipassana meditation mind: mental phenomena, source of thought process, man greatest resource s mindfulness: that quality of the mind that notices what is happening in the present moment with no clinging, aversion or delusion mooladhara chakra; root; energy centre located at the base of the spine morality: ethical conduct; loving-kindness, compassion; basis for a harmonious world mudra: symbol, psychic gesture; subtle manipulation of prana nadi: subtle energy channel in the body along which prana flows nadi shodhana pranayama: breathing technique to attain purification of the energy channels namaste: salutations, traditional greeting in India and Nepal; gesture of offering one help and service; I recognise the s God in you; nidra: dreamless sleep nirvana, (nibbana): liberation, freedom from sorrow by elimination of desire. niyama: cultivation; guidelines to attain spiritual discipline through self-purification non-attachment, (detachment): unaffected by the woes of the world or life; without fear of change; freedom from sorrow; open-minded; unrestricted Om, AUM, \ : sacred sound, primordial vibration, sacred symbol, representation of God one-pointedness: immovable concentration, absorption; identification paramatman: supreme universal consciousness; attainment of the essence of spiritual knowledge paranirvana: attainment of nirvana plus total extinction of the physical self Patanjali Yoga: path to attain divine union through Eight Limbs of Yoga as described in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Raja Yoga pingala nadi: solar energy channel in the spine that terminates at the right nostril pitta: that which digests; dosha responsible for metabolic and chemical transformation consisting of fire and water used as diagnostic in Ayurveda positive thinking: absence of doubt; ability to attract exactly what one wants; optimism, confidence, hope prana: vital life-force energy that pervades the whole universe prana mudra: gesture of prana; technique to distribute prana throughout the mind and body pranayama: correct breathing; technique to control and regulate the vital life-force energy pratyahara: control of the senses; technique to withdraw the mind from external influences present moment: now, awareness where past and future are absent; continuous momentary concentration; basis for meditation puraka: inhalation of breath rajas: activity; guna that has the quality of passion; process of change Raja Yoga: path to attain divine union through meditation as described in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Patanjali Yoga, Eight Limbs of Yoga 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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relaxation: process of letting go; technique to release tension and stress; removal of deep-rooted psychophysiological disorders rechaka: exhalation of breath sadhaka: one who practises, student of yoga sadhana: spiritual discipline, practice sahasrara: one thousand; abode of highest consciousness located at the top of the head samadhi: identification, absorption; meditation technique that utilises one-pointed concentration to penetrate the true nature of existence samsara: infinite repetitions of birth, suffering and death that result from karma sangha: pure contact with enlightened beings; spiritual community Sanskrit: language of ancient India for divine communication, perfect language satori: understanding, awakening; temporary moment of discovery, clear glimpse of the true nature of existence sattva: untainted, guna that has the purest quality self: ego, self-cherishing Self: soul, the observer Shakti: primordial creative energy; divine feminine, avatar; Hindu goddess who presides over the mode of divine energy, Mahadevi shanti: peace, tranquility shatkarma: six internal cleansing techniques of Hatha Yoga designed to purify the mind and body in preparation for Raja Yoga siddhi: perfection, gift; extraordinary power attained in yoga Shiva: pure consciousness; divine masculine, avatar; Hindu god who presides over the mode of destruction, the Destroyer, prince of yogis Sivananda Yoga: path to attain divine union based on the teachings of Sri Swami Sivananda, gentle variation of Hatha Yoga developed in northern India emphasising the five principles of yoga, sadhana, sangha, karma and bhakti shodhana: purification, cleansing sixth sense: intuition, inner guru, third eye (ajna chakra) soul: Self, infinite and eternal unity of consciousness super-consciousness: awareness of truth; enlightenment swadishthana chakra: one own abode; energy centre located in the spine near the sex organs s swami: master, one who has mastered the senses; revered yogi surya namaskar: salute to the sun; technique to attain physical health traditionally performed at sunrise and sunset, dynamic sequence of 12 asanas combining breathing, mantra and awareness sushumna nadi: the most important energy channel in the body running through the centre of the spine th Tai Chi: grand ultimate; natural healing system originating from China in the 15 century; meditative dance of energy based on the study of animal movements, martial arts and the principles of chi, and Yin and Yang; component of Traditional Chinese Medicine used to balance internal energy, vitality, mind expansion and spiritual cultivation tamas: darkness ; guna that has the quality of inertia tantra: to expand one experience and awareness of existence; to extend the frontiers of apprehension beyond the s material world and attain spiritual knowledge and liberation from the cycle of death and rebirth; origin of yoga Tantra Yoga: path to attain divine union of Shakti and Shiva, accumulation of practices and ideas originating from the Tantras, including yoga, ritual, goddess worship, incantation, mandala and yantra Tao: the natural way, path of virtue, force behind everything; philosophy originating from China in 3000B.C.; the art of living in peace and harmony with nature according to the principles in the I Ching (unknown origin) and the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu emphasising compassion, moderation and humility Tibetan Yoga: path to attain divine union through Tibetan Buddhism and Tantra Yoga, originating from Tibet emphasising ritual, mantra, meditation and karma transcendental: divine experience, illumination trataka: steady gazing; technique to attain a state of meditation through intense gazing on an object tridosha: three doshas, three main combinations of elements within the body used as diagniostics in Ayurveda tristhana: technique to purify the mind, body and nervous system through conjunction of asana, pranayama and drishti truth: that which is; ultimate realisation of the nature of existence, transcendence ujjayi pranayama: victorious; freedom from bondage; psychic breath, breathing technique to attain a state of meditation, purification and psychic relaxation vata: that which moves things; dosha responsible for intelligence that channels perception consisting of space and air used as diagnostic in Ayurveda Vedanta: Vedic literature; study of the Vedas Vedas: ancient Hindu literature; sacred knowledge of India, basis of yoga vidya: clear understanding, high level of knowledge vinyasa: technique for internal cleansing by synchronising breathing and movement 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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Vipassana: seeing clearly; insight meditation, technique that focuses on the basic nature of the mind-body process to understand its true characteristics virtue: acting without greed, hatred or delusion; basis for a harmonious world Vishnu: avatar; Hindu god who is master of the mode of goodness manifesting on Earth as an empowered living being, the Preserver vishuddhi chakra: purification; energy centre located in the spine near the back of the throat visualisation: meditation technique that utilises mental images to manipulate energy and consciousness; ability to visualise and manifest exactly what one wants through attraction; positive thinking wisdom: penetration of the veil of illusion; application of perfect knowledge; absence of fear, doubt and confusion; basis for a harmonious world yama: abstinence; guidelines to attain personal discipline through morality yantra: mystical instrument that restrains, visual astrological diagram used in meditation to attain transcendental experiences yoga: unite, yolk; union between jivataman and paramatman; divine science of life, natural healing system originating from the Vedas to develop virtue, vitality, mind expansion and spiritual cultivation; component of Tantra Yogamaya: that which is eternal, truth; Hindu goddess who dispels the veil of illusion allowing intimacy with the source of all existence, spiritual counter-part of Mayadevi yoga nidra: yogic sleep; technique to attain a state of relaxation and heal deep-rooted psycho-physiological disorders Yoga Sutras of Patanjali: classic text on Raja Yoga by Maharishi Patanjali describing the path to attain divine union through the Eight Limbs of Yoga yogi (m), yogini (f): one who has attained success in yoga yuga: age, period of spiritual growth or decline; Vedic astrological view from the perspective of cycles of the sun zazen: za - to sit cross-legged, zen - to calmly concentrate one mind; mindfulness technique to realise the ultimate s truth of existence Zen: experiential path to wisdom through mindfulness of all thought, speech and action that emphasises meditation and seeing directly into buddha-nature; school of Buddhism originating from China with the teachings of Bodhidharma known as Ch (meditation) which spread to Japan and became known as Zen an

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REFERENCES
This book contains many references and excerpts from the following books:
Ada, Merta. 1997. Meditasi Kesehatan. Indonesia: Bali Usada. Bodhidharma. Red Pine (translation). 1989. The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma: A Bilingual Edition. North Point Press. Bernard, Theos. 1968. Hatha Yoga. USA: Red Wheeler Weiser. Chaa, Achaan.1987. A Still Forest Pool. Complied & edited by Jack Kornfield and Paul Breiter. USA: Theosophical Publishing House. Dalai Lama, His Holiness the. 2000. Transforming the Mind. London, UK. Thorsons. Dasa, Jaya Vijaya. 2002. Our Merciful Mother Ganga. Los Angeles, USA: Bhaktivedanta Book Trust. th Paul, Pamela. 2007. When Yoga Hurts. TIME Asia, October 15 2007 edition, Hong Kong: TIME Asia Limited. Desikachar, T.K.V. with Cravens, R.H. 1998. Health, Healing and Beyond: Yoga and the Living Tradition of Krishnamacharya. New York: Aperture Foundation, Inc. Desikachar, T.K.V. 1995. The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice. Rochester, Vermont: Inner Traditions International. Desikachar, T.K.V. 1996. Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandiram Darshanam, no. 4/1996 (last edition). India. Easwaran, Eknath. 2003. The Upanishads. (10thedition, translation). USA: Nilgiri Press. th Easwaran, Eknath. 2004. Dhammapada. (10 edition, translation). USA: Nilgiri Press. Evans-Wentz, W.Y. 1958. Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Ghandi, Mahatma 2000. Bhagavad Gita according to Ghandi. (translation) USA: Beverly Hills Books. Gryant, Edwin F. 2003. Krishna: The Beautiful Legend of God.(translation).UK: Penguin Group. nd Gyasto, G.K. 2002. Introduction to Buddhism. (2 edition). UK: Tharpa Publications th Gyasto, G.K. 2004. The New Meditation Handbook. (4 edition). UK: Tharpa Publns. Gyasto, G.K. 2006. The Joyful Path of Good Fortune. (2ndedition). UK: Tharpa Publns. 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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Hart, William. 1987. The Art of Living: Vipassana Meditation as taught by S.N. Goenka. USA: HarperCollins Publishers. Hirose, Takashi. 1999. Lectures on Shin Buddhism. Kyoto, Japan: Higashi Honganji Publication Department. Nishimura, Eshin & Suzuki, Dr. Daisetsu. ( .). How to Practice Zazen. Kyoto, Japan: Institute for Zen Studies. Iyengar, B.K.S. 1992. Light on Pranayama. London, UK: Thorsons. Iyengar, B.K.S. 2003. Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. (translation). UK: Thorsons. Iyengar, B.K.S. 1995. Light on Yoga. (revised edition). Schocken. Jois, Sri K. Pattabhi. 2002. Yoga Mala. (1st edition). North Point Press. Kelder, Peter 1998. The Ancient Secrets of the Fountain of Youth. (1st Doubleday Edition). Doubleday. Kempis, Thomas . 1998. The Imitation of Christ. (Rev Sub Edition). Translated by Joseph N. Tylenda. USA: Vintage. Khapa, Lama Tsong. 2000. Great Exposition of the Stages of the Path (translation). Snow Lion Publications. Kornfield, Jack (ed.). 1996. Teachings of the Buddha. USA: Shambala Publns, Inc. Krishna, Gopi. 1970. Kundalini, The Evolutionary Energy in Man. USA: Shambala Books. Kumar, Vijaya. 2005. The Power of Mantras. India; New Dawn Press. Kuvalayananda, Swami. Asanas. 1972. India: Yoga Mimamsa Office. Kyokai, Bukkyo Dendo. 2003. The Teachings of Buddha. (1,129th revised edition). Japan: Kosaido Printing Co. Ltd. Levine, Stephen. 1979. A Gradual Awakening. USA: Anchor Books. Little, John (ed.). 1999. Bruce Lee: Artist of Life. Boston, USA: Tuttle Publishing. Mallinson, James. 2004. Siva Samita. (translation) YogaVidya.com. st Millman, Dan. 1998. The Way of the Peaceful Warrior. (1 Doubleday Edition). USA: Doubleday. Myokiyo-ni, The Venerable. 1988. Gentling the Bull. Boston, USA: Tuttle Publishing. Osho. 1997. Meditation: The First and Last Freedom. New York, USA: St. Martin Griffin. s Osho. 2004. The Secret of Yoga. India: Penguin Books. Prabhupada, His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami. 1968. As It Is, Bhagavad Gita (translation). Los Angeles, USA: Bhaktivedanta Book Trust. Prabhupada, His Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami. 2003. The Perfection of Yoga. Los Angeles, USA: Bhaktivedanta Book Trust. Radha, Swami Sivananda. 1994. Mantras, Words of Power. (revised edition). Timeless Books. Rajaprommajarn, Pra. 2004. Path to Nibbana. (6thedition). Wat Pra Dhard Sri Chomthong Voravihara, Thailand. Reid, Daniel. 1998. A Complete Guide to Chi Gung. USA: Shambala Publication Inc. Rosen, Steven J. 2002. The Hidden Glory of India. Los Angeles, USA: Bhaktivedanta Book Trust. Sach, Jacky. 2003. The Everything Buddhist Book. USA: Adams Media Corporation. Saraswati, Swami Satyananda. 1997. Asana Pranayama Mudra Bandha. Munger, India: Bihar School of Yoga. Saraswati, Swami Satyananda. 2001. Kundalini Tantra. Bihar School of Yoga, India: Yoga Pubns Trust. Saraswati, Swami Satyananda. 2007. Yoga Nidra. (6th edition) Bihar School of Yoga, India: Yoga Pubns Trust. Saraswati, Swami Satyananda. 1989. A Systematic Course in the Ancient Tantric Techniques of Yoga and Kriya. nd (2 edition). India: Bihar School of Yoga. Schiffmann, Erich. 1996. Yoga: The Spirit and Practice of Moving into Stillness. New York, USA: Pocket Books. Scott, John C. 2001. Ashtanga Yoga. USA: Three Rivers Press. Sekida, Katsuki. 1985. Zen Training. Boston, USA: Shambhala Publications Inc. Shaku, Soyen 1987. Zen For Americans. (translation by D.T. Suzuki). NY, USA: Dorset Press. Sharma, Robin S. 1997. The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari. New York, USA: HarperCollins Publishers. Shastri, Hari Prasad. 1942. The Spiritual Awakening of Man. India: Shanit-Sadan Publishings Committee. Simpkins, C. Alexander. 1997. Living Meditation. Boston, USA: Tuttle Publishing. Sinh, Pancham. 1997. Hatha Yoga Pradipika. (translation, 5thedition). South Asia Books. Sivananda, Sri Swami. 1978. Sadhana. India: A Divine Life Society Publication. Sivananda, Sri Swami 1983. The Sivananda Companion to Yoga. Fireside. Sivananda, Sri Swami. 1995. Meditation on Om and Mandukya Upanishad. India: A Divine Life Society Publication. Sivananda, Sri Swami 1994. Mind, Its Mysteries and Control. India: A Divine Life Society Publication. Sivananda, Sri Swami. 2001. Practical Lessons in Yoga. India: A Divine Life Society Publication. Sivananda, Sri Swami. 2003. The Bhagavad Gita. India: A Divine Life Society Publication. Sivananda, Sri Swami. 2004. Karma Yoga. India: A Divine Life Society Publication. Sivananda, Sri Swami. 2006. Bliss Divine. India: A Divine Life Society Publication. Snelling, John. (1991). The Buddhist Handbook. VT. USA: Inner Tradtions. Sogyal Rinpoche 1992. The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying. USA: Harper. Sparrowe, Linda 2004. Yoga, A Yoga Journal Book. Lauter Levin Associates. Tolle, Eckhart 2005. The Power of Now. London, UK: Hodder & Stoughton Ltd. Van De Weyer, Robert. 2003. 366 Readings From Hinduism. India: Jaico Publishing House. Vasu, Sri Chandra 1976. Gherand Samita (translation). Theosophical Publishing house, Ltd. Vishnu-devananda, Swami. 1999. Meditation and Mantras. Motilal Banarsidass, India. Volin, Michael. 1971. Essence of Yoga. Sidney, Australia: Dymock Book Arcade Ltd. s Watts, Alan. 1957. The Way of Zen. USA: Vintage Spiritual Classics. 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS Copyright 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php

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Yogananda, Paramahansa. 1996. God Talks With Arjuna: The Bhagavad Gita. (translation, 2nd edition). USA: SelfRealization Fellowship Publishers Yogananda, Paramahansa. 1946. Autobiography of a Yogi. Los Angeles, USA: Self-Realization Fellowship Publishers. Yukteswar, Swami Sri. 1990. The Holy Science. (8thedition). Los Angeles, USA: Self-Realization Fellowship Publishers. Zangpo, Ngawang. 2002. Guru Rinpoche: His Life and Times. Snow Lion Publns.

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This book contains many references and excerpts from the following websites:
www.ashtanga.com www.asianart.com www.ayri.org www.ayurbalance.com www.balimeditation.com www.balispirit.com www.buddha101.com www.chakrayoga.com www.completebody.com www.dalailama.com www.dhamma.org www.dharmaweb.org www.dkinstitute.org www.gita-society.com www.godshaer.co.uk www.himalaya-yoga.com www.innertraditions.com www.internaturalhealth.com www.iyengaryoga.org www.jelila.com www.kadampa.com www.karmakerala.com www.krishna.org www.kundaliniyoga.org www.shambhala.com www.taichibali.com www.kym.org www.maharishi.org www.mahatma.org www.medical-clinic.org www.osho.com www.physiotherapyexercises.com www.quantumtouch.com www.sacredcenters.com www.sanctuaryresorts.com www.shantigh.com www.sivananda.org www.sleepfoundation.org www.tbsn.org www.thebodytalkcenter.com www.thesecret.com www.tharpa.com www.time.com www.veda-balance.com www.whatthebleep.com www.yogakshetram.com www.yogananda-srf.org www.yogascope.com www.yogavision.net www.zaadz.com www.raganiworld.com

www.taichibali.com/yoga.php YOGA RETREAT EDITION COPYRIGHT 2008 MADE IN BALI


This book is created with love and distributed free. It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
To Lord Ganesh for teaching me how to clear the way in all I do, ever, and always. To Lord Krsna for His Celestial Songs, eternal love, protection and guidance, To Lord Buddha for sharing his valuable experiences and teachings. To Lord Shiva for sharing the first teachings of yoga. To my first guru in India, Swami Shyam Yogi, whose love and devotion inspired me to practise yoga all those years ago. To all my teachers past and present. To Merta Ada for offering regular retreats for practice. To Martin Moore for his preface, photos of meditation, and all his wisdom and encouragement. To Kayti Denham for editing assistance. To Ari for referencing assistance. To Yudhar at Jasmine Printing. Grateful acknowledgement to authors and publishers of all the books and websites that were referenced to help expand the wisdom I received in the Himalayas. To all my friends, colleagues and students who kindly donated their time and effort. To the people and island of Bali, where this book was completed, for its spiritual and relaxing vibrations that allowed me the time and space to practise, work and think. To my darling wife Eka for her sense of humour, support and understnding, And to my parents for their loving guidance throughout my life. Thank you all for creating this book.

www.taichibali.com/yoga.php YOGA RETREAT EDITION COPYRIGHT 2008 MADE IN BALI


This book is created with love and distributed free. It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.

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3 NIGHTS 4 DAYS RETREAT IN TABANAN BALI * Tai Chi * Qigong * Yoga * Trekking * Canoing * Hot Springs

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TAI CHI BALI MOUNTAIN RETREAT


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Experience the healing power of nature in this unique mountain retreat package surrounded by scenic views, rainforests, waterfalls, hot springs and lakes. The perfect environment for health, relaxation and spiritual growth. For more information Email: i n f o @ t a i c h i b a l i . c o m
Take time from the hectic pace of modern living to experience the stillness and silence of meditation and yoga. This book awakens the mind to the potentials that are present in each and every one of us. When we open our mind to meditation, change becomes possible. Problems dissolve as deeper wisdom emerges Sit quietly for just a few minutes each day and diligently apply these principles and techniques. Let the light of love shine clear in your heart. After only one month you will be astonished at the results! It is without any doubt in my heart and mind that the regular and diligent practice of these meditations, by everyone on the planet, would produce a significant global reduction in violence, crime, poverty, disease and deterioration of the natural environment 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS DAVE WEST

Other Books and DVDs by Dave West


TAI CHI DANCE OF THE PEACEFUL WARRIOR Ancient Secrets to Health, Tao Meditation and Relaxation * Free download available at www.taichibali.com Millions of people in China have been healed and gained longer lives through the therapeutic power of Tai Chi. This ancient Chinese healing system is the perfect antidote to today high s pressure lifestyles, ideal for keeping fit and as a martial art. This special guide includes effective daily fitness plans for all ages to improve your health, increase your energy, and speed up recovery from illness, TAI CHI DANCE OF THE PEACEFUL WARRIOR is a foundation in personal development based on the ancient secrets of Tai Chi, Chi Kung and Traditional Chinese Medicine, and teaches how to develop inner strength and unity, cultivate moral character, and live in health and harmony with the natural world.
DAVE WEST began his spiritual journey in India, Nepal and Tibet in the early 1990 s, practising Yoga and Buddhism with Himalayan Yoga masters. After 2000 he began studying Tai Chi and Chi Kung with several masters from China, Thailand, USA and Canada. His latest book combines the art of Tai Chi, Tao philosophy and TCM into simple and effective exercises for living in health and harmony with the natural world. He has taught Tai Chi, Yoga and Physical Education at international schools, hotels and health centres around the world. Dave lives, teaches, and surfs in Bali.

www.taichibali.com/yoga.php YOGA RETREAT EDITION Copyright 2008 MADE IN BALI 10 MEDITATIONS FOR INNER PEACE AND HAPPINESS COPYRIGHT 2008 www.taichibali.com/yoga.php 181
This book is created with love and distributed free. It is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practise.

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