You are on page 1of 22

EECS 117

Lecture 18: Magnetic Energy and Inductance


Prof. Niknejad University of California, Berkeley

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 1/2

Energy for a System Of Current Loops


I1 IN I2

In the electrostatic case, we assembled our charge distribution one point charge at a time and used electric potential to calculate the energy This can be done for the magnetostatic case but there are some complications.

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 2/2

Energy for Two Loops


B I1 I2

As we move in our second loop with current I2 , wed be cutting across ux from loop 1 and therefore an induced voltage around loop 2 would change the current. When we bring the loop to rest, the induced voltage would drop to zero. To maintain a constant current, therefore, wed have to supply a voltage source in series to cancel the induced voltage. The work done by this voltage source represents the magnetostatic energy in the system.
University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 3/2

Energy for Two Loops (another way)


A simpler approach is to bring in the two loops with zero current and then increase the current in each loop one at a time First, lets increase the current in loop 1 from zero to I1 in some time t1 . Note that at any instant of time, a voltage is induced around loop number 1 due to its changing ux
vind,1 d di1 = = L1 dt dt

where i1 represents the instantaneous current.

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 4/2

Current in Loop 1 (I)


I2 = 0
vind,2

I1
vind,1 1 = 0

2 = 0

Note that this induced voltage will tend to decrease the current in loop 1. This is a statement of Lenzs law. In other words, the induced voltage in loop 1 tends to create a magnetic eld to oppose the eld of the original current! To keep the current constant in loop 1, we must connect a voltage source to cancel the induced voltage

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 5/2

Work Done by Source 1


The work done by this voltage source is given by
t1

w1 =
0

p( )d

where p(t) = vind,1 i1 (t) = L1 i1 di1 dt The net work done by the source is simply
t1 I1 0

w1 = L1
0

di1 d = L1 i1 d

1 2 i1 di1 = L1 I1 2

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 6/2

Current in Loop 1 (II)


Note that to keep the current in loop 2 equal to zero, we must also provide a voltage source to counter the induced voltage
di1 vind,2 (t) = M21 dt

This voltage source does not do any work since i2 (t) = 0 during this time

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 7/2

Current in Loop 2 (I)


By the same argument, if we increase the current in loop 2 from 0 to I2 in time t2 , we need to do work equal 2 to 1 L2 I2 . 2 But is that all? No, since to keep the current in loop 1 constant at I1 we must connect a voltage source to cancel the induced voltage
vind,1 d1 di2 = = M12 dt dt

The additional work done is therefore


w1 t2

=
0

di2 M12 I1 d = M12 I1 I2 d

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 8/2

Energy for Two Loops


The total work to bring the current in loop 1 and loop 2 to I1 and I2 is therefore
1 1 2 2 W = L1 I1 + L2 I2 + M12 I1 I2 2 2

But the energy should not depend on the order we turn on each current. Thus we can immediately conclude that M12 = M21 We already saw this when we derived an expression for M12 using the Neumann equation

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 9/2

Generalize to N Loops
We can now pretty easily generalize our argument for 2 loops to N loops
1 W = 2 Li Ii2 +
i i>j

Mij Ii Ij

The rst term represents the self energy for each loop and the second term represents the interaction terms. Lets rewrite this equation and combine terms
1 W = 2 1 Mij Ii Ij + 2 Mij Ii Ij
i=j

i=j

1 W = 2

Mij Ii Ij
i j

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 10/2

Neumanns Equation
We derived the mutual inductance between two lamentary loops as Neumanns equation
0 Mij = 4 di dj Rij

Ci

Cj

Lets substitute the above relation into the expression for energy 1 Ii Mij Ij W = 2
i j

1 W = 2

Ii

0 Ij 4

Ci

Cj

di dj Rij

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 11/2

Rework Expression for Energy


Lets change the order of integration and summation dj 1 0 W = Ii Ij di 2 4 Cj Rij Ci
i j

Each term of the bracketed expression represents the vector potential due to loop j evaluated at a position on loop i. By superposition, the sum represents the total voltage potential due to all loops
1 W = 2 Ii A di
Ci

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 12/2

Energy in terms of Vector Potential


We derived this for lamental loops. Generalize to an arbitrary current distribution and we have
1 Wm = 2 J AdV
V

Compare this to the expression for electrostatic energy


1 We = 2 dV
V

Thus the vector potential A really does represent the magnetic potential due to a current distribution in an analogous fashion as represents the electric potential

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 13/2

Energy in terms of the Fields


Lets replace J by Ampres law H = J
Wm 1 = 2 ( H) AdV
V

Using the identity


(H A) = ( H) A + H ( A) 1 Wm = 2 1 (H A)dV + 2 ( A) HdV
V

Apply the Divergence Theorem to the rst term to give


1 Wm = 2 1 H A dS + 2 S
University of California, Berkeley

( A) HdV
V

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 14/2

Vanishing Surface Term


Wed like to show that the rst term is zero. To do this. Consider the energy in all of space V . To do this, consider a large sphere of radius r and take the radius to innity We know that if we are sufciently far from the current loops, the potential and eld behave like A r1 and H r2 . The surface area of the sphere goes like r2 The surface integral, therefore, gets smaller and smaller as the sphere approaches innity

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 15/2

Energy in Terms of B and H


The remaining volume integral represents the total magnetic energy of a system of currents
Wm 1 = 2 ( A) HdV
V

But A = B
Wm 1 = 2 B HdV
V

And the energy density of the eld is seen to be


wm = B H

Recall that we = D E
University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 16/2

Another Formula for Inductance


The self-inductance of a loop is given by
1 L= I B dS
S

Since the total magnetic energy for a loop is 1 LI 2 , we 2 have an alternate expression for the inductance
1 2 1 LI = 2 2 1 L= 2 I B HdV
V

B HdV
V

This alternative expression is sometimes easier to calculate


University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 17/2

Self-Inductance of Filamentary Loops


We have tacitly assumed that the inductance of a loop is a well-dened quantity. But for a lamentary loop, we can expect trouble. By denition
1 L= I 1 B dS = I S A d
C

L= 4

d d R

This is just Neumanns equation with C1 = C2 . But for a lamental loop, R = 0 when both loops traverse the same point. The integral is thus not dened for a lamental loop!
University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 18/2

Internal and External Inductance

int

ext

Its common to split the ux in a loop into two components. One component is dened as the ux crossing the internal portions of the conductor volume. The other, is external to the conductors
int ext L= = + = Lint + Lext I I I
University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 19/2

Internal Inductance of a Round Wire


Usually if the wire radius is small relative to the loop area, Lint Lext We shall see that at high frequencies, the magnetic eld decays rapidly in the volume of conductors and thus the int 0 and L(f ) = Lext Consider a round wire carrying uniform current. We can easily derive the magnetic eld through Amres law
Binside 0 Ir = 2a2

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 20/2

Round Wire (cont)


Using this expression, we can nd the internal inductance
1 Wm = 2 1 BHdV = 2 1 BHdV + 2 Vinside BHdV +
Voutside

1 1 2 Wm = Lint I + Lext I 2 2 2 The inside term is easily evaluated Wm,int 1 0 I 2 = 2 (2a2 )2


a 0

1 0 I 2 r2 2rdr = 2 8

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 21/2

Internal Inductance Calculation


The internal inductance per unit length is thus
Lint 0 = 8

Numerically, this is 50pH/mm, a pretty small inductance. Recall that this is only the inductance due to energy stored inside of the wires. The external inductance is likely to be much larger.

University of California, Berkeley

EECS 117 Lecture 18 p. 22/2