You are on page 1of 214

g#9,

ZLI ?

^S"<S

The Handbook of

MERCHANT
SHIPPING
STATISTICS
THROUGH
1958

HE
THE
Pi ;'..;ViL\ Al f

'a^^WTTveRS+TY-

ST-ATBT

pt,-;.

'MMCVI VAMlA

U.S.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
MARITIME ADMINISTRATION

The Handbook of

MERCHANT SHIPPING
THROUGH
1958

STATISTICS

-.

HE
N1VL.

HA

U. S.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Frederick H. Mueller, Secretary

MARITIME ADMINISTRATION
Clarence G. Morse, Administrator

Prepared by
Statistics and Special Studies Office

For sale

by

the Superintendent of Documents, U.S.

Government

Printing Office,

Washington 25, D.C.

Price $1

NOTE
All statistics in this book, unless otherwise stated, are based on

oceangoing ships of 1,000 gross tons and over excluding special


types such as icebreakers, cable ships, etc., ships operating on the

Great Lakes and merchant ships owned by any military force.

FOREWORD
Statistics have the unfortunate reputation of being hard to understand. In reality they are the tools which render great masses of heterogeneous facts comprehensible and manageable. The neat rows of figures that you will find in this handbook represent thousands of individual ships - luxury liners, world-wondering tramps, busy freighters, deep-laden tankers - ships of many sizes, shapes, and flags. They represent the cargoes those ships carry - ores and laces, clothing, food, machinery. They represent the men who man the ships and those whose livelihood is affected by their activity. These statistics, in fact, are the essence of the waterborne trade on which so much of our lives directly and indirectly depend.

By careful and painstaking labor the staff of the Office of Statistics and Special Studies condense these myriad kaleidoscopic bits and pieces into figures which can be added, subtracted, analysed, compared; from which we can observe trends, make predictions, draw conclusions, chart our plans for the future. When the plans are made and actions taken to carry them out, the figures become once again ships and cargoes and people.
Tools such as these statistics are useful not only to the government offices which gather and use them, but to the individuals, companies, and associations who are in any way concerned with the merchant marine. We have made some of this information available previously in fragmented form. Now in order to make it more readily useable, we are bringing together in one handbook a comprehensive collection of statistics on the United States and world merchant fleets. It is our plan to keep these tables up to date by an annual supplement. Undoubtedly there are gaps, and our hope will be to expand this compilation in accordance with the suggestions and criticisms which we hope users of this booklet will submit to us.

YJJXMAkd
Clarence G. Morse Maritime Administrator and Chairman, Federal Maritime Board

isiA-

Digitized by the Internet Archive


in

2012 with funding from

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

http://archive.org/details/handbookofmerchaOOunit

PREFACE
World seaborne commerce and the ships to accommodate it have expanded substantially since World War II. Total loadings of commodities and goods on ships engaged in international seaborne trade increased from an estimated U82 million long tons in 19U8 to about 9U5 million tons in 1957.* In contrast, the cargo tonnage loadings in 1938 (U62 million tons) were the same as the loadings in 1929.
During the past decade, loadings increased from all the major areas of the world, with the greatest rise noted for the Asian continent. In large measure, this is due primarily to the further discovery and increased production of oil in the Middle East spurred by the worlds expanding requirements for this energy fuel. The largest cargo movements from the latter area were to European countries whose requirements for petroleum products increased enormously since the war. Even the United States, a primary producer of crude petroleum, imported 20 million tons in 1958 from the Middle East as compared with 3 million tons in 191*8 and none in 1938.
The trend of world seaborne trade, which has almost doubled in the past 10 years, has had a relatively steady rise. This was accomplished despite a number of adverse political, economic and social influences that were at work during this period and which affected the world shipping situation. The flow of relief and aid cargoes from the United States immediately after the war required substantial numbers of ships to move urgently needed supplies to Europe and other war torn areas. Adverse terms of trade in many countries throughout the world seriously affected their gold and dollar reserves, lending to currency devaluations and the imposition of various forms of financial controls and trade restrictions. As a result, normal channels of trade were distorted. Political factors such as the Arab-Israeli Conflict of 19U8-19U9, the Korean Incident of 1950-1953, the closing of the Suez Canal in 1956, and the continued disturbances created by a rising tide of nationalism in former colonial areas throughout the world have influenced the volume and direction of world trade. Social factors involving an upsurge in the growth of populations and the migrations of peoples, caused by political and economic circumstances, were and are important influences which affect the volume of trade between countries.

Although the quantum of world trade increased each year during the past decade, as did the number and tonnage of ships, the demand/supply factor for shipping was frequently unbalanced. Wars and warlike incidents, for example, create an enormous demand for shipping. Orders for new ships tend to increase sharply. But, too often the causes for the expanding supply of ships, have disappeared or become relatively innocuous before the ships have been delivered. Consequently, when demand for tonnage is declining, ships delivered from construction create an oversupply, thus depressing tonnage rates still further to a point where, in many instances, they are less than compensatory. The closing of the Suez Canal in 1956 is an excellent example of suddenly rising demand, feverish ship construction programs, a subsequent overtonnage supply of ships and a stagnant charter market. As a result, for the last two years world shipping has been experiencing one of the worst depressions in the history of the tanker trades. Approximately 8 million tons of tankers, out of some 56 million deadweight tons in being, were laid up for want of
*1958 estimates are not available

cargoes during the second quarter of 1959. Dry cargo shipping is also affected; about 7 million deadweight tons of freighters operating in the tramp trades are laid up and charter rates for such cargoes as may be available have depreciated to a breakeven level or less. Yet on December 31, there were about 31 million deadweight tons of tankers and oil/ore combination ships and 11 million tons of freighters on order or under construction. It is an anomalous situation with uncomfortable implications for ship owners and operators

An examination of the ship construction and merchant fleet tables contained in this handbook will indicate the extent to which political crises and the outbreak of hostilities in various parts of the world have affected the quantum of world shipping.
It should be noted that although the relative increase of 68 percent in the tonnage of the world fleet (excluding United States flag ships laid up at reserve fleet sites) during the last ten years was not as large as the rise in the volume of world trade (96 percent), the fleet apparently was adequate to carry the world's commercial shipments during that period. Ships entering the fleet from new construction were on average, larger, faster, and more flexible and efficient than they were prior to and immediately subsequent to World War II.

Increasing requirements for ferrous and non-ferrous ores by the important industrial regions of the world and the longer ocean hauls involved in the carriage of such raw materials led to the design and construction of specialized ore carriers ranging up to 60, OCX) deadweight tons in size. The closing of the Suez Canal in 1956, requiring an additional 5,000 miles on each leg of the voyage around the Cape of Good Hope between the Persian Gulf and European ports, and the insatiable demands of the world's economies for oil as an energy fuel were instrumental in creating the need for the "giant tanker" of 65,000 deadweight tons and over, including several of more than 100,000 deadweight tons. Operators have found that labor and other operating costs are more advantageous for the larger ships than for the warbuilt "T-2" type of 16,690 deadweight tons and even those of somewhat larger size.

Another special type is the ore/oil combination ship, the largest of which are over 50,000 deadweight tons, designed to carry ore inbound and petroleum products outbound or vise versa, depending upon the area of the world in which the ship is operated, thus overcoming the handicap of sailing in ballast during one leg of a voyage. Other types are garage ships for the movement of small automobiles^aanufactured principally in Europewhich in recent years have been an important foreign trade asset, and trailer, container, roll-on/roll-off and lift-on/lift-off ships designed for fast turnaround and to cut costly loading and discharging operations. Even the conventional type ships are larger and faster. Tramp ships of 15,000 deadweight tons of lU-l5 knots speed are in operation to serve more efficiently the rising bulk cargo movements, such as coal, grain, and ores. Freighters of 13,000 deadweight tons and 20 knots speed operating on scheduled services are no longer uncommon, and may be the phototypes or forerunners of this type of
ship.

VI

In the summer of 1959, the NS SAVANNAH, the first commercial type ship driven by nuclear propulsion, was launched in the United States. This vessel will offer an opportunity to investigate the economic possibilities of nuclear power for ship propulsion in commercial service.

In connection with the growth of the world merchant fleet, it should be noted that a number of countries other than those of the traditional maritime nations have acquired merchant fleets of their own. Some of these countries did not exist as separate entities prior to World War II; others lost their identity; still others, such as Panama and Liberia, because of favorable maritime laws and other advantages to shipowners drew ships from other registries to their own. A number of countries acquired ships under their flags for economic purposes; others did the same thing for purposes of national prestige. In all there are, since World War II, 25 countries which, as sovereign nations, far the first time have merchant marines registered under their own flags. They comprise about 9 percent of the total number of oceangoing vessels of 1,000 gross tons and over, and almost 13 percent of the total deadweight tonnage. United States participation in the world's seaborne commerce has increased steadily. Its relative share of the latter trade rose from 8 percent in 1938 to 12.5 percent in 191*8, when the Marshall Plan was given effect, and to 15. h percent in 1957.
Emerging from World War II as a dominant economic power, the United States contributed enormously to the rehabilitation of world trade and international shipping in the postwar years. From the end of the war to the present time, this Government distributed about $69 billion in goods and services, including military supplies and assistance to foreign nations.

It was through the sales of prewar and warbuilt ships, principally the latter, that many allied fleets and those of neutral nations were able to acquire the tonnage with which to rehabilitate their merchant marines so as to participate not only in their own domestic and international seaborne trades, but to resume their trational functions of carrying the goods and commodities of other countries. The sale of 1,113 ships of all types, totaling about 12 million deadweight tons, and of over 3 million tons of prewar ships was a power ful stimulant to the economies of the nations which acquire them.
Substantial changes have occurred in the direction and content of American foreign trade which account in part for its increased tonnage movements. No longer a self-sufficient nation, if it ever was one, the United States is importing on an ever-increasing scale non-metallic raw materials, ores, and petroleum products which formerly it produced in quantities often sufficient for the support of its economy.

Iron ore imports, for example, averaged about 2 million tons or less in the prewar period. In 1958, iron ore imports amounted to 27.5 million tons (they were 6 million tons higher in 1957) and estimates indicate they may reach about 68 million tons by 1970, principally from Canada, South America,

VI

and Africa. Rising tonnage imports of bauxite, manganese, chrome (1.3 million long tons in 1938 and 11.2 million tons in 1958), among other ores, are also required to support our industrial economy. Tanker imports, which amounted to only 9 million tons in 1938, have increased to 95 million tons in 1958, despite the Government's restrictions upon receipts of petroleum products.

On the other hand, exports of United States bulk commodities, principally coal and grain, have also increased; the former because European and other regions 1 requirements for coal were not being supplied by British and European mines as they had been before the war when this commodity was one of their important foreign trade assets. American coal exports overseas in 1938 amounted to little more than one million tons; in 1958 they totaled almost 35 million Shipments of grains stimulated by this country 1 s aid programs rose from tons. U.5 million tons in 1938 to 7 million tons in 19l|8 and 18 million tons in 1958.
United States shipping, however, has not kept pace with the growth of its overseas trade. From a total of 986 ships of U.2 million deadweight tons operating in foreign trade at the end of 19U8, American flag ships declined in number and tonnage to 51*0 vessels of 6 million tons on December 31> 1958. These ships, which carried 53 percent of United States foreign trade in 191*8, now carry less than 12 percent, the smallest share for any period in the last 38 years. Higher costs of ship construction in the United States and increased labor and other operating expenses, due to the higher living standards in this country, are among the principal reasons why operators of the United States flag ships find it difficult to compete with foreign flag ships in the overseas movement of its foreign commerce. Another is the fact that there are approximately 6 times more foreign flag dry cargo ships than American flag vessels entering and clearing United States ports in the foreign trade of this country. Unlike the rapid growth which the fleets of the principal maritime nations have experienced during the postwar period, the American merchant marine has remained relatively static. Larger, faster, and more efficient ships of the most modern design and construction are replacing United States warbuilt tonnage in specified categories, but on a one-for-one or lesser basis. This is particularly true of dry cargo ships operating on regular services in overseas trades and of tankers in the domestic and foreign trades of the United States. On the other hand, United States flag ships in the tramp trades and in the coastal trades are not being replaced due to high construction and operating costs, compared with foreign-built and operated tonnage. Domestic shipping has been declining for many years due to numerous factors, among the most important of which is the decreasing return on capital investment resulting from the rising costs of ship operation in relation to the rates which operators are able to obtain in competition with railroads and motor carriers. Under these circumstances, ship replacements have not been encouraging. The Department of Commerce and the Congress are cognizant of this problem and are undertaking studies seeking the means to its solution.
The information contained in this handbook is concerned with the factual aspects of world shipping and shipbuilding. In particular, it presents the available statistics of the structure of the American merchant marine and the part it plays not only in United States domestic and foreign trade but in world shipping as a whole.

via

CONTENTS
Page
Foreword Preface
Ill

V
GENERAL

Historical Events Affecting Shipping


Ship Tonnage and Measurement Terms Explained
Selected Characteristics of Specified Ships Delivered Under the United States Maritime Commission and the Maritime Administration Construction Programs Compiled as of December 31, 1958
NUMBER AND TONNAGE
United States Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates
United States and Canadian Flag Great Lakes Fleets by Vessel Type as of December 31, 1958

13

14
15

Danish Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates


French Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates German Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates
Italian Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates

16

17 18
19

Japanese Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates


Liberian Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates
Netherlands Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates
Norwegian Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates

20
21 22
23

Panamanian Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates

Swedish Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates


United Kingdom Flag Merchant Fleet as of Specified Dates

24
25

Total Merchant Fleet of the World as of Specified Dates

26

Ships Owned by United States Companies and their Affiliates and Registered Under Foreign Flags as of December 31, 1958

27
28

Merchant Fleets of the World as of September

1,

1939

Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31, 1949

30

IX

CONTENTS Con
Page 32
34 36 38 40 42

Merchant fleets of the World as of December 31, 1950 Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31, 1951
Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31
,

1952

Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31, 1953...

Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31, 1954....

Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31

1955

Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31, 1956


Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31, 1957

44
46

Merchant Fleets of the World as of December 31, 1958

48

CONSTRUCTION
Ships Delivered from United States Shipyards During the Calendar Year 1958
53

Ships Delivered from New Construction for and Number Constructed In The Major World Fleets as of Specified Dates:
United States.
54
55

Denmark
France.

56

Germany
Italy.

57

58
59

Japan

Liberia
Netherland s

60
61
62
63

Norway
Panama
Swed en

64
65

United Kingdom

Ships Constructed in the World 19491958.

66

CONTENTS Con.
Page

Status of United States Subsidized Operators Ship Replacement and Related Activities as of December 31, 1958
Index of Estimated Shipbuilding Costs in the United States 1939
(Chart)

67

1960
69

Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1949

70
72

Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1950


Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1951

74 76

Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1952


Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1953

78
80
.

Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year

1954-

Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1955

82

Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1956


Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1957

84
86

Deliveries of New Merchant Ships During the Calendar Year 1958


LOSSES AND SCRAPPINGS
United States Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 19491958

88

93

Danish Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 1949 French Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped German Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped

1958. 1949 1958 1949 1958

94
95

96
97

Italian Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 19491958

1958 Liberian Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 1952 1958 Netherlands Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 1949 1958 Norwegian Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 1949 1958 Panamanian Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 1949 1958
Japanese Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 1949

98
99

100

101
102
103

Swedish Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 19591958.


United Kingdom Flag Ships Lost and Scrapped 19491958

104

XI

CONTENTS Con.
FLAG TRANSFERS Page
by-

Vessels Sold for Foreign Registry Under the Ship Sales Act of 1946 Country of Registry

107

United States Flag Ships Transferred to Foreign Flags for the Years 194-9 Through 1958

108

United States Flag Ships Transferred Foreign During the Calendar Year 1958

113

Ships Redocumented to the United States Flag During. the Calendar Year 1958
United States War-Built Vessels Registered Under Foreign Flags as of December 31, 1958

114

115

SERVICE
United States Flag Fleet as of Specified Years Showing Government and Privately Owned Ships Active and Inactive by Type
-.

119 120

Employment of the Active United States Flag Ships 19491958...


Number of Active and Inactive Government Owned Ships Under Bareboat and General Agency Agreement as of Specified Dates
Number of United States Dry Cargo Shipping Companies by Type of Service, Normal Area of Operation and Number of Ships Owned
,

122

123

Number of Ships in the United States Maritime Administration's National Defense Reserve Fleet as of December 31 for Specified Years
Specified Combination Passenger and Cargo Ships of 10,000 Gross Tons and Over With a Passenger Capacity of 500 or more
OWNERS
United States Owners of United States Flag Oceangoing Dry Cargo Vessels of 1,000 Gross Tons and Over as of December 31, 1958, Arranged by Owner Location and Principal Officers
,

124

125

131

United States Owners of United States Flag Oceangoing Tank Vessels of 1,000 Gross Tons and Over as of December 31, 1958, Arranged by Owner, Location and Principal Officers Owners of United States Flag Ships of 1,000 Gross Tons and Over Operating on the Great Lakes as of December 31, 1958. Owners of Canadian Flag Ships of 1,000 Gross Tons and Over Operating on the Great Lakes as of December 31 1958
,

139

145

148

Xll

CONTENTS Cod.
SHIPBUILDERS
Page
United States Shipyards and Addresses Showing Characteristics of the Yard and the Ships Under Construction as of December 31, 1958
153

GOVERNMENT AID
United States Flag Companies Having Operating Differential Subsidy Contracts With Maritime Administration as of December 31, 1958

157
159

Foreign Shipping and Shipbuilding Subsidies and Aids

Estimated United States Subsidizable Expenses, Gross Subsidy Accrual, Recapture, Payments on Account and Balance of Subsidy Due Calendar Year 19471960 ( Chart)
'.

160

CARGO DATA
Cargo Shipments From and Receipts Into the United States by Flag of Ship

19211958
Cargo Shipments From The United States By Flag of Ship 1921

163

1958

164
165

Cargo Receipts Into The United States By Flag of Ship 19211958

Domestic Oceanborne and Great Lakes Commerce of the United States by Area of Trade in Ships of 1,000 Gross Tons and Over-Calendar Years 19511957
LABOR DATA

166

Major Organizations in the Maritime Industry


Descriptions of Selected Shipboard Ratings
Employment Procedures

169
171

174 177

Seafaring Employment 19251958


Seafaring Employment Potential-Job Distribution by Ratings Officers and Unlicensed Personnel Aboard Active Ships as of January 1, 1959
Estimate of Civilian Seafaring Job Potential by Collective Bargaining Groups
Basic Wages and Crew Complement for a Typical Class "B" Freight Ship Atlantic and Gulf Coasts 194-9 1959

178

180

182

Basic Wages and Crew Complement for a Typical Class "B" Freight Ship Pacific Coast 194-91959

184

Xlll

CONTENTS Con.
Page

Hourly Overtime, Penalty Time and Non-Watchstanders Pay Rates as of January 1 for Specified Years
Seafaring Wages and Overtime 1918

186

1958

188

Monthly Base Wages of Licensed Deck Department Personnel in Effect on Class "B" and Class "C" United States Government and Privately Owned Freight Ships for Specified Periods from 1918 to 1958 Monthly Base Wages of Licensed Engine Department Personnel in Effect on Class "B" and Class "C" United States Government and Privately Owned Freight Ships for Specified Periods from 1918 to 1958

189

190

Monthly Base Wages of Licensed Radio Officer on Freight Ships for Specified Periods from 1919 to 1958
Monthly Base Wages of Unlicensed Deck Department Personnel in Effect on United States Government and Privately Owned Freight Ships (10,000 Gross Tons and Under) From 1918 to 1958
Monthly Base Wages of Unlicensed Engine Department Personnel in Effect on United States Government and Privately Owned Freight Ships (10,000 Gross Tons and Under) From 1918 to 1958 Monthly Base Wages of Stewards Department Personnel in Effect on United States Government and Privately Owned Freight Ships (10,000 Gross Tons and Under) From 1918 to 1958
Longshore Monthly Wage Rate 1946 Philadelphia and Baltimore
,

191

192

193

194

1958

For the Ports of New York,


195

Shipyard Employment By Years 1947 1958 Total Production Employees in Those Major Shipyards Having Facilities to Build Oceangoing Ships 477 Feet L.O.A. by 66 Feet

195

Number of Graduates From U. S. Merchant Marine Academy and State Marine Schools by Years 19511958 ( Chart)

196

XIV

GENERAL

HISTORICAL EVENTS AFFECTING SHIPPING


Year 1936
1937 Date June
Oct.

Event
29 21

Merchant Marine Act of 1936.

Initiation of long-range construction program by the United States Maritime Commission with the signing of the contract for the construction of the SS AMERICA.
Hitler starts hostilities.
Poland is invaded.

1939
1939

Sept.

1 3

Danzig annexed to Germany.

Sept.
Sept.

Great Britain declares war on Germany.


France joins England in declaring war on Germany.

1939 1939

Sept. 18
Nov.
2

United States closes its waters to belligerent submarines.

1939
1939

Embargo repeal is passed by the Congress of the United States.


President Roosevelt forbids United States ships to enter western European, Baltic (Neutrality Act) and North Sea waters.
Italy declares war; invades France.
France and Germany sign surrender.

Nov.

1940
194.0

June

10

June
Feb.
Mar.

22

1941

6
1

Joint Resolution:

Emergency Cargo Ship Construction (PI

5)

- Liberty Ship Frograc.

1941

Effective date of transfer to Interstate Commerce Commission over water carriers engaged in interstate commerce.
President Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Bill. President Roosevelt proclaims unlimited emergency.
Congress authorized acquisition by United States of title to or use of domestic or foreign merchant ships.

1941 1941

Mar.
May-

11

27
6

1941

June

194-1

July
Oct.

14

Congress passed Ship Warrants Act. (PL 173)


House of Representatives votes to arm American Merchant Marine.

1941

16

1941 1941 1941


1942 1942

Dec.
Dec. Dec.
Feb.

7
8

Japan attacks Fearl Harbor.


Congress of the United States votes war;

Britain declares war on Japan.

31 7
30
12
5

First liberty-type ship, PATRICK HENRY, delivered.

Executive Order (9054) established War Shipping Administration.

June
Jan.

Subsidy payments for operating subsidy terminated.


First Victory-type ship, UNITED VICTORY, launched.

1944
1944 1945 1945 1946

Aug.

United Maritime Authority established.

May
Aug.

7
14
8

Germany surrenders unconditionally.


Japan accepts surrender terms; war ends.
Merchant Ship Sales Act, 1946, passed.
War Shipping Administration terminated.

Mar.

1946
1947

Sept.
Jan.

1 1

Operating subsidies resumed for 12 lines holding suspended contracts.

HISTORICAL EVENTS AFFECTING SHIPPING -Continued


Year
19A7

Date

Event
22

May

Greek-Turkey Aid Bill passed by Congress authorized $400,000,000 to furnish aid to Greece and Turkey.
All but 10 of the approximately 900 requisitioned vessels in government service had been returned to their owners.
Government owned ships, which were operating under General Agency Agreement, were withdrawn from Domestic Service.

1947

June

30

1947

June

30

194-8

Mar.

Expiration of authority to sell war-built ships foreign under the Ship Sales
Act, 1946.

1948
1948

April

Foreign Assistance Act passed by Congress - Marshall Plan.


Organization for European Economic Co-Operation.

April 16
Sept. 18
Oct.
May-

19A9 1949 1950


1950

British pound devalued from $4.03 to $2.80.

Approval by Congress of United States for 50-50 cargo legislation. (PL 664)
Establishment of the Maritime Administration and the Maritime Board. Establishment of the Planning Board for Ocean Shipping, North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Republic of Korea invaded.

24
-

May

1950

June
July-

25
14

1950

Secretary of Commerce made public a text of a letter to Acting Administrator of the Maritime Administration which set forth policy of the Department of Commerce towards sales and transfers to foreign registry of privately owned vessels.
President of the United States declared a national emergency.
Congress of the United States appropriated monies for construction of the Marinertype.

1950

Dec.
Jan.

16 1

1951

1951
1952
1953

Mar, Feb.

13

Establishment of the National Shipping Authority.


First Mariner -type, KEYSTONE MARINER, launched.

29 27

July
July
July

Korean Armistice.
Egypt seized Suez Canal.
Canal nationalized.

1956

26

1956

30

United States Congress authorized construction of a nuclear -powered merchant ship for operation in foreign commerce of the United States.
Egypt took over full operation of the Canal.
Israel invaded Egypt.

1956
1956 1956

Sept. 14
Oct.

29 31

Oct. Oct.

Britain and France attacked Egypt.


Suez Canal closed.
Suez Canal opened for all ships adapted to 34 foot draft.

1956
1957 1957

31
8 15

April
Nov.

Contract entered into with the New York Shipbuilding Corporation for the construction of the NS SAVANNAH.

1958

May

22

Keel laid for the construction of the NS SAVANNAH.

SHIP

TONNAGE AND MEASUREMENT TERMS EXPLAINED

Every floating body will displace its own weight of water. Sea or salt water weighs approximately 6U pounds per cubic foot. If we find the number of cubic feet of that portion of a floating ship which is under water it is a simple matter to determine the ship's displacement.
Since salt water weighs approximately 6I4. pounds per cubic foot the total number of cubic feet represented by the under water portion of the ship multiplied by 6U represents the total number of pounds of water displaced by the ship.

If the total number of cubic feet of the under water portion of the ship is divided by 35 it will give the number of tons of water displaced, since 35 cubic feet equals one
ton or ZS times
6I4

pounds equals

22ljO

pounds.

Let us assume that a ship is afloat in a quiet body of water. The water freezes and becomes a solid mass of ice'"'. The ship is lifted out of the ice. The cavity in the ice then represents the form of the under water portion of the ship. We then fill this cavity with water to the level of the surface of the ice. The water is pumped out of the cavity and placed on one side of a scale, the ship is placed on the opposite side of the scale. The scale will then balance.
Now to prove this, if the water on the scale which balances the weight of the ship
is again poured into the cavity in the ice and we proceed to put the ship back into the cavity the water in the cavity is forced aside or displaced until the ship occupies the entire space in the cavity, at which time it will have displaced all of the water which we previously found equalled the weight of the ship.

DISPLACEMENT, LIGHT - The weight of the ship excluding cargo, passengers, fuel, water, stores, dunnage and such other items which are necessary for use on a voyage.

DISPLACEMENT, LOADED - The weight of the ship including cargo, passengers, fuel, water, stores, dunnage and such other items necessary for use on a voyage, which brings the vessel down to her maximum draft.

DEADWEIGHT TONS - The carrying capacity of a ship in tons of 22U0 pounds. The difference between the displacement light and the displacement loaded. As an illustration, a ship with a light displacement of U,000 tons has a draft of 9 ft; at this displacement (1^,000 tons and draft of 9 ft.) her deadweight is zero. Her loaded displacement would amount to 15,000 tons and she would have a draft for this loaded displacement of 30 ft. Therefore her deadweight would be the difference between the light and loaded displacement or a carrying capacity of 11,000 tons.
CARGO DEADWEIGHT TONS - The number of tons (22lj0 pounds per ton) which remain after deducting fuel, water, stores, dunnage and such other items necessary for use on a royage from the deadweight of the vessel. As an illustration, a vessel of 11,000 tons deadweight taken aboard fuel, water, stores, dunnage and such other items necessary for a voyage amounting to 1200 tons, the cargo deadweight available will then amount to 9800 tons. The cargo deadweight varies according to the weight of the last named items. In other words, for a long voyage fuel may be carried for a round trip and the quantity of stores proportionally increased, which would reduce the figure for the cargo deadweight tons by a like amount.

* For the purpose of this illustration the expansion of the ice is ignored.

GROSS TONS - The entire internal cubic capacity of the ship expressed in tons of, xoO cubic feet to the ton, except certain spaces which are exempted such as:
Peak and other tanks for water ballast Open forecastle bridge and poop Excess of hatchways Certain light and air spaces Domes and Skylights Condenser
and other items* NET TONS - The tonnage of a ship remaining after certain deductions have been made from the gross tonnage expressed in tons of 100 cubic feet to the ton. Among the deductions are:

Anchor gear Steering gear Wheel house Galley Cabins for passengers (when on decks not to hull)

Crew spaces Master's cabin Navigation spaces


and other items*

Donkey engine and boiler Shaft trunks Percentage of propelling machinery space,

REGISTER TONS - Register tonnage is applicable to both gross and net, in other words it can be expressed as gross register tonnage or net register tonnage. However, as a general rule it is ordinarily used with reference to net tonnage.
POWER TONS - This is used to classify the ship for the purpose of establishing the rates of pay of the ship's officers and is calculated by adding together the gross tonnage and the indicated horsepower of the ship. The result is power tonnage.

GRAIN CUBIC - The maximum space available for cargo measured in cubic feet, the measurements being taken to the inside of the shell plating of the ship or to the outside of the frames and to the top of the beams or under side of deck plating. In other words, if a bulk cargo was loaded such as grain it would flow in between the frames and beams and occupy the maximum space available.
BALE CUBIC - The space available for cargo measured in cubic feet to the inside of the cargo battens, on the frames, and to the underside of the beams. In a general cargo of mixed commodities the bale cubic applies. The stowage of the mixed cargo comes in contact with the cargo battens and as a general rule does not extend to the skin of the ship. From figures taken from an actual ship the grain cubic amounts to 6141,000 cubic feet and the bale cubic amounts to li70,000 cubic feet.
CARGO STOWAGE FACTOR - The bale cubic divided by the cargo deadweight equals the stowage factor. In other words, a ship with a bale cubic of 570,000 cubic feet and a cargo deadweight of 9800 tons would have a stowage factor of about 58 cubic feet.

* As enumberated in "Measurement of Vessels" published by the Department of Commerce,


Bureau of Navigation.

9,830 9,830

6,518
11,000
103,000

rl

37,000

28,000

p O
co to vo \0 >n en -4/ ir\ its CM Oi -4- -T -4 -4 CM Oi

OO O O O O^
.

rH
r-1
>i"i

^
\Q en

en en -<f -4

>

Cubic

(000)

Bale

OvOvOON-~4TnoltOenvOrH

t> en en en oi -4n0 irwo to vo

en
1 1

ITN

ir\irifN.vr\m>rt->Tcnir\Lr\ir\

-4

en irvto to tO I> J> kTNsO sD -~4 ^J to vO

CO

vOOHIM^ en to m OI Ol rH
IT\ lf\ tCO 0 On &n

cnc-ONtOoivOtotocoo^cM
siirs-jSOltOtoONtoioirNtotO
en en en
-4^

H H On
ir\ ir\

cn^HuMninHOOHinri
^f -4
-sf

ol
-<t ir>

1>-

to vOHrlOlA

On

t> t> NO ir\ ir\ qn


itn ir\

U"N

S3 EH

oj oi en en oj oj rH

en en en en

-4-

-*

-4

en ^J

43 rH

to

s u o
C3 EH

en O rH H t> tO 00 en O o t> o O H
-4; ir\

rH

r-H

ir\

ir\

irwo nO en en en

vtirnrvri<Ot-sfl>-sfcAOItOO>a On to O iri ON ON Sh ri ^o ~4 in o \p rHOrHrHolOlOlkTlOlrHtOoi-d-ON NONONOt>tOtOtOvO^DNOt>tOtOt>

On 10 ^o vO en en in ir\ en I> ON C\l Oi l> > t> On On sO t>

a
c
03

01

a ^
BJ (0

weight
Dead-

vO\OstWOOt> rH rH O en rH rH tO -4 -4- rH On O O J>


Tons

OJtOrHtOir\^40ir\OOenONOrH t0vr\~4---4'[>'r\Oir>ir\OrHrHOOI N0t>-4OJ>en--4/rH0it>v0Ot0O

O H
IfN

t> en t> ON -vT

-<f
r-\

O oj
rH

IT\ i

C- l> On CO

ir\

in en

tooNONOoootooNOONOtoON rH rH H rH rH
r-t

Ol H

On

O rH

On Oi

B
CO

X> fc
rrj

10

oj

rH

4J
Ih
a]

CO CO

-P

^c*H|oj^iNH NiH'*H Nirt l<NH<N>- l',


<
|
|

ft CO

(3

rHrHrHrHrHi-HHrHrHrHr-HrHrHrH

ir\ir\if>ir>irNir>Lr>vOir\irN\0

HM

h|oh|ciHm ir\^o

\Q \0

rlririrlH

\) \i>

\D

>
"H

05

(D

4b*

(D

to

IA o
to oi
d)

H
43
CO to

to
iH
-3
43
J-)

*H
43

ra

" =

d o
-

3 .S e EH Q Eh Q

tH

iH

fHEESSSBSS 3
to

-H 43

"a

eh

E E

.
Eh

. .

eh

83
i
14

tb

to

b s r s B r s
\> \> \>

nO

S3

u a a o tH h P
(D <d
(h

en en C- t>
Hi

OJ Ol OJ OJ OJ OJ rH

OOO H rH to

b EBB HCM en t> S E C E S en BE ONONONrHl>t>NOt>ONaNvOt>aNsO

Co Co Co

o Co

OJOIOIOJOIOJOJOJOJOJOIOIOIOJ

u"\u"\ir\C--t>Ot>t>tfNiJ"NNOt>*r\ir\

tO vO nO t> tO Oi Ol Ol Oi Ol

<D

(iH

O O
to

og O
-p

aJ

CO

ooooooo o o o o o o to vO nO nO ^t
n> if\ tfN

B B B c c S B

BBSESSBSEEBSBS OOOOrHrHHOOOOHrHsi)
cnenenNOenenenOenenenenenirN

Co Cb Co

o Co

On ON On sO On vO nO nO nO nO

i
43

,8

to 5)

3$
XI H

a m o o <a
to

,3

en en BBSS to to S en en on t> o
OJ Ol i> t> to to t>
-*

HjcMrfjc^CM

" ri rL H ^ en en ^ -4 ~4 en
-<r ~H;

OJOJOJtONONO'sOOOJtOrHvONOO ONONONONQNONONOONtO Sf ^ s H

^]^Ioi^fM

-^Ol^IcMS -iJciHloiE

rH rH OOO

= E
rH

>Tvir>>r\t>irvioifNoiTvvOI>uNiir\ON

Oi rH rH en Ol

On On On ~4 -4 -4

O On ^f
-<f

^1

f M

CO

-p Eo O -H

_ C

fl a)

rH
to

o bO U E E
s s
a)

o 00 U E

'

ft

eco a
find
EH

&

O O

O 43 O a)
to CO
a>

o
o
00
JH

s O

a=
ct)

&.
o no U E
43
t/>

e e e e s b

(HBSBEBBBESS
00

tOES

co

do
(H

a
tO

CO

P
<=a

co
to

43 H El O

&
g

O
49 "S

P
oi

aJ

Q
=s

p3

eh
I

CO CO

I
a.

>>

p3 rH ra cs <-i O p CO U H O Q eg p aJ ft ra C n aj a d tug O H C
>>rH rH
CO
PL,

t> T3 rH -H

S p U

CL,

CO CO

6,
H
rl

9 a

CO

rH OJ

b^tlririd

>Ti

O <JQtO
>"

^toi

ft a,

-H

-PPPPP-P-PP riHHHHHHri
H
-rt

-H

-rt

-rt

-rA

-r-l

t-I

riHHHHriH ooooooo

tfNjsolPc too w w tj ra tj n tj co 88SS8B888888S

c^coH w s
en en en en en

fQcqpapqpapQfqcq

ooooo

^-^

-P
*
1 1

hpr-i-.

H
J-c

o p*^

envO III CM** o to o en 00


ITN

-<r cm tirsvO vO

TO C1 1

O -4 QvO
K
l>
CM CM

-4 O to t> tn
if\
|

to
| |

>BH rH tO

OO O rH o
IT

M into
-4

HO H 42 O S O
pq <5CO

t> en en -J -4 ir\ t>

O
O

Q
1

rH
1

CM CM t> rH CM
1 1

CT-

sO

sO id

C-C--

C- l>

en

ir\ v>

sO

ifN >rv

3 $ CM
-vf

to to

-4 ^f

CM OOO O < -4 O O
ir>

t>

vO t> -4 ^t l>

ir\ vr\

r^S

ir\OOencM-4;

irv

OO
i

nOiHcnt^rl
CT- vr\

rHH

-<j-o

4>
CD

tH 43

!3H
ta

O ^
*

-4C--

lA\OvO

-4T-

O O

-0-

> Nt
#>
1

vO
CM

t>
\
S
1

CM

nrt\OHr\ H en -4
>rv
ir\
* \ #v
.

OivO

CT

Cn

rifflinooo 00 rH -45
-4- ir\

l> TO

-4 -4

--4 -4;

-4

Tv

to t>

ir>

C- v\

-3

-<J

-t -3 t> en ^t -4- en -<f

sCJ

T3 "H H to

>

u O

8 a
o
Eh

O en\Q O r> O rH O TOC-Ot0OOOir> *S*l^**kt


t--vOtoc--c--toTOO

O-XJOOvOOtOO

O O to rH tO t> O O O CM C^ CM t> cr\if\ O CM O rH rH rH rH


v) ir>
i-l i-t

rH

NO
IT\
*

to r>
*\

ir\

O\0
u~*
\

CM CM CM CM vO rH
Wk
\

^ en\i> l>
-4;
<*

o cf o o C> H O to o
4h

vPv>rH-4if\C0
&

\OC--NOu~\tOO

rH-4tOt>00 \*V#t*^kl

-4 C> On

vO ifv nO l>
rH-4*
*s

rHO^

ir\

onto
*

3>

to

t> t> > !> vD l>

CM

*v r-t

sOTOrHOmtOrHt>cn k^W***\#
0-4---4-4if\c--vnenen

sfOOsfHol OOO -4-ocntot>cnOrHcM

CM

HrlrlriHriCMiA

CD

H T3 -p ^5 Mn C -H C O SH
CO
CD

mNixMnO^Osfl o

CD

OH (MM WO H H H rH M H

u> e> ^o

vr\ Cr-

vQ

m cm
O-

cootcooo o o en to so CM CM m en en m CM HHHriHri
-<J-

ty> "vf -<t

o 8
-4
CM

vo en -\rC0 \D iTivO TO

tf\

CM CM

o-\

-<f

to

o to

O o l> o rH

O o o H

vo r>
-4- u~\

C--

-4 CM

\O-4ent0 en-400i> enirvH -4rHmoo-4 en-4vOC-C--rHON-4' r>vOtfMt0t0Hi-j^D

r-i

.<H

TJ
CD

O
tj
co CO CD CO CO CD CD

CO
CCJ

-p

-4 -4-4 00
^joi-'JM^lo^lc^airHlc^-ilc^^cii

43
0>
ft CO

Ph CO

O c

sOvO-iJ^xi^vOtovi)

lHrHH(-(HrHi-tH

l> t> l>

HH

rH CM CM CM

ooo

H|01

r-j

NO
rH

-4 rH HrtriHHrl
lf\ IT\ tf%

Sfl

nOOOi-HOOOcMO HCMCMCMCMrHrHCMen

>
"H

<D

<D

Eh

43
CD

O
43

CO CO

OOH _
CD <-t

Eh

O
bp

co

o
S

5 1

a O

CD co CD

a
cd

-h
-P

-p -H

I p
rH
CD CO co ft

P O
CD

ft

(D

g.5o8
1
c
fl ?j EH

rH

in

1
H

43
CO

-g______
g
_
"8

S = B S C

1 .a
6-t

2
43
EH

(3
CD

CD
CD

ft
CO

43 "H
ft

CD

a o

Q,

U
ix,

O s
CD

a. lH

CD

iH

gs

43 43
EH EH

^|s
CM

c5 eh Pi

CD

tO

tO<H
E

j-H

*h

%C

CO

O G a o CD iH M -P
0)

CD

W MOW oocoto CMCMCMCMCMCMCMCM

i tO^vOOvO^O^O

O t> O O O O rH = rH CM O CM O H O cn m en cm en cm

1
CM

5b to

S S S
c>-

r- fv>

o to to

5)

s^ H
, ?5 CM rH

ESSES "Hoi 0-4C>encMOOCMCM


E

en

^J-

vO

sO -4 t> t>

CM CM CM CM CM CM

t-(M0 t-\Oif\OOPi

CMCMCNCMCMCMCMcncn

<m

a) In

u
ft

CD

CD

8
E O
cd

<*<j%<*v^*.5*
en en en en en en

%
co

o a

<n

o o S o
co

vOOsOvOsDvOOvO
O^^O
vO vO
-fl

OO \D ^O nO vO O0\0 vO
en

vO vO vO

OOO

ooHooo H H o rH H H
sj3 s) vO ir\ ir ir\

S E

O rH

SSESSESES rHOOOOvOvDOsO
vOvOsO vf-4mir>OrH sOC--l>-TOTOt>l>tOO
rH

CX*

H rH rH vO sO vO t- t> i> t> t> rS S E

to r>

sO sO in >r>

v> ir\

3$
E
O-hJm H <>
av to vO in
CM CM

3
CD

p
CD

.5 43 A!

43

35

J OHOOOOrHO J CMenCMCMCMCMtOCM
;

- - ^Ir3w^<icn en en
rH rH rH t- l> !> cm cm cm en en en CM CM CM \0 \0 vO
iT\ IT%

\^1^
s
en

SEE ^) vO vD
rH rH rH
--

E E

^4^
-hJojc

en en

CM CM CM t> vO vO

Of-C-N0t>cnoir\0
enenent--encM OCMO t>s0^3rHTOrHrHtOQ> -4iAir\sOifN\OsOsO(JN

E E S E

e
-^-*

-4 ^f

't>OC>OOl>CT -4" -4 -4- -4 -4

;'

O CO
IT\

> 1> rH rH rH

-4

U^

ITS lf\ U"\

O
60
ft

a
EH
ej
CD CO

a
c0

h ? H
ft

H $s
0)

MESEEBSEE
60

&

43

o
o
60
ft ft

Sessseses
cd

CO CD

&->

"

CD

lessees
bfl

co co

o
<s

r3

Messes
bO

o
hfl

*H o

<D ft

ft

E E S

.$ o rH 60

86 3

C0EEESESSE
01

Ph

a H
CO

CMen-4m:a333i><Sm
<S3<3c!aj)ff>a<

CM rH

3
f
p

* *
? P?77 9 77 7 7 77 7 ~3 ^
p

* * * *

oooooooo

7 7 777777 cncncncncncncncn

w to w TO O iTi ao ire
1
!

CM

777
Kl

t f sea
en en
13 Si

CMH H* * ^ ^ ^^1 ^^ w QHHf?HnJ CM T T T T 'OQ HHriWNcMWW-4


1
1

oooooo

<s* -4- -4- -4- -sf

WHM

HM

r-t CM CM CM CM CM CM t%t (X,.t\, (In ft, fl, (L, fX, fl,

777777777 Cn^O

-P

OQ2>0 CM O C>
-JO
k

^5 rt--'
rH .O
(1

en c- to to en en

rH

Q O

HH
*
sU rH
1

o^^ HO O

SO
s o

Q O cn
ir\

-<!-<

o O in
CM

en
to

cm

*
p<
1-1

H
t
|

<om ~4-0
ov *v

no

tbt>

O
1

r^-vfcCM

sOtri

C-OO OOrH ^#kl


UA^O

\0
1

Q O
*^
1

tOiTNt-ifN

S3 EH

C\i

fr\ -<f

sO

COHNw ir\u-NOO v*ks*v tO rH CO O rH

C- rH CM tO rH irvsD to
v> LTN ITS IT\
h

-4

m ^ \ -J-t-*

^O O^ -t en
-vf-vf

O o
as

OS

l0^->

H
rt

u^
to to

>

(o

O
1

8 | M O
EH

to
r^v

O c- -* OHo
itn^O C-

lf\OOiCMOlf\QOrlQI>'A-^CV tOt^^O^OCJ-C>OQOOrHCMtO-J HrlOI(MtBrlfi)rosfOON^-~J

C> t" t> rH to alA^OsO sf

oo

^o to

~j-o

CM CM

ririPM^O^OOOHOHstNvO HHHriHiHrlriH
tOu-xr^OmvOtOcnc^-rHOOOO

C- > t> to

t> t>

H t3

lu
o5 as

3
a
at

p
ej

-h

K
to

C o
"8
10

.c Mm O "H S O EH
nS
d)

\OvO

sf in

o (n o o c> o H 1A

WOOiAOiAnt^KMrvOOiriO
-Nf-^rHC\itOC-ir\-JrNOir\Oc^\if\

sD 00 to

OOOQ OkmaO
O

in

-*o CO

a)
=

-t-<ftO vO

i-HrH-vf^fu-wo^OvOC-vOtOr^OsQ

HHriHHHHCVCMCM

OOHO HHO

rH rH rH

^Z go
Wh'2
00
CO Os

<M

a)

X)
to
55

CO

-P
i*S

,Q
a>

to to

a to

OvOirvW HHriH

OOOO\fls(NfNtifMn\D\Diri(0

r-<jcy^<lo^-ilcv^Hjoj^lcv^H|ojHcy-<Joj

rHHHHHrHHHi-HrHrHHrHi-H

m in in criHHH
en

C~-

O rH

rH
r-i

m
0)

>
"H
fc

<D

Xi -p

.3
to

o I 8
H
to

b.

X\
.C!

S3 CO
9fi Ec@
w2W fe w D o^

5 to J
<D in

U o = =
O U

.H -P

U o
-H ^3
Eh

to

5
P
as

rH

H w
rj

rH

a p o
(0

-H xi

-rl

H = =

to

id

S5
"8
Cm

0CSS
CO

^3 ^>
fj

CO

,Q

Eh EH

3 B

=
-H

m = =

O -H ^1 ,Q
eh Eh

8 M
H

3
Eh

MM 3 3

to

m e = 3

O =

85
<D

.5)

^
rtf

= _
Co vb Cb Co
to to to to CM CM CM CM CO CO
c- t> CM CM

OOC^i
rH
v>
Cvi

O O mJhIchJm s rH H O = ^OJ t*> O HriHHtttMHHstHHsrc^H

^9
1*8
B w 's b w ^

a o m -P as <H M
<X>

8
-3 "8

irvO CV CN CM

CMcMOO^OOOOOOrHrHOtM HrtriHtMr^NNnNf^tnn^

h s =H O
IS
to

O
Cd

o o

PQ

ooOO rH O vO sD ITvsO
C^i IT\

OOCMCMOOOOCMOOOOxO
C-t^-tOtOtOtOtOtOOtOOOmt^i r^r^^-vj-v^^^o^o^^o^gj^to

OOOO
vO vO vO vO
CM CM CM CM

oo rH

enenr-\

\D >o in in

-P

.C -P

.3

58 S|
CO

3$
J3
to
to

(D

^\
^Im=
(O
c^v c\

IH ^O

\0^(MO
to

rtjcur

mom
C\

^^wcM-^i>^b^bcnr--HooCb
OOirinrHrnmcnr>i)Lr\\DCMC CMCMCMCMOtMCMtM^fOHuA-~C\i
cm cm

c\

mmm
ir\

vO sO
rH rH

lAlAlAlTl
in in in

O
H

o
T3 -

irv ir -<f -vf

cncntnir\irNir\irvLr\LT\ir\LnsU

-*
-<

-S--3--*-*

~<r ~<r

P
to

C
aS

m
a)

rH

-p

a
to

CO

cj

% -P
Eh

$ o
~

O to M

8
M
= = -= = = = = = = = =
td
C3

M
to iH

8
M
O
to

H CO

O
<x>

A V
as

M
0)

to

=
co

M = =

W
aS P-.

CO

M"S

X
Eh

Ch

Pi

Eh

Eh

al

Eh

H
to

&

* *
*
ri
I

nH H B >W>
<!

a
<-\

PH

co co

w
C\l

mm cococoscococococo SS3S mwmTT t m


<4 *4

HCMEHEH
T

W mm JIT
ri

r-t
i

CM Cr\r-\
i i

rHHCT-^1
i
i

^f(M en Pi
1
1

o
1

en en oo
1
1

<5]<JJCslrH[i,C<]cnCM.
<< <<

Oi pi cd a:

rHHrHrHCMCMCMCM cnmtnm^fu^ EhEhEhEhEhhEhEhhEhehhEhEh

CO S CO CO H CM CM CM CM o o o c3 >>>>
1 1 1 1

02 CO
1 1

rH rH

B T Tr N Nl

NUMBER AND TONNAGE


MAJOR WORLD FLEETS AND OTHERS

-g

to

'S

CD rl

M O
to

UN
CM

vO

nO
So
ft

o
V

to

>* o
v

ir\

ir\

to

to

g
v

en
to
*

o
IT\
9%

to
rH
^

vO

1
vO

&
l>

ft*
(A

c-

v>

vO
to to
CM
ft

nO

t>

nO

vO

vO

CD

3 A

-ft*

NQ
rH

un
CM

-<

CM
CM
ft

c3 EH
1

81
h
CD

-**
.

o o

ft

CM
-ft*

-*
to to

en
*

8
CM
k

On
*!.

o o

CM

o
ft
-ft*

o O

"ft*

--t

-4-

^4"

^r

-*

en

ft?

to

o
t~

l>

to
r\

to
IC\ -4-

C\

-4-

-*

vO vf

o en

en

-4

3
CM

t>

en

to e-

cn

en

o -*
CO

0] .H

-p .8
*H
CD IS

CO

o
un

UN
to

o
v>

CD

O
EH

c-

sO
H CM
o
r\

3 vO
sf cn en

to

vD

CM

$
o CM

St
ITl

l>
IfN

ir\

^ ^ UN UN
ON
to
CM

ft
rH

Cd CO

J3 ^5 -P
co

g
.

a
B
<S

rH -P
CO

p
CO tH cd

PI Jb
CJ
1

l>
CM

CN

$
t>

H en
en
-4" ir\

4^>

t>
CM

ON

cn

en

cn

O <n
cn

en

O en
o
-ft*

9 en
rH

P 13 H ft U

8
^5

E-i

E 3 5
1

U
CD

nO

fcr

CM

in

O
ITS

.Q

3
ir\

ON cn UN
ft*
\

CD CO

P ill HO Q EH
CD

cft

to
rH
ft

rH

O en
CM

-4-

O
ir

vf

O
CM

un

c>

s
ft

H CM
CM
ft

H O H
\

H
1

A .a H^ U P O
fi

CO

f-<

Cm

P
O

"B
CD
r-i

CO c
ft

f-i

ft

to
CM

to

vO
CM

vJ3

vO

IT\

f\

ir\

co

IB

CM

CM

CM

CM

cn!

ct
vO
ft

U
iri

p
a
iH
CO

CO

v>

O EH
1

P! M o

A
cn

O to

-*

ir\

xO
CM CM

en
ft

o
CM
ft

^~
ft

cn
to
ft

O g
P -H

g
fn

to
-ft*

-ft*

to
l
ft

13

o H
H to
t>
CM

O H
UN

C 3
CO
tjfl

to
rH

to

to
tH
ITft

l>

H
CM

t>-

C--

crH

v
r=l

rH

CO 2 o O
H

s 3 h S .0
to

UN nO
t>

CD

O tft

8
ir\

O l>
CM

to
ir>

in
ft

O CM
ir\
ft

rl

^Q

in
ft

^
Oi

"sj-

to ON

to

en

cn cn
ft

rH H

o U m >H p- CO 8 to

c
0)

,a

>

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

bO
cd

5 H
P
o5J

in

ill Q
CD

So

en

cn en vO

l>

cn
ITv

O
r-i

H
CD

CO
CD fn

OrH
a
erf

O
%

g vO
H
rH
ft

cn ON UN

CO

O to
H
9%

U O
M
4J

O M
bfl

&
CO

P
CO fii

ft

ft

ft

EH

r-i

CM

CM

CM

H
CM

ft

Jj p ciC
H Cm

M -H
CM

ft

H -H

Eh

1 o

ra

CD

asp O
CD co CO cd
PL.

O
1

88
fc

a ON
tk r-i

CM

to

to

^ C^

ir> ir>

en
ft

& en

ir\

en
ft

O O
CM

^
U

CO

cn
ft

en en
*

g rH

ON
v)
ft

Eh

CM

CM

CM

$ m h t> U O
<D

O^ uo
Hco
fi,

rH H

P
CD

r-

CM

CM

CM

CM

fi

UN ON
rH

13

*2

&
i

^ CD
fi<

en \D

H to

8
to

-4" n)

O vO
CM

IfN ir\

CM
ir\

to

O
CM

rH

ft*

cn
CM

g^
CM

CM

CM

CM

tf
-*

g^ *
CO

8 o u

H
13

rt

5
ft

5
CO

-H

-g "S 8> tH
CD

CM

3 O
EH

to
v>
*t

vO

O H
n

3
NO cn

l> sO
CM
s)

to en
rH
ft

vO
Cn)

sT

Cb

en
v

H
ft

CM

l>
V
-ft*

vO

tft

to rCM
ft

CM

UN vO
Ci

ft H Ch ^3

g&s U
p

s s
CO

H H 13 13

>

uu bo

r-i

H
+>

CO

H
>>>

sO en

en
E* to rH
*

vO en
-4-

IT

en

en
to en
*

en

en en

cn
en

cn cn

-4-

o
eh

12
i

S!
i ^ 3 CD

3
ft

-*
*

CM
%

3
ft

8 CM
ft

H
ft

cn
r-i

UN
CM
ft

P rH E O
C--

a^ o O H
a
cd

O
ft

N*
CM
ft

-P

to

UN
CM

vr

vrv

ir\

ir>

CM

CM

CM

CM

c^

st
CM
r\
r-i

-ft*

en
CM

CM

CM

^t

o l>
H H H

rH

en

53 fi

H 3 Q
ft

en
l>

Qi -4cn

to
*

-4"
ft

cn

m in
cm
ft

to

cn
ft

CM
*%

o H
*

\Q

rH

-<t
ft

vO

ft

en

en

en

en

en

en

en

en

cn

cn

o
cd

8 1 S & o

to

M S * w -P c e u
bb
aj

g o

J^U rH
a
rH tfl

p O
M
cd

ft

H tH bO M 8 O % CO rC CO

IS

CO

tu)

cd

-H rC

ft
1

O en
?>

o O -4 o H H >
r-i

r\

cn

H en
h
CD

H O H H en
U
CD

CM

en

-*
irv

T\

o H
H cn
U
CD fit

IT\

O rH
rH

ir\

O H
U
CD

vr\ ir\

vO
ir\

l>

to

-P
CO

o rH
H cn
u
fi
CD

ON
rH

UN ON

en

H cn
fi

H en
U

H H cn
u
CD fit

H H cn
u

UN ON

-P
-P
cd
N

8 o
H

fn

^a P
co

p H
8

il ^J -P -P O iH t>

H
r^J

3
H

CD

u
CD

U
CD
fix

a u o

ft H

>

^ CO

O o P R o

1
CD

8
CD

-P ft
cS

CD CD

a CD O

CD CD

e CD O
CD

| s
Q
CD t> CD

CD

CD

CJ <D

B CD O
CD

1 S
CD

CD

CD

p o
S3

13

i <

-s

If a 3 HO p
Cg

en

EH

B
CD

CQ

w
w co
C/3

c3 Eh

SI
a u
I

H
CM

oonHN Q O cnH H
ft
ft

i &
g
<D ri

O OvO Ol>O O CM H <n en

CM ->t

cm en

lis
1

3
CM

W >

e
CD

-a
iH
CD

a
O
EH

to

CD

H
J
PL,

OOmrlrl gg-^CM

oo oo
k

^*t>Q
en

*$

ft

ft

en >n

CQ

</>

A- EH
1.8
00

8|

3 CM
ft

g
O CM

5 *
g

CM

C/3

W J H

t>

ft ft
ft

CM

en

<i

3
a
H

OO Q CM OO
ft
>

tf\

tf\H

V> OH

OOvOHtq o o cnH H
k ft

-*vO

cm <n

<-.
CO

E
CO ro

Ifa 3 HO O <*
to

5
O O So W u H H co s ft O 3 & 3 o a
t-H

ft OS

i
H

c9

SI H

fiO

CM

O TV
CM CM

02
ow
Ed

Dim
CD

t>

to

8833$
>r
k

*4

ft

ft

CM

"3

Q z^

8,

o
E-i

O
H

no 3 HO p |EH

O CM
in

vO

OS ft

C/D

Ph

O
o

qj

-2

S CQ o 3

3
a
tn

CM

(X,

II
i-aa HO p EH

H u < H 8, 4S& OS o 3 *x oj u a t
ft

vO CM
ft

88^33
ft

o o cnotq o Q en H Tn

ft

sO

enir

a s
ra

^->

a
5

8S
3,,

en
CM

0-

-~#? o
-g
"So cd

^5*
O
_
fl
CCt

<^

0h

NO en

H
CM

5 $ CO

EH -H

M P N'0 "tj

{3 ^ ^-"
Ffc

tsp aJ

EH -H

+ SH

M '-'0 m >b
CO
ffl

t3 &h v-v^

-P %h

m
bo

o o <4
(D (D

p
<D

ob ob Sb

O
ctb

5o

at

ID

(D

d)

6b So Sb Sb 6b
IS fi

$
CO

S 2 S g g ^ g ^ ^ g
3j <lj

fi

tij

ij <4

P ^ ^ ^ g

1 I

14

43

1SJ S Q
P
to (4 <D

to

en
Si

en
CM

en

5
On to
CM

CM to

to
rl to

NO

nO

to

o
^

t-i

to 01

01

ti
aS -

28 a -p
i

8 H

wn
ITN

rH

& CM
-*
CM

H
r\

ir\

c-

tf\

en
kf\ ir>

en

C-

en

en -*

nO
CM

CM
>TV

nO

nC

$
ON
r

3
1

<D

S3 .Q

to
rH

QJ en

N@ en

to en

en
-t

ON -*

O
ir\

sT
ir.

rrt

-P -8

01

to

HO

-P
IB

-* * Q to m

rH
St

O -*
cCM

o -*
C^

en
CM

to
rH

nO
CM

vO
CM

CM CM

<D

01 01

^ 3 n

a
B
i

O 8 u o

01

tH

vO
CM

*
CM

t*-

nO

NO

CM

H
t-

en H

to rH

to rH

Tv
r-i

-p

fn
fit

S
Q
01
<D

,3

ITv

CM

3
CO

rH H

r-i

H
vO
rH
CM

H
CM

r-i

rH

Tk

c-

C-

nO

I -P 13 .8 S W) iH

8 O

01

IT* >r\

H
rH

On

-P

H H
rH

CM

m
H

if\

H 4 vO en
H
ITk

to
CM

to

en
rH

-* en
rH

en
H
to

en <*

o
r-i

-<t

On in
r-i

rH

H
C4

-P

01

ITv

4
iH

O
1

SB O
fH

OO

nO

3
en
00

to

o<

ON

en ON

s S
<
en
CM

H H
t

en
CM rH
*

-P

rH

&
Eh

w o

Pm

e u 3
53 .Q

lf\

t
CM

4 CM
fc

I>

en

en
CM

cf
to

CM

CM

to en
CM

ITi

en
CM

vj^4"

lf\

nO
CM

CM

o _
rl

1 " a J3 5 w>

O
tg

H P o3
H

86
n
(D

HO

43
Vi

H
O

if\

to c

to
C--

On NO

*
CM

en nO

en nO

en NO

en
t-

en
to

no

S 3 O O -p
In

CO to

Sn

8
to
CM

to

ON
c-

ON
r-

to

I:

to

O o

ra to a)

P*

a
3

^ 3
s.
fit

lf\ IT\

cCM

ON
CM

to
CM

vO
CM

c^
CM

vO
CM

nO
CM

r\

C*-

CM

CV

-p i d .8

Q
rH
a5

M iH

IB

oi

8 O

nO t-

CM

w
H

m
ir>

nO

m t>

EH

H
>r\

H
nQ
rH
r-i

t> H
cCM CM
rH

O O H
en

CM

t>-

O o
CM

o
CM

ON On

o
-<r

en en
en
CM

O in
ir\

ITN

CM CM

S
CM

CM

01 01

-P

O
fcH

O
1

O 8 U O

01

s*

Em

o H

O H

-4-

H
r-

H en H
CM rH

ir\

to en

H
ir\

C-

to

^f
in

sr
rH

nO

CM to l>

cJ
ON
r-i

H
On

H
ITN

r-i

H O en
en
CVTN

a in 3
53 ,0

On
C>-

to

en

o>
CM

o en

On

en

en

H en
en
tfN

VT\

t>

rH

rH

en

en

H en

f-

VN en

ON

O On
H H

On
On
rH

o wn ^ O

rH
VT\

CM
IT\

H
rH

On
rH

ON

48

U .Q a
CO

H en
U fit a o
Ri

rH

en
rl
fit

en

H H en
Fh

ON
rH
r-{

Vf vn ON
<-\

tf\ IT\

On

H
rH

nO ir\ ON

to
IT\

en

H en
U

en

H H en
Ih

On
r-i

ON

H en
u
a> fit

r-i

en

P ft

e o

U fit a o

rO

a o

h fit a o

M B
o

U ^t a o

^>

B o

,o

a o

u a o

15

-p

HO Q EH
CD

UN O H UN CO

t>

fc

3 rH H

cn
cn

nP ON cn

-*

Sn
to

t>-

n>

m h
CD

01 0]

CO
CO fl

tf\

3 H
a)

w O
1

rf

en

cn
un

vf vO

vO cn c-

if\

ON
to

H O cn

o
vO

EH

A H O UN O H
CM rH rH

UN

H H vO
CM

s *
rH rH rH

?r
0%

c\ cn
%

CM

CM

to

H
H

cn

rH

H
CM

H
to
rH

at

8
1

B m 3 CD
,>

0 vt

un
NO

to

8
PJ
CM

O H

-sT

o H
ON

O
rH

3
^8

3
cn ON
rH

-73

-P .C
tuO

n u

CD

t4
CD

c O

CO

H <n
o CM
-^t

en

o UN
CM

fc
rH

c^

rH
to

rH

H
en
rH

H
CM

rH

P
CO

Eh

CM

rH

k o
C3 EH

a
v>

s
-*
r\

r^

3
t-J-

cn
rH

O
rH

rH

rH

3
to

3
n
3
1

S H
J3
CD

-sT
s>

un

O ^
-4" ~4-

UN
-*

o cn
to
CM CM

f-

en

o cn
st
CM CM

en

03
<D

we O Q OH
t3

"
-ri

.)

to

9 ^t
H
c^
CM

O
H
vO
to

Hi

CM

to
CM

O
CM

H
CM CM CM
UN.

to
rH CM
CM

3 o
CM

o o
-4-

UN

O
CM

cn cn cn
CM

CD

CM

CM

S=

+5 .a bo H
co CD

o g P o
CJ eh
1

co CO

vO

-t
r>
IC\

CO

cn
rH

^
H 3 <n
o

# UN
H

UN
to
-<f

to

to

rH

H
r-\

rH

H UN H
O ^t
en

to

-t NO

*r\ .*

H
st
vX>

S
rH

-a
CO

fa

co

A
O no b
H -p <#
is

3
- tj .C

S m
CD

O O
vO

un

S3 .Q

en

O en
st

O cn
cn NO

ir\

cn
ir\

O # 4 cn
rH CM

en en en

en

00

<n cn

6
B a O 0)
Ph

Md HO
CD
IB

co

O
O

^
C--

O in

UN

CM CM

ON UN
~4-

en 3 3

ON cn cn
cm

CO

t>
CM

,0

W>

O
.

8S u o
En

3 t
rH

8n

C^
to

cn UN
to

t>

to to

O ON

c*-

vO

TN

-st

nO

3
vO
CM

co co a3

S m 3 CD

-t
rH

CO

vO

CM t>

-*
c-

H
cn

t> co

co r-

CM

r>

UN vO

<rt

Q
rH
<a

O O SMC O* O
1

-P J3
-H
CD

\D
r>

<n
rH

-4-

CO

st
h

CN

cn ON
cn

-<f

UN
CM
v

cn cn
*

o cn
c<\

vO

CD

vf UN
\

o rH
vO
*l

cn

& $ cn
k *

EH

CM

en CN en
cCM

cn

-4"

-*
cn
CM

si"

st

-<t

^t
rH

u^

co co

co

CO c-^>
k

-p

o
eh

P S u o
EH

to to
CM

o
9k

o CM o O rH
9%

O -4UN
%

-4*h

UN
t

en vO vO

ON vO
fc

to

to

O
w\

CM rH CM
V

CM

cn

c^\

cn

cn

en

cn

en

st

a u

CD

.q

un un un

st -<t

ON

ir\

cn -* in
rH

8 UN

vO

o o

to

o
UN

o
c>-

UN

H r>

UN

vt ON UN

cJ
vO
t UN

O H
CD

en

o O rH
H cn
u

st

rH

-P

O ON H H cn
U

ir\

A ON
rH

CM

UN UN UN ON O H O UN O rH rH H
rH

cn

~*

UN

vO UN
rH

r>

O
H
U

UN O rH

H cn
u

rH

cn

cn

H cn
U

H en
U

en

H en
U
CD

O H H cn
U
CD
.>

S 5 ft
CD

CD

u
CD

^ e

CD

^ S
O
CD CD

CD

^ e

CD

^ B

CD

,2

CD

CD

CD

H CD o
CD

^ S
O

CD

^ a
o

CD

& a Q

CD

^3

CD

CD

CD

a CD U
<D

a CD O
CD

CD

CO

CD

CD

CD

CD

CD

16

>rt

3
CD

-P XI
tD

CO

u
to
CD

tH
CO

a O

O O c^ m CCM

m H
rH

en
<M

fc

ir\

H
rH

o o en
CM

r>

r\

en

to
-4-

EH

* o to in t~
-4-4"

in

to

a
at

83
OH &
ead-

O H

en H

sf

en sO

O en
CM
ir\

ir\

CM

CM

en

cn en

O t>

en
c~4-

en

EH

s u
CD

o
St

CM

to
rH

O CM
CO to

CM

en

X>

o ^ ^ 3 in
to
CM

ight
ons

CO

E
CD

CD IB

EH

CO
rH rH

H CM

r-i

to

O
rH

CM rH

55

CM

CM CM

en

<n in

co

5 ^ 3
PQ
1

8 s u o
t3 eh
1

3 m
in
CrH

rH
r>

sO
if\

-*
C-

ir>

st

t>

o
rH

in

t>
CM

-4

Pf

58

en

+> -H
CD

->

in
-4-

i3 CD S5 .a

H.

C-

o rH
ITi

CM CM

en
CM

l>
CM

H en
o^
in
k

o Nj o en

vO
-4-

-St

co

CD

O
Eh

to in
*

8
t-\

CM
ir\

en
rH

to
rH

-5
9k

O
b

-4*

g O
k

CM

o
in
rCM

CM
k

en

U
CD

p
co CO

CM

CM

CM

en en
CM

en

CO

-<t

St
XI

-P

-4
to

t>

w
T3
c3

S. al
H
CD
f*4

CM

P S H o
C3 Eh
1

cn
k

nO

m en
CM

vO

H m

CM

CM
ir\

to
T\ T\
k

& ^ en
-t
v\

CM

O o to

vO

en
k

in

CM

H
E'-

O to
k

w
co

rH

rH

CM

CM

w 2 o
Eh H
CD

3
fej

B U
CD

.Q

nO

3
k

en en
t-i

3
CM

en en
CM
Tv f\

to

O
-<r

S -*
en H en

CM

vO in
-4-

en in sO
vO in

O rH
t>

vO -4
l>

-P
bo

bO
Cfl

o H

o W) _ h gcS
-P 08

HO
CD IB

EH

o o H
rH

t>

en

to

o'
v>

sO

H
o in

rH

O l>
rH

co

2 sO O

rl

CD

SP O CD M
03 a)
(X,

O
1

83 u o
Eh

O O
k

O CM

to

to

en

en

sO

O
Pi

en in
rH

r-i

ON
rH

On
r-{

rH

CM

H 3

3
55
1

a u

in

en

l>

0^

to
rH

to

CD

rH CM

CM CM

-4-

CM

tf

-P

>
to
t>r-i
k

00 S HO Q EH
CD

cJ a)

Jq

3
en

in in
t>

u> H en
%

o en
to
N

CM

to

in
^1^

O O
V

vO
CM

O
v -<f
k

to
k

O rH O
*k

8 nO
k

in

rH

rH

CM

en

en

-4"

in

in

33 ts

aJ

co

vO
rH O
Vk

+>

nO

rH

O
fr*

83
C3

S
-4

of

en

O H H

o
lf\
V

Ci

-4
i\

en

cn
to

lf\

C>
>t

IS

en
k

to
k

ts

rH

rH

CM

CM

en

en

&M

to

-4 n

c~-

-*
cS?

-4-

C--

en vO en

vO

O
-<r

to
IT. lf\

in vO in

CM

to
-4-

f-

to rH to

^8
CO

o en
rH

O m H rH rH H

CM

en
ir\
r-i

->*

vO

t*-

CO

ir\

0^

-P

H
(h CD

H en
h
CD

H en
U
CD

r-i

en

H H en
U
CD

0^
rH

0^
rH

in
rH rH

in ON
rH

rH

rH

en

H en
U
CD

en

H
,g

H en
t-<

en

H cn
u
CD

Cm

co

at

U
CD

^
CD

u
CD

I P<
CD

CD

,2

CO

e CD U

.Q

s CD O
CD

1 e
CD

ja

^>

CD

s CD O
CD

,a

e CD O
CD

e CD O
CD

^>

a CD o
CD

i
CD

^>

e CD o
CD

-P

CD

CD

CD

17

-P W> H

en

Q
U
CO

a) CD

(0

C O
En

to

St

a>

vn

*
pH

o o H
to to

en
fi
r-i

o
en
rH
r-\

o s H
to

o
to
rH

NO

vn
to
OI
OI CM

CM

a H
Oj

O
1

SI o
*h

O xO H en vn
to

in

vn

sO

vD

vn

to

I>

*
H
rH

st
O!

en

vn
rH

Eh

H
st en
rH

H
H

5
1

CD

is
rH rH
CM

H o H
to

H
e>
rH rH

rH

rH
OI

3 3
rH

t)^ aj M C
co

+>

H m

p
CD

(P-H O
0> IK

& H
en

H H O

o
Pi OI I>

e>
rl

vn

O OI
OI

O en
8^

~* in en

EH rH
OI OI

H
CO

en
rH
EH

en

3 3
P3

O
B

si
fH CD

>

&
Oi OI

rl

en
CM

OJ

to

in

P &&
1

en

to
iH

I>-

l>
rH

o rH
en vO VO
V

O OJ
vn
-tf

OI

en
vn O en
k

t>

en
CM

P
w>

(0

O fg O
EH CM

en
V

rH CM

rH rH OI
i

iH
CD (S

o A
CM OJ

O en
CM
v>

en sO VO
i

to

O VO
r-i

to
v>

ch

o
O CM o

o st
*k

#h

OJ

OI

OI

OI

OI

en

en
to in
CM

en in
cn
CM

-P J3
t>0

CO

CO

rl <D

O
l

a o
fn

NO in vn

VO en

in

to

^f

lO

EH

H
OJ

H
en
to
OI

H
to
iH

O H

en

VO

l>

l> sO

H
I>
~<t

o cH

I>

en
to

H
CM

OI

CM

c 8

fe

H 3 ^> S
*-

ID

* st
to en
c-

vn
OI

l>

cn
en

st en

en

~* vn en

c-

en
rH

st O st

in

st
vn
-<t
CO

3
in

H
O
tkO

J3

tj ^3

to

CD

fH

CD

-H
CD

O
EH

cn

o en

en

3
to

H m

9 3 4 3
to
OI

u
H H

P
CO co co

o
E-<

P
O O

c
CD

P S fH o

* o
H vn H 3 O
to C*

vo
to

en

en

H VO

IS

vO

vO

t>

8 t>

vn
oi

H
rH

c-

to vO

CM

l>

45
CD

nd

CO CO a)

CO

Ph
1

S
O

CD

,a

*
to rH
o%

to

H vO
fJ to

rH

to

is

o to
sO

to
e'-

q H
to

-a
crt

01

-p
co ri

-q ^3 S to CD iH

sD

H VO
*k

to 0^ o %w o st s

to to to
fc

r-i

3
k

H nD
k

l> vO

en

o in

g ^5 H +>

9k

EH
CO co to

en

Cn

en

en

-<f

st

vt
St en sO

in
rH rH to

in vn en
rH
k

v>

Nf>

VP H TI
TI
trt

rH

M a> u
al
fl)

p
o
EH

O
1

s fH O

Hk
C\

to
OJ CM

Vt
k

st
t>

CM
v>

st
to

st

to
v

H
*

^ en

en t

vn
r=
0t

p O
crt

Eh

OJ

OI

en

* en

en

en

st
k

a
CD Ih

C
CD

vt

-<f

-i

ja -p

3 a .a

a h
CD

t>

sO vO

to L>

en

en

to to
>*

e'-

en
vr\

sO in

r-{

to

XX)

VO

vn

O vn
in VO

C~<t

vO

* to rH vO O
J>

m
5a

p
-s -a

n o
-p

o o o H H H
p d Q

H
(h

H en
P

H en
U s o

H VO H H en
U

OI

en in

H H en
(h

H H en
u a o

-* 85

vO

to

rH

u
a
CD CD

H H en
U a o

H
r-\

& H
H en
.2

S5
rH rH

S5

en
rl

en

H H en
U a o

s H

r5

m >
Jl

i
9 p. w

a
a

1
a
o

1 a

a o

u a o

u a o

a
V

5 o a

18

ight
ead-

3
ons

to to
CM

8 en
-t UN
CM

CM

UN

o-

to 8s

CM

CM

CN
CM CM

UN

H
rH
rH

O
rH

to

*
H
85 sO

in

EH

rH

U
as

en

EH

O
1

f-l

o
Eh

H 4 on

ft!

H UN
cn

<n UN

u^ H

ON vO

-<r

-4-

8 g
8 H
UN
nO

g en H
H
to to

en

a u

B
s
i

&
Eh

<D

o o en -t
en
to

r-

en

vO

-*

-t UN

58

^t
t-

nO
l>

H O rH

-p

a u
H

HO

un

UN

rH
CM

*
CM CM

rH

en

UN

ON

en

3
en ON

cq

28 O EH
a u
is
1
1

-* ITS

-tf

-t

en H

CM CM

CM

en

vO

vO UN

&
EH

ON H

C\J

CM

-t

UN

UN

vO

ON

3
9> QN en

en H
to

rH CM

1*8 Q
ra

8
r\

Cn
to
CM

CM

UN
CrH

UN
"5

to

-t
CM

o o

UN H en
en

H en
UN en

~4
CM

^t
c>-

en NO UN ON

to

H
to

en

en
to

<r

4
&0
CO

vO

8
Cf\

UN
to

H
H

CN.

vO

CM

CM CM

3 CM
CM

85 en
CM

UN UN

UN UN
l>
CM

to
CM

3eh
i

H
Si en 85

CM

en

en

1
at

3 o
60
i

(h a>

en

wn en
CM

ON

1
CM

ON

5? -t
nO

3 UN
-<t

en UN ON

A &
H

5 H
+> og H

ri

HO
g
to co

2 o H H O
en 8n
ON

en

o H

en

9
to
<H

H H
vO
rH H

3 9
rH

2
3,

Eh

co

o HO @ O 9
CO (0

a>

28 O EH
.

un
CM

a
NO
CM

en ON

H
UN
CM

rH

a ^ .3
ON
ON
CM
nO,

a
g HO Q EH
&p

3
UN

H
O

E-

^t
CM

~t
CM

CM CM

rH CM

On N
ov

4
k

3 CM
*

CM to

UN
to
*

en

sO

O
*
*lt

O o
UN
nO en

en

9
UN
NO ON

CM

t>

rH

CM

en

en
to

-4 en Sn
CM

H
at

c-

01

P
O
E-<

O
1

89 5
fH

CM O H

vO un
rH

-<t

en UN

So

UN
CM

O ^t
en

CM

CM

Eh

UN

H
8<
CM

H
fe
CN,

3 s
-<t

CM

en
to

en
CM
CM

UN

a u p
S5

&

8 H
H
ON

UN sO
->t

CM

H
UN

vO UN

ON UN

nO

UN NO

en ^t
l>

o
to
to

ON

S 3

H H
.g

UN UN UN ON $ S^ H H H ON H H H H H H $ H *
rH

iH

CM

en

UN

vO

t>

cn

H en
U

H en
U

H en
U

H en
U

H en
f-t

iH

<n

H en
N

r-\

en

H en
U

p a.

to

j_,

a
o
o

4
a
o

1
a

1
Q
o

1
a

4 a
o

4 a

19

tj ^3

Q OH
te

CD

p w 'H
to co

CO
to

g O

m en
O rH
CM

CM

en
t> t>

en

in in

o en * H

CM

~*
00

en O
*

l> en

en

l> r4 00
h

CM

3
00

en NO
rH

CM

en
en
rH
t

vi-

in

to
<D to

vO
CM

vO

-<r

3
a)

en

-<r

8 CO
*9 vO

u\ vO
CM
t

vO
CO

n
*>

^
k

in 00
CM
*k

l>
k

c3 Eh
1

rH

CM

CM

cn

in

NO
CM

EH

e h
S3 ^>

en
rH

CD

CM CM

t>

en

c> in

vO
rH

H
O^

fc

CM
CM

in

in -* en

H -4
-4
t>
l-i

CO a>

P A d boa iH O Eh
1

HI
1
1
1

O H
H

*2.

~* en

CM

p
en -4 en
-4-

H in
c H
k

en
k

CD

CD

IB

5
p
pp

01 CO

O
1

o a U 5 B U p cd

CO
1 1 I 1

-J-

rH

B: -*

o
NO en NO
nO
CM

Eh
1 1 .
'

CM

CM rH

r^

en

SS .a
I

^
CM

p
cp

H W W
CO

1^1 O
s
S

CH

00
H

-* en m o en en m

ON vO C-

3
00
rH
k

vO
CM

00 t>
k

c>
c>
*

l>
CM
k

l>

eh

en in in in
h

in

m
00

P
T3

CD to co

,3
13&

H
1*4

u o
CJ EH
1

to fl

O H

CM

vO
CM

H m
en

^ m
CO

00
CM CM

CO l>

O
H
k

cn
\>

in
k

*S> NO
k

H
CM

CM

en

en NO en in
00 in

ii

p o

H
1

S3 .Q

a u P CD

m 3 en
1

en
00

H
CM

CM

en sO en

* N*

O
ho

-rt

p ^3

(0 ft

CO

o H

en

O -t

o o CM <n
H in

6 H
O
EH

CD "ri

O
EH

r^

c$J
1 1 s I

in
CM

m 5
-4><f

-4

H
,>

CD

OS

^ O O

bO

oh
1

h o
a u
H

CD (0 (0 a)
P-,

CM

o
en

vO

l>

O
ON
l>
t

CD

tiX
aJ

-4
si
(4

l>

O iH
fc

cvO

O
+>

OiH O

to

W>

tn

EH

H* H
CM

nO en
CO

nO
rH CO
s

CM

* H
t>

m sf
k

O
CM

in
vO

-t
l> l>
k

<n
*

CM

in

i>
rH

3
cn
CM
VO

o
EH

O
I

82 O
Sh

H CM
CM

H
CJ

NO

m CO H k
H
k

00
So

\0
*k

rH

in

in
t

Eh

rH

en

vf sO

NO

On

k r-i r-i

s u
S3 .O

CD

m H
o
St On

en

CO t>

rH

CM CO

en

Pi

*
-^

51

in in

-*

ON
00

O 8*
00
c5n

*B

H H cn
P a
CD

o m H
cr.

in $ H rH

CM

en in
rH

in

vO
r-\

t>
r-\

CD CD CD

^ rH rH
H en
U
CD

in ON

rH

rH

en

H en
fe CD

rH

en

H en
fn CD

H en
U

H en
U

en

H
M

H en
rl CD

U
CD

h
CD

u
CD

,2
il CD

.a 73
CD

.a

O
CD

a CD O
CD

.a

a CD o
CD

,0

g CD O
CD

.g

a
CD

^ e

CD

A a n

CD

A a
CD

CD

CD CD

CD CD

a CD o
CD

CD

CD

CD

20

q
U
to

1 - a ^3 3 bo CD -H

w H
O
e-<

sO
CM
ir\

to

-^

$
p>

iH to to

to

>

Os

s
to
CM

5s

01

O o H
sO

-<r

CM

Os

H
vT

H
r\

H
sO W\
iH

rH

01

3
a)

* C3
1

H
In

vO m H
fc

s>

sO

OS
en sO

vO

fc

&
rH

H k

3
CM rH

55 .a
1 -a j3 <a bo

3
oi

m O H

ON

o H

O H
i>

en
PJ rH

iH

en O H

Os

H H

to
Pi
CM rH

CM CM iH

a HO Q Eh
S=

m en -4 H
O en
CO

t>

!>

-*

-*

Os sO

to

O H

en

H CM
to

01

-4"

-4

-*

sf

en

to
-sf

s>

6 3

18 ah
.

t>

3
a

&

E Fh 3
S5 ^>

3
to

CM

CM

<N

CM

CM

H
Os Os en
CM

H
en sO
CM

st

sO

+3 1 TJ J3

vO

01

w
.fl

1JP8 Q Eh P
01 S3

k
rH

H en
9\

vl-

r>
CM
k

O
-<r

to <n
CM CM

to CM
CM

Os sO

CM CM

en

-4-

r> to

-4
k

to
CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

Os
<2

H
CM
*

5b H

O
1

P U o
Eh

f> & sO V\ m A
rH

-4
sO
T>

m O en
ir> ir\

-<t

sO
v

to sO
k

sO en
c-

sO 3
5

rH

*h

rH

rH

H
CM

>,

4 Om 8
CM CM

sO

3
55
1

&

So
CM CM H
tX)

m 8 O en
i? to

5t
CM

CS.

s CM
sj-

C>
CM
ir>

O O
en sO

en en

en

3 en
rH

in en en O
CM

sS en
en
r>

"6

o bo _ u

B8
H

m3 HO O Eh F
c5 01

m fc m
rH CM

O -4
sO to

C--

vO

sO

^f

r> rH sO

sO

in
<H

8 9
a)
1

IS O
O
<D

a
i

fc

sO en sO

OS vO

8s

o o

CM

sO

s
8
Os to
CM
k

eh

01 01 a)

Pi

e u 3
.>

en

H
in

to to

os
to
c5s

*
J> to

at

Ss

en sO to

-e
i*3

CM CM

sO

H
en

vO
to

gtfg a eh

sO

o
sO

en

to

en

rH

SJ

m
CM

Os
-4-

en

-4
en to

-4
en
en

-4

in en

in sO -t in

H
0]
+>

01

O
1

gg u o
EH

o
CM

rH

en
CM

t>

3
h

00 to
*

Si
^

So

OS
<ft

o st
9%

o
sO
k

o o

3
-4

CM

CM

CM

CM

en

en

-st

H a
6 Ih 3
.o

in

~4
os

8 m
O

8
ir\

H O

Os

vs.

-*
en

&
irs.

vrs

en
Tv

vn in sO

So

in

to

o
in

o\ os
rH

cH

CM

^ Qs o^ OS H H H H H H
H en
U .a B o

>t

irv

l>

ITS

Ss
rH

8 H
H en
U ^> B o

^ H
H en
u ,a B o

to in Os

H
rH

S 3

H
U 2 a

H en
(h

H en
U .g a o

r-\

en
IH

H en
U & a o

H en
U
.a

H en
U ^i B o

en

p. A

1 a
a

a
a

B o

A3

u B o

21

Q
u
bi

1 -P t! Q 3 bo tH

os fl

H tn
iH

co

Eh

en

ON Ha O

C>-

CM

UN ON

ov

C\

sf

->*

>*

*k

CO cUN

H UN
CO
*k

CO to

CM

UN
k

3
to

UN

UN

vO

vO
CO

r-

to

8 h O EH
B U 3

E o
Ok

CM CM

3
k

ON SO
*.

en

o o

c3 CM
mk

3 en UN O
E'k k

CM

en
k

o UN
*k

ON
to

ON
*

UN en UN
UN

CM

CM

en

en UN en en

en

en

-4-

-*

Eh

St

S3 ,a
1

3 CM
rH

-4
UN
CM rH

ON
CM

H en
vO

>

vO en

Sn en
CM

CM

3
ON UN
CM

st
CO to en

in Fh

1 bo C HO O
E-i

S
On en

C-

vO

H 9
CM

2T

3 a
CO ON

8^ UN

ei

a
.

83 O
Fh

un -4

CO

ON
en

CM

CO

en

H
O CM
CO

ON

UN
CM

3
en

eh

S3 .a
i

Fh

ON
rH

vO

vO

H
UN UN

CH

CO

CO
rH

en
CM

H en
en vO
k

3
i

+ bo

"S

w J
Ph

HO EH
2
-p
co

O UN
UN
k

rH

CO CO

-4-

vO
k
k

UN
b

UN

en

en ON
CM

c^

en

en

* m

3k
en
CO
CM

Pi

en
k

en
CO

<t

-t

UN
Es
k

a
01

few

T3

bo H

s,

01

sp

g@ oD *<
w
fe
PL,

CO 3 o

O
1

? s fc

H
t

CN
k

^ en
h

Crt

CM
*t

* CM
CM

CO
CM CM

O
en
k

UN
k

en
t

UN
k

o H
rH
k

Eh

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

en

en NO en

In
Ct,

H
H
Ct)

S3

3 .O

to

rH

vO
CO

H
CM

CO

UN

ON UN
fe

CO

ON

NO

rH

s
CO CO

2 3 3
So

CO

01

ttfl

cd

CO
Eh

o DO U geS
H P <#

rrt

bo d HO

rf3

at

g
en

en

P a

Eh

H <H

z <o
OS

9 SP a a O 0)
H

Fh

O
1

SB o
Fh

en en
rH

O^

o H
CO

3
CM

en H

-<t

NO

t--

9
CM

en
rH

en a H UN 3 a H

UN

UN

UN

CM

Eh

o 2

05 01 0}

S h 3
S3 .Q

en

CM

PN

-* en

-4-

en

en

en en ON
k

CM

en

-* en

en en
CO CO
k

H
r^\

p*

O H
a)

HO

EH
01

bo

c!

H
*

3
c>

3?
CM
#

NO

8
\

vO

CCO
CM

CO

CO

8 H O
ON

en 3 O UN

ON ON UN UN
0k

o rH

f%

H H

9
ON H UN
t

3 4
en

P
O
Eh

88 h o
C3 Eh
1

-*
*k

UN

c-

<*>
\

o c-

*
#fc

c^
\

o o

o
o
NO
Vk

UN

-*
en
t>
h

3
k

o UN

-st

s*

*l

Tk

UN en

UN

9k

s>

t-

C-

CO

ON

CM

3 .o

&
H H H
Fh

CM si

ON
ON

# %
H UN
ON
rH

o CM o H

NO UN

O H H H
Fh

CM

UN

r^

rH CM

to CO
CM
k

H
NO
rH

iH

O o
on

ON
rH

H C^
rH

H H en
U o

ON

UN ON
iH

CM

en

->*

H en
Fh

H en
Fh

H H en
u

cP

UN ON

H H en
Fh

UN UN ON

C-

cSn

r-i

en

H en
U

H H en
Fh

C^

CO UN

ON

H
rH

n
U o

i
1 o,
<8

1
a

o
f=t

i
Q
o

1 a
o

1
O
o

22

" bo

3 HO a eh

m vO O Cn
CITv
k

O $ -* t> rH

SI

l> tst
v

sf O

l>
CM

-<*
k

en l>
CM
k

O H
en

>n
n
Ck

-4k

kj

CM

CM

CM

en

en en
CM CM CM

m
i>
r-i

en

en

en

n u

01

O
v>

>
rH

^
a)

EH

OH
1

?g O
H

in en
CiH

to
ir>

to to
r-i

ITv

St

vO
rH

l>

tf\ if\

o^

in o en H O
CM CM

-<t

H
Tk

CM

CM

CM

i 3 u e .a

-<t

CM

n
CM H

CM

H
IT>

"
CO
r-i

to rH
r\

a CM
o cH

vO
CM CM

CM CM

8 8 rH
r-i

en to
rH

#
r-i

HO Eh w
01

* &o

en
rH

vO
i>
r-i

to

t>
r-i

O H < en CM
C~-

to

ir\

9
en

vO

en
<4^

l>

83
a
1

to

H O O O * H H
GO
CM

to
rH

O H

<t

o
CM

rt

CM

CM

3
3
PQ

H
S5 .Q
1

fn

en

n
CM

O en
NO
CM
k

to
CM

8
nO
i>

-*
CM

to
CM

sX>

r-i

en

*
en en in
k

-4 >n en
k

P
P

en

l-rfg

<n

o m
l>

f\

Q
.2

H
NO en
CM

8 *
H
en

en en
CM
k

r-<t

ITk

H
k

CM
k

en
k

& -*
x

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

sa

****
CO

A bO
H
(D

T3

OH
1

n co a p pi u o * 3
.a

C\ O-

H H

m nO H en
i-j

l>
<r

H
lTk sf
r-i

en

VTk

H
rH to
CM

O H
CM

ITS

en
>r\

irv

H O
T\

O t>
sO
rH

vO
CM iH

in

ft

3 o

H
H

a
o
H
i

%Q

O H en 8 en m en CM CM
m H S CM
r-i

rH l> CM

CM

l>

O
ft
to

O O CM
en

nD

H en
8<

CM

8
01

-p

Eh

s o

3
o8

m3 HO Eh
?

vO

r-i

CM

H
Tv

Pi

3
rH rH

to

r-

o > W g O
rl

II o
C3 En
fc

en
CM

CM CM CM

H
rH

en
rH

o en
H

rH

3
to
rH

o in

CM

en
rH

01 a) PL,

^ *j
1

-*

a
sO

CM

en

O en
vO
to

H CM
en en
k

O H H FrH
r\

ON

rH

H
CM

o H

+2
**

x)

Q
rH
a)

&p d HO

eg

S
k r-i

**>

to

EH

en
k

vO
ITk

~<t

en
k

^
k

to

-sf

-*

rH
*%

$ 1 m
\0 vO

ITk

tf\

T\

f\

ir\

vO
ITk

01

O
r-i C--

to

P
O
EH

&EH

SI
a h 3
1

&
k

4 O
-<*
k

T\

NO

CM

en
k

>r\

en

en

en

k en

en O en m

vO
lo
*

en

O
m
-4-

en
k

#\

en

-st

vt

O
<*}

CM
^0.
St

.a

rH

y> o> ^*

ITk rv

>r\ vjXTk

O Vt
ITk

o>
rH
iTX

en

ir\

en
ir\

O
n)

>

ITk

in

m
to

St

O 2> O rH
rH

O o H CM en -* nO tin m O in o H rH O u\ o H rH O O O O H > rH H H
st
if\ IT\

lf\

r\ xr\

r-i

rH

2 o

p a, w

U -S a

en

rH

en

H en
U ^ a o

rH

en

H n
U ^ a o

H en
h ^ a o

H en
U ^3 a o

rH

m
& a
rl

H en
JQ

H H en a
Q
U
o

in (^

u 2 a o

& a a

U
u

U ^ a o

U a o

23

12 ^ t3 .a to

t>
VTi

^*
CM

O
in

<D

O
EH

CM

m en m
o in
en en

to

CM

to vO

o
S5

CM o o CM O o
*

^Q.
-<f

v)

CM

5 en
k

to
t-{

in
k

to to

H
k

rH

rH

H
H

rH

rH CM

rH

m ca w o a
C3 eh

O.

O
H

s*

T\

-4"

in
rH t

vO
to

Cto

^
en

t>
iT\

O
rH

a to

CM

s
a<
en in in

en
CM

H O CM
vO
CM CM

01

3 .o 3 m a iH O O H F

rH

4 3
CM
CM

-4-

to

to

So

8 rH
N0
CM

en

t in
CM

CM

to
CM

vO
C>
CM

in H en

to

to

vO en

9
en

o in
-4-

NO

10

to

8 w
1

83 h o
i

CM m o 3 H 3

to to
rH

**

a
s*
-4-

o in
CM
CM

~sf

)n

in

->*

S 5
Hf ho

iH

Cn

5 $ 3
O to o en
H
H
vO
rH

en
en

>*

^ $
en

rH

in

n u

.g bo H
ft

HO Eh
*

cn

-<r

CM

rH

s
rH

8^

e>
rH

H en H
to

en o $ 8

&
CM

m o
rH CM

H
*
So

H
>*

H
NO

CM

a
i

8g
eh

m O o
H
in

fc
rH

vO
CM

sO

CM CM

en
CM

H
CM

O
CM

to to

rH

en

en

8 -*
H

H
CM

H
00

rH

rH

H
in

l-\

g 3
1

en

en
*o.

3
en
to

36
H P
c*j

O w u

rt

+2
.c!

HO q Eh
ra

CO

w>

H rH

Si

o H

en
to rH

-4 3 3 3 8 en m t> vO ^o H CM w ^? o to H rH H rt H rH

O in

en

S O o
<D to CO a) PL.

a* H

8
53 Eh
1

H 9
vO
CM

rH

O 5 O CM

CM
CM

en

O
CM

to
^}

H H CM
en en
CM

r-i

in
rH

CM

to

to
rH

s
j <D

^ 3
.a

H en

H en

CM

en

t cn

en

O en
*&
-<r
k

t>
CM

t>
CM

+> 1 13 <*
tap

ra

en en

g
EH

v>

O o O en m o en en C

CM i>

to

-t
*

in
t

nO en

to

en H
k

8 en
k

H m
l>
>

V.

ra

CM

CM

CM

en

en

en

en

-kt

-kt

-*

H
-P

h o O En
1

1
a u 3
.Q

3 8 en o Ha H
-*

to

en S CM O *
CM

ITN

CM CM
k

CM

a *
CM

to
"*
k

in
k

5J
i>
k

in e>
k

vO
CM
k

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

en

en
VfN

c-

vU
l>
irs

t in

8^
r>

to

O in
en
rH

vO
t-

in

H r-

in

in
vO

to in

tf

to

in

o o O H CM -* en in m o H H t> O H o o H rH
ITS

in O H
H en
u

-t

in

in in in in O O O H H H H O

c-

to

4?

rH

05

.O

H en
U
9

H en
U

H en
U

H en
U

H en
U

H en
U

rH

r-i

en

en

en
(H

U
-a

i a.

CO

a
Cl

i
Q
o

1
Q

i
a
o

24

1 - Q rC 3 bp Q) rl

to

Q
2
CD

d O

$ CM
k

NO
rH

-*
k

CO

^J
fl

CO en

^8
-^t

So
CM
wt

en
>4-

l>
V

vO
k

CM o CM
v

rH t>
1

9t

CD E-I

-4-

r\

ir\

sO

sO

P
to

c-

t>

t>

CO

CO

H
co
k

-<r

3
a)

CO
k

-^ en
Wk

f^L

CM

v>

CM

SI O
fn

3
v

vO en

en
v >

s
s

EH

C3 EH
1

CM

en

en

-<f

-*

-4-

~*

^
T\

en
CO
ir\
tp>

rH

S3 CT>
k

ITv

V\

3
J5
1 +2 T3 J3 3 hO

rH
CD .>

tn
-4"

8
l> t>

->*

o H in
CO
v>

H CM
ir\

v>

CM

rH
vr ir

CM
VT\

en
lf\

~4" ir\

O
tf\
VT\

rH

rH

l> UA CO

CO VN

CO

CO

u
CD

CD ri

o 9Eh * o c fH o
co co co

O rH
ir\

rH

-<t

vO sO

CO CO

vO

CM CO ^ O 8 CO o t> >
IT\

H
CO

O O O

rH CO

CO

en
-4-

CM
IT\ <t

-*

o I>
CO

-*

o o
IT\

CO
-4"
ir\

n)

en vO

H O vO

H CM H

O o
H O

w\
k

I>
ir\

l>

CO
rH

CJ

H
CD

3
sz;

CO
^>
CO

<n
tx>

s CM H
k

rH

en O CM

o CM
PT
l>
*|

H CM
CM
t^~
*

en
CM CM

en
CM

CM

^
k

en
ITk

CM

^
CM
-4-

CQ ft CD

O Q OB
to CO H

T3 rC 3 hp CD "H

o en
en

en
CM
ir\
i

81
CM

o
c.

o CO

O
v

CO

H
k

H
t>

s vO
\

P ^5
ho

H
CD

s O
1

CO

nO
00

H O en
k

P H H H O rH O O O
iH

en

9
vO
CO CO

H
rH

CM

CM rH

rH

3
t>

CM rH

en

r-i

o
9%

en

C3 eh

O
H
CM

o
H

o
H
sO

9%

o
CM CM

o m

H en
CM

en sO

O
IT\

en

3
O
&
ir>
9%,

rH

o
o
rH

o
CO
rH

#w

o
H O

*%

3
o
CM
V

CO

o
1

e 3 IS

u
CD

CM
u-\

c-

I> * vO H H H vf en
ir\

ir\

irv

if\

-<t ITN

ir\
r-i

-4-

CO
-<f

rQ

H
CM

rH

H
l>

rH

H
CO

rH

gcS

P ? s HO EH
*ii cd
tio

$3

3 $ en cCO
IT\
k

en -^ en
CM

3
CM

O
CM

-t en

fe
rH

CD

l> H CO H

t>
CM

-^
85

to
rH

O
rH

v>

CO n vO
rH

H
en

H -P <#

to

a h H 9 2P s a O CD

83 u o
C3 EH
1

H 9
k

vO
CO

CO

O
*

O O

O
ft
CM

vD ?i

cb
V

O en
k

CM

Cn

en

en

en

n
CM

O
k

rH rH
k

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

H
CO

at

'O

to

CO a)
PL,

s u 3 CD
Ses

&

O in
en

en
CO
CM

O t>
CM

cnO
CM

-tf r\

CM CM

-4-

CD

en

CM

CM CM

CM CM CM

t>

H CM

CM

O CM
-<
CM

O rH
CM t>

IfN

-a .a
CO
01

to

1 " 13 ^5

CD

bo H
CD fB

to rf

m CO
\

t>

ft vO

Eh

rH CM

H^ CM

o en
CM CM

-<r

C--

ir

o
C--

vO
t> CO
V

-4-

o
r-\
0t

8
k

CO

rH
#

O k
CM CM

rt
en
k

H +J
+3 H -p
00
CD

0) t>

l>
#k

en
k -<t-

rH
CM
r-i

rH CM

CM CM

CM CM

en
CM
-4-

en
CM

CM
tf\ r\

<n Tl
Bl

H
Qj

fi
crt

to to

t>
to

+>

o
e-i

O
1

o c h
EH

CM

O
k

fc en nO
rH

$ CV

nO

CO
ITv

CM t>
i

en
i^k

CM

CO
h

vO
rH

vO
rH

xO
rH

vO

vO

$ t
t>
r-l

H O
v>
t

O rH
N

CM

-P
ti
to

(l)

vO
k

H O
CM
if\
IfN
v

t> rH

i>
r-i

CO rH

CO
<-t

u
al

* p

(i>

o
-p
0J

3 s&

s u
CD

CO

O m
*>

H
l>
ir\
9%

ir\
v>

CM

en
ir\

H O
IT\

CO

vO
CM
CM

lf\

crH
u-\
k

en
VT\
k

M
CM

UA
k

CM
IT\
k

CM CM
CV

0] a)

VN
k

Go T)

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

CM

O en O H
P a
a)
CD

o o
T-{

-4-

H
U

H en
h
CD

O O H H en
U

rH
ir\

CM
ir\

en

ir\

O rH
U
CD

o H
u
CD

O H
H en
u
CD

ir\

^ in O o
vr\
r-i r-i

-p

s c o ^
o U

vO

l>
vr\

CO
tf\

VTN

O
IT\
r-i

O rH
rH

o rH
^

rH

a>
fit

H en
,o

H en
^ e
o
CD

H en
-i

r-i

en

H en
u
CD

en

H en & B
<D

3
H

>

i)

M S P &
CD

CD

u
CD

u
CD

>

,g

s CD O
CD

CD

CD

63 CD CD

^Q

CD CD

o
CD

S CD O
CD

>

CD

e O
CD

,g

S CD o
CD

1
CD

rQ

1
a>

CD

CO

o V

S CD O
CD

<D

O
CD

-p

25

s-aa -H O O g EH
<D

9 On
H

en vO
CM

a en

O O
to
CM

to

Qs
sj-

NO
CM

to i>

vO
CM

H en
b

en

O en 3 3
b

CN.

to

vO
in

01

O in
CM

to

m o nO & o CA o o in CM
5 a o CM to m On -4 a vO o CM
*> b

to

to en

m 5 H
to
CM
-*

-tf

no nO
in en ON
CM CM

CM CM

vO
CM

en

n>

Ijb

nO

8 O
CM

ON
in
CM CM

m E>
CM

en to
CM

3 O
en

CM

CM CM

CM

en
-4-

s-aa -H O Q jgE-4
CD

ON

nO
CM CM o c-

*
en
CM

CM

en
to
CM CM

to
CM

a
C?

o
en
to to

m to o
en
-a-

CM

H
vO

nO

8 a ^ C3 En

to r-

H in
to

O H CM
CM

CM

CM

en en vO
to

to
1

in in

CM

vO in

in

vD in

& in
-J-

P?
no

en in vO

-<?

t>

9 O
w HW
ft

sa O
iH

"S

H C>

a o
b

in vO in

g>EH

3 a
H
b

ON
to

NO en

a
to

%
to

en
to

CM

in
b

ON vO
to

H
o in
1>

en

ss

in
to

to to

01

8
EH

a
si

CM

en

o to
2.8
-t
to

m ON
cm

3
vO vO
sj-

On in vO ON

to

ON

o in o
vO in
CM

Sn
CM

in ON
cv

o in
CM

CM

in

en in NO

ON
in

H nO
ON in
Fl

H On
-4
ON ON
Sn

H l>

in

8s
b

ON

ON
to

ON en ON

ON

wS
j
ft

o to H 3
55 en

to
#b

H NO
CM

a
Sn
CM

?J

uo 3

HW <w X ft

3
rl

Q)

-H

|eh

en en
On
V.

ON
vO l>

in >* SO

ON ON

in in
b

Pf
en

a?
On
vO

3
NO
in
CM
b

vO

-P c

0}

en

H
8n
to

in

CM

l>
*b

en

CM

^ C3 Eh

en

8
b

P?

S a
a
o en H
in
b

to

to to

9
to

to

ON

a
ON H en

a
o en

o H

O H
in ON
CM

ON

O H

o
vO

5h

a en
in in no

g CM
H
in ON

H in
CM

in i>
CM

iSa O
Q>

sO
b

vH

H O o to
o

H
b

in

ON

3
ON
Pi

to to
vd'

a en

55

en

on

to

H
o
EH

i>

a o
vO
b

a
to
cm

a
-^J-

a
in

in H

CM

a
in

H CM
to to

OS
to

8
in
to

in
b

3 3
^ a H H
to

*b

<3 Eh

to in

en

H H O

On
to

to

ON
cb

CM

ON

to

58 CM
b

O Cen

en On
IN

in
nO
b

On
CM
b

nO

a
ON ON ON

in in a a 3 3 3 H H a a

H
-3
Pi

ON

O in On H

H in ON H H en
&

in ON

CM

en in ON

-tf

in ON

in in On

no in on

in
On

to

en

en

H en
u

en
Fh

I
CO

M
iS <D

S a
<B

1
t)

<D

o
26

a>

Q>

(.0

3 o
EH
to

Q 4 HWrl
cm
*

ir\

'3'

s
CU

CO

o en

38-*
uncm
fc

c--covo

c-

&
o
a

I
tn

un
CM O

cm
~4

-O

jN

H o
CD
g

& o

to

o o

H to tpsO to H C-vO CM
it

n
en

-<t

to

1.8
a o
EH
CQ
CO

tn

3^
H^OH o co un UNsQ cm
*

ir\

to
s

H
CM

CM

un

1 a a
E?

335 H
tn sO CO cm
* v

& o
1
1

'3
fe

Oi

s to
H
in

o cm
to
to
CM

O C^O O O
CM
*>

tn
to

8
sO
CM
1

3*
CD

HON O
CM

UN
r-T

*v

H
1

Ijs
i o
EH
CO

o un
to t> t>

UNCO

'ct

'

t*
c^N

un

&
2
tu

-*

h H en stOO^ H I> CO H O O CO H\OtO HH


C*

to voorCM C *v

en

*r\

OsO O t> CM UN HvO vO


k v

-<j-r- cm

CM

C0

*\

**
en

HO UNO

vO en un
t> CM CM CO vO

CM vO CO

~-

UN O CO H CM

8 3^

CM -<jen

HH

O <0>H^ tn

vO

HH fHq H
*

UNO

p ,d
H
to
tn

OJ

vO
c>
9%

OiAO^
cm cvD CO v>

o un tn CM UNO
CO to CM

1
OS

**.
*

UN tO en en to tn r~-

EH

1 8

S*
a
i

a H
\

t> c- tn

cm un un ^T UN CM

oo o o tn en
CM

.**

UN UN
*>

CM CO UN
C**

CM -3-tO

CD

C-

CM

CM

m$
OCOvD

UN OHO CM
*v

--i-

O CO H UN H
k

t> envO C-rH


k
r-j

OU\lf\
#k

O unH
envO
*

-4-

H^

tn tn
tn

Q -! CO OtOvQ
CM

CMsO -<
CM rH

vo vj-cn

cnH

HH
UNH
h

a o
EH
tn
tn

o o

$$3
k l

OO
* * *\

\OtMCCM CO
I t

tn UN UN

OvO O

O
t

u o

H O CM

ih

UN

o cm tn un en en cm o o HHH
%

cm O en to O UN cm H H

Hnc3vO *** cm -*cn

t> CM UN

CO UN
k

(MriO
%

-<C^

CM

vfl irir\

OA

O- CM CM CO UN
*

O
*

vO UN CO

3?!^

HH

CO

tn

en

o H

UNH

H H9

c%

H 5 o
EH

p
.fl bfl

H
ta

tn

& un H On
H
to

UN vTH en C- ~cr
-tf-sfCM
<*

CM t- ON to en cm

OH en
o to o OvD en
CM

tn en to

UNCO
k

O
o
*

**

9\

CO ON CO

cm

tnvO

***

tno

CM CO UN UN UN C CM -vfCO

CO tO vO
-J-to

13 Eh
cvi

On CM

-*
i-h

**

CM

O H H rH

O UN O OiHNt

**

*v

rv

O CO CM H UN H H
t> t>

O CO > H

UN
v>
eh

-4 oH UN en CM
*v

K M

HH O

*v

rH tn

CM

II 3

o H o to

CM i-l -dCM CM

OCO

vO

no ~*tn

en

unh
CM

CM

tn <?

H $ o
EH bo

.3
r

ra

a M
cci

ri

M
tn

s CD

a
J3
tp

ep

1i B

U 3
tu to

^5 P
<u

NO a
H U

M
Q)

H
fl
cfl

ctj

P
0)

crt

a
ccj
ct}

51

-H

-ri

a>S

U o

fi tu

H
tu

U
<j

50

P OH
csj

an a

*tt 111 o h
qa
ta

H
Ph

tu

fe

27

H a o\

H
<o
oi
-tf

CO

r\naH ovo o\
J H H rHtC
S>;
<nr\

a i.
2> o>
-=t

3
3,

21

3 o CQyJmmm o H (tu mvo j H to Q f-Tt^rOPO Sg^ 3 wwvg

OJ ONI1T\5| J-

'

'

nO\
ON-=J-

'

PI.

cTcvi

"3P row
a
'

gas ~^~$j
OJ ON -*

'

ONNO

00

& K
ONt Sr-(
iTN

lTN-*\ VD ONON

CJ
-=T

CO J4

if\

ooj

t-oi on

tt<

,Sffi
i

tfNNO O*

-*
On

CJ

n iT\0J
ONtfNC

OJ x> ON 35

o\

ON.* -* lOAO

H-* ON OJ mf-

J-

OJ

fn iTNrnir\

<noj no\

m Oif\hH

M3

f-n- L<"N-=fOD

!&

'

w 3\s

SA3

'

'

'

'|'

'

'"Si
'

(3

si

& as'
ON

'3
vocom t-vf)
00 -* oo no co
t--

'

mi-* On

O On ON

mmvoco

jp^s:
v
oj
On, coco -* -* ONiTN lfN-*h-*n0D

**g*i
Q
<:

8r
t- J--* t VD oco ro

H(0(0

no

sp oi-ONir\ON
OJ OJ

j5

in

H OQVO

Q t J- HVO
OnQ
oi ON roi?\ ONrOiTN

NO
NO

t-H tfNIfNU
o\N>cb -f

tfS

vo

h H -* onoj
CVJ i-l

aRp^s

-<<o
r-l

Hco

t-

pi oj cvjvq

ONOJ CO onrnm

MCO

j-

P3*

KB|

co

ON.OJ

lT\H

itnio oj

tf\ovor tr\
ON NO ONH eg
icut*-

HHQHtc-NuS-lcb
o \00fi)[-0
35 p-ijrvvo

'H4HO)

O H WnO OJN0 en
tf\ <~*

'CM
CXI

t-ONt-NO-*
ON rH ONNj

h\

mi

00
irjl u\ oitr\ojir\vo

OJ OI

0\0-3-f">0

rlHlf)
1- OJ
r-l

9Pc

$o<3 'P ON tfN_ O H itnoTiv

-* ON ON^

OH^
r-Tr^

noiovo

i>4mm

a 00 ^t**0\Ot-0\
vo o\-* OJO OJ - 1?\ '

qw

oncoitn

MO r-OOMTNONO
-VD
)

l>-00- CI

O-d-

OCO

S 8 en
ONpr

VO^VO Q
-a- <-f

eg

CO^

oj

o\

oj t- qj ovf-H OJ a3 0\i-i

VO<D f-

01 co

H^t
-

on

r~5| x

fi

v>ON

w -*vo

<*^

-\Otf>ir\co
t^ <o oj

4
R
C

OnSco coj-cooon

NOCONirnON

OiAiShS

^ On

MOJ r-

en om

Oi mH cq H
rS-

^3oiR
H
Hi

da
m
rnlob

rnKjD
OJ tfNCO

r^i

28

t- oj

vocO
tf\NO

0\

mmc-

ir\voo\o

u not
i

is as
I

33
.*

a&s

vo I-

01

cO

(o\o

ur\

u\vo

HCOOJ
on oi un -*

-* t-ONH"\
i

oj

itnoj

o\in

p-

o
(O

P9 55 Stag
-=t

CO ON

CO
OJ

tf\ o~s

-*

o vo
rH oj

<

m
ir\

<ONO

d
i

si*
<>
' '

*
PJ^Q

t*

o\

co on on

rot\)H

pv
ON
OJ

-*'-3" cQ'
CO
ON

,<5'

T'
tf\

lN

CO

WOJ m\T\
'

KE
t
i

m
.

S
I

H ft9
VO-4-

IJJ.l
l

icon
l
l

cm

ig

OJ

if\

CO

CO OJ

& "ftS? H OO

'

'

'ft

CO
'

'

(J\

'

'si

roco-a-cooj
no i ir\o S <m <o^ on
ir\

NO J t voojt-ooj OJ .* j* omtn. .*

wo
tl t--

r-w^o
ON-a
if\

-a-p-ooioi

<>Sj-

oi

3\8o^> oj

Sshh
r-f

oi

no in

ncoo
US CO
ir\
CXI

o\oo
01 IIS

it*

mfc-NO

rr> r

t . [mH on<5 m 91 p
tf\ ir\

H r-IcO

t r-NO

NO s&s

vo

u-N

oj oi

t-r fn
OJ

irwo

H
H

mH MHh H tf\co

pNOMf\lT\H

NgOJ OJ ir\SO OI

}R
OJ

Oj^S"^

t-H-N OI

-=t 1T\

III
ON
I I

'

s)

WH
01 ON

ICOO

vo

mo on
\OCO

P-O -*VD-*

1%
I

ON-S

ftpLSSjg
p q foco^t fnfl \o fncq
i?-t^ lf\V>
r-l

O (T\-* moi OIOH W S H m J- H


U"\

CO CO -* -* ir\
55T

CO -H

ONCO

'

mvo

'83
-* OJ

'

ON en P

j*\o
OJ

OI

H-

m
oj

m oj P-

NO CO hOJ VO

oi W ho\H4 OI

oi f-

j-\q

IT\

o> on t
-3-

i
i

VOH t-OH

IfNONJ

m
r-l

R
ifNONCOJ-

coon

en

rn

J-O! t-

p-irs
r-f

q H

-*vo

moi

OJ

H OJ
<o

OJ ON

CO

mr-4

O
POi

voco\o\o

Oi

oio\ohoj

OIOI

HOO\OiA ON ON m H
ONH
^J-

H
ON
CO

t- IfNrH id

rtm
HOI

qvo

O P-H on H m w tr\m Hoo

o
OJ

moNoi o

fOJt P
r-T

M4

mp

VflCDCOOVO

CO VO -* OJ -* ON r rn

\f\

rni-f^ oj O rOCOH O

OiT\0\m

voo-rH^rifN

rn ON jON OI O-

mo
OI

4P- t-Hfo cOj^ntS VOfncOVOPOn 0<DVD 3o bcOvo


8n-*ssi
^f

OJ

01 ONCO CO r-| \3 CO p-p co

t*-HfOQ\H & o
p
rH
i-4

asasd H H >-m
r-l

oi

mmifNO tfN H rn p- p
rn

mir\

^oT^ibS NOH J-

p^ ^ in

pi <:v,o, ,

OH -k

r^SSS OJJ-

III'
ftfi

Iff-:

PiAffiUJCO

ft

29

2
a

sb^'^^SH^a gg
,rt

,,

^^''g
3'

,,

3g'
tO

u a

11

3 gg|

"s-

8P3'

'

MN
I

-*>

ca

QnOsO

on

1J
>

if\

I SI
1

IHHHHift

s^s

#<*

-a

<H

C-

saa

-s

'

'

'3

'

'"ss KS3
>#r-

3 N 5J43
<H \-0
CM CM

'

"

"^a
<-,CM>0

:$

4
t-

>o

ii

g3tf
< r>0

'

H
I

M
I

Jj

CJ

H ^-f>
-*
i

ill

w\

c*v

8
I
I

<|l

IH

00

tf\

R
5

IH
<H C*
S I |
I I

en

cm

iHiir-i

H
o
o

CM

-* CM

PA

>

*~\

iH

--*

a <M
s.

*4 cr-i *-t

^ cHr\v\0 'S^qiHO Mi <a ~4 H *$ ITvPAmS rt & CM


*-(

cam?

r4

R"*wir\
>f\

caoocC> CA

C*-

a H ri CACM >0
-Jr*

il
^ c~ r- d oj r- ^o so c> ia i> *a
s

sw
O m> r> O fA cm %ej

*AtMcAr\
ca

*cn fc-

\0 -*

ca

O cm

cm

vr\ *-*

-*

tOttH^O <a
a

r-1

- rt

0 CM

C\9 TV
rH

rtiA

r\

oiii 38
Of-i>*

iiii\
i

mi

ai

{ft
co
i

-**

in

oiioqi

1
8

# 15
8"
rsuts

fH

r-l

IIIICM

lllll
CM

f-"\

-*

stespssa SR '5 3'


M? CJ

"V

-*CM

T*

C>f*\^*CM

pn;

*A*8 **

8.5

*S
lr\

tr\

coiicMrH

ca

5^9 S^'"*'
r> *a

11

<aJ'
rr\J,

(ACM r*

cm

* w* ot r\ cm -r* t* f>^> *AsO w ia -*(r\*H W\*-t CA


i

CM

tf^O >fCM

tftO^CMIACM

CM

iH *N <A

~^>

O O D

W^.

3
8
t"

3
>>

SfecQ3"S 33*2 v*"a "***$ 0


(A
*H

?%T

CM

ggg^jpa^ SHIP 5
a

9,HS

^ ^^ci^i ^oga-

s
5
-8

3 S

S a
tn

I
i. ^
5

M
~

ill

30

'

'

'

'$
> l

ST'Sa '$
01
l

a**'"
s "*
,rt

sl s aR

j^'

-j}

3
I
I I I

o B"3* S'JS"

3^ a 53"'
' !51 N VN

M P

Oil '';*
MM
I

^'sS
A
I

01

~ M*

,r*

8
n
I

rt

'

0t

r-f

Ito

H VMA

u"\ u"\

n*n

V\

tt

cj

*-*

<|l

im

to

lv\Qn g^

r^qiii ^g

>Dn 1st

-*

'rH

iifNito

oiiiirH

ot

o^vnh

rtftrtiii

no

-~i

lllt*\

a a
(*\ c*\

5X3

'

1-4019

ioiii
1001*1
^^J^f^Q (<\0>Ar(J5

eoiii

SU
B

H
f\

l^n
i-h

IfHIII
H sD ^O O
r-1 i<\

rH

H Q Q >0 (^rlN>AD

OO-^t-Oj T rHrH
f*\

r-( -l n) f*\

<H P% t^)

-^ c*

H f\

*f\Oc\t
C*"
<D
r-.

^|^

Cv

CO

U"\

NH

r-t

CV

sO

<M

CO

<H

58 O V
at~

^"""ss
M

8^"*
11(11
I

jj(~*&8

^^^

rt

2?5

S^'
(l(

.J
a)

ffil^P

IS
' ' '

(M

1(111
I I I I I

Ik,

-4

r^3
H
I I

.H

llOtll
jr'?r .A rH

lllll

lllll

III!
~*a {<
rH

N,, S8 e'''' iH c\
"*''ag e''''

^psa
rH

'$3 rH^I
sg'as

"SB4h 3

s'ss.a

"sss

s~*s'

El c a

i!

^ssss -vs aapas ssss-* sspq^ 3$s'


ft e
fc

^ D 2f
(X

^2
rH

,<

^ rt '<
(\J

Heaof
CCH
J*-

i\-'j)ffln
r-i

joi-no
O fPA

rH

C>

-.*

nnr. P^ rH H

^IfVrH
>*

^T PN

a^apjs

g^sa s^aaa

s?$-*~

SRasa

!X54*

n
* B

5I

SI o

il

n
H HP

si

III J lllll M
rH

rH IH rH

-> r5 rj .4 j|

X XX

iH

6 o

5C
2 OT ^
ft.

u a

2*

O. O,

ilflj tti & M


ft.

O. O.

Ui

CO

Ul

3>H

31

3a8i

'^"^"^
i

8? R

'

'

^-'
vp ft
'

,cu,,
'SI

'

& ?Ts?
ITNCQSP

co *> on

if\fog mco
"~

oj -* oj

ir

'

'

fc

IT\

CO

oi

(HQfntOJHrHHlf\ Sen OJ
I

J;0\0\

3/

ITS

Ol

J*
01

Oi

CO

-* t

U*v

til

g t

a ro

o\-*

mo*

u>H

tr\

j-

\X>

U"\

On

'

'

s!


ojd-

COVO

OJ

HCJ

(Orl4

fj

VO

.tf-cO

t-Q Asa
j*

* '

'

ico

jy-*

111

<j{

R-*

' '

.-8

if
S
OJ

CO

Q 1A 9^

'

III!
"3
a
fl

(AfO

0> ON

5.

OJ

Jf OJ

&

lltlt

QNr-l

>

n
H
rr

OWO
ii-

vo
OJ

oj- <x>

u
g
i
in

co uS

oi

m f *SmH co HrnoJ-am
ip\ ir\

vooirlcut

CO

(OfOO

oHcocDnniniH

o-4-voco

ir\

ov

t-a-l

-*

voif\f-(

o
oj

vo*cop->onoj

en
oj

f-l

VO co

tr\

If? 3*1

.,

ID
OJ' SVO OJ H Q H (nt-rlw

OJ

'

'

'

-4

S
CO

CO rj

21

0\QOj

Q\0\-3"

O 4

CO
OJ

OJ

N r
v

OJH-^OJ-*
US

OJ

CO QJ -* CO (O

'

VO CO Ov

iT\

'CO

VO ro OJ

<

-^

ON

'

OJ

ir\

vo

u
en ov F&n

CO On ^O On OJ CO ON l?\ OJ IT\

-4-

CO VO CO

if\

CO

H ON PO H OWO
iT\

CO ONOJ

OJITSCOt H OMTNCO

Q H
OJ

VO

Q3

Ql On C rn

oor|(nrVO

lf\

-sropcoQ ojoncoo

co in a? H mvo

ir\

o-

ookp ajt-rnin t cOcO


CO h-VO

trfScO

ojcovoouMrJ H <nd OJ

-=t

cool

f--4" lA

IT\ Q iT\ co cC q>h ir\ ^t oj H-=f

>

H-*'VQ
<-l

oj

if\-* .^ vo

r-J

U"\ hcoi-* 4

t-H 3j"OJ
gj

Q\vo

OJ -* On cy

in

3o

cooj

mt h Hco

ojcovo

j-

^o

-)

tr\H

<u

o
(0

^
q 9
<

o)

S3*

rt

3
c o

ffi

A!
Si

H-H3 u

tDiH

tiHOJ

-ho

-rj

9 q

<d

m h

-p

aj

ASMM

Pn

fiScfln

32

tr^St ir\co eg IfNrH CO

ON On H O

On t . On On .* .* t

<

OJ

QCO

&mm
QJ

ir\ -a-

mjfc-H ON
cnto
if)

limil

IH-tfil

VOfOmiru

l\tf\QV>

IHCOQH

OnOOnQVOI

,H

'CR" as
I

'g
I

OJ

HH

tfN

tf\-* tTv-*

oj3-

m
i

tf"\OJ

IIION h

t-lf\

ICOt-

<5

CD
ir\

KMtNO
oj

IIJ-OO*
u\if\

IA

OJ^<0 m

lf\

ON

<

ONrn-c*

1111m
I I I
I

itrscji*

hw

i\o

co.HGit-1

< i

i i

ny
fnoj
t

oj a

'

-* CO '38
I

P-

co

iii
ri

mm

iiiio
COOJ J-VD
trvoltoi
ff<

tfN

,H H

.3
H\>

VO ON J-

Q m ononH m rH ( O t ONCO
I

rn

CO

On

OCOOJ
f""*

3 *} &

CO

oj

H
>f>

m
oj

h
H Q lT\ Q lf\ mtf\r-OJ-4

ONOJ * &""* H

Q i?Smg\m&\
.-T

ON a

HW
OJ

MA
OJ

Ql Ol UMT\ ON <o^t ^* H

3-H

o h

H <p co l>-_3- Q OJ
u\

HOJ

ON qcojH H CD O <o o

V>

ajojmojcQ
OJ

lf\Lf\-a-

OOV

CO

Kr&

r-i

IJ
P to

II
o

OJ c"

rniTNOJ

H-*

m
III

&

9 o
g

CU

ON

OJ

rj

IQI

<

(i

r-J

iiilrn
iilioj
iir-ioj

tf\

J*

Hilt
i-=riii

Hllll
vo_* t v>
oj

lllll
Jt
i

QHM4
m jon

'

ir$s&

t-aj t -a-

oj

IS
'

<25
i

t-

\&

CO,

cOrH

p ga^^g
Oj co

'sS'

3s

'

CD

i-i

*3

ovo
i-i

JS

HlTNOJ

ovoHrno 5 H H rn
-=r

r-\

ot-HVOJ H\>
t-OJt

3 CO

co ir\_* On.*

OnQ-*HO\ (SHHCUJ-

m^r o rn

o WF-H
oj uS

onno

*-fcoo\ONOJ.
Cf\

roj t-Hcoo

p-Hm

iTNj-jt-coON

o\ -*
o?

itn

.* on f-ON on

On

m on-*
f-T

r*-

UMfAUNH mv
#-T

ST^

PS

oTh*

tf\

on

55

Q IQ

OJ On
ff>

l?S

ON

lf\p rr>-*5B ONOJOJ-4-CO -*

r-OJOh-iTN
t^--* OJ U\
-4

OONOJQONi
r-i i-l

roSS-*

-*

+>

SI
-p
co

ill
no ch

h3o

T*

O MO

fc

Sri-**?

SP'-'^-P

n*

^i
P<

3?a

Sd'i^

?S

*S

33

'

X> -*

A
el

'
1

tA tA

(A CO

Q\H W 3||

I '

I '

vow '$S
!

>-

OJ

'

OJ fO f*

ass

lA

OOl

VO

VO *0

81 ~3

8
r-i
I

irJ

Mvl

a* t
VO CO
S)|

vo

co

-*|-

UNO

OV

ITN-

f- cu vo
CD|

'

j-M

'

'

'

(A

^ Q CO

3"
w\|

iS|S<

T
ojJoj

OQllAlTi

IfN^

tA

lA

o,

OvVO

on

MH4
o

-3-

iA

_*co

ol
oil

cvj

r?Jpo

VOrl

IA

HM
I I

it
Is

rocO

CO CO

3
VO

'

s
OJ|

VO

OnKo

CM

VO

H
mj- vo

1 ' '

a"*
t VO OJ
r

P"tr

>

irvj

rnrH C\ mvo O lA ON on t^-CO OvOJ ON

H ,*

HH

-*t OOJOv
-a-

vo iaoj lA rovo

co

Qirv-4-om H-*H

CD OJ CO _* t co oj oj

CO H Ov VOOOITN

^sia:

t h_*

HfcOCO t^co

CNt-O

n-iov-* CU

t-OJ 0Jv5cO on

OJ vo

HH m H

vo j-

_*_3-Ov-Q

onH H moj ^*

CO

H VO O

m r*\6 04

OJ CO on

co

o OJ rocO j O HOIO _*

-^-3QJ
-3-

rooj fy
\o

mm O
OJ

OJ -* LA t -* OJ

HH

II
cOltAVO r<X> -=T OJ IAH U-WO -<X> -^ oj a t^co mvo .H ^t

-* O -* -* vo ia '"OJ

OJ

O OJ H OJ H QHHO

COH Jt-rn
OJ

COOMHO\ VOO mco J-

OJVOnH

Os

0\|

W
vq

I
ft

vo|

a>

3| -|

Ov

OKO
v3fo

-*

<

.j,

<s|

*-

S|S

'

'

'

'

'

'

Oj

OJ

&3an'

-t^H

f-O

M
OvJ

139
r

mcvi

-* OJ

lf\0JHOV-*
PiA

OMA tm iA
OJ

OJ

H
VOIOJ VO Q>-* CO co r- Qco rnvO
CVj|OJ|OJ

OJ

o
OJ

^S-5B9SS
(

vo

lA 'I
-H

CO lA
cSl

OJ lA OJ OJ

rntAVO IA
oniH

8t|

.-I

OJ

iA
OJ

O OJ O OJnm

OJ

VOHH

roj

OJ Ov On

OJ

t~~^x

rOrH c CO _J on t CO oj rlAOl

Ov OJ ON

f-CO VO

vo

OJ

JHi

_T iA <H onVO <h on r IA C\ mCO

onVO UD

O m^hi
-

VO

4|HOJC0 4<DVO ITNO J-l'HOJCO^COVOtAQ

CO COOf-J-O

vboSroF-OJ

Hm

(TvOOOsf-

I^ITMAHCO ~
"

C\J

OJ

H CO J Ov

O O HOlW
-sf

ONHOrnj' '

4.

OJ OJ
"

f^ r VO
f

in

t-l

oj

H|h
r-tlOl
* fdrnnoj (ACO onOJ OllAH iH OllA
t

ITvH

OJ

H mH\o f
<~t

OJ

VOf lA-d-jt-

mE HH

HHW lAOJ 44HHH H

o en

OvOJVOOcO
OJCO

j-t H HiAOJOJ

roj

ir\H

O t-

OJ

r-i

rn^H OJ H

rnjoT

ill
I

i
-H

s
e

-P

-H

!ii3iii
2

in

mm

Coooi

Hi
Ic5c5v5W

MHHHH

34

'8K'E
ift'3

M'kt

"'**'

"W*'
ivotr.,*

s "$$*
ono-hiA-*

'd

SS'ie *'*

h-

t-

If
'
I

rH

13

CO fH

CO I

MDcb

U"\

lf\

lAO
CM

Kg
,H
t

ft

'ft

it

OS ON

CO t---

d
'"
1

w ivqo

Hcyh-

S)3

(M

"I

"

ia

'

'

'

'.Si

'1

"
"
%&
f-ITv
CM ON

hvo

m
mo
t*t
f

'

'

'

'S

' '

'1

CO CM CM CD

H\DO po_*
.-J.

J ON
1

en

O\r-vo CO-* CM-*


cm

ONVp on

l^QVO-*-*

H O O CM

QONNOlfNC

CM

-* CM

R CM

ON t-

lAO
1/N.VJD

m3
CM

cyvo
IT\

won -*
CM

ltn

r-co <h cm

o\vo no
lf\

HCM

cohmcmco
CM

rH

ON

8)

CO

O ON HH* root

CM

_*

ON.* o->tf\_*
ON
CM
U"\CM

tQ\

IfWO ifNNQ VO

r-tH_**3

CMCMCOvOr-(

H _*

0\fOH

IfN-* VO
t^-

-*

mH

OV
_

CO ON

'

1
'3
*

a^S

"
'I

if o a
(D
tjp

32
i

-* VO

ON

t-H ONE

mcovo ON-*
CM -H

Hm ir\co H
r-{

il

IfNI

IfN

ss
ON

cm-i^^m

IT\|

i/N

a +* fc f K H O O O P<
p.
I '

(Am

H
O
ITN

00 CJ 2J CM t" OJCOdJ rlvo on

^O ^3 t -* "5 OncO HcO cm t oi "^

-=*

O^CO CO-* ^-Ir-ICMCU-* co in

NO

<-l

HH

rloirt

moh

ON CM CM

o
CM
ir\

m t t^ ON H NO
ro\o

So o
t>

g.

O
to

IB

+> )

'

cow

n-i

rocyr-coNO
o\\rtco

COO

cm

uSco
<-i

cm

ir\

r-

CO
CM

-* NO
U"N

c tr\ r- o
CO

coco

ltncq

troch^
n*

CM

Ti

jhw Mr r- rnco
ONO
CM

dH .a

rH

^-i

Q O

H
1
I

CO -H

O-vO H CM

OJ CM

lT\_*CO NO f -*

OOfnc.lA mO NO-* lA CMA

CM CM CO CM CO CM CM ITN ON

C1CO NO
CM

SDCOH
t-IfN

<-H

rH

i~\ -I

54
o
>

O O

h
+J

-P
(D

si
P d

..

C tO

<M

P* jd on
+3

Q O Q rt d H o* v* M O
-* <3
!

h -3

H
o
d.

^d

a c

O O

-rf

<m -h o J3

3 _

d H d 3 ^ tH d 3 ft^ UN OH fl d o m j3 d 5
+j -d
^-i

m m

h <M

"H >H
co

^
>d

vol

8,' q co co Sn d r-i C *
i]3

SO <3

-P +>

MOJ

-d
'

M
.'

co

Jilt's
I".

,5

s5
E ,
c.

M.i^flJ

**be

co co

cfi

co co

ft3;jti^

cyl

c^L*^irOkol

35

ITNQNO
-=r

Hs

mi w

Acnno

01

*85

so"jso

$'
0\J

-rtR

"ft**

>S$g

'I"

Ol

On
LT\

'
s

co cu so

'

C. |>

'

c*~

<

so -co so

SO

lf\

'

ONQ '29
I

I '

-*

r-(

f-

II

H\pH &&c

III

MCO H

Oil CM

Ho

GOSO

<-H

OJ

,3m
I

jT

oj

oj

-Ol

ITN

9
.*

**
t-~

CO

QICN
IT*

mco

com

H
H

3 CD

OJ

sd

k&

h1

hU
<-t~
i
i i i
i
I

fO

SO

CO

.vg

Sl9
cOO\J-so

infOin^tH

ir%

aif\<^

ho

so t t in mso

O\C0 Ch-T CO h 064(11 h Sn h

.-lr-|CQt-OS

tnnri

oi

rHtr\ITvH rnir\ mvo H a so HSj* r\

oi

cn

f0\fO SCO "^Ol CO CS|H


<2

trs

lA t Cn

h o so -* Q
r-i r-i

cOir\iT\r-l

HmHrH
rnoi-*

or -a rHco^fnco

hw

<n

oj vo t so ir> Hr oi oj

a3

osHjohso ^-j-oSos a)gt-

popojsqo h
oi ol oj

> i

oj

f- ONro I--H OJj*

Qo o

pm

spj'som SO *n
sOtfSOj

jtoohcJCOOHtOlH^JH

o\h onoj so 0\HCT\OlsO


Ol

tco t IVCOt ON-*


VD QJ

OJ OJ so

tT\

a
0\

%
m
OJ

OJ

Ol
IPJ

COM
OJ OJ
trJir\

cn

so]

'S

'

'

*'
'

:<81 Wf
1T\

,
Oil

ig

d
I

coi

m
tf"\

soi-

<VJ

OJ

OJ

ONf^-*

^as'asi ~s;^ H

'

'p~ H k^s^s

r- o\ g>o a> t OJ CO ro so

ir\-* OJ ON

1
H
o->

3 3

Ol

HrHOJOH Cy H n

fcQ

VOHH
<\j

H
r-i

SO CTsCO Ol
f-

88$83S$
SO 0\ OJISO Ox

"SH*
HlfsrOt--rr)
1

*3^

*s|-a aaggs a"a


VOVD
oj

OQ

CO

O CO

8,

8
O
c")

Q OJ ITSSO C Hf-mmov

mO\fH h

ITS

F-j-oirsuS

om OJ

Q SO

m cn OJ
ir\

-=t (T\

in cn

|e
U"\|<H

o oi QCOOJIACOHOJCO
moi
so

f-^r

>f~_e?vJf

h-co

j-oJONfoo

J jHW

hh h

wfito
rt

co t^cy

t " rH moJ ^^S^P.


u*\

h mco hcu "

on OJ

^1
to

$
W

+3

+j

-h

-h

5i H 9
+>

a t<%

3S as;
o
"
fl

& &

Htac$i

illii 3 MmMH

36

ICO

OIOI t-

t- t

Ol VO fl

mm JHW p |QCM
(OO

d|

'3

ft- ICO

!3

3
M
.-1
i

"> ON -f U"\

'

O tUS
-=*

1^
OJ

CM OJ

H GO 4Q'

'

IH-tf

CO <K

lAiTvW

mw
i

OlQ$

HHm
o\
i

0\vo

<

co cm t

Hamm Oh- H

p S

cm vo

ifth

iiitni

vo rnco -* cm

*!

'

a ' OJ

IVOH4

g <* 4
t^co

>

gg
1

'

'

'*

'

as3.

dl

itn

<

Hriw

Hm

Oi

i ,

i ,

cvl cvi

CM

CM

n
Ov
I

IV04

m h

II
1 o -3 S3

Rg)

.,.,.

ivgoj

i.

*1
,H a
q fnjt ifMr\ t H vo H oj tir\o\
o mcQ o<x> nnHaim
it*

d
o\oj <r>y?
t--

'

'

'

t \o

cm

Jtoi

o r-Hr-o H

co\o

co

t t o p m 0\0\ ci mH
ir\
_^-

ri

o Wflm m

co

flS

mp mm

t irwo
cm

a
a
^
811

vo it\cq cm
oi

owo b <0O

CMir\-4-liA ITv (n

pm

o-.*

mocoir\m
CM-*

mt tf\ t

Hir\ifv,vorH OJ VO OJ

C\Hoiqh

-*wcoo\cq

n H

j*

H CM

cq t-cu t~

H cm 0>H H ON

ST!

HOI MJt nj

!T\

CO
oi

t-t-HH
ir\ <\s

-*v)

wl*

ON-*

CM

F-

(f^HJf
in

fe|

I?

8,

r
1

u e

3*
i
a)

t
<n

s u

iO ON mco cb CM OJ

vo tf\ OJ tf\OJ

3a

Qm P cn

<

mH

lp
r

9'

?3 1 la S
2

E D

'

h 9

O p v.

0\-* On

oj

ggjd

^^^go

,m
' "c

1
OJ

'

5-

+* OJ

OJ

covo

OJ

HH

O m U"\H

6a

Q K>>C H V\SqO r4 ma)

^4? tf>

4^0^01 fmmoolH
cooj
co

t-w fontco m
r-|

m
co -* .* co CO C

vo vo CO ifN

H H OJ

Ho\o\ir\o -d-mmmm mm mm

oj <M

cm co co .*
irv

HOJt

on p t mHvom as o f on
tf>

H
S]
VO
CQ

-P

oj

III
O"Q H

m t^vo m HHlA OJ itn-* Q HH mnr-H H row


cvl

*-i

if\f~ Qi
oj

ir\

ON

p vo co m cu tr\ on p
F-Fir\

-*aDoj
-* CU'Jt

o mp 5

if\

cm CM

-*

<h oj

ho) H -* _* p

co -*

t--*
V-l

cmao moi
OJ fij

CVJ

en

t-Ho\ir\H
CM OJ <H

lT\tf\

O m

moir\ cum
5 -* CM CM

OMf\

\5 Ov

Hcoftj o\
f- 5v
oj
ir\

co (OHr- iT\co t ir\co


CM

H H

COtrv
-it

m roH^OU^
<-i

3 o

3 -g a 3

as

If
s s O

M
+* *H

^3

00

P-

s s

.^5

I z H A

p.
ft -H CO

S3
S3 s. SS^S,?
a-2

55 S53s 3 j^25 Eied stiff s 3a |lfi .SSligS =^S Slis-JS


co

Jo

o'j;

o O iao C q H H flHH q
cyl

mV^liTNl

37

-P

IfN

^O

UN

8U
tn

3
0)

ID -H

c O

8
r-

nO i> TO CN

en

m^f rH
CM rH

O^nO
-J-

-<tt>NO

r> tfNso so rH -i) en

Hf.
~^
IS

3 0) i-l M o C a o
t

*
to CD CO

o
t-*
00
-V?

* vO

C- CM

CM

cm en cm TO UN

Ovoo\Nt
cm enoo rH en CM rH rH

rH CM CM

CM

U
CD aj
E-t

-rl

u O
,

O C

O O en
CM

4
-j-<f

cm t>
Ifv

en

-h*

OCM O r\^>
CM

rH

en

HO>Jst H UN CM

UN CM rH
e'-

en

rH

en

TO tn sO rH On rH

en

rH

3
I

E-

-4-

rH
3:

3J!

I
=5

H UN
fe

o>

un
CM

9^ O

CM CM en cm

CM CM
t-i

vOsO I>
-<f

CM

o*
UN
"1 ^

fH en CM -^ CM

CO rH rH

en

CM nO )> UN rH CM rH rH

rH

rH

l -P T3 -C cd w>

CO

Uq
<D

(a

a HO
e-t

fc rH

o
r-\

-4-

-O

n!
t>

en Q>oo r-

OH
rH

to <h
CM

00 CM CM
CM

r> l> fH

no
rH

-H;

tn UN

o CM Oo

cCM

en
CO
c^v

O ^ 9 CO

n CO 01 o R
cj?H

o? TO
rH

en

on cm cm

m UN

m t>

vOHnO
rH

co

en

cn UN rH

c>

r>
CM

Cn^OrH

3 Z
+> 1 T3 J3

.o

CN

O UN
-J
CM

CM
u-\

O rH S rH rH O CM CM
W TO o l> -t m H1 rH
i-J
1

<T\

rH

HvJ
-4-0
CM

-**H \D

'S"1

'

rH

rH

<

nIMNJ

UN

fH ^t CM

CO

Pi o

00 en
r-H

~<r

rH

en

i>H
> en

nO

TO TO

,-s
CO
'-,

CN

-H
f*

O h

CM * CM

en

-p
as

id

p
J3
H
<D
J-.

tsfl

CO

co

to

bO-H
f-r

o c
.

o a
CM

^ c>
CM

CM CM
-H

Q
CM rH

moo

TO en

en

\0
CM

tn un

O rH

CM

nO

OTO

H
ID

*?
9
5= ,0

H >
o

Cn <n en

9: o*

-il

cm

cn
rH

rH en

vO rH

rH

en
<-*

rH

>

rCM

vO

CnrH

Hi
cn

w
Ph

tea -H O
-fc*

O a
CM

a
CM

tH CO

-*

--tCM CM^O*r\-JC0 O ON<Menoo ~4-c3\Ocn <n^J-i-rHir\rH(HCM


rH

c-nQ en^o Q>iH

SO
O

rH UN

CM

rH rH UN vO en rH TO rH rH CM

rH ten UN V -4 TO en TO \U rH <n

Oo
O

envO tn un
vO
CM

h cm en

as

H
1

CM rH rH

BE

X
t->

P
Em

(0

J3 -H

o c

a x>
00
-.t

vO
t>
--t

vO -J
CM

rHTOCM-<t<nCMCM-^'

enONOOensDc-rH
00^ CM CM rH en

in

rH

rH rH

or- no en
cm

U"rH
--J

OuNMOsT rH O-^-h* -*

CM NO nD CM UN t~- rH rH CM

en ^J

t> cm en c- cCM -<T -4; CM

en

-*J

o
fH

C-

cm c- fH CM

o
i

e-t

to rH

a-

l>

3
ss ,Q

8b

cn 0! vD

-J en
c-

en
H

o oto ouNcnoo OnO to mc-H (\ sj

t> t> en en \Q V\C*\ fH

-4 en rH

-^t

on

On rH

CM rH rH CM rH

-4" -^f

sO

en
CM

rH r> en rH tn

oo

en

oo o un m rH

en

o CM

r^-

vO

^
O^

H
Si

O
bO

CO
ft,

B o
<J

S-8
-P
Si

o fl -H O Q Eh
j:
tm
CO co

a 3

-p

s vO

/\

C-

<?

rH
IfN.

M>

CM

UN
CM

CM

>

Hfe
at
Jh
0)

b
(^

(m

m o c

p %
(!0

S
CM

<n| en
rv

t>

^ C-

rH

TO

en

'

'

'

5,

'

'

CM

SPd?
0)

ca

i ^ p

s
O

\0

vj

CM

en

CM

tn

rH

1 + T3 ^3

to

T3

g S
-p
OS

9
w

c HO
tjj}

H-<[

H O
00

u-\

o
-# ^
rH

cm

vO

-^- -<f r\

^iTvHsfi

en

to --j rH CO

-**

en
iH

On rH rH CO CO CM 00 rH

OO CM CM
UN

CM

CM

nO
>>

*H

vO
C-

U-\)

rH en O 00 CM >*

II

STUN

gH

t-

CM

U o

3 IP .O o 3 a
o
5 n
a5

m
ffi

r\

o c

a
o^j-

CO
CM CM

TO

m to TO to O cO fH en
H
rH

t\ u"\

iAo
CM CO

IT\

lO -^ CM C^O-CVj

cm en

CM

en

TO
t>

rH

CM -4 rH

CM

E>*0

TO

h
1

CM

Ph

a
i

3
.0

c^

TO tn *h*nO cm, rH TO en rH

cnM3
CM

CM

O
CM

rH

H O rH en

vDO
rH

>}
CM

tn rH

->

-t cm ^4 00

HH

tn en

H
r-

^1

-p 13 xi

Q
rH

-H
IB

WO O
EH

CO

5
o

o 0>
t>

iH
r-t

o CJnnD O tA (tmJ- ^ O irvvO r> OCT-OCMrHOrHCH\D4A(\\DHOJ>J H>f>0


Ifv *^f ir\

rH CM CM rH UN CM C*- CCM nO CM

OCM

tn fH

-J rH C^ Qn CM rH CM

onNtoi o rH ^0 UN
rH CO en

en

-4"

-<f

nO
rH

en r- en o-^o en -4 ^J

a 8
UN TO

m
TN

CM

CM CM

rH

rH

CM

M-CM

-P
E-t

O C

ITv

en 00
IT*

TOt>iHTOenCM^CM
TO
U-l -J"

in

r>-

oo

en

6
rH

rH -t

rH,

en

O O CM O H TO -J UN <H
-4(>-

sD nO UN ^ f> CM CO rH *H

r-t <?

en
rH

O sO en o cm O O C^ CM ^f iH UN UN
ICN

en en cm unco oo en en en

<S
s u p
ss

CM

o vO H
cnooeno ->J OrHCMU^OOrHCMO^
r\\o rH
CM nO

tn rH rH en cm
CM

O
en ;\

4 m

s o
en

~\iH fH
CM

3^3

nL>

vO -<

Ntv+OvO^O
-*}

rH rH

UN rH en

O UN 00
en

rH

CM sO

o o en O O vO rH O
-J;

rH nO CM

-J-

rH

a5

o
tH

<M <4

H iH
-o<

^
p 3 CO

13 -P

is O H
0)

O
p
60

H rH
h M

t>

+5

3
T3 .H rH rH
(8

5
id T3
+5

a
fntSl

bO
aJ

rH
Bj

rt Cm -P O H Ih J3 pa -p rH

T3
CO

w ^ O

-H

f a
CO

Q 3
-P

0)

-P

P
S3

Eh

d Xt H *

CP 3U^2HD(l,0

d 5

-P

CW-h O -H j-rj-riijj: aoed+J

C _ -h e gj -P 3h H C -H -H son h tn m 3
j-.

cd

*H

H
"

aj !>

a;

-H
ttj

|M
zecho
enmar

0}

0) CO
r

O U

rH


tiOrH

<

ll

CQ CQ CQ

rH -H fH rH p id jd o CQ

B a O -p

P
ominl

IS

OOOO

cuado

uba

OOQQw

KC bO-H

o o rH tn U

(d fcrtt,

fJO

OSSHH

f> o B u u a 3 3 P TJ tlQrH G C P o p o
gl

-H
o)

c O
T3

38

928
1,389

13
2,032

181

15

917

cn

230
1,092

22

CM

<-H

tn rH c- cn en CM

t^ O CM CM

rH

1 |

rH

ono

H O

u^

O
CM rH

rH rH

-4-

^O

mcM
r*\

CM CM

rH CM

*h ^o

sQ

r-i

t-A

en -4 CM vD

CM -* CM i-A

t>

rH {>

CM nO en

C-

(JH

OrH

Cf\

~4 CM M3 CM

cn

I>

e> -4 CM
cm r-

rH [> CM >
-4-

m CM

O CM en

rH

rH
01

CO

22
CO
1

o^o

u"\

CO CM t>

'

rH f>rH rH

en
r-t

O CM

CM
IT\

rH

lA

vO -4

cnto
CM

rH

rH

en

rH
>~t

CM CM

-4-nO

[-CM

-4-

sss^ opj

'S3
CM
1

'

-4

cn

O
r-i

-4

rH rH

rH

CM

C-

*T\

CM rH rH CM

CO -J3 rH en L> rH CM

CM

CM

^o

Cn rH

CM
j

CM

OO cn
-J

U~N

en nO rH

lf\H
nO

o -4

till
Xi +i

oo

tnCM

lA

\OvO

CO

vO rH

en

Mil Mil
oi a. cd +3 -H "^

O rH

-<f

CM

>

rH > CM

en

rllTt

rH

lAsD CO
-4

UMA

U"\. s) CO t> rH -4 CM

(> 0> CM CO CD rH CM CM
CM

ir\

CQ

CM

-J

O CO

g> cm

cr\
fT\

38
oo

co i> ^f CM en rH rH s>

o> O*

cm cn c- CM rH r- cn CM

CO cCM

o o
1

>

CO CM

~<t <?- r-\

en

-4-

a* r-l

^ m ct> CM
tf\

CM en

C\ CM
f ^J j> -4-00 it* vO rH CM -4

r-\

fTiO

O en CO O rHiA
\D CM
r-t

-JC0>AO
rH rH rH
fT\

c~

m
r-t

r-t

CM

nO CM rH

rH CO ^D CM en CM ^J CM

O O

iAC>rl
CnCO
l-\

rH

CM CM

O cm
(Q

10-H
a)
a)

P<

"T3
CD

CM

CM

C -P O O +J 3
vD vO
CT-

CD

CO

CM C- U"\ en rH CM cnt> <H cn"**

rH r> *A c- -* co c> CM

O
n.

-vj

cnf> -4
^O

CM

c> N O r\cM

rH

iT\

[> VTkCM r> NO cn

r-i r-i

-4"

o en

r>i co
co

c-

j-.

-P +> -H
01
Dfl

a
CD

C HO O
J
J

-C

P1
-r]

CQ

P, -H +J
CO

Xi
CO
CD

-H
CO

>>
r-t

O
-P
CQ

aCM

III) Bill
1 1
1

CM

l '

'

'

iiii
O ^H 8ba H
CO co
CD

CD

a)

co
ri

f*N,

-<t

S3
1 1 1

Mil
till
1/N.I
1

-4f

co

a o

XJ

O Cm

~4

CM

-H

CD

-P

O
rH

ir\

'

-4

O CO

<-i

rH CM

cn CO nO

CM rH -4 CO rH t~\

cn

m rH o u\
(Jt->.

-4-nO -4 CM

lA

CM

H0T3

3-S
IT*
t
1

-<f

CM

rH

m rH CM 3 3 cn O CM rH rH
WO-^M'H

s C- en CO rH
rH

CM CM CM CM

cn ^f

H O rH Hin rH en
O

-4-

O en

3
CD

u"\i

irv

-t

cn \D c- oc

CM

O
CT-

J3
<*\-<t
r-\

CD CD

rH -J" -4 en

rH C> CM CM C-

rH

rH

a -b o O 'O O P. n O 3 CO oO O O -4 +* -o
i> co aj co

<D

CO

rrj

CO

cr\ c- CO r\c cm sO *D O^ to CJ> rH ~J en

nD cn
CO CM
CM

CHHcr\f>H
CO
c^v

rH

O
r^

rH

LT\

O
u-\

rH

o H

r-

C^

^O c> CM CM r\ en oo rIT\

O o c^lAH
rH en

cm co

o rH o H cn co en
CM

CM

enrH

CD

Cnl CO iT\ en co cm co 1 r>

O qoco U 01

OjO-n -4 ON TN

q
CO

0>

44

117
3,342 2,973

63

CO

o C- [> O miMco
rH CM

c-

CO rH

qn

o o

mco

-4 tCM

C^ CM

en -^

O m O O rH O <H
-4/
-^J

rH CM

cm,

Q CM rIOiAtV -4"
00

rH
C~-

ir\

rH CM

^ -4 CM H

CD

O
-4
*

+>
co CO

O
10

v\\ t> co

-4

CM rH

a
CD

rH CM

rH

-4 -4 so t> co
rH CM vfN^O
r-t

CM

CO CM

O C- CO -* 0>
-J

O O tn m cn CM -4
CM CM nO

On

CO c- to ^* IS CM CM >A

rit

-rci

cnsO ~4

rH

O
1 3

CO en CO

o m o o HI 00O^ p o
co

o o

en

+>

a-d^t bOvO

-4

u~

CO

e CD U > o O &4
c/l

^2
-4rH ^i Jj
co
cn

a)

-o

CO

^
CQ CD

+^

^ o
X)
CD

to

IT

t>

rH OO
CO
CO

cn rH
CO

H
f-i
Ireland
Israeli

flj

O O O
-r-j

rH

3 3
t< CD

H
a * CB' d d H fH O CO CD
ai

1
rH
aj

ttj

-H

0)
Japan Italy
Korea

i ri
-J

a ak

Q O

O O O K fH

Pea

Xi
-P
0)

55

s= a,

U m-h a cp 3 c a CD N +> aj -H TJ +J S <d CD -H M O 3 P<f S


aJ

rH

'S
aj
aJ
-r\

tS HM -H
CD

Kb! aJ p ay
QD

>

N
<d

CD

o a
Total

Philippines

U.S.S.R.

(v,

a. a; co co

gsp| > (h a

^i

c-^-3i'

39

en
CM to

CT>

IP-H

9
nO N
rH

383"
1

HO
rnR-*

rH

cm en cm no

3
'

In-

Nt^tO -*ON in
rH

t^ en en rH in en cm cm

r en

ll
CO

8 3

to

en

a gjen
in
>0|rH rH

en D t>

en

I4 0N rH to

f OO CM tO NO
en
rH

1-

.^CMrHvO

0>ejNCM to rH in en^* s CM rH rH rH

o O

A5

II % 5 nO
CM
IT.

1-1

f-i

IHNO
*"

!5{;

'

'

rH encM
CM

cnrH rH

CM

JQSSSrH rH

3-S8 -H O
CD

W 3
en
rH

ilps 8

,<0

CO CM CM

MP

e> rH

en rH en

en
CM

mo mON
t> tO

cm fCM rH

o
5

"A
cm CM

en en

ils^s^"*
cm

""^
m
cm

vO rHM0

no

35

rH

>-i

cneno

inrH

4 II nO 3
i

kn rH in

^ rH
1
1

rH

sfH\C

eg in

o
I

rH

t-

~*men-*
rH
-<f

CM

+>

rH CM CM
-)

w * CM
8 en
o
en ON
sf

s en
ir>

-40

tq vO

rH

eo

en

to en C> <n

no n8

rH

M
co CO

3
0)

la
&0tH

go CM

en to

tOvO

'

SI
i

'ft

' '

'S
1

'r?

H >
lb

H
i
*<

OS

jj-ien

rH en

v CM

no

CM rH

O Q

to rH

o
1

-P
-rl

H
a,

'S

O JS<

n
a
-H

&3 O
83
i

O
no* CM

en 1AM? HM) lf\^N en O^-J-t0QC0M3tQ in

to SO x5 CM CM
vr\

CM

I>nQ e>CM en^o

cm to

enc>>0 in en
rH -4

wen rH
en

e>HH-i CM
rH
I-- C3n

CNnO in en NO nO rH nO
r- On
-<t

^*CM

rH CM rH

(H IH

nO

1
eo

o o w
to

rH CM

Sn en

envOO^O-^toen

CM

O tQ 0^ CM

en cm -}

to mto to cm (> en ^Jcm CM

CM ri<0HH-l to

-*0

NjfnOHIfl
r> to en cm t> -^en in rH

e> CO

rH rH

1
1
J3

1.8

R w
CM

tj~*>-io>-*rHtoe5
rH H
Q-lQi
irv|ir*
I i

Oene>ent0iHiH-5

JQSrH-;*^
rH

<n

S -*WrH CM
en
1

CO CM rH t^ tO rH [> NO en rH en ^*rH

to

r>

m a
1 O

o
bO

S-&3 HO
a
**
GO

CM

*
to en

'

1 ' ' '

in
CM

p
o o

13
as

&

6
i

83

IS

*
CM

r>it-

enKM

rH

en

3
en

to

Ijb
1

>n|en

cm

en

CM

4>
iH
eg

CM

9 O
H +>

H
aj Ih
fl>

Sue O
CD

no
rH

u^^f)vpr^cMeMene^i rH CM AiH nO rH tS
ir\

ff>t^riH
CO tO CM

C>>0

CM

enwrH

en

5^
-s* in rH CM CM nO tO rH

(5

on

rT
IT*

O
tlO

5 Is O o 6 m o d
eo
(J,

83

NO
CM

W 8 en
C> CM

to

Oenpto^f-t^Oen

O
O

cr>

en *n

rH i>

CM rH

e>CM
rH

wso
CM CM

en

O tO rH nC CM rmrH
rH en

oO

h
1 4* *o .a b0 gJ

rH

rH
CM

in

OilrH

t-KO

C^\

if\*G CM rH

C*j|iH

r-i

Oi V\ <N

CM

OO O H en rH QO

VO

Cjv

rH

no in to in
tO rH rH

C HO

en
cr-

^8^5Mf?^8rHCM CM

rH CM CO CO CM in CM CM (>

rHvO
r-T

jl-rH rHvC -t t> r- o^ en


cm no

en

M/-NiHO cm & cm cm in rH
cJn

no en <> r> en t>

>OtOtNt o oom
-*enrH

H
1-1

w en
to

IH

CM

CO

to
cm

in

CMCOOOtOrHrHtCM Csto O mto ^to


-ten ^tCM -^

tO

fcH

si

c/"

to

CM

HM
o

OenrH B en mcM CM H

CM

O -*CM in cm o cm m -JnO CM
-3-

t- rH CM NO tq rH in CM rH rH

~t
rH

C3

eno cm to g me? H -*
en rH rH

s
vOito^OrH^r^en--ten
~*kn
en|CM
e3Tlfs

nO -* en

to <n "n cV in cm rH rH

\C vO cm

m in

O en no cm n-JHNOri
r-i

en in no j> no
rH
CM

en

rH CM in

wo to CO nO CO wtr.
w rH

t>

II 3

en

8
& I a 1 o
+>
II

to

-H rH

R
rH
i

$ CO

u A Q

tI
SB

1
ri
(0 ea aj

1
4
ffl

1
o a
+j
H

5
n 8

a
CO

H Cm p O a

rH

* iH

c da) SiteflCci)*?
-P

1
w bflrH
cd

s
n a
CJ

-H -H pi
aj

rH

^H

8-5fe

to

rSS'tbc,
J3 ej

IH
CO

<S pS (E

HHH X O

oooo

8)5 O 3

K DD ooaww
<c

B B 3

CD

O O

1 8 8 d 5 s c"tj c o U o c c? & tr

40

qcm
riri

c~

-<*

>h </><>

o j^mo

t-

inmo

to

cm cm e\

o>o

I cm

fll

'fl

c\

lrHP\C-

>}N ^0^<S

In 2) 3

of- c\ ?*-?*>&

mo i-hh t!f 9H W <nc^H


C-

o*

cm^ Mirjo
o~>

hh mm >ncM n
~J

"

^*

-1

f-

-1

r-i

Hn
H

l>
r-i

SO

CM CM

-*\P

to O}

sO f\

to

IPrH

C\

C~
r-i

a|

'PI

<Jn>0 rt

CM

a
I

~ 9^
0

rH P\ C-

-*CT>

IN

>0 P\

rH

-I

C\J

(MO

riir.

O-

in

mrH

O rH

mo

III

en

Inn

O-*

CM

Ol

II

t>sO

r\

rHv>
r-t

III

to

nOrinin t'vr^-^m

ndNr>~* m ivNO-tq c\ No^H m^ fA H nQto o


i-i

rH rr, * rH rH -C cm i-l e\

c\opt>eo

iNn
t~
cr,

r-\

cmvO

vo-*c\rHto
in
rH

< cm
>0

oto

r-finrr,

<*Nin

~j-cCM rH

Ol

tO CM

^*

r>

CM

C\CM

SSSS *n M S 3'S^Pi k853 aS'SP #*a g^'sa r?r?m * m -J o


cm

cm

cm

\0

i-i

cm

81

cm

^4

rH CM

H
>0
I

MO>M)HO rH CM
Iri
I

mp^rH-* jtC^rH 0
{T>
I
I

m C >0 p
in
I
I

i-i

CM >C f>MSHHm in cm
tt>

-* tvfl

l^t 0> O

rH CM in 0CM

pm

.-I

CM

P>

H
I

-* in

<

tog;
fe|

CMllll

IIIII IIIII

1(111
IIIII IIIII
I
I

rH

C\

IIIII
IIIII
' '

-4

IIIII
IIIII
CO
CD

r-illl
i*i-icmc}
01

-4

CMllll
tOOrl

IIIII
vocMCMcfim
CM

t-^"*CM<"\

32
* rH
i-|

io

mcMintom

S
I

NtjO

nnri CM-i

vO

p>p>cmcm~*
CM

tin

th
en

m m

e\,-io
CM CM

coc-CNCMtn

-*

lay
iS vO

rinvH-i CAinrHrHH
iHH

Oc-nari rt H C^ CM CM rH
rH rH rH rH
fr

Irt-io lc\*o
rH rH

f-CMi-H>o f> CM rH >0 fl

ml
H H
CO CD

rH

c-

InOrin
CI
C<\

|> -^CM rH

-<r

jg

rH

S~C\-*rH

rH f CM

OCMrHC\rH
o
Q

-1

rH

rH r- *

tt>Qy3W\CM
*-*

-**s

g5 s
m
^CMrl-*f(J^c- to
c\ c\

<HrHlHCM0

OMnc^OcM
fesiPiPH-k

O O C- O -*

si^^cS^

a^ss
i-hcmcmOcm

-*~*OrHCM

^^

sr ~

-J-M)

W M) H

t^>|

CM to|

to rN to
r-

!<nn<N nir\-*H

cac~}i<>cm

cm to

ff>mriO-4

M^O>OIS

4nnto> fr,c\cM n O iH mm
CM to CM
Ch'

P>inrH-*^
cj 0^
-^r-H

ml m|

3
co en CO

m
CM

C>
* |H t~ C;

M) P\
3
-rfvO
<Jj

CMvO~*r>>* 1-HHrHCM

rH0nCMC\ <OC>CM M3

inmcn

mom
->C
CT>

SSrHCMCM*

WC~ cMm

\M)

CM CM CC* CM CM

Hf\riO^ m rHm
-t)

Cfl

CO

a g

s,S
b<H*5

i8"Bs| iMMflfl

hSS-I-ss ini^iaJa

Igfeiis .xx*E

KiSfiCiJ:

issg^ eicSiScijfi wt?Cfe elss.s "Sr3&


41

-H ^H >; bp

m*I1C9 SIsp eiS|S|S


.

^1

ft".
r-i
ri

CO CO

iH
ri

fie."

'

c\f

co

hoo

-5

51

-*>

*-"*-

m
I
m
CM
I

-9fta-

S3*

<M

mwH

&
i-l

STt

Hn
ft\> CM

irti-i

<n

a 38$

Si

HWWM
i-j
1

CM

IMJOOJ

90

1'

as
-J-ftO

-O Wt

CT*

f-

-*i-l

vO

iH

-9ITI ITl

<M

i-l

f SP

}|

*
CM

sir-9 1 ft

mO>P\

IH\

'stieoll

f-v

ft

r-1

u%

--O O-.
i-l

ftctl

3 O

60 -H

|H

HI 5

CM
<J

S o
i-l

55-

ril

HlH

-I

>

ft

to ft

eii
ill
ftCMlt-9tirtSQ03-9 H sr -a

'"&
I I

eiiiirH-t
SI3
5

<cn

I5>

IH
i-l

l-l

#4

Sat CM vD P- ft CM to <r> cm fr ft rl >ft Q -4-9 vO rl H


i-l i-l

?>

\OfnHt>CV SOW >rtft^

>0>0^>0-1
CM CM iH

f)CMO-9-^
-9

CM

ft

50"^^

F-c^c?

S-l >\ \0\

ft

O
t-

M)
CM
I

.J

-5 0>riSrlN}
i-l

Q J>-}Hr\H^ 00 -^ CM CO O ft
i-l

ft

\0<J***CTCM t0^9-9i-li-l ft CM -9

CMCQr-lOv

rtftTti-l l-l ft -9

00 l> ut CM t-

HriOrlH C^

OCM'fftQ 00 '3 ft

SS ft CO

tftl

ol

-*

CMI "tff CJiH C"A 00 ft CO -t CO

H t> CO H p>f\

>0<TtM

t-ftCT*-9rt

i-tOftt-t-

nOHtf

>>

ftvo MMTt

Qi-IOOCf-tQ n o5

SI

CMItrtlloilll 515
ft

ftttll
III
-9

ft

SI
OOl

BI& C-l\>
ft in
I

ft

w-1

31
vO CO
mo

cm

1ICMII

IIICMI

CM 1>
trtl

CM CTt CM >r\

i-i i-t >f\

-9 ft iH -9 i-i \S

CO CO CM

ttrin
H

Ol
St

H
ft

i-il

"

.
I

irttrt

fj,

a* 3
I

ft

-o to

i-l

CM CM

f-

(v 1-4-40 Hft

CM

CM

Jri JJHfl

3
fj

-p

00

-H

C? ftvO CM vO

3 *9CM ff^>*C> CM H H ft e-

HKtt^OtV t> ftIS ft CM iho o

'

cm

C? CO & CM irt t>

HOO-JtQ ftCM-^CMCM

l-HCMftOvO
IT. --*

CM

trv

Sft CO 0- VO O ft -9 iH -t IH

ft
i-i u~i

CMOQvOftft
irt

CT>

-9 t-

\D CM-^9*9
r-4\0

ftI>t>CMO
CMrH-9CMCM
>A

TtCMi-lft^
rS

i-tt>0^9

O\0#
O CM

ft vO rt CM ft * 00 f,

3
ft
,

CMOOfttrtC^r-ICMft

i-i ,-f

vOtT>-9sO>fN vOir>-9sO>T.

--Jt-O

I-I-90OCM H-}0(M\

tA^ftH

0^fttr.t--C0

tCM-l t^

ft

^
H
lid

BO)
-H
a)

Ha)
a
<

H
-rt

<M

O 3
4^

1
a
O

tJ

S5

-p

i-|

pO<ZHp|l,0
ias mfflfim

ooooo

3 N OOBl
01

Kw

&- f- ?

42

aa

,,w

-aga*
^H-g H
t-vO H CM OJ t- -*

,,N 'str* 'E8 NS ' 5 83


'f' s
rt

w
sagg
C- CM C> -* -O e\
' I

'

'h

g^i.^
IH
I

^'nis^
0>

tfS'&

tH noo

,lrH

*
CM
I

t-l

t-

IH

r-i

IN 00 H

IN

lrijl<\
c^cjj

Hr\0 Iri

ri

rHI

rH

I
jj
i
i i

1 cmc^

igcoii

-*'g^ 8

<a

'

S|

to

S|

'

ap$

tH

h|

fl

mill! n

INOrl

C-H

-H

O CO rH

CM r-

~*<^lll
r-i *^

w i>on pH

a
I

<D rl

CMI

CM

'1

"

'!"
to

<*\H

CT^

C-

crtcvil

c-

In

cm to

Man
f MN C>-3-0>0
""?
'

II
'1

"
CMI

OC-CNOC<*\ CM

HO -*CM

P\CQvOrHrH
~ CM C\
(M

HC-vO
l>\

t>-

ON

-J^cnrnvOrr.

H-^ri
vB
CM

PNvvlCM~* \QrHCr\C\CO
-^
CO CM

CO CM CO Cn

Offi nl C\CM

(MO*n-* C- <*>
OCOr-f

CM

"4 fS

-t

vO

C>

O CM nu>

J0|

rH CA

O rH

CMrH

nmOrlO Com

{-"-1

<*\

rH CS CM

C-

C>

-*

mm

vO CM CO CM CM rH

C\ CT< CO \D rH

rH CM CM C*\H

vOI
-Jl-j

rHlTl
CM
CT<

rHI

CM

OCM0W SSScSh f\lTl


CMIICMI
I

"^
CM

rt

^ S^rHrJS P\ vO CM
11-^11

PfKm^

'

#5"^ C\
rH
I I I 8

cf^QrH -^

'

<

irvl

*&

tol

o t^

In

lllll
lllll lllll

rH

lr-llll

II
'I

"
,,

<n

>n

c\

II

a
-tf
I

rH

lllll lllll

CM

II

.,

rH

rH

rH

rH

lr-llll

II
'1
ir\|

"
I

an
lit-n CM
I

in

o>j>on
CM

13
t- CM

cmsOIII

8
P
CM

rH O O CM r* H C*\rH

OCr\rHC-rrv
CM CrH

<OvO CMOS
CM

lcr>

CM

O CO -O H
rHc^l
>T>

CO C\
rH Vl
01

UNI

^
i-\

InO

^*

mcM

riCN

O^

CO vO CM

CMrH

C\OI

CM

OHH m CA
-^
-~*

Iri

OriONri P\ CCM CO v> rH CM vO CO CM

~*rH

a a o

55
is*
a?

i-t\

rH

riO U"\
C-

C-OP-s-JCO
~J
i?\

vO

\OC-vtOrH

O rH

C-

IT>

\> fr>

rirlOH

rH

CMCM

O c\ vO H

00
CM

ri\OOOn ff>H<lTvr-(
-<f

P-vCMvOOOrH -^

C- CO rH

OOH

-J -4

U~\

C\ <n * C<*} r-i -400 rH


C~ rH

O sO^tCA

CO vO C~ rH
<*\

ml
rH

col

nto

vr\

t3

31
O
<*\

CM CO rH

IC\
)

\0 rH \0 CO

CM rH CxFrH 00 -*

rH CO CO -4ffrH

^3
COCM
-5

CirHV\vOrH
-J

OHs+C-CO Hto

C^ C~

O CM O f- CM
CM -4

CM

C^t

f^

rH sO -cf rH CO CO rH "A

cr\

CM

O CO O rH OQiA"

rH

^H
r~{

Ol C\ ml

rH CO CM rH

rH CO CM \D CM

OuN

CM

HH

"AC^tpW
rH CM
CT<

-J

sfvOtOH

Ti\0

CM CM

C-

(^

UMANnOI OrHCM
1T>

rH lA

CM^ScO

O CO

r~ 00 CM

rHrHt^CMO Of-rH
cm
r>

mO-JOri l^ri Q to >5 r^

<

vO

t>| COI

vO (A
CO

p
H rH
(d

O
en

a m a>

h
oj

o 9 3 3 o 'Tj<y>rHO

^Ifirl

b g fl

3 a H JH J
t,

o
I

P.

<J
T3
<s

>-.

fe>

At,

xi/ H
1

sj4is 8
fl

a
sa

fc

rlri

rH

Cd

+J
I.

Ar^firttS

,3

3I I

EK

Pl,

a.

So
ct,

o 9

3
CO

p-

t CO W Eh W
CO

Go N

I 3 o
E-,

a
&. ^H to H H CO

ai

>*

J rH +5 th -h

aJ

CO

43

-p c^ fl ho
1

vO

n
o
Eh

ra
a)

to

bo

O o
CV

to

lO
\*T\

-J n> Ht| to- cnitr- CV


f--|c~>
\
j

o no en

enlvOsO
<n 00 t>

lenen^fOcv
cv CV

OKfiri
-1
>

rH
rH

sO vO en

nO to nD cv
r-i

rH

-^H

CO

r-l

OJ

-^ en cv in 00

a)

-H
(P

\0

-*

oolt>
to

o q
to

h
10 a>

6
i

8 a

a8
-* en
00
CV

O CV IcrwO > |\0 n


r-i

>t^C
cfrH.

rv

JD CV

O rHrH
CV

^>

C^ nO C~

00

r-i
1

en en

O On O in
r-i r-i

r-i r-l

en SO

^fr

to

rH

en CV rH
in in

<

(f\

in in

r-l

11 H
1

S g
-p

*-|

mlrH C -<*"
1

oj |in t>
O-NIl
1

r-t

rHlo^vD Ol lf\H
inlin

r-l

r-i r-l

rH rH

> ~*

OO CV
1

rH

en CV rH
CV

rH

O rH in
vO
CV
1

rH

id

r^vlf^i

IS XI cv CV
r-i

in

"% ">

1) 'iH

2 O ge(0 TO

vO

^1-^ No

'

1
i

'

'

t> Ito

ir\|m

en

cv Dig O vO O
r-l

in

to in

en

00

sO
-tf

l-JO IN in cv
to

rH

in

r-TlrT

3 o

O C
&EH-

10

818 r^lo-N

'I
I

'

en

vO

~d- --*
r-i

^-in

vO

e> r>
1

H en
to

t> CV

in

rH

r-i

00
r-i

en

m
>f
1

(0

1
1

3 &
-P -H

co

\ c

X>

S
Ccv

l vtl-*

'
1 1

'

'

cv lev

to

cv lev
|lfl Cr\

Ut

en t> cv
CM
1
1 1

r-i

vi-

H
1

in in

cv rH
1

rH

t>

co

co

en

aO P
CD

M
|D

B O
E-i

in

fAIIAtO

C^lrHrir
t^|t>
fc

10

rH 4 O
r-l

ITl -4-

to nO
rH

On
CV

rH

cd
cd

rH rH
1
1 1
1

>

a>

Fh
a)

10 CO

t>
CO

OIO o

r>
cv

T5>tH
(1)

o q

a
c\T

to SI*"

en
cv

en en -*

S vO
sO CV

cv

rH

rH

rH
1 1
1

<G
ID

In

<H
1

3
-p

i-i

t-l

^O ICN -J-IOi CN

cn|-<f

rH to

O
cn
rH

cd

Bl
c-l U"\

31a
00|vO (V t> in
C- cv
-\

o
CO
fcl

<p

CD

&S O
-H
CO

rH

CV

CJN ITlvO rH CV rH sD CV \D en lAOritO nj vO cr\t-ir> C^\Dr-lr-l'^)

H
r-l

mo

to mvO c> cv in > cv en in ~H/\D

on en On e>in on oj cv rH ~* >

nO \D

r-i \C en CV CV NO ri CV

Eh

P
-a
H
(D

ID

CQ

en nO
to

??rs rH o OO cv ICWO
r-t

rH

rH

r-i

in^o
c~ to

rHrHvOininOOO in OM-1 CV rH ^t -4
r-i

vOCJN-rfinvOrHrH-^

cv

^
:-

.-,

ON
.-1

to

in
-r

O cv

CV

CJN
r-i r-l

rH On r~

cv

en

-J-

in

\)

-*

HHstHH O
rcv,

en

H O

cSeh
i

P.

m m CV
fi

cn

(i

E-i

@ g

f->

-*

t> H o O -4
c\

-<t

cv

rH
r-l

c> t>
00 enev oinevt>-t>ev in t>entO->tOrHrHO f-i > en
rH
r-l

rH

to CV in r-i 00 vO r-l vO f- vO rH
r-i r-l

sO

O
en

in tn

s*-

-4 NO

r-i

rn

O NO O
rH

t>
r-i

O
r-l

in en in in
cv cv

rH

id

xi

3 I 9 C

o
bO

-p tH

3
o

a mi;

.3

3 O BH
cd CO
CD

CD

vOI c\

OIOn III
1 I

ml

vO vO
-<fl-*

Olcv

t>

en

H p

3
UD

XI

H
B C
CD

S
1

a
g

tol

31

3|tf
1

T
1

'

-4|-<f

O
CV

vC

en

SIS
1

o o

OS

*-

0) to
1

lil
-P to -H
<l>

1
00 fCN-

CM lev
1

1 1

rilO
-<Hcn
in
to
r-i

-^

cv

CV

^ o m I* J 2 be H a n)
:

1
CD

CD

S O
Eh

t>
i-H

O m n CM cv o vf tO cv 00
-<f rr,
r-l

in en
r-i

\OCM -^rivO

cvoomocnmcvcv ri\D
-^-<tcvcnoc~cvvo t> en in

00 On CV

t-t-Ol^

rH

enev

en

<D in

p
1

>
CO

vO
c?
c>

rH

[r-i

to

XI

el
to
PL,

^
i

s a

to r-t sr cs -<MX) \D cv
tv
rH rH

V\ \0

<r\ CT\

O 00
en
cv

cr^r-i

en
cv

OO

H CHO
r-l r-i

On -*
r-l r-i

00 rH
CV
-vt

CV

vO tc
t>

avO
c^\

\0
rr\

i-i

i
-p

*h

rH CV rH

3
O
^fv>

~*|toocvmrHcvencn JM^rl IrH


r-l

On rH On CV
rH rH CV

CV

IMD rH
en

H
r-i

CV

rH
i

O
c
to 00

O
rH

0)

tm tH

O gEH
to

vO

-* t> t> to r- cr\ en inr~


IT> r-i

enl-totoc-ocnv-oo -t t^nlACM t-HriCO


OlrHvO C>envO mtO^>
\D en
cv lev

O H>CO m en
rH CV tO t> t> tri
i-i

cv

QOO

en on <n ON On CV nO

O
O

\D en ^*nO en cv en cv ev cn
cv

sO

en cn

a
a

m
o

r-i

Oi

00 rH
r-i

enrH

5 O
Eh

U
1

In

vO

JP 00 CJ cv r-l 00 in en tf

Eh

l>
ir\

O3 prH
<)

3
cv

ooen^*cv ini-HrHvO
r^

^cvev>o-<fOinin r>eninocvrHenrH

rH

CV en On vO cv cv On Kt i>

n>

ev in t> cnNj? rH in vO in cv ^t

rH t> 00 CV ON CV rH rH CV rH

NO
rH

i ^
fijB

rH ^*

in 8 O ON OO
x-\

t> 00 vO 00 r-i
r-i

O
is

oininOcnrH cvtorHinocvcvm
inr-H

nD sO

-J-

\0

n>

r-i

in

r-l

r-i

r-l

r^^S

en cv en in in rH cv
rH
rH

to en t> c> t>


rH

en

in
rH
1

CN rH CV

en CV

cd

tH bo
CO
cd

"O

a
P
CD
CD r-i

9
-H
H->

t>

t>
CD

CD

ho

5
F.s
5 o

at

B
a
CD

P
-P

E^ rH
i-H
a!
1

O O
r-il

la H O
cd

H
r-i

q d

bo
a)

-P
cd

>% rH
CD

a g CD
g

XI
CO
i-i

PC <M

-p CO a
CD

+>

a >

<

u
CD

K W CH
O
rH

til
r]
tt)

@ 5

xi -p

a)

cd

tH rH

H
U
Aust

td

CD CO
CD
(tt

rH
Cd

1
H

X! -p

-P rl

13

cd <D -r)

cd

CD

O 3 -P co P d
Indi
Unio

<H

cd

s
rH
chos
mark

3
or
inic

-p

Unit Cana

New

Paki

Othe

3 C
CD

IrH
tH -H bO N
Cd

H
t-1

cd

O -H h a; XI
co

-P

CD

Cd

Eh

b p N IcE OOOOO O000H


CD

bDrH

ii H
r-l

r-i r-i

>-*H

XI

O -P -HH 01 XI O O

cd fi

ed

a
Xi
cd

ad

a a ? CD

44

26

rH CM

216

496
1,967

on

CM CM

'ft

4 53
1,899 1,223

UN

-~t
6,851 3,273

rH
5,817

175

f- rH rH PA

OO

rr\

vO

O vO
ON ON
rH

UN UN SO 00 On ON C> ON

ON
CM

rl

UNrH

rH

3
CM

'3r1oN

UN

H
H

'rH

ON vfUN ON -*
rH

on on
rH

CM 00

-sf

S '33 \0 rH
on
-*t
1

UN
4,508 2,096

CM rH rH CM

H
1

O O
CO

ON UN CM
CM CM to
-<f

CO

vO CM rH ON

rH ON

UNCO

UN
rH

C-

rH
1

C- CM CM

rH-* vOOQ
rH CM

ss
1

H
1

Hst-^O on to
ON
rH
1

CM C0 UN rH CM

CM CrH

CM CM

~^rH

fr\

rH f- tON CO

CO ON C^ tO CM

O
C--

ON

b U
O

rH

rH

--sOCM

un -J

ON CM

CM CM rH

ON

CM tO CM

'$ 9
1

UNrH
r> un
cm
rv,

-4CM

CM

rH

O 00 UN O

UN

ON

UN

O ON

CM

frH

*$
a .3
0)
bfl

rH

C- cm un

'

~*rHr}

J8

IN rH
1

^
ON

CMf\

CM

ONvO
on

'o^cS
rH CM

ONrH

--J

HrisJ
ON

'

"* 'S|rH

rH

O rH
CM

ID
1

g u P P w fl
a) a) (D

rH rH

C-

rH ON ON
1 1

OrH

vO

ON

CM rH
1

rH

~*rH
on
un un

'

-<*

CNvO
CM ON

HH
1
1

t-

^33
1

' '

CM

CM
1

UN

H
1

U
-a

CM

a
1 1 1

CM -J-rH

td^O

UN vO

to

to

ONvO

-vt^O

vO

UNrH
UN

00 rH

''

s
1

'$
1

SH

3
g>

'

a
1
1 1

s-a
1
1

CM CM UN

'

rH

V
'fi

ON

tO

UNtO

un un

ON UN

r-

c-

UN rH

UNvO

UN

rH

ON

z"

+5 rH
1

B ID O U e

rH C--ON CM rH

on

rH

rH 17 67 99

O ON

CM CM

rH

C- ^t

ll>\

CM ON CM

O
O
CM

43

3
796
1,973 3,528

rH
3,011 3,933

&

rH rr\0-O rH
rH

ON

rH rH 16

jr, -JCJ\
4,256 2,396

vO on
CM
<t

rH

CM

~^vO PN C\CM

C-

-*

UN O CM

O tp
rH

UN ^t
-J-

CM UN

rH

H
CO

vO CM ON ON 00 vO

-t CM -*CM
ON

&

3 -H a-p n
3 a 0) B

CM

UN
si <m

pp
O
t> ID

f- cm ON

p\va co

O OvS in^*cm
rH*CM*

00 rH sD ON rH

12

48 65
1,985 2,697

to

3 UNrH UN
CM

rH ON 11 UN to

rr, UN rH -t UN vO r- C*M> CM
2,818 1,581

CM

CM

sr ON CM ON sO CM
rH

C*N

UN O CM CM rH UN CM

ON CM

OOO
CM CM

ON

vO
rH

--J;

UN ON ~*

r-T

rH

P
CO

bb
0) ID

Orlirirv^t
rH

O^r-f ON rH P\\o

ON sr On on On

$CM

cm

rH rH ON CM on un

unon -j 00

vO rH UN rH

tf

NO ON

\0

O UN
CN

CT^

UN
rH rH UN UN

rH rH ON tp CM

vo CM

O O^H CM ON
1 1
1

UN UNvO <T- rH Ov CM rH UN

rH rH \D CM

UN

5
a>

a
aj

O r-

rH

rH

CM

rH

Cr\

'

ON

rH

H
CM

SrH 5*3
1
1
1

1
a)
1

H
u

ID

ID

uncm
CM

on

CM

on

O
CM

rH

I"'
a
Xj

INH
CrH UN

H
rH

rH

rH

rH

w
-3

-p to
a)

CM

vO

O UN
~*rH

-*

CM

m IHOO CM -|rH
'c^rHrH

vfrH

O CM

O vO
rH

rH

'&
1

CO CO

UNvO ON

^rH
vO CO ON Qv CM vO
rH

^^
ON vO
rH rH

'

'

rHtO^

JO
<D

CM

1"
1 1

UN

rH vO

UNCM rH rH CM UN

O
rH

c-

f-rH
rH f- CM

$
r,

ON CM O-

v rH

C-rH
CM rH
X)
1 1 1

58
vO to

33
1

tp rH -3-to
CM rH

ON

O 00 vO Q
~d-

H
1

rH ON ON CM

ON
rH rH
C--

*e a
<d

UN

(D

Vl

CM

H
ON
rH

t^

ON
CM

P\

l-*^

CM to

CNH

HstPIOri
CM UN-JD C>

vO
-tf

ON

rH

-vt

ON

rivOH

<d

la a
a

tin si a
>> 0. O -H

rH

Hl^lMOff

Q> rHvO

rH

0-4

C-\ rH rH to t-

-^rH
VD

on ~*
rH

O O ON*> ON \ff> t> rH ~4


rH\D -4
UN UN

UN C> UN rH vO UNCM vO rH ON CM

31
4,863

16
6,124
11,530

H 0N\O UN^*

rlri~ivt

un cm cm on r> rH ON CO ON ON -vj CM X) ON

vO ON CM vO
CM rH

ra

~4

UN 00

?n

O
rH

rH

*"8 a
a S
-P

3"rH$K H f-v> On
ON CM
J-rH CM

CO CM
C--

pnon
M
rH

ON

UNONO

UN

ON ON ON

UNO
-JON

NOHH -* ONCA-J rH UNrH


rH

rH CM t> 11

vO

to 00 C> rH ON
7,734 4,035

^t UN

CJv

^*CM
-<f

CM

CM vO r> rH ON ON t -^ ON

risKOOvO UN rH <> rH
ON UN UN rH
CM*

-*grj

rH CrH CM

C
a>

a UN
ON CO

be

a>

CN ON

oNr- -3 CM UNf-

t^-

rH 00

r\0^i^> on UN rH
CM

rH rH CM

O <M>

C~-

rH

si"

"N

O unnO UNCM
vO

rH

to t> UN UN UN UN 3uN UN
rH

CM ON ON CO CM CM vO CO

ON

O O CO CM
ON UN

vO ON rH vO UN ON rH rH -<t
rH
C-.

CM CM

O ON

uH U
ID

11 O
H
a)

to

no rH O iH

n H

<H

(West)

(East)

2/
Arabia

0)

1
Philippines
Indonesia
Switzerland

Yugoslavia
Venezuela

<d
Ireland

Ethiopia
Finland

Honduras

Nicaragua

ID
Israel

Lebanon

Liberia

Portugal
Rumania

Thailand

France

Germany

Germany Greece

U.S.S.R.

-p

Egypt

Mexico

Monaco

Panama

Poland

Italy

Japan

IrH

Norway

Saudi

Spain

Sweden

Syria

IS
45

Peru

Turkey

Uruguay

Unknown

Temen

>

1CMH
flc*\vO
<d

rH

-tfH <M

Cf-

cr\

so

>>

*^

to

h o

O C

so -i

<r\

1TO rH jTvr-l

iH rH

O H

<*\

J-

j&^p'
I

+> on
i

Otto o*j0 t\
tv
|

to

id

it-NOf-Tv

ir\t-*

2g O
E-i

IS ico

<*!

"4
>h

OW

tvj

00

n
I

OiO

31

jf C\rH IN

IHvOI

f*\

CO

jITllNrl
I
I I

C-

-P

HOC
a
I

rHrH^
g
31

OQJiH f-

3'

s
C-v

-p

p <B J3 60 60 -H -H *,

*
a a a a a a

H
a t

spasa
tv

coso

to

vO cm

,-j

t8

60
rt

N
H

ojeo

voTvTOr-i^i'Tv-J^

-J-CMC'vC-C^f'NVvCvlWWT.

<^**Hc-vo-icya>.o^vO
-4"sQ

r>

t>

<D E-i

^-jToo
CV|

33
t\ i>

m m o c

u o

TO rH CM

h o cv vO cH Tv rH TV
r-

CvJH>OTvO^OO-*-*~*c>

Siriav<o
sO c- CO Tv C- yO

Jtv a-vTO 1^

1rHrHrHC-l>Ol>r-ICVi '

-}r SnhS

KOI^h^O'P.MONrif^ sas^RSSSd

<Mrv>

tjj
i

ail

.j.

'35

ffti

>

io

h o
J3

n o o a o
EH

at

j
31

-|-

iii
-I

O o

a n
<D

'I

Eft

-**

5333
a m
<a a)

fMiHt^Tio^to-tvOr^a

i-t

cm

-*

-3

c-

a> o MOH nn t\
a

c\J cvi

<o

o c
ti

C-. roioo t~- r-{

Tv

--*!>

<AfTvrH

^as^SS'
^^3^3^^^'

'

8 on

>jovr|

o o

3^3s a
4 0-v

sas
to
c\(

to

cm

moo

lata

pa SB
Ri

TITv

83H3iaa
C\t

,ROk

3gs**e3*8*
I

O f> CO TO
V

Wk

CO -j

P"v

MNCTvNHHNCM^nin Tv rH H c> 53 3
f-TV

-3-

TV

[O Ojff-H

rH

rH

-4M> H

^tTviVCvtH
rH
rH

+ -H g go

O *> O -H
n
I
F.

<o

rH)

J3 B5

t
0)

O
4J

rl J3 oq +j

ro

+>

u o g

r-

S3O<rJS5Mt30iOOO

5d N
60

-if CD 00
I

o o OOO

arH

SB -f O

ft

5S
ol
,

^IOh
i

00

as.

46

ts.

enenNO

cM rH >n

Sl^'d g^'S'S 5-^2' $ -^rH m m O-*


trH

'
'

f-

-J en

r-l

en

safert' *' m CM

s's^'g
CM
I

3 'a (M H
I
I

"M^gs
I

H JT'S'S g3 ^s ^^'
,

'^^^K'
I

a*

rH

-*

CM

OnCO

'3
I I

--J

rt^Hjjj-*

rH

SOI ICOIC-

WvH>OtO

H-i

tO

engNON

S
I

3
I

3
CO -NiCM
i-h

rl

c-c-no

H CM

O m
<n

On
r-{

rH

enen
-*

001

50

O cm

Ht-n mm
rtQO
-4

M c- *n t
"4
I

It-I

t> On cr-l

in
*\

jjji^N

CM

r-l^t
CM

jj

mi
H
in

vO

m
CM

KM<\rl<
CM

(4^

O
CM

+ -p

P to
1

a)

a)

j3
+

c r~

on

OH
i

nO en

14 IH en
1

CMH
t1

H t>
1

^rtS'
'rlS'
i-l

1
'

N
1

OHM CM
CM
1
1

rH CM

OCO

->t

to to

\0

i^n en ^

nO
r-l

nO

en

ON

'

ff-O .HCO

en

ONto

C- f

<">

IT*

'5 '$

e-

t- cm

3
I'M
1

m en
ON

~
f*\

-,'

t>

enH

rj nO

r-l

CM

CM CM

"^'n
r-l -x+ -l

n-^

-p

C> -*

m On en CO O en -5 <nCO r4
tO
r-l

-*N0QONt-CMCMW-\CMC;
CO
.

t3
<*\

nH OMAvD O-J"n0
<

3>
a

W>vO 00
r-l

t~n

to

en CMnO in
CM*

CO

nO CO nO fc- CM noh CM On O^nO en

HftOI

o
i-T

qw r^lS"^
CM*

? -g
o 9

CM

r-l

en ~*
0> nJ
r-l

in

-*
-n*

rf*>

rr\

On ON
rH CM

in in

CM t> O CM CO rH
>Tl
-~*

rH

H IA nO N H (Mn sf Q O CM C^ CM -5 CM rH rH CM CM m
CJn

"-t

-* CM C-

rH CM rH -}
CM

O OOnO
f\

en -J- n ;* en CM CO OS r-l MS tQ On t> nO I> n3 f. CM N0 CM CM rH

O
r-i

Q ON in en CM nO m fr C\p. C*
CM CM
<*\
-<t

CM Cn

en nO

H
ntOr-tH^C>CM-N*Q00CM>r>AtOtQCM rHrH ON -* rH OONrH HrlrlNCJlA
cn
cm

*1 &2
aJ

^& a
0 n
O 9

O rH

CM nO IT\nO

Qn m On ON <nCQ

^t On cntO rH ^* -*
55

u->

t>

>T\

H
1

tn-S

r-l

rH CM oNr-l CM -n*n0

ON
-<f

H C- WnO Q
en en

m
1

m
1

On CM NO

r-l

CM

111

rH

rH

H
T3

IE

mot CM
Nrl
WN.nO

en

II

CM

ON

CM

11(1
^3
1 1
1

r-l

IIS!

r-l

CM

CO + CO
a)

3 o

Ce?

s
s
1

nO CM CO

m
rH

-Ntco CM

-* R 3d -4 CM O ~
t>rv

en nO

CM

to

On

cm to to

m\nO en HCVj

On n

I
1

e^\sQ

33
i

ONrHNS
CM

o to

IrH^ 5
1

5
a <M

^ t>

SS'
f>

O H
Rl

t> CM
CN,

-?

.ncgb

in

C-.

en rH On vt

727

nO <n

o mto cno rin cm r>


rH rH

cm
CM

>n On
r-\

cm en to on

rH en en
CM

4
i
1

in-

rl

nO CM

cnm

cnO

nO CO CM CM
C- CM

HnO

to to

fn

On rH -* CM On

r-l

e-ON
^t CM

rH

enH
en

rH

iHnO rH

t~

e 3
rl

NONOONinONCMf-NONOON-*

S'

in c> rH

o
CM

-irH rnNO t>NS rH CM rH ^trH

<nf

s^ssjjs s&gfcsNSS&ss^rn-cSotcifc^gs in CM nO lAl^rl CM Jn -xtrHr-i^t^*


-nO

H
o o
a)

J?\

>*m

*0

3
to^tconenQenoNO>nNO
r-t

H-n*
c- to tS 85
cm

en en ^ rH en cm cm

r?SSen^l5

-s*

m CO On tQ

CM^*CMcnt><JN

-^ rH CM C>

>*

H q H >n o
i-H

>n~to j cn o en--t cm en rH f On cm on
n,

en^*m ^*enoi

eANO \rl H Q enm-Nten<n enrH en m CM rH cm


n<J

gin? Coo
O

H> Q. a> a m

rH

Nt

N* ,0

MCO
o
rH

en CM On -4C0
CM

enOiH cm mco

mo m
CM

no r-

to

Sm--"^^ in cm

SotSJg:!3
>n

**"|3 N,o ain^ HN ti w


enin
ri

c-

*c
-P

a a
>

CD

CO

5P

5 a o o _ S
rH
I

R5
H
rl

rH 3 O <5
-l

TJ

fl

+> -P

a a

131 3
at

O
3=

H
H
6

a)

H 13 cu a

a)

3 3

aj

irSl

o n

W)rH

g SrH p 3

T3 -H

c a
-p

OH O H

drf
I

a u o
i

Pi

<j
.

O rH & o o o u <d K o a is aJ o H o C J5 3 U 1 O +j o p H a

is

5=i 9*5
(X,

r
I

,1
tj Tl
I

rHfl*l

do
ex.

to CO

a H as H T3 -t* -H 3 <o in h at o. fe > R,

CO to

s a > +5 O 8 Jco a -H s B

&w

H +> < O

CO

SrH<S

t=>

>>H

^^

47

o oin Z < o z lO uj - o Q or O UJ 1X 3 UJ -1 ^ uz z < CO to CO oz a: o <o z O h


1

l-

o
CO <o
3-

^ o

CO CO|%0 IN -h O r^ C>|CO

OO

m Oin rg * HHnO

o
cr*

en en 0> rn rg a> -t

rCO

f-*

r- gp in r* gO <p rg rg

rgo rg rH rH rH rH

gp

go en rg
Ift

O
O* rg rn o\ go

in r- rg rH rg rg in rrg

m mo

*-.

r- NO

in <0
-0

o rH oo
*

0"l |0"'

o
in
%o

co r- -^

r~
if

* 0* A|if>

nno O
r-<

r-i

go en go r frH rg in

CO CO in co en ITI rH rH

rH rH J- CO rH co

en

rg rn en in gP CO P- rH rH gp

i/l

m
OCM CM

in

a: UJ -J

^ < Z X < n
t
i

cnlm ^|cn

3 Z
i-

Olm

oh m r-|o
til
1

^l-t'H HI 00
vol in

^
ii

MHHHN
in

r- rg o>
^p rn rg

rH in rg rH rg

CrIH
in

rg gO <- rn -* in

or UJ CD

m
-*
1

to

or uj

UJ

Qt < oz -O OUK X
CO

r-|r-

<c r~
r~

MP"
if\\iT\

t en co

0* * 0>

m rg
O
-
i i

oin

o co in

go co r-

rn

rg in co rg

O
in

rn

rg rg

gp (n rg r- 0* en - in

OT
a:

< u ^ _J 3
CO

r*
I/)

CMJfM
colf*i

ren

oz or O O 1Z 15 z
1 1

I/)

o> t>
-t

gt sO

-f

am
en

.*

en

r-o

rn

O
gp

OH
cm

r- co

rH CO gp go rn en

M
-

CO
a:


l
-

inl ^- %o en

<rk
CO -o cm
lf\

UJ CO

m|

n|g)m
CO in in in <0
<t
1

NH
rg

rg co

gp

gp

rn

go

go co gj

rn en gp

O
1

UJ

a I co <oz UJ o a uj >X
CO CO CO

i-

do
-d-i

vO colco -* oo >o
r-fl

o
o

co en

eg gp

co O- 0*

fN||rH

CM

uj

- UJ e>

_J

UJ
L/J

UJ u_ OT UJ
u.

OZ a: O O 11

o> ~o rn

oto
iftliH rvjj-i

oh * 00

0*
iT>

gt

CO

O m m
JJ

00

N4r-

co

go

*o rg O-

rg

^
i

i-1

z D

ct

Z
UJ

UJ CO

H m
CO CM O*
u:'.

rgl

co -*|f( 0^

*\r4

Mrt

ml
in

^
gf

||

rH

no gp

rg

^1-.

O CO m rg

>
U_

O
or UJ
UJ

O I CO < o z UJ O O UJ t X
5
UJ OT U-

>-

r- co

-t

4CO -M s0 rg en

am

-jj>

mo*

CO <o

CO ^) r- rrg H r-t

oO H O en m H H
iO r-

lf\tf\

en <f * >-h 0 co gO rg CO rg CO rH rH

r*-*oc>

gpo*encorr-incnin gprginrgrgen
rn go
<-i

rH p- rg in in

O stlflHM
ITi

ifi

Om

in -t gO

r-

ii> r- t> go gp ao r- rg rH

rg <p

OO

CO CO CO

rsj

O-

m ^m
H
sfl

sO CO CO en in f^-t CO rg

in in rg r-i en in en in in -* rg en >0 in co go -t en en r- co rg U\

ciHif\4(>Or-Hif\st
en en gp

HiAHrl

Orgg0rgrHrHcncorrH <p
<p

m 4-

gp r-

O
m

co CO rH rH
-*

o> *0 go 00 rH rH in gp go r
"-

6 ~

>
k-

o
I

or t-

CO

(N
r~*

o> r*

r-

IN

CO

z => Z
IS

or UJ CO

CM

-* rg 0 c> r- r\ CO ** r^ o <N

co --H gj rg rn -h co go en gf rH j- rg eg eg r- en CO rH p* en

rHcoeor-rj\gPOsgpegin
C in en

rg rg eg

en in ao rg gp go rg in rH n CO ITi rH rH rg rn en r-

<M Zl
vO
tf\

rt

^ ,H
i

5 &

1o o Q I CO < O Q < O Z a < UJ UJ O O UJ tZ < X O Q a; CO Z UJ I- < CO CO < OZ z a or CE O UJ u_ o tCD O UJ X z a: o z a: \J co 3 UJ Z CO


i
1

:|

ii

i/)

H-* o|o
g|-|m

en en

rH

-t

CMl

hi in
1 1

rtj^

PI

H
%o)g^ gfirg

fill

ilivilll
I 1
1

en

gp

tf\ru rg

in
SI
1

ill
1

rg

gp

rg

rg rn

en|m

Q I CO <OZ Q UJ ~ O z Z OUJto < X or o CO < UJ o zoo: CO CO z < o z CD UJ \J or o O 1o < Q. z or D UJ Z CO


</>
l_J
i

t-

co
*Q

CO

CO

O CO ^ m
CO

on a> O- ^H
*

if

CO -* P- rr- g3 * rg gj" rg

rg en rin rH go

oO

h- en g)

co O*

en in co -h rg

rn

O
r-

gj

0", ao hrg P* rn en rn

m
iTi

gp

r-"

0> eg co ir\ rg *0 in <-< IN

if\

Om

rg
rg

oO j- rH o

f- O* h- CO

rn in

<j-

<-i -4-

r-

OOO
l~t

%o P-

<P r- in rH <r

rg

gp

CO

r-t

l-i

in P- gp rH CM rH rH gO rg

C>

rg rg

r-

Om
rsjj

cm r^. ^-

M<f

MM
rvilrsj

Mn
tf

en o* gj -h rg

O
rH

in -J rg

r-t

rg

CO r-H rn rg

rg

mO
rg

rH

tn

r-

om rg
gO

rg

rg

rg|r-*

r-

q r co < O Z UJ o

gp

o
CO
ITi

IT*

c* 0^ en co in rg rg en co >* rg r- **

.* rg rin o* rH en co ^rn rg r- r- rj\ go rg rg rn go rg O* rg

mo

cninr-rHco
rn co rn

O
r-1

COMN^tfir-CMNO
eg r- rn r-

Oh n^

co

go P- in CO P- in in co co in i> go rg go gp gp -* in ren go rn

O
<
_(

UJ l-

m rn
-*
<NI

en
n-i

o
rg
if\

o-

CO -drg (N

-*

rg

rn in in

rH
gp

r- en
-i

CO CO CO
or

1
h-

oz O O l-

en

rg

rsj Csl

*
^t C- in ^~

m o

co r^ 4- CO g>

o in

\0

mmm o

in en in
<r go in rg

rg co in rH co go vO e\l r^ rH rH

mo m

mr-inONOcnr\imo go OrHCorgrgor-cOrH
,

r*-


CO

<p

go r-

rg in

in

gp -t en a- en r- rg go in fVI rH rH CO rH 0 CO O* gO rg CO

* *
gp en

rH
-01

or CO

r-i

<o

a*\

o\

o in oooo m (N m
-

r-

r- rs in

J-fsjH en s v0 co go (M rg en >0 rg in co rg rg <-* i in rH i-i

rHg0g0rHi>sOONgpgprH
gp co

gp p- rg rg

go h

p- in

r*-

rH

rg

rH

rH

in en

rg <p <p *0 go rg rg go rn rg go co

-I

rn rg

Z
< U

=>

>-

o:

o zo D UJ O or
or
t-
Iwl

>-

O <
u.

U~l

O <C _l UJ u. Z 3 O
ifl

O Z 3 O
t-

UJ tlu Ul
_l Uv.
<-*

-J

U_

<

_J _J

<

_J

z UJ < -1 UJ > h~ Ul Z a Ul t- z Ul Ul < a L0 X o > UJ UJ tUl > or o 1 a o a. o z


>cr
1

Ul

lO zX I r~ UJ oo ~ Cl *D Ko O Z O < z Z O < -J X z - < CO ^ -1 O z u. u_ _J <u<o I- o o < < z uj or o O < < or io z or x 1- r- < _j z UJ - o CO h- z > < OJi^ _l Z 3 < UJ X ZLUKZ Ul < D< UUO Z O O- 3
i/)

Z O c o U

or u_

<
l0

U <
-*

_J CO

r- h-

<
SE < X -- 1- 3
co

<

<

0.

UJ
or

tsi

<
_i or

i/O

UJ

z>

t-

ZZ-<<UJ<Z< <LU(JMOI_JZOro j< _ior>-'--'_)to j a a D3XXOO <<CDC0COCQUUUU


uj

. or CD

<

z -J < vOi^ua O or ~ o x< za < u x < CD UJ Z X 3 3NLUOU U ^ O Q Ul

>

to Ul jt UJ
i/>

<
1

< Q >- >aziuzz o< u<< -J Z X X x z < or or


r- - or uj ui

UJiLli

OO

48

r- o>
,-h

mm 4
cm

r-

CM

o
0* p-

en

fM ^* oo CM r-

cn 00

cm in en in

* H
rH

iH ^O "

r4- -i CO
-*

o H

CO 03

om

00

f> fn en

o
*n
rn

co en

ft CM

H(MO
m

en

r- ,C <t (M

-J
^-)

w
CM
rsj

in en en

o
-*

oh o
rH

^ O

r-

o
CM

en OJ en fM

Om

-. j- cn l> CM CM

CM (O

J- rf

*
\T\
1

in cm

-C

f~t

r\j

pg

co rH
-*

CM

-*

CM f>
J"

CO >

mh

^)

ff>

-I CM 43

* O

co en to rj

o
(N

CO vo

o
t

* m

CO
Jesj

en .*

4
en

ao

m
OJ

en ON sO in

cm en

-t r- o

in

fM CO

P-

in
-0

en

CM
r-

*o en in CM

CM co

f>

CO
J-

0^

en

^-i

r-

>* -c 4-

-J

J-

p-

-* <M

-*

<M

r-

_
CM

r-H

<M

(*1

^
lT>

-O

m m
m
CM

en ,h
4-

HHOD
1 1

CM -*

^
in

,-,

CM

if\ irv

CM

4-

en a?
r-l

&
*

*0

-n

4- r*>

O*

CO

c &

CM
3-

4
r^

HCO

O^ m

iTl

>t

(M

so rs0

m
tr

p
1

i3

R
1^

t*

-t

en

rs)

-*

cm en CM

en

CM CM
rsl

o
CM

r-i

en cn r 4-

PlifiOO'O

en *o <n en

rsl

HH,f m
m
m

CO

CM CM or- .O CO <o 4- r- co 4- in CM rvj r<A rao C> CM

o^h eof-entMOO
-. 4- (M

co

r**

en r>

4- r- p> CM

oo
rH CM co r05
r-,

rg r- in cm -4 -H r- in ~l >o pin
(NJ

IT.

in cm CM rM
t\

in

in

esj

4-

m
O ^
(DO
ao -* in 03 co en

O 4H

iTi CO CO > cm cn r^ cn in r-l CM CO


i

en en (M ra in cm CO

Om

IM CM h- rH rin ^h en in

o in ^ O cm
-c

r- CO
o-

r-*

MOO m
en wo en IM P-

-*

(N CO CO

IT*

p- 00

m m

CM en

en

fM

en

""

**

O
fTl

rH

H
CM

<n e>

***

HHCM-t
fr

oo r

CO
r>

rg

rr\

OD

r* 4- 0

CM <H rn
in

CM

^ m

rrH 00 r- cm

hhma
till

lA CO r^ *o

CM

CO co r~

O w

CO

sO c\( O -I
ir\

_ m
ao

cm

CM

(M

en

1 1? 3 %|

II
4>

a a
s

+j

Ot. m
i

en

CM

c d
ffi

fl CO

at

ja o> +3 iH

.-

""'

CM

~ o

'
1 1
1

x;

3-8
Q

O m

ao cm

r- cm en :m <-t

* CM

O
in

cn
in

r-

>*o

co co

m
r-t

"
J-

>0 ao

v0 CM

rsl

CD

OH

rn

m
t>

cm

cn p-

oo JCM

6*1

MM
en

-JOv
cm f-

en cm _<
r-

fM
CO

en cvj cm en

co en r^ cm r

^-<

s0

in CM J- CO CM

in

Cn
-t

r-l

CO

-4-

45

D cn

en CM

CO

^
CM

en

\&

_ r- CM

e\j

rn ao

rr*-

e> 0> (M ^H

4-

cm e>

r-l r-i

in rd- r\j

cm

rg
p-

0 ^H

ii a o CM
CO

*
Ifl

tnco
-H

r~-

co

en

*o c* -* - cm in r
>

mm o o fM
r-

>

ao
*0

O CO O N
r- rj f

v0 CO

m
v0
-t

^f

CM
4-

** %o
<r -o

in in in en r> cm co cm en s0 J" en r- *o *C r-

o HHimn

^m

cm en in P- 0>0ffl 00 r- i-i rr> r rH ao ~0

fM

in

"4 O 00
rH

O4 m m

sO rr-

<\l

-S"

r^h

en in in CM o < in oo ph h- CO r-i cm r- fM

h en
r-t

m
in <0

J- rg

o
*
^r

r*-

en

O 4*

CM

in en

o CM CD CM r- ,_ CM J" <t r- prg <t J-

r- -t -*

m
*
^-i

in

P- O^ r-t vO a> cm P- CM
CM

i*i

O
s

CM

^
~->

" O HO m
co CM en ri->

J-

m o
rg

S moo rg ro o
,_,

"
miTi
CM IM

s
^-,

&

en *o oo cm cm en rr- CO

r-

%n CO > CO -t cm in

o CO

O 0)04 CO o J O 00 mm
*

irt

esj

en <r en

m 4O
r- -j p-

O en

a
iH

n a

CO

p.>

^
CM

<

UIUD<<Z<UJ>- V UJHQO-IO-l<J< UJ < Z ZUJQUJtt<


OOI
0:13

uj

< < -J m < < V O l0 Ci ce aziuz j ouz


ct

to Cl
7-

i/)

o
z
<
_J
QC

CD

z< o < z 0/
UJ

< o J
.)

<
-i

Z
a.
>-

CD

<
CC

<

19

;>
.j

<

UJ

lNWWWW
i-

<

Ce CD CO

->

X z

<o
D

^j rr (J

T
Z-

UJ

v: _j -I

I E

O
J

rr

< < < S< J o: z O<


<

Z Z

CL

< < < a oo Z 3z zZ 3 _J < I- < o - o CC _l CC X D < LO X O O 3 < a t a a o. a or


i/i

_J

LU

z <
<

a.

<

fM _i

I
l/l

i/> l/>

"

<<Z ~ >- o < 3 Z _J s i/lUJ UJ ~ ^ l- IS LU o o z Z o ^ za d r> z or LU 3 Z K - 3 3 > > V D


>-

<

<
_i

< >

CD

lO LU

c-.

*/)

t.

49

CONSTRUCTION
MAJOR WORLD FLEETS AND OTHERS

"8
Eh

to

oo

m
O CM
CM

to

m
-*
c.

to

m
in
cm

to in

to in
CM
r-{

00

to

in
rH rH t^

to in
rH rH

to in
rH rH

to

CO

in
C^ CM

m
t^
CM

00

00

00

00

00

to

n
00
CM

in
~J on

in on

in

in

00
ir\

CO
ir\

to

to

in >*
CM

in
in
CM

in
to

to in

CO

m
<NN

00

m
rH

O rH
rH

O CM
in

o
<^i

Q g
o

-*

\Q

vO

t^

to

00

00

CO

o rH
to in on
rH

o rH O rH
to

-*

7 H
00

R
O H
00

rt
rH
rH

CM

C\

O
t-i

rH rH

CM rH

CM rH

a
to

a
to

|>

t> m cm

r)

o CM

III
cr\
1

to

ia

to

in
C^
CM

C" in
to CM

to

00

in

in
v>

00 in 0^

00

in
on
CM
-<r

00 in

to

in
in
h

CO in t>
r-i

> in
NO
rH

in

in
t>

00
tr-i

m
t>

m
O
r-i

to
r-i

m
rrj

to

00

in

in

to

m
CI

in ON
rH

in
rH rH

to CM
*

rH CM

\0

CM

o CM
NO
t>

O
ON
t>

rH

a
NO in
00 rH

a
3 a
rH

o H o
I

s
E00

a
CrH rH

CM

00

P>

c\

^t

m
f-

NO

in

a
NO in
NO
,

to

t>

I>

O
r-l

O
in
On
CM rH

O rH
to

vr

m
H
P\

m
C\

t'in

t> in

c~

in in

t>

in

r~-

m
u\

t> in

t>

in
sf
r-i

in
vo
rH

ON
CM

r-i

O CM
st

r-i

O CM
C^

rt

O CM
t>

IT.

t-

rH

O
r-l

in

o in O o

f-

in
in

t>-

in

in

l> t>

in

t> in

t>
rH

00

in

in

in

C^ in

in
rH CM

On <f

c^i

O CM
t>

to

c^

O
r-l

O 7 to

O rH
rH

3
CM
r-i

rf

rH

O H

O rH
CO

C,

ta dp

C0

-P

-p

CO

CO

CO

CO

-p

-p
-2 CO

^ CO

p CO
"8

p CO

al rl

P P CO
cd

CO

CO

CO

-P

c
ri

5
CO

P
ri

p $
CO

c
-rl

p $ CO
T3

CO

p $ CO

CO

p 5 CO

CO

CO

p $ CO

p $ CO

5
CO

p 5
CO

CO

CO

p 5 CO

ri P

P $
CO

p | CO

CQ

p ^
CO

A
h-,

"8

p H
p
t>

p
P

ri

p iH
C

"8

% p tH
P
i=

1
S
cd

< w
r*

pS

a.

% 5 P &

& B iJ

3 p &
ri

a a

p t!
t

-rj

t.

fl

A X Sh
f)

P P &
ri

CD

a p ri P D
.

1
ri

% p H
P
t=>

5 ^ Sh
1-)

8 p
ri

P
!=>

Q
to

p iH
P
fc>

"8

p C &
tH

v P H g

A
Eh

-8

a
m

p X &

T^

8 p
-ri fc>

p
C3

-ri

8
CO

<

OS

CO

o o o H O
ri

M
-4
CO

o p
CO

to
CO

1
CO

O
,3
CO
0.

P H

CO
Eh

iH
(H Eh

d.

rl

i u w

o o

Jp

MOO
o
In

1
aJ

o*

p h
o

& O o
CO

p o
o

ft

ri J

5
i^l

55
8

ppin

|
tl

1
s
QJ

a
CO

5 -4

c H
Eh

X p
O
Eh

& O
I*,

cj

8
e 3
rH

S
tH
r-i

A
a
s
>

If
ri

5
h4

ft
rl

>!

^
CO Eh

E^

53 a "3

rH
ri

EC

,
ri

ing

rl

S-'

CO

,0
<0

o z s 5 Q CO Q

X CO
P
CU

CQ

ft
*ri

ft ft iH

(D

Si
>>

rH

CO
-"I
cd

X CO
O

O
co

5 ^1
a)

i
cd E-i

S J3 ft

rH

P
cd

Cc

H
n3
CO fj

^ ^ 1
O
1

E^

O O
r-l

CO

ta

ft *H Xi
CQ

A o
-ri

a
id

o o o
CO

P Eh

P
cd

T3

EH

o o E
u o

ri

a rU

Eh Eh

5 X ft
rH

p
<D CO

H
a

ft ft tH J3 CO
rH

^
1 Eh O O O
1

P
CU rH

Eh

r-i

T3

-P

fH

O
O
0J
PL.

-ri

rH
HI

CD CO

r^
ri

TJ rH

^i

0}

r-H

o o

h
O

p
cd

a
cd

Cd

J3
CL.

rH

B=

O s

tn

Eh

u O

id

63

A
ri

>
cd

cd

il
p.,

a e X M

c
fi

d c
Q)

jd

Eh

1
Eh

Eh

-ri

CO

Eh

O O

P 3

ftCO

O O
Eh

55

01 CO

CO

tn
CO

&
>

*
CO

rS
CO

s
cd

CO

CO

>
to
to

a)

cd

IM

CQ

CU
CO

CO CO
ri

g
CO CO
t>>

W w

CO

e
>

>,

p
53

55

3
a
o >
ri

p H
"B ft a,
ri

p rH
"8 ft p. iH
<P

p
Eh

p
o
ft

rl

CO

Q.

Xi

rH

r o

M
"B

d
G

c
53

r? 53 p"

ri

CO

p
ID

e
Eh

ai
.-

s
CQ
co*

ri

65

^
rH

sS

cS
ft

A
g
00
cd

P
Ei

P
O
ft

P
CO

pa
CO*

p,

-g
<S

g
bo

ft

P k

n
r^

TA
ft
fc

g
t

1 M
E
ft ft H J3 CO
1-

5
c"

p bo U
ri

01

iH

| 3
O
C

& ft
ri

55

-g

3
.s
r>

ss

o
CO id

55

s
CO
cd

53

H
"B

Q
PI

1 s
ri

P CO P

CO
fl

J3 CO

o
.

o
.

o M o
o

g, ft
ri

ft
ft iH

O
,X

och n hH
cd

oo
ScS

5
-3
!> *ri

g 0D

Cu

:A g
ft
Eh

OCh n
rH rH CU

OOO

P,

P.

rH rH p.

CO

Cl.tlfl.ti

W5r1. o o >>a
>,
co

p-a

o
PS Ph

o
0)

O
parr

S S -5 rn
co
parr
oint oint

5h. Q r2r?
CO

Q
<

X CO p
ri

"S
rH >>
!h

X CO p
o
CJ-,

'S

m
O

-ri

1=1

cd

<& ci

a
<*i

o g

-rl

rH CO >,
t.

Pl,

o a
<

ft

O
u
ft

O
ft
.
Eh

O O
O

O
.

O O
ho

p CO
Si

c
ri -ri

oa

a a

ca bp

CO

S
oint

CO

3
oint

P
ri

u8

D
parr

cn
oint

rH

PQ CO
CO

60

.8
parr teel

w
CO
CO

S.

s.:

.3

parr

a
OS

s
CO CU CO CU
1 1

CO

a
rH
CO

S
,c rH

co

53

Olf. f
1

t.

3 ri

co

Bras:

x\

CO Ph CO
1 1

P-,

CO

55

> J PJ D

P C +5
CO

CD

(D

* 6 E x 5 p En Eh u U rH U O
Q)

CQ

$ CO CO &$ a.^ w w a
(U

H x: p

PP

| ft
ri

CO

k O oj ft ft p
55

In

t O
ft

x: CO

E to E CO s p c i; o ^s o fn ri
rH P
fn cd

55 IS

^ ft X CO
ri

3
ri

p-i

5 3 ri

ca CQ CO

& Q
<4)

POO O
CO
CO

-ft O tn
OJ in

ft
Eh

hH

O
hD

O C

P CO p

- ft

-ri

C
Fran

cu

=1

CO
CO

ca
ri

a
rl

CO

X CO

rH rH

55

X CO
CO

M 5 3
ri

ic
r!

Id

Ph

55

>:
Ih

55

q
CO

p W

ftp ftp

rH J3

Ch
cd

rH Jh
cq

o
3

p
c o
s
ft

.0 ft
ri

>H

rH rH

p.

X CO
a
CO

ft

CO

CO

53

55

a a n

55

p M

s,

s
53

ri

X H C p
CQ

X co ft -X p co
cd
-ri *rl

"3

C SO S O ~ PH p ft O p
co Eh

O c
ci ri

0D -q
rH
<j

ri

c p ri

Ei
Cih

rH

Eh
5]

-ri

CO CU CO
1

a
ri

if

p-3
CO ft
-ri <3

CU

CO

CO
-ri

rH rH
cd

X
ri

co

J3
CO
tn

O
Eh

>
'ri

Eb C QH

P
CQ

t,H ftp
CO

CQ

rH

CQ

E C O
ivis

CO

in

n
gall

thle

a
00

c aH

a
"9 P4

(D

P\,

nO vO
rH

jj

sO u\ >t

-sfr

oo
tN
ir\

^O

iTN u~\

in in
-<f

rH cm CM CM

HO

vf
^o

in

00

^f

in in ~*

in in in
-J-

rH

vO vO
rH

O
e*>

On
r-i

in

in

^o ~*

> ON CM CM O Njfjmf^ in O H *
1

rri
CNN>

in

in

CN.

rH
c\

tO
-o-

-X)

O m in
*

CM
v>

in

rH

O rH
Eh

~J ^ in ~J
--t

rN

in

O rH

in

*&
p*
r>8

U
CO

U
<D

U
d)

U
<D

5 H

1 I

^i

u
ti
cd

a?

U
-a
ai

a
r^

Eh

<g

CO

a
si

a
cd

-s
cd L-H

-s
oj

^
cd

en

0)

1 a-s o
cj>

EH

a
H
Ki

a
cd

EH

tH

eh

CM
1.

cd E-i

Eh

EH

cd

CM CO
1

CM
0-1

X E o O

Eh

Eh

r-

Eh

CM CO CO f m 1 CM En P, Eh

a
cd
t-.

X P
cd t-i

Eh

X CM H
1

Eh

S
1 1

Eh

Eh


tn

A:

cd

CO

r^

^ Eh
1

a
cd f-t

-a

EH

tig

-a

CM Eh CU

X CO
^ o

CU H 55

s
CQ

s g
<c

<ij

8 s OS E 5 O

O 6 R a 3 o

o 53 <i > H
-1
Sci

CO

CO

M
PS

os

CO <i EH

9 H OS
EH

g W o
i~\

as

1
CQ

'ri

(3

1 W
<al

i
3

i ^

9
as

o &

a M 53 1 a
& O

9 a O M i >h ^ O
53

CO o 53
a!

1
7$ Hi CO

5 *1
CO

M g 8
CJJ

> s w
a!

55

W CO
E-.

a 53
03

U Eh OS O h
CO

OS

Q O H O cu s 53 rH
Cx.

O O s
KAT

<

rH
CO 55

3
si

M CO
CQ

M
co 53

i
35

|
Si

35

a ^

n & tH lJ O

rl
STER

ROUU

| ^

co

5S

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR UNITED STATES FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Car go
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
118
118

Gross Tons

Number
45 45

Gross Tons
532

Deadweight
Tons

Number
73
73

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total
United States

1,763 1,763

2,538
2,538

569 569

1,251
1,251

1,969 1,969

512

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED
Total

IN

UNITED STATES 1949-1958


Dry Cargo
Tankers

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Year
1949 1950 1951
1952
1953
195-4

Number
33

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
-

Gross Tons
3

Deadweight
Tons
6

Number
33

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

540

857
615

540 378
71 128
355

857
609
116

24
10
16

381

1 6 8 15

23

U7
239
493
548

182

76
111
138
92

66

4
8

300
752

96
202
135

204
550 733
8S

37
36 7 7

22 26 4
5

868 131
159
373

10
3

456
56

1955

94
98

38
7
-

43
15

1956 1957
1958

2
-

91

UU
373

11
25

236
524

33

11

236
463

794

61

21

761

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

54

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR DANISH FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 194 9 -DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
218
135

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
163

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
55

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total

1,386

2,017
1,166 171 295
94 111
16

733

1,006
735 154 26 38 23 16

653 275 11 177

1,011

Denmark Germany Japan


United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands

U
18
13 12 8
5

816 121 196


65 116 11

114 23 4
8
3 8

541 110 19

21
1

431
17

U
5

269
56

27 16 11

38 100

154

Belgium Italy Norway

51 7
2

84 11
3

51

84

7
2

11
3

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED
Total

IN

DENMARK

1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Dry Cargo
Deadweight Tons
118 153

Tankers

Year
1949
1950

Number
19 19

Gross Tons

Number
17
15

Gross Tons 60 67
65

Deadweight
Tons
85

Number
2

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
33

80
108

20
42
59

87
87
45

4
6
5

66
92

1951
1952
1953

20
16

124
88
135 125

177

14
11
15 13

121 187
182

39

49

76
96
98

21
19

71
61
76

91

6 6

64
64
59

1954
1955

84 109
114

20
18

135
114.

199 166 236


322

16
16 16

4
2

90
52

1956

80
104
86

34
61
125

1957
1958

20 26

165

139
126

4
8

97

211

18

196

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

55

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR FRENCH FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
350

Gross Tons

Number
267

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
83

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total
France Netherlands

2,569
2,008 196 178
58

3,358

1,369 1,164 74 26
43 8 14

1,555

1,199
843 122 152
15

1,803
1,262 180 238

261 41
15

Denmark
United Kingdom
Sv/eden

2,551 282 273


63 111 21 32 18

207 29 4
7 4 7
6 2 1

1,289 102
35

54 12 11 2 4

9
8

a
10

74

Germany
Canada Japan Belgium

7 6 2 1

66

22 101

21
32 18

24 12 4

24 12 4

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED
Total

IN

FRANCE

1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Year
1949
1950

Number
16 25

Gross Tons 99

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
2

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons
37 59 33

127 181

u
21
26 29 24
13

72
98

91
123

27

139 148
252

4
2
3

a
23

1951
1952
1953

28
32

182
258

125

149
178
152

198

54

80
59

28 26
35

220 271 351


233

211
385 504 318

180
68

4
13

40
203 237
90 263

1954
1955

77
149
181

308
355 137

21
29
33

114
143

14

1956 1957
1958

33

4
12
12

45

454
407

649
577

191 178

245

404
348

39

27

229

229

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

56

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR GERMAN FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight Tons
4,140

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number

Gross Tons

Number
607

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
30 30

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total
Germany
Finland
Note:

637
636 1

2,822

2,551

3,738
3,735
3

271
271

402 402

2,819
3

4,137
3

606
1

2,548
3

According to the records in Ship Data Branch, there were no ships delivered to German Flag during the year 194-9.

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED

IN

GERMANY

1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons
15

Tankers

Year
1949

Number
1

Gross Tons

Number
1

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons
15

Number
-

Gross Tons
-

Dead 7 weight Tons


3

11
75

11
75

1950

39
69
97

114
345

39
68

114
342 435

1951
1952
1953

221
456

220
288
415

686 987
1,263
1,118

80
109
97 113

17

168

251
356
663

129 131 134


152

650
848 779
883

631
600 682
1,096
1,255

20
34

235
435

1954
1955

413

494
809 866
976

21
6 11 19

285

436
112

1956
1957 1958

1,208

146
139

74 200 278

150
168

1,066

1,560
1,792

305

1,254

149

1,372

420

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

57

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR ITALIAN FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949 -DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage, in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
159
155

Gross Tons

dumber
100 99
1

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
59
56
3

Gross Tons
835

Deadweight
Tons

Total
Italy
Germany

1,615

2,114

780

845 843

1,269
1,218
51

1,578

2,061
53

777
3

801
34

37

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED

IN

ITALY 1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight Tons
68 78 96
127

Tankers

Year
1949

Number
12

Gross Tons
65

Number
12

Gross Tons
65

Deadweight
Tons
68

Number
-

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
-

~
-

1950

17
12

67

17 11

67
103

78

1951
1952
1953

121
161
131 292
122

70
53

18

26

18
15

14 9 2
8 23
32

112
50

4
6

49

74
128

157

29
12 &3

81
262
67 96
143

1954
1955

22
16

411
184 367
558
735

30
55

20
8

399 101
146

1956
1957 1958

30

249
403 506

153

221
341 251

7 7
15

39
37

260
187

217 484

22

319

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

58

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR JAPANESE FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
505
505

Gross Tons

Number

Gross Tons.

Deadweight
Tons
4, 066 4, 066

Number 64
64

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total
Japan

3,703 3,703

5,353 5,353

4a
441

2,876
2,876

827

1,287 1,287

827

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED

IN JAPAN 1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons 128 323

Tankers

Tear
1949 1950

Number
24
34

Gross Tons 86

Number 24
29
54
53

Gross Tons
86

Deadweight
Tons 128

Number
5

Gross Tons
-

Deadweight
Tons
-

220
436 480
688 370

161
332 365

235

59

88

1951
1952
1953

71
63

621 687
1,036
597 695

474
509

17
10

104
115

148 178

64
40

33

235

326
405

31
11 12

453

710
192

1954
1955

29
35

249 277 734


914
973

121
172

47
121 174
186

449 1,420

426
1,135

269 1,129 1,957 1,929

1956 1957
1958

2,264
3,271
3,355

87
115

34
59
55

706

2,140
2,156

1,314 1,426

1,226
1,183

131

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

59

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR LIBERIAN FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Country in fthich Built

Number
432

Gross Tons

Number
184
97 46 24

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
248 119 30 37
25 8 10

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total
Japan United Kingdom Germany

6,762

10,861
6,250 1,225 1,284
878 244 309

1,868

3,024
1,874 544 391

4,894
2,697
445 566

7,838

216 76 61
25 15 13

3,824 819 789


531 164 196

1,127 374 223

4,376 681 892


878 173 258

United States Netherlands


Svreden

7
3

49 31

71 51

531 115 165

France Belgium Italy


Yugos la via Norway

10
8
3

254 109
28

394 166 41
51 18

10
8 3

254 109

394 166

28
36

41
51
1

4 1

36 12

12

18

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand
There are no shipbuilding facilities in Idberia.

60

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR NETHERLANDS FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands

Total

Dry Cargo

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
268 204 32 19

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
195

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
73
57
3

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total
Netherlands Germany United Kingdom

2,074
1,598 239 121
47 12 14

2,809 2,142 336 158

1,231 889 207 90

1,570
1,099 289 117

843

1,239
1,043 47 41
71

U7
29
13

708 32 31
47
14

Japan France Belgium


Italy Norway Sweden

4
3

71
17 21
3

4
12 17
2 2

2
2

21

24
9

34
13 16

24
9

34
13
1

11

11

16

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED

IN

NETHERLANDS

1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Year
1949 1950 1951
1952
1953

Number
27
25 28

Gross Tons

Number
26
17 22 19 28
33

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
1
8

Gross Tons
8

Deadweight
Tons
12

138 157

159
212

129
75

147
94
133

82

119
104

190
183

236
248

120
75

6 11 11
17 23

70
108 128 168

30 39
50

88
153

160
187

259
312 398

340 456 571 467 606 664

131
144
88

1954
1955

207 124

249 447
248 258

51

28

310
164 170

1956 1957
1958

37
55

331
463 468

27
45

167 293 238

219
348

10 10 16

54

38

3U

230

350

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

61

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR NORWEGIAN FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
856 255 216 179 106 30 29
12 11 8

Gross Tons

Number
473

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
383

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total

7,135

10,520 3,638 1,762 2,590


1,338 453 275
170 123 39
125

2,583

3,592

4,552
1,649 661 1,355
398 222 104
35 64

6,928

Sweden Norway United Kingdom


Germany Netherlands Denmark
France Belgium Italy Japan Other Colonies Finland

2,^03 1,181
1,79-4

124 144
65

755 519 440


534 92 84
85 23 27

1,079 751
578

131 72 114
29
15

2,559 1,012 2,012


600 343 157
53

932 315 187

77
15

19
10 6 8 2 2 1

738 110 118


117 27 39

10
2
5

119 88 27

96

7 2 1

U
3

19
3

28

65

97

4
3

4
3

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED
Total

IN

NORWAY

1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons 75
63

Tankers

Year
1949 1950

Number
19 17
16 23

Gross Tons

Number
16 16

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons 68

Number
3

Gross Tons
5

Deadweight
Tons

49
43
55

44
42

7
3

60 47 70
72 82
73

1
5

1951
1952
1953

84

11
16
12
15 15

30
45

25 50
53

37 77

95

U7
151
187

7
10

22

99
123

46 54
55

79
105

1954
1955

24
23
23

9
8

69
84 87
134
165

139
173

201
247 316 342

128

1956 1957 1958

16

86

113

7 11
12

134

31 26

211 226

20
14

77 61

110
88

206 254

Notes

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand,,

62

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR PANAMANIAN FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage In Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
100 28 17 16
15

Gross Tons

Number
33

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
67
18 9 14
8 10 3

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total
United Kingdom Germany Japan

1,349
315 171 286

2,076

254
66
52

403

1,094
250 119 260
162 195 34
30 45

1,673

481 252 445 344 310 118


60 66

10
8

2 7
5

26

112 75 38 99 66
13

369 176 407


245 310
53

Italy United States Sweden


France Netherlands

226
195 73

64
39
8

10 8
3

38 45

2 3

46 66

Notet

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand,,
There are no shipbuilding facilities in Banana.

63

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR SWEDISH FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949-DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight Tons
2,934
2,388 219 82
53

Tankers

Country in Which Built

Number
272 207 32 8
6

Gross Tons

Number
186
133 28

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
1,318
995 143 26

Number
86

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total

2,076
1,648 156 67
38

1,007

1,069
915 52

1,615 1,393

Sweden Germany United Kingdom

732 104
23

4
5 5

74 4 4
1 1

76
57

44
11 12

Belgium Denmark Finland


Italy France Yugoslavia
Japan Netherlands Norway

6 3
3

41
12

62
15

26 28 12
32 2 19

36 42
15 15 3

17

20

2 2

45 23 19

34 36 26 7 10
3

2 1 2 1 1 1

1 1

23

22

19 33

26

1 1

4 22 2

4
22 2

7
10 3

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED

IN

SWEDEN

1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight
Tons

Tankers

Year
1949 1950

Number
54
52

Gross Tons

Number
36

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
18

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
232

298

459
532 575

148 123

228
169
132

150

357
378

27 22 19
26 26
35

25

234
287 357

364 444
552
503

1951
1952
1953

50 52
55

92
63

28
33

420 467
512

640
692

88

136
135

189 190

29

331
377
268 207

1954
1955

57

767 697
669
945

31
19

577

54 51
59 59

472 462 632


695

204
255

289
348

408

1956 1957 1958

37

U
25

321
623 683

34 32

232

322

400 446

1,033

249

350

27

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand*

64

SHIPS

DELIVERED FROM NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR UNITED KINGDOM FLAG REGISTRY JANUARY 1, 1949 - DECEMBER 31, 1958
(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight Tons
12,604
11,702 369 109
58

Tankers

Country in 7Jhich Built

Number
1,160
1,085 39 10

Gross Tons

Number
847 790
32 8

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
313 295 7 2

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Total
United Kingdom Germany Netherlands
Canada France Japan

9,381 8,761 256


72

5,491 5,217 124 31

6,891
6,507
173

3,890

5,713

3,544
132

5,194 196
62

47
58

41

4
3

a
23 54
18

4
3

3 3 2 2

34 78

41 23
13

34
16 2

1
3 2

41

62

Other Colonies Belgium Finland Italy Norway Sweden

20
51 7
73
5

IS

20
2

34 7
47

34

51

7
2

2 2 2

47
39
12

73
58

4
39
12 7

58

Denmark Spain Yugoslavia

1 1 1

18 13 11

18

1 1

7 7

13 11

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED
Total
Number
196
173
Gross Tons

IN

UNITED KINGDOM 1949-1958


Dry Cargo
Tankers

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Deadweight
Tons

Year
1949

Number
157
115

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number
39
58

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
521
835

1,234
1,292

1,630
1,748 1,727

875

1,108
913

359
575

1950
1951
1952
1953

717
519 570

151

1,298
1,229
1,243

81
94
85

591

70
56

779 659

1,136
977

150
152

1,711 1,746
1,919 1,658
1,893

734
639
823

492 679
615

67

751
747
589 547 485 551

1,107 1,096

1954
1955

167
143 152

1,426

106
98

61
45

1,204
1,389
1,325

789
1,073

869

1956 1957
1958

116

842

36 30
37

820

M4
161

1,795 1,972

114 124

840 860

1,068

727
823

1,411

1,149

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

65

SHIPS

CONSTRUCTED

IN

THE WORLD

1949-1958

(Tonnage in Thousands)

Total

Dry Cargo
Deadweight Tons
3,901
4,138
4*383
5,065

Tankers

J&

ber
443

Gross Tons

ber
341
312

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
2,139
1,939 2,156
2,380

Number
102

Gross Tons

Dead weight
Tons

1949
1950.

2,791
2,933
,240

1,639 1,479
1,740

1,152

1,762

445
475

133 146

1,454 1,500
1,775

2,199
2,227
2,685

1951
1952
1953.

329
361

520

,719
,579

1,944
2,042

159
216 243
172

608

6,501

392 377

2,657
2,762 2,898 4,710 5,539
5,943

2,537
3,026 2,225

3,844

1954
1955

620
566

,064

7,374 6,230
8,165

2,038 2,117
3,400
4,073

4,612 3,332
3,455
5,262

342

394
535

1956
1957. 1958.

676

639 454
8,469

141
187

2,239
3,381

794
885

10,801

607 646

12,459

4,299

239

4,168

6,511

Notes

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand.

66

p
o
CO

SR

H'V.
c\ P rH 0\ Ha
a)

.N,

W M

O
H
r-{ r-i

to

O H

-^

O
VS rH
CM

-<}

CO
0/

vO
ON.

ci-H

vO nO

O IA

ITS

CM

CJ

ia
e

O
rH

ON

ON

v\

c~H-

CM

t>
rH

nO

NO

8 CM

8 in
*

p o J -3 p a W

5.

-*

n*

H
a)
1-1

p
EH

O H CM

nO
rH
CN

en
UN.

-*
-4

On

CM

^J

On
C>i

9 t> Q PO Eh OO

H -P

^ O
*
41
1

^~N
'
l
8

O
O

C-f-i

s
H

^J-

-H-

&
CM

CM

Pi

H
CM CM

gg
co

CO CO

cn

>>

83 gg
pM go H
&4

t-3

2g

0) CO CO cd

r-i

cn

I-l

IA

Eg w
5i co cd

*
-P

>O

a
H
CD
1

s
t*

3
vO
ir\

n^
CM

O 3

en

(3

b
r-i r-i

cn

~*

ON

nO
4

b
r-i

NO
CM

*^-s

T3

O a
r-i

P
i3

a M
*

O O
-O CO CO

5 M

w
9

co CD

P
cd (j

CD

13
HH

CO CD

co CD fi

&

O
P.

3
t.
CD

P.

P
cd

CD

a
cd

3
CO

O O M C
H H
CO
ft P,

M
C

O a

cd

|
g

P.

c M
CD

&
cd

& & s
CO CD

CO CD

p. H ^3
CO

P.

d p
EH

3
h
CD

3
p h
O c
a)

ID

a
r-H

c
CO CD

P.

H
fe

3
M
crt

T3 H
01 CD

a p
W
co cd

g O
CJ>

a
P. H

6 Eh
<:

CO

3
a
a3

A
a
cd
rH

G
rH rH
CD

M
CD

a s O
CD cd

CD

J
O
co
eg

CO

CO

CD

CO

P
O
cd CD

CD

A
s
co

rl

CO

H P.
P.

C
a)

a
A

u m
CO

H
(0

O O O s

1
fe

P
cd

CD

Ph

H
ri 0)

h
CD

H
CO

CO

rl CD

&
cS

ffi

CO

U O

CD

O
CD

O :H
O
cd

P P co
cd

CO CD

a p e
<p

<H H
Ph

CO CD

a H

CD

1
P>H

K*

P CO

67

o
0> 0>

00

CO 1cn

JO

o o

If)

If)

ro in
IPBUILDING

OJ
STATES

JO
100)

_if>

55
lil

Ss
7 3
THE
>-

o
If)

en

<
(JA

CO

5t"

ESTIM

CD
5J-

IN

F o X UJ Q

ro
.ST

CvJ

_<d-

o
ro 0)

O
00 OJ

O CO
OJ

O
Cvl

o
OJ OJ

O O
OJ

o
00

o
ID

o
OJ

o o

69

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1949


(Tonnage in thousands)

Country for

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

Total

Which Built
No. G.T.
IJWT.

United States
No.

United Kingdom
1

Sweden
1

G.T.

Dwt.

No. IG.T.

IWT.

No.
... j

G.T.

IWT.

SUMMARY- -ALL VESSEL TYf >ES

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark Prance Italy All Others

415
3

2,693
52 764

3,758 JS3
30
3
-

51*0

857
80-

196
_

1,234
_

1,630

54
_ -

293

J*59_
-

52
-

113 15 24 98

21
31
5

47 119 556 93 173


32

991 68
11*9

113
k k

764 6

991
9 37 27U

10
-

33

50
_

28
188
30 10
-

108

856

809 136 230 2k 1,269

26
7 2
1*0

38
3

kl
10
-

227 25
1

351
33 p
-

1 2
1

30

489

777

208

268

12

18

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO VESSELS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy All Others

in
_

335
_

297
_

17

182
_

154
_

1*

12
_

10
_
-

.
-

_
-

9
-

127
-

113
-

9
-

127
-

113
-

1*

9 3
-

50
i5

56 36
k

12
-

10
-

1
3

1*

11

29 80

20 69

55

U2

FREIGHTERS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy All Others

275
_

1,207
_

1,699
_

_ -

140
_

693
_

954
_

32
_ -

136
_ -

213
_

84 12 12 60

i58

35

19 25 2 61

51 237 71 121
3

625 49 67 355 102 156


5
31*0

84 k 2
1^

1*58

-'
-

6 2
-

18 55 19 10
-

625 9 23 72 26
10
-

7
-

20
-

31
-

22
2
-

102 13
-

166 20
-

231

29

127

190

TANKERS

Total

102
3

1,152
52 179 13 18 274 22 48
-

1,762
80 254 19 26 418
34

33
3
-

540
52
-

857
80
.

39
_

359
_

521
_

18
_

150
..

232
_ -

United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy All Others

20
3

20
-

179
-

254
-

13

19
-

. -

30
2
5
-

13 1
-

10 134 11
-

14 202 15
-

12
1

113 12
1

176 19
?
-

71
-

36

545

860

30

489

777

26

37

11

16

Note Individual tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have been rounded tothe nearest thousand
:

70

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1949


(Tonnage in thousands)

:ountr f IN WHICH BUILT

Nether Lands
No.

Norway
No.

Denmark
DMT.

France
No.

Italy
DWT.
No.

All Others
|

G.T.

DWT.

G.T.

No.

G.T.

DWT.

G.T.

G.T.

DWT,

Ho.

G.T.

DWT.

SUMMARY ALL VESSEL TYPES

H
-

133

159

19

k9

75

19

80

118

16

99

127

12

6f>

68

k2

191

26U

1
\
1

8
-

10
-

20
2
-

91 23
1U

112 15
-

19
-

k9
-

75
-

5 10

19 35

26 52
33
-

3
-

11
-

Ik
-

ko
k

55
5

3
-

19
-

2
-

20
-

16
-

99
-

12?
-

1 7
-

28
-

39
-

5
3

13

32 Ik

2k 20

29

119

165

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO VESSELS

10
_ -

.67
""

62
-

1
-

3
. -

3
_
-

1
_
,

k
m

k
m -

k
m -

31
m

22

36

k2

..

_
-

_
-

_ _

_ -

9 1
-

50 17
-

56 6
-

1
-

3
-

3
-

1
.

2
-

2
-

1
. -

11
.
-

15
-

1
-

k
-

k
-

3
-

29

20
-

25

27

FREIGHTERS

16

62

85

15_

HI
_

65
_

17

60

85

13

68

87

3k

kl

3*

112

159

1
_

8
_

10
_ _ _

10
l
-

33 6
-

kk 9
-

15
-

kl
-

65
-

5 10
-

19 35
-

26 52
-

. -

_ -

2
-

9
-

12
.

3
-

lh
-

19
-

13
-

68
-

87

2 1 7
-

6 k 28
-

6 5
39
_

2
3

13

8
TANKERS

Ik

20

2k

7*

108

12

_3_

_!_
-

20

33

27

37

~^-

k2

63

1
-

e
-

12
-

3
-

5
-

7
-

2
-

22
"

33

2
-

20
-

33
"

2
"

27
-

37
-

20

30

71

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1950


(Tonnage
ii\

thousands)

ta<b&l

Registry for which built


G.T.
UWT.

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT


United States
Ho. G.T. DWT.

United Kingdom
Ho. G.T.

-r

Sweden
No. G.T. DWT.

Netherlands
No. G.T. DWT

EWT

SUMMARY ALL VESSEL TYPES


kk? 2,933

V38

2k
5
-

3&X 615
7

173 1,292 1,7*8

52

357

532

25

157

212

United States United Kingdom Sweden Hetherlands Horsey Denmark Trance Italy Japan

115 19 22 87

116 7^ 367 1,152 U+6 105 ~ 160

116
-

_ -

21
31 k

AU
Total

Others

2k 39 78

601 321 171 N 7 U+5 75 6kQ

908
173

115 2 8 23
it

867 1,152 18 27 J+8 62 203 305 26 39


-

17

87

1
32
-

11
21+9
-

119 16 381
-

13 6
-

67
C-!

81
Ro
-

226 11 213
life

919

19

307

99

21

130

163

Ik

30

111

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS


fe7

306

275

18

162

UtO

20

16

Ualted States United Klngfloa Sweden letherlan&s Borvay

Ife

128 20 7 6
fel

115

lit

128

115
2

2
3

Denark
Trance Italy JaptA

2 6

16 7 k k6

20

16

All Others

8my

17

98

7 81

3*

25

FREIGHTERS

total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark Trance Italy Japan Germany All Others

265 1,173 1,661+

1 1

3 3

6 6

97

555

773

25

317

163

15

55

78

1 71
15
lit

3
1+3*

1+0

13

21
k

21
36 29

75 6k 150 53 88 7 112

71
116

6 599 102 83 223 73 121 11 162 107 177

71
5 7

l+3l>

599
15

75

102
9

33

k3
1*3

29 8

9 1 1

59
2

2 1

30 12

1+0

18 8

32 6

12

50

75

32

TANKERS

Total
United States
UnitfaS Ktngflii

133 l,fe5^ 2,199


1+

23
k

378

609

58

575

835

25

23U

361+

82

119

71
305 30 k2
l+l+it

310
1+38

71

no
30 2
3

30
It

Sweden Motherlands Norway Denmark Trance Italy Japan Germany All Others
Note:

6
1+1+

kk 60 679

6
it

62
1+1

96 59

16 2

305 18 15 17U 18

1+38

27
19

32

261 27

21

31 203

17 16 316

2
It

17
1+2

25
61+

51
U26
662
19

32

307

199

1+6

63

lit

23

30

Individual tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have heen rounded

to the nearest thousand.

72

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1950


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT


1

Norway
No. G.T. dwt.

Denmark
No. G.T. DWT.

Trance
No. G.T. DVT.

Italy
No. G.T. dwt.

Japan
No. G.T. DOT.

Grammy
Ho. G.T. SOT.

All Othora
Ho. G.T. DOT.

SUMMARY -ALL SHIP TYPES


17

U3

63

19

108

153

25

139

181

17

67

78

&

220 323

39

75

Hit

20

93

120

17
_

*3

63
_

31

11 2

6o 13

50 8U 17

2 2 k

1
it

lit

7 7

11
11

28
12.

19 39

25

139

181

2 2k

18

U*5 213
39

75
-

1U
-

1*

h9

50

21

35

19

90

116

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS


1
2

It

17

Ik

35

38

36

31

it

2tt

22

1 2 6
it

35

38

It

36

31

21*

22

FREIGHTERS
15
ItO

59

11

50

73

16

63

85

10

31

lt6

29

161 235

36

71

107

10

28

ko

15

UO

59

it

21
22 7

3h

6
1

30 8

2 2
16 63 85
k

It

1
3

It

11 11

2 7

16 12

20 18

21
2
12

112 162 36

71

107
9

18

21

35

25

37

TANKERS
1

it

ll2

66

it

itl

59

59

88

kl

57

1
3

10 32

16 50
it

1 1
kl

1* 12

19 19

59
3

3h

51
5

kl

57

73

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1951


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT


Registry for Which Built
Ho.
TfYTAT

tfcited States

United Kingdom
Ho. G.T. DWT.

Sweden
Ho. G.T.JDVT.

Hetherlands
No.
G.T.

G.T.

DHT.

Ho. JG.T. JDWT.

DWT.

SUWIARY- -ALL SHIP TYPES


Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others
i

ifl5

3,21*0 ^,303 10

11*7

132

151

1,298 1,727 50

378

575

28

190

236

7 90

27 11 72
19 U3 8

102 693 163 69 652 128


21*6

57 66
75

96 398 211 kjk

120 887 23U 78 978 189 310 76 572 330 609

7
-

112
-

120
-

90
3

693

887
31
11*

*3

1*6

28
25

32 21

Ill* -

172
-

7
3
-

29
2 U
-

3W
9

508 20
3
-

199
32
-

307
1*9

31
1*5

1*8

29
-

25
-

1*8

7
-

69
-

3**

35

62

19

170

231

11

71

73

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS


Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others
1*1*

U63
>*7

305
21*

2 2
-

U7
1*7

21*

16

177
_

109
_

1
-

10
-

5
_ -

56
_ -

37
_
-

21*

10

1
2
3 -

128 8

21
17
1*9

79 2 16
12
-

10 1
-

128 8
-

79 2
-

2
-

21
-

16
-

1
-

5
-

3
-

1
-

10
-

9
-

5
l*

29
32

1
-

16
-

8
-

67

3
11*

20 107

29 81

20

17

35

21

FREIGHTERS
Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Hetherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others
285
3
l',277'

1,851
36 385
91* 51*

l*

29

1*2

65
_

31*2

1*82
_

21
..

52
_
-

123
_

17
_ -

61*

96
_ -

50 17 8 18 10
33
3

25 269 66
1*2

3 -

25
-

36
-

_ -

50
-

269
-

385
-

15
-

56
-

82
1*0

19

23
9
-

5
-

23
-

30
-

62
1*6

98
63 190 18
1*60

1
-

6
-

5
-

25
-

51
62 30

137 11 321 189 108

3
-

12
-

17
-

5
-

17
_

27
-

298
155

21*

35

1*8

TANKERS
Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others
11*6

1,500 2,227
39

71
2
-

116 60
-

70
-

779 1,136 28
_

287

1*1*1*

70

101*

2 30

60
1*23

39
-

_
1*23

295
89 6 573 82

30

9
1

51 9
5

137 8 868 126

_ _
-

_ -

2 1
2.7

295 20 6
333 9
-

3 -

30 8
It*

6
-

58
-

90
-

1*8

1*96 11+

165
32
-

258
1*9

31
-

2
-

3
-

1*2

1
6 1

60 18 77 2

91 26
113
3

2
-

28
-

s-

1*6

11*

31

258

373

32

56

115

166

32

12

Note: thousand

nearest Tonnage figures are not additive since the detail figures have heen rounded to the

74

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1951


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT


Norway
No. G.T. DWT. No.

Denmark
G.T. |UWT.

France
Ho. G.T. DVT.

Italy
No. G.T. DWT.

Japan
No. G.T. DWT.

Germany
No. G.T. DWT.

All Others
No. G.T. DWT.

SUMMARYALL SHIP TYPES


16

55

8k

20

12k

177

28

1U8

182

12

121

96

71

1+36

621

69

221

3^5

20

122

158

2
16
55 Ok
3

13

1 1

11

17
3

13
3

21 76
23

29 111
33

11

16

28

Ht8

182
8

96

76
57

398

572

66
1
3

211

330

25

20

13

27

33

18

109

138

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS


2

11

26

13

92

52

20

29

27

22

1
1

2
7

1 9
3

26

13
k

67

32
3

20

29
k

25

20

27

22

FREIGHTERS
11
_30

i2

12

56

31

99

136

_3

11

18

22. kik

65

200

313

10

.32

2 11
30

13

hi
10 1
1+6

1 7
63 9

23

99

136
3

11

18

51
1
3

321
10

k6o
62

189

298
9 31
41*

Ik

TANKERS
_5_

25

37

59

_92

23

_33_

18

26

il

10U

11*8

_3

62

_89

1
5

11

17

25

37

2
3

19 30 10

28 ka
16
2

11

16

23

33

18

26
6

77
16

113

1
10

'

19

51

72

75

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1952


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT


Begistxy Tot Which Ballt

Total
GrOSB Ho. Tons 1ST.

United States
Grost Ho. Tons 1ST.

United Kingdom
Qxose Ho. Tons 1ST.
-

Sweden
Gross Ho. Tons 1ST.

Netherlands
Gross Ho. Tons DWT.

SUMMARY -ALL SHIP TYPES

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Hetherlands Horway Dspaark Trance Italy Japan Oeraany All Others

520 3,719 5,065

36

23?
-165

300

350 1,229 1,711

J2

420

64o

J2

183

248

11 111 31
Ik

165

8#
205 90 430 95 323 3A5 438 213 781

57 Ih 46 32 59 65 100

180 1,325 306 315 646 135 365 108 623 332 1,130

11

180
111

1 1 10 2

83U 1,325 10 7 6 9 116 365 35

23
16
3

154 170 33 36

233
10

265

1
7

66 32 2k

80 19 36

22

51 23

7*

120

25

251

38O

47

68

32

81

113

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Hetherlands Horway Denmark France Italy Japan Oeraany All Others

i2
1
5

36 53 66 24 k
329 95 9 7 49

234
33
1*2

1 1

53 53

13

66

k2

29

17

13

66

k2 2
2k 16

2 2
11 7

36

1
84 33

1 1
10

31 10 2k
FREIGHTERS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Hetherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Oeraany All Others

^1
6 75 20

1,508 2,346
55 kl6 74

7
6

58
55

83

89

504

692

18

60

87

15

46

71

77 56H 105

77 75

416
7 6

8 22 9 26 1 52
62

48
104 ko 82

71 351
50 314
3

1 1
k

48

564 10 9 63

14

46
11
3

65
5

26

39

18
4

si
193 138

498
302

ko

211

27 TANKERS

46

34

23

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Hetherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Oeraany All Others

159 1,775 2,685


4

_8
k
-

328

204
90
-

56

659

977

33

357

552

11

108

160

57
352

31 31
4

90 519

57
-

31

352

519
9

131 18
322 55 132

201 28
494 85 37 72 1J4 20 895
-

108
159 33 13

168

3 -

16
12
-

33 5

6 2

66
15

102

34
3

247 51
19

1
-

25 19
-

9 4 6 2 50

22

18

27

48 73
13 594

71

314

17

224

334

44

67

62

89

76

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR


(Tonnage in thousands)

195fc

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT


Norway
No. Tons

Denmark
Grose Bo. Tons DWT.

France
No. Tons

Italy
Grose No. Tons JDWT.

Japan
No. Tana

Gtenaany

All Other*
No. Tone

GroBB

DWT.

Grose

DWT.

Gtobb
*"*

Gtobb No. Tons

WT.

GroBB

WT.

SUMMARYALL SHIP TYPES

i3

21

ivr

.68

121

.31

252

258

JL8

161

127

jt&O

687

_9J

156

686

23

116

1A0

1
k

5 2
3
3

23
-

95
-

1*7
-

21
39 12

8 1

28 53
19
32

35 16 16

23
k

252

258
11
13*

91
59 H38
12

1 1
623
65 6H

11
213 138

50 23 22 31 7 17
332

1 1
-

6
3 .

2
-

12

1A

27

36

17

21

109

131

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS


3
T

11

129

8*

10

102

37

11

10

31

1
11
129
6%

95

33 1

11

1
1
3

10
3

31

17

FREIGHTERS
16 U5 70

32

1*3

18

09

<*

10

16

52

356

H98

79

281

>25

15

>7

67

1
16
*5
70

2
7

12 16

17 23
1* 7

28

36

18

69

2 1

12
it

52
3

356

1*98

13

62 9

193

302 62

1*

61

TANKERS
_7
_77

_5

Jt9

6 .

_3_

_2l

80

k9

-Hi

_10

115

21
2

168

251

_5

_56_

23
16

33

1
7 50
77 2 17

1 1

11
12

2? 17 19

i
3

11
11
13 <*

22 17
17

5*

80
3

37

55
6

1
73
nil 2 8

20
1*2
It

13

12

19

36

53

77

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1953


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

Registry For Which Built


No,

Total

United States

United Kingdom

Sweden

Netherlands

Gross Tons DOT.

Grose
No.

Tons

DWT.

No.

Gross DWT. Tons

No.

Gross Tons DWT.

No.

Gross Tons DWT.

SUMMARY - -ALL SHIP TYPES

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

608

4,579
369 854 298 129 620 132 279 136 386 373 1,103

6,501
558 1,213 412 173

37 30 -

493

752 558
-

152
_

1,243

1,746
_ 1,181 10 201

35
_ -

467
_

692 _ 384 200 20

22
_
l

Si2
_

340
_

30
107 35

369
-

104
1 -

_ 834
7

17
73

22 41

756 181
295

a
98 128

13

176
559 570

31
15
2 1

264

20
-

U&
-

131
13

15

4
55

4
-

1,608

124

194

27

254

354

10 13

84

22 123 30 84

10 163 43
-

124

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway

Ik
_
2 2 2 1

318
_ 27
25 11
3

202
_ 22 11 -

-Z
_
-

_ -

_ -

_5
_
2

61 _ 27

21
_ 22 -

_!
_

J. 3

_1
_ 1

_1
_

25.

M, _
-

22 -

1 -

11
-

4
1

Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

11
3

117 28
-

73

4 9

1 -

10 3

10
-

26 81

36 45

23

FREIGHTERS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

m
15
57

1.724
138 300 94
78 153 95 82

2,455
202 421

11
15 -

1J8 138
-

202
202 -

80
_

421
_

604
_

il
_ -

232
_ 82
-

188 _
-

5_
_

106
_ 72

139 _
-

55
1 8

17
13
35

IP
22
2

33

89 57

4 235 321 224

128 99 224 128 104 4 326 497 322

297 7 32 -

416
10
-

H 8

110
62

11

16

95

43 -

40
2

13

89 18

1 1
-

4
5

4
-

7
-

135

21

32

TANKERS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

216
15

2,537
231 527 179 51 356 34 80 104

3,844
356 770
273 74 528
52

22
15
-

251
231
-

552
356 -

Z
47
-

251

1,107

22

221

5m
273 -

11

128

182

48 16 4
36
3

8
8

11
5

151
26 798

62

118 162 233 37 1,241

~ -

10
-

510 105 -

743 -

16
-

124

194

10

136

154 210

7
1 -

179 91 11 -

51

4
2

74

138 16 -

15 -

22 91

62

50

76

78

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1953


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

Noruay

Denmark

France

Italy

Japan

G-3rma.r.y

All Others

No.

Gross Tons

DOT

No.

Gross Tons

DOT.

No.

Gross Tons

DUT.

No.

Gross Tors

Gross
DOT.
No. Tons

DOT

Kc.

Gross Tons

Gross
DOT.
No. Tons

DOT.

SUMMARY --ALL SHIP TYPES

22
-

99
-

151
-

21
~ ~ 2 15 2
-

m.

187

28

220
~

211

15.

ili
-

152

&
1

688

1 ? 036

122

650

287

&
~~

124.

u^.
-

" : _
j

~
2

: _
28

_ "

_ 14.0

17 "

'5

"

21
_
_

97
_ _

147 _
_

19
81 25
-

29 106 37
-

_
-

"
_
_

12 12
-

_ _

_
_

_
-

220 -

211
-

10
"
5
j

110

_
-

_
1

_
2

15

44 18

386
-

19 ^59

4
3

98 7

6 1X4 26 26 -

10 166 36
-

11 -

36
-

^3 -

10

21

17

273

431

373 99

570 159

42

181

226

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CABGO SHIPS

_1

J.

_1

10

IM

70

Jl|

21

15.

_a
-

26

3.S

20

_ 1 3
1

_
~
-

10
-

115
-

70
3

28

10
:
j |

i
-

_
26
36
5

n
11

"I

46

30

freighter:;

22.

46

22

M
-

M
-

2Q

M
_

65,

32

Jt

M
-

21

m
_

226

191

m
3

121
c 5

21

102

M2

_ _

1 5

n
-

44
-

68 -

13 -

67
-

88 2

65 -

1 3

33

H -

4
1

6 26 26
3

10 38 36
2

11 -

13 -

82

235 -

10
TANKERS

12

326
-

89
1

321
1

497
2

27

89

_ _ 127

1Q

52
-

22

A
-

26

J
-

42

12

_6

SI
-

128

21

412

710

2Q

221
_

25i>

10.

46

62

_
-

l T

17

27 "

10
-

53 -

79
-

2
1

19 11 25
-

29 17 37 -

7
-

_ 128
-

4
-

40
-

13

59 -

6
~
-

81
-

11 18

12 _ -

19

88 _
23

128

_
34

_ -

_
-

233 -

151
273

<;

431

26 98

37 157

- r ~ 10"1 46
1

69

79

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1954


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

Registry Pop Which Built


No.

Total
Gross
DWT.

United States
Ho.

United Kingdom
Ho.

Sweden
Ho.

Netherlands
DWT.
Ho.

Tow

Gross Tons

DWT.

Gross Tons

DWT.

Gross Tons

Gross Tons

DWT.

Ho.

SUMMARYALL SHIP TYPES


Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Betherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

SUMMART - ALL
57

620
25 127 23 26 81 22 29 22 34 84

5,064

7,374
491 1,370 245
234

36
25 -

548

868

167
.

1,426
_

1,919
_

512

767

50
_

312
_

456
_

24
_

U7

317 1,053 170 164 678 152 252 292 267 403 1,316

317
_

491
-

_
-

167 258
-

119
-

1,013
-

1,309

266 -

20
-

1,004
233 353 411 383 595 2,055

187 -

22 26
-

240 -

3
-

22

32 124

50
-

396
48
-

4
-

36
-

176 52
51
-

2
-

32
-

6
-

36
-

11

231

377

28

226

344

55

83

23 1 -

15

84

127

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

Total
United States United Kingdoe Sweden Netherlands Serway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

zl

261
.

144
_ 39 -

_ -

8 _
5

128

42
m

_ _

_
_

_ .
-

_ _

123
-

^ -

_ 123 -

_
-

39
-

_ -

.
-

3 1

4
7

30 29 10 36
33

20 10

10 37
2g

FREIGHTERS

Total
United States United KingdoB Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan GOfflMW All Others

356 10 84
15 15 35

1,777

2,618
135 614 120 89 245 90 61
2

10

92 92 -

135

98

551

781 m 584
-

26
m.

135
_

190
_ 115
51

33

144
_

207
_

15

14
12
1 24

72 74

92 441 86 65 171 64 41 1 182 295 339

70 -

135

m 77
-

^ 421
-

_
2

m
-

51 -

7
-

71

H 8

83
-

14
3
-

12 57 19
-

35 -

19 78 27

9 74

U
1

259 454
549

24

3
-

7 -

14

79
TANKERS

126

11

17

49

Total

243

3,026
225

4,612 356 717 125


145 759 143 272

26 15 _

456
225 -

733

61
_

747
_

1,096

31
_

377
_ -

577
_ -

17
_

168
_

249
_

9
_

United States United Kingdon Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Qeraany All Others

15 38
8

11

489 84 99
507 88 181 262 75 72 944

356 -

686 -

37 -

469 -

20
67 17
-

46

H
20
9 8 66

399 114 104 1,478

_ -

13 -

136
-

195
-

18 2

84 223 32

125 345 -

31 98
25 -

1 -

9
-

48

29

42

11

231

377

11

142

215

38

59

35

53

80

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SKIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1954


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

Norway

Denmark
DVT.
...

France
DWT.
Ho.

Italy

Japan
DWT.

Germany
DWT.

all Others
No.

Grose Tons

Grose |Tons

Cross Tons

DW>

No.

Gross Tone

Ho.

Gross Tons

No.*

"

DWT.

Tons

Gross Tons

DWT.

SUMMARY --ALL SHIP TYPE.

123

187

19

125

182

26

271

385

22

292

411

40

370

597

131

848

1,263

48

237

339

8 3

11
5

2 3

4
121
2 _

40

184
3

6
16
1

107 12

155 19

U
403 319

61

58 85 23

15

29

21 52

20

172

235
22

292

411
34

267
103

383
214

84 29
595 436

193

266

99

150

43

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

3|

30

20

29

10

24

26

36

37

30

20
1 29 10 1 2
FREIGHTERS

10 14

10

4
16

36

37
2

u
99

54

82

13

61

84

10

38

57

26

225

379

93

377

563

31

138

52 2

79
3

12

59

81
9

1 1 2 1

8 3
8

11
5

12 3

11 15

34

52
1 1 2

24
1
2

182 43

259

72
3
1

2
TANKERS

120

11

295 48

454
61

30

97

136

69

105

64

98

13

203

308

20

262

399

11

121

192

34

435

663

15

124

192

3
69
105

4
4
1

32 49
11

48
12

74
19
8

1 108 163

47 70 17

13

19
52

29

20

262

399
9 75

1M
78

95

145

46

8 18

72 271

104 425

11

82

121

81

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1955


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

Registry for Which Built

No.

Total Gross Tons

United States Gross DVT. (Ho. Tons DVT

United Kingdom Gross Ho. Tons DVT.


SHIP TYPES

Sweden
~T Gross No. Tons

DVT.

Netherlands Gross No. Tons DVT.

SI JMMARY- -ALL

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

566

4,342
75 869 201 319 725 150 336
122 188

6,230
101 1,166 283 454 1,058 227 487 184 260 588 1,422

_7 6

94
75

351
101 -

|2
97 _

1,204
..

1,658

54

472

697
_

51
_ 2

398

571

6
107

30
38 85 19 35 16 26 78 126

. -

816
-

1,091 -

^ 23

_
179

255 372 70

_ 26
-

41
-

~
-

_ -

22

244 -

358 "
~ _

" 26

_
253

33
3

305 12

433 17
-

17 38

19

_ -

144

25
-

410 947

30

24

_ 209

10

55

40

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

Total
United States United Kingdca Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark Trance
Italy

17

337

102

64

44 \_z

"
1

4
1
1

60

41

60

41

2 2 .

Japan Germany All Others

2
9

18 52

19 38

FREIGHTERS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

377
i

1,980

2^796

J,
3

38

Q.
43 _ m -

2
m

551
<_

B
M

11
m

204
_

289
1

88
m

124,

74 22
16

38 415
98 55

43 546 132

_ _

38 _
,

66 -

47
12 19
8

256 57 82
55 174

76 354 86 110
83 237

6
-

24 69
83j

312 438

447
682

.
_

394 44 _ 123
TANKERS

517 _ _

63

165

15 16 -

76 _ 109

104 148

i
13 3

6 -

_ 10
-,

45
12

62 17

. _ _ 19

4
_
-

20

37

21

30

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany All Others

222
3

2,22?

2,221
58

A
3 m
_

56
37
_

58

f&
1

H2
362 _ 200 _

m
_
533 _

32
_ _
8

268

m.
.

?1
.

3J0
20 260 _ 13 -

44Z
_ 31
,

29
8 22

37 394
103 264

579 151
378.

"

27
_

_ 103

37 7
15 8 2 7 34

466
93

250 67 14 80 457

702 141 375 101


23 122

_
. -

_
1

_ _

" " "


*"

16

_ 295 "
"

10

144
_

_ 151 224

1
-

_ 1

20 1 -

371
_

_ -

2
|

"
-

_ -

20
-

33

19

"

702

30

27

41

21

17

"

25
J

82

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1955


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

No.
IY -

Norway Gross DWT. Tons

Denmark Or 088 DWT. No. Tons

No.

Franoe Gross Tons DWT.

No.

Italy Gross Tons


,

DWT.

No.

Japan Gross Tons

DWT.

No.

Germany Gross DWT. Tons

All
No.

Gross Tons

DWT.

ALL SHIP TYPES


339

SUMMARYALL
20
135

3HIP TYPES

23

201

199

35

351

504

16

322

184

-47

449

695

134

779

1,138

36

199

272

22 -

127

183

4
24 100

4
2

7 6

21
18 3D 65

27 24
14

7
32

21

4
26

32 153

31

318

-459

122

184

37

8 1 1

96
5

3
1

3 -

16

26
1 12
18

188

260
78

10

33

45

17

231

391

30

410 251

588

361

33

172

233

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

"
1

2
1

2 _

34

28

30

24

3
1

2 2

18 16

19 9

30

24

FREIGHTERS

15

55

73

15

73

107

20

310

347

55

83

275

424

109

460

654

18

71

107

4
8 54

4
12 81 16 : :

6 6
3
5

9
38

12 24

10
28 3 1

15

55

73

u
5

14

31

1
77
102

1 8
55

24 1

174
101

237 69 187
18

10

33

45
TANKERS

10

332 79

447
108
17 65

100

_8

128

_4

52

22

227

255

_8

22

101

32

172

262

21

?15
12

426

2k

ss

141

1 2

15

4
26

7
3

72

310

l 3

33

38

37

55 2

46

72
34 237

37

21

32

355
8 67 101 2 14
128

23

32

18

202

7 10

80 156

122

244

32

77

109

83

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1956


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

Total
Registry for Which Built
No.

Gross Tons

United States Gross


Dwt.
No.

Tons

Dwt.

United Kingdom Gross No. Tons Dwt.

No.
'

Sweden Gross Dwt. Tons

Netherlands Gross No. Tons. Dwt.

Norway
No.

Gross Tons

Dwt.

SUMMARY--ALL SHII TYPES

Total
United States United Klngdan Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark France Italy Japan Germany Liberia All Others

676
5

5,639
91

8.165
144 1,186 312 366 1,170 189 176 322
4.72

J.
5

98

152

152

1,389

1,893

51

462

669

2Z

221

467

22

122

247

91
97 835

110 34 29 89 21 22 28 39 72 93 134

899
223 262

1,093
23

2
2

4
3

186
234

261
26
243

339
21

827 130
128 219

12
1

170

232
6

22

345
1

169

240

316 328 1,329 887

479 2,126 1,223

12 2 7

U2
238

15

30

215 347

29
13

45
18

60 25

92

32

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark Prance Italy Japan Germany

22

_23J7

131

_9

m.
97

&
48

_1

_6

97

48

26

19

7
-

10

Uberia
All Others
19
104

71

9
FREIGHTERS

Total
United States United Klngdan Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark Prance Italy Japan Germany Liberia All Others

505

3,163

4,579
721 229 228 612 124 86 205 320 477 918 659

15

107

718

1,009

37

255

348

26

161

215

16

86

113

83

30
23

61
18

19

20
34 71 56 90

520 169 170 443 88 69 134 222 327


565

70

456

628
19
132

1
1

2
2

4
3

178

20
4
1

151
1

201
14 82

38

55

14

110

152
1 2

106

8 2

456

15

24

63 157

93

227

13

18

10

TANKERS

Total
United States United Kingdom Sweden Netherlands Norway Denmark Prance Italy Japan Germany
5

2,22?
91 282
54

3,455

21
5

26
144
22

547

820

24

207

2.21

12

164

248

_7

82

224.

lU
417
83

91

22

282

417

4 6
24
3 3

4
7
113

54

83

92 358

42
59

138 549 65

92

138

170

124

193

87

134

90
114 152 2 1,208 493

6
5

75 94
1

Uberia
All Others

37
25

764 327

4
3

79 73

122 111

29

45

60
12

92
18

84

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1956


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT

Denmark
No.

Gross Tons

Dwt.

No.

Prance Gross Dwt. Tons

No.

Italy Gross Tons

Japan Gross
Dwt.
No.

Germany (West)

Tons

Dwt.

No.

Gross Tons

Dwt.

Germany (East) Gross No. Tons Dwt.

All Others Gross No. Tons Dwt.

SUMMARYALL SHIP TYPES


18
-

114

166

21

212

318

22

242
-

262
:

121
-

1,420
4 -

2,264
-

152

880

1,20?

_1

.2
-

_5
-

52

287

407

:
1
2

:
3

3 13 1

16

79
17 -

27 110 26
-

19
1

_ -

26 106 -

11 38

:
-

9
1

52

74
21 27 263 38
2

7
-

5
3

16

_
_ -

_
_ _

219 -

25

26
5
1

U2
-

24 70

37 90

28 2

322 -

39
-

30

45

66
13

_ 316 984 91

39 _ 472 1,611 135

19 194 25
1

_ _
_
_

_
2

_ _ _
_

_
_

13 _ 18 _

17

_
25

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_ _
3

_
_

_
72 6 24

_ 328
53

_ 479
70 229

_ _
i

_ _ _
3

_
_

_ _
5

_
56

192

43

37 218

307

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

_1

10

_2

10

_3

_2

_2

_8

42

12

_2

22

28

10

14

10

4
FREIGHTERS

40

17

32

28

16

80

114

28

129

171

21
"~

143

218

85

710

1,132

122

759

1,072

_1

Jk
~

_5_

22

112

167

_
1

_
2

_
3

7 -

11 -

3 12

16 62 -

27 84 -

17
-

26 64 -

32

38 78 -

20 -

_ -

: -

:
i

:
4

: 7 -

9
5

52

22
5

16 19 166 25
1

74 21 27 228 38
2

: _ _ _

_ _ _
_

13

_
1

_
5

_ _
_ _ _

_
_ _ _

17 _ 6

_
_

_
_ _ _ _ _
93

134 9

205 13

34
-

222 -

320

_
_

755
50

42
8

44

449 35
TANKERS

_ 71 6 15

_ 327
53

_ _ 477 70
135

_ _
1

_
_
3

_ _
_
5

_ _
_ _

100

24

_ _ _ 142

_2
-

14
-

52
-

_4
-

2Q
-

222
-

_2
-

2i
-

146
-

14 2

706
-

1.129
-

_6
_
1

24
_

112

-=
_

_r
_ _ _ _

_=
-

16

M2
_ _
13

212

_ _
1

_
_
19

17
17
-

26 26 -

42
-

1
1

"

24 24

64 -

6
-

75
-

114
-

39 152

25

21 _ _ 1

_
_

_
94 -

_ 1

33 _ _ _
2

_ _
_

_
_ _

_
_

_ _ -

_
-

_ _
-

_
_

_
_ _ 56

_
-

_
_

24 3

856 82

37

36

21

32

535
52

52

_
77

_ _

_
_ -

_
3

37
93

12

137

85

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1957


(Tonnage in thousands)

Registry fcr Which Built

Ho.

Total Qross Tons

Dwt.

United States Gross Toes Dwt. Ho.

United Kingde Gross No. Tons Dwt.

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT Japan Germany (West) Gross Gross Ho. Tons Dwt. No. Tons Dwt.

No

Germany (East) Gross Tons Dwt.

SUMMARYALL SHII TYPES


Total
United States United Kingdom Japan Germany (Wast) Germany (East) Sweden Netherlands Prance Italy Norway Denmark Liberia All Others

224
8

7^%
172 1,154 659 325 16 259

10.801 269 1,556 956 452


23

11

226.

373,

Ul
110
2

1*125

1,795

m
i

2 f 140 3*27*

246

1,044

1,527

J:

22

12

126 87
58

8 _

_
.

3 30 50

340
585

4U
254 286 938 209 1,886 855

_ m -

31 31
98

27 117
128

346 412 1,396 301 2,987 1,178

_ 3 -

172 _ _ . _ 64 -

269 a _ -

1,002

1,341

u
_

12

87 1

24 659
-

36 956

76

106
,

58

325
=,

m
3

_
_ 16

_
23

_
_

83 149 77

_ .
104

_ 117

21 -

=
5

.
32

23

9
1

70
1

452 m 29 101
2

17

148 22 170

225 30 315 267

~ i.
-.

220 105

u
11

4
66 10

87 57 51 79 1,219 1,914 109 167

4
17 27

209

_ ~
_

10

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS


Total
United States United Kingdom Japan Germany (West) Sveden Netherlands Prance Italy Norway Denmark Liberia All Others
22

242

jjg

^4
-

22
70

22
27

_2

22
-

4
1

70

27

23

4
1

49
13

29

6
15

26

62

36

20

FREIGHTERS

Total

55

3,830

5,421

_ -

110

770

1,041

111

234 1.314
502

332

824

1,217

_4 3

22

22 23

United States United Kingdom Japan Germany (West) Germany (East) Sweden Netherlands France Italy Norway Denmark Liberia All Others

94 76 57 3 22
38 23

22 61 20 62 107

615 502 303 16 133 261 120 164 371 109 620 616

825 710 420 23 175 355 157 252 523 144 963 874

83

559 m
m.

2 -

14

755 12

76 _

710

6
57

28 -

34

.,

28

_
5

_ -

_
-

_
-

58

m
m.

10

92

_ 82 132

19 343 50

9 1

303 23 70
1

_ 420 29 101
2
-

_ 16

12

58

47

60

30 7

499 77

4
14 25

22 130 189

86 30
253 262

~ _
6

10

TANKERS

Total
United States United Kingdom Japan Germany (West) Sweden Netherlands France Italy Norway Denmark Liberia All Others

182
8 28

3,381
172

5*262

21
8 -

226 172 -

222
269 -

22

415

222

52

1.226 1,957

21
2

222

225

-=
-

11 1

469 157
22 103

269 704
24.6

23

373

559

7
8

32 160

_
-

_ _

35

7
5

37 7
55 13

131 121 96 567 100 1,266 177

201 183 145 873 157 2,024 268

_
25

1 11 1 -

24 157

36 246

1
-

48 22

32 -

21
-

64
-

104 -

57

4
2

30

88 45

4 36
3

38 59 51 79 876 1,415 90 59

_
3

90 40 -

72 _ 32 _ _ 139 62 -

m -

Data for "Iron Curtain" countries incomplete. Includes information received through February 28, 1958.

86

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1957


(Tonnage in thousands)

No.

Sweden Grosa Dwt. Tons

Netherlands Grosa Dwt. No. Tons

No.

Pranoo Or oss Tons Dwt.

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT Italy Cross Dwt. No. Mo. Tons

Norway Grose Tons Dwt.

No.

Denmark Gross Tone Dwt.

All Others
No.

Gross Tons

Dwt.

SUMMARY -ALL SHIP TYPES

52
1

622

%1
19

55.

462

606

42
1

454

642

22

402

558

21

216

2fi

165

226

66
2

222

422

12

10

13

13

12

IB

10

18
1

166

238

33

303

392

21
347 12 60 14

33
519 19

29
3 2
5 53 2

2 12 232

3 17 311 71
210 24

23

3 1

31

48

U
12

17
18

13

31
32 1 3 3 77 3 48 73
5

286

412
29

50
135 14

200

300
16
122 170
3
58

94
23

10

33 62

2
5

18

76

25 116

38 286

57

390

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS

5k

22

_6

_5

42

ss

22

S3

23

49

29
1

13

6 4
26
15

4
FREIGHTERS

37

28

24

232

322

22
2

239

3J6

22

178

239

22

211

221

20.

72

IIS

16

104

122

55

252

262

10

13

13

10

12

75

98 23

156

212

1 3

2 12

22
18

119
29

3 17 155

2 1

19

28

14

17

13

22
134

164

252
18

188
13 23

1
2

7
2

7
3 28 53

38
2

66

94 14

85

111
1 50

9 14

4
7

19

18

25

45

13

29

44

9 227

13

329

TANKERS 25
4Q0.

623

12

170

258

22.

22

404

.2

42

21Z

124

206

Jt

61
12

22
18

_2

62

25

12

19

6
1

91 21
213 12
51

140

12

20

6
33

98

151 6 100
21

1 150
5

12

18

96

145
11

14 1 2

331
19 81

46
14 12

70

33

134

206
2

37

59
2

1
1

20 17

4
1

135

210
11 2

47

72

29 22

44
33

87

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1958


(Tonnage in thousands)

Registry for Which Built

No.

Total Gross Tons

Dwt.

Doited States Gross Ho. Tons Dwt.

United Kingdom Gross No. Tons Dwt.

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT Japan Germany (West)


No.

Gross Tone

Dwt.

No.

Gross Tons

Dirt.

Germany (East) Grose No. Tons Dvrt.

SUMMARY--ALL SHIP TYPES


Total
United States United Kingdom Japan Germany (West) Germany (East) Sweden Netherlands France Italy Norway Denmark Liberia All Others
885
18 152 114 75
5

8,469 12,459
337 1,396 835 48l 35
1*16
351*

25 18
-

521*

79^
1*81 -

161

1,1*11

1,972

186

2,156 3,355

158

1,203 1,722

10

51

70

1*81

337
-

36 36 39 20 114 33 83 160

1,959 1,210 676 52 607


1*85

127
-

1,105
-

1,532
-

1
111* -

13

16
-

8
71*

97
-

835 1,210
-

11*2 .

3 -

1*78
-

673
-

20
-

30
-

1
-

22
-

32
-

377 280 1,181 182


1,1*96

543 389
1,71*7

Ill*

6 9 2
-

1*8

71
10l*

78
5

7
1*51

10
-

165
-

1
3

272
2,1*1*9

6
1

1,099

1,589

160 27

267
1*6

8 16

78

V*
HON

119 156

51
15

20 61 39 1,057 1,738 278 177


13

32 6
6 15

313 18

68 98

26 119 129

1*0

31

cot 1BINA

PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS


1*1*

Total
United States United Kingdom Japan Germany (West) Germany (East) Sweden Nether lands France Italy Norway Denmark Liberia All Others

12
1*

158

105
33

1*

61 61

33 33

33

11

10

61
1*0

1*

31
10

1*0

31
1

11

11

10
-

11*

12

1 1 2

20
3

8
3

1*

FREIGHTERS
Total
United States United Kingdom Japan Germany (West) Germany (East) Sweden Netherlands France Italy Norway Denmark Liberia All Others
63I*

4,l4l

5,838

121

816

1,116

130

962 1,1*16

139

925 1,302

_9

1*6 6J*

111*

102 70
3

759 672
1*26

1,037 959

98
-

&*9

881

1 102

13

16

1*

21*

31*

672

959
69
1*23

20
137

591* 30
185 292 163 131 735
11*0

591
3

20

30

19 27 25 12

1*

19

28
101*

71
26 36 129

219 130 95 524


97 387

9 2
5 6 12
1*6

78
5

63

27 6 17 10
201*

225
18
1*0

626

675

9W

54 67

82 90

73

332 109

1*

14

93

31^ 26 75 123

26

34

TANKERS
Total
United States United Kingdom Japan Germany (West) Germany (East) Sweden Netherlands France Italy Norway Denmark Liberia All Others
239
11*

4,170
276 597 152
55 15

6,516
1*1*8

21
14
-

463 276
-

761
448
-

37
m

551
_

823
.

55
.

1,183 1,929
. .
-

19
_

278
_

420
_

_
-

36 11
5

2
17

891 241 82 22
1*22

27
-

416
-

620
-

4
-

73
-

108
-

11
-

152
-

241
-

5
-

55
-

82
-

8
11*

279 121
21*7

2
-

29
-

43
-

7
1*3

6
1*7

165 657 82 1,109


1*15

29

181 380 250 1,012 129 1,823 635

1
-

22
-

32
-

5
-

68
-

102
-

1
3

6
1

160 27

267 46

2
3

24 43

37

64

34 5

20 13 61 39 853 1,406
104 169

5
-

88
-

137
-

2
1

28
5

44 6

Data for "Iron Curtain" countries Incomplete. Includes Information received through February 28, 1959

Subject to revision.

DELIVERIES OF NEW MERCHANT SHIPS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1958


(Tonnage in thousands)

COUNTRY IN WHICH BUILT


Sweden Gross Tons Dwt.
Netherlands Grose Dirt. No. Tons

No.

Ho.

France Gross Tons

Dirt.

No.

Italy Gross Tons

Dirt.

No.

Norway Gross Tons Dwt.

Denmark Gross No. Tone Dwt.

All Others Gross


No.

Tons

Dwt.

SHIP TYPES
59
695
1,033

SUMMARY --ALL SHIP TYPES

t.
2

468

664

39

407

577

37

506

735

26

226

342

26

211

322

104

611

873

27

39

10

47

73

9
1

97
3

142
3

15

22
34

25

308

1*50

22
293
44

33

13

24
4

230
23

315 35
1*3 11 63

24

19 3^
3

25

30
4

412 20 280
12

56

89
5>*

27
3 3

313

468
58 18

8
5
1*

13

95 8 44 66

61

3
1

389 20
16 184

25

225

340

36
117

1 4 84

16

25

19
3

17!*

4l

61

10 120

^5 410

69 578

COMBINATION PASSENGER AND CARGO SHIPS


1

14

12

20

14

12
-

20

8
1
3 3

FREIGHTERS
32

249

350

37

224

302

27

178

229

21

167

243

14

61

88

17

83

123

87

430

605

10

7 1

63
3

91
3

12

93

123
16

25

3*

2
15 2
3

117 4

154 6

24 95
12

3^

21
3

121
30

150
12

121

170

4
5
3

22
13

39
18

20 3 30 *3

26
11'

41

3 1

131 20
16

13

60

86

10

15

71
2

15 103
3

43 59

10

20

28

26

42

73

27 312

39 438

TANKERS
27

446

683

16

230

350

12

229

348

15

319

484

12

165

254

125

196

17

181

268

27

39

47

73

3^

51

2 13

15

22

215

327
7

22 172
14

33

13

19
3

99
19

2
12
1

149 29
117

9
1

262
7

56 26 43

89
39 68
i
1

165

250
12

192
12

298
19

4
1

75
14

20

165

254

2
3

16

25
30 140

23

20 33

21

33

142

11

18 98

89

LOSSES AND SCRAPPINGS

MAJOR WORLD FLEETS

UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958
T o t a 1

s s e s

<:

r a p p i n g s

Year Type of Ship


19-49

Number
28
18 10

Gross Tons
168,982

Deadweight Tons
261,893

Number
2 2

Gross Tons
9,445

Deadweight
Tons

Number
26
16 10

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
247,993
121,629 126,364
156,735

Average Age Of Scrapping


(Years)

13,900

159,537

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1950'

91,967 77,015

135,529 126,364
156,735

9,445

13,900

82,522 77,015
121,886

26 31

20
15
5

121,886
89,171 32,715 61,142 53,816 7,326 86,297

20
15
5
5

Dry Cargo Tankers

104,604 52,131
66,781
56,213 10,568
86,732

89,171 32,715
32,018

104,604 52,131
26,315

35

31

1951

10
8

29,124

40,466 31,351 9,115

Dry Cargo
Tankers 1952

4 1
6

22,927 6,197
36,958 25,363 11,595
56,277-

4
1
5 5

30,889 1,129

24,862 1,453
33,363
33,363

39
8

11
9
2

53,369
35,237 18,132

49,339
49,339

Dry Cargo Tankers


1953

74,702 11,595
97.156
33,123 64,033

68,600 18,132
156,240
50,196 106,044
104,172

4
2 6

32

12 6 6 2
2

89,594
35,232 54,362

6 2 4
8

40,879
9,696 31,183
55,046

66,646 14,964 51,682


93,822
93,822
35

Dry Cargo
Tankers
195-4

4 2
1 1

23,427 32,850
6,195 6,195

31

61,241 61,241

10,350
10,350

Dry Cargo Tankers


1955

104,172

55,046

21

11,552 11,552

27,985
27,985

1
1

3,337 3,337

5,005
5,005

8,215
8,215

22,980 22,980
34

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1956

6
5

41,484
30,900 10,584

64,715

34,308

53,965

7,176
7,176

10,750 10,750
14

Dry Cargo
Tankers

47,950 16,765
196,260
196,260

4 1

23,724 10,584

37,200 16,765

1957

23 23

201,989 201,989

23
-

201,989
201,989

196,260 196,260
34

Dry Cargo
Tankers

23

1958

68

482, 816

709,701

68
-

482,816 458,427 24,389

709.701 668,099 41,602


16 17

Dry Cargo
Tankers

64
-4

458,427 24,389

668,099 41,602

64 4

93

DANISH FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH
T o t a 1

1958

L o s s e s

S c

a p p

n g

Number
1949
_
-

Gross Tons
_

Deadweight Tons
_

Number

Gross Tons
_

Deadweight Tons
_

Number
_

Gross Tons
_

Deadweight Tons
_

Average Age of Scrapping


(Tears)

Dry Cargo Tankers


1950

_ _ _ _

4
4

7,245 7,245

12,420

3
3

5,003 5,003

8,145 8,145

1 1

2,242

4,275
4,275

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1951

12,420

2,242

29

3
3

6,257
6,257

9,318

5,208

8,690 8,690

1 1

1,049

628

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1952

9,318

5,208

1,049

628

54

4,028
2,995 1,033

6,430
5,063 1,367

1 1

1,806 1,806

3,288
3,288

2,222
1,189 1,033

3,142 1,775 1,367

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1953

1 1

60 28

4 4

10,281 10,281

14,317 14,317

4 4

10,281 10,281

14,317 14,317
45

Dry Cargo Tankers


1954

13,002

19,940
11,375 8,565
15,032

2
2

7,209 7,209

11,375 11,375

5,793

8,565

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1955

2
1 3

7,209 5,793
10,060

1
1

5,793

8,565

28

2,928 2,928

4,625

2 1 1 1

7,132 1,418 5,714


5,723

10,407
1,713 8,694 8,625
57

Dry Cargo
Tankers 1956

2 1

4,346 5,714
5,723

6,338 8,694
8,625

4,625

30

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1957
1
2 2

5,723

8,625

1 2 2

5,723
3,452 3,452

8,625

29

3,452
3,452

2,705 2,705

2,705 2,705 40

Dry Cargo Tankers


1958

18,724 18,724

27, 837

2,990
2,990

3,877 3,877

2
2

15,734

23,960

Dry Cargo
Tankers

27,837

15,734

23,960

39

94

FRENCH FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958

Total
Year Type of Ships
1949

Losses
Deadweight
Tons

S c r a p p i n g s

Hhmber
1 1

Gross Tons

Number
-

Gross Tons
-

Deadweight
Tons
-

Number
1 1

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
6,945 6,945

Average Age Of Scrapping


(Years)

4,731
4,731

6,945 6,945

4,731 4,731

Dry Cargo Tankers


1950

30

12 12

48,449 48,449

64,456
64,456

8,442
8,442

10,350
10,350

10

40,007 40,007

54,106 54,106
36

Dry Cargo Tankers


1951

10

15,117 14,058 1,059 65,087

16,524

1 1

1,463 1,463

1,850
1,850

4
3

13,654
12,595 1,059

14,674
13,259 1,415
39 43

Dry Cargo Tankers


1952

4 1
8 8

15,109 1,415
51,910 51,910

1 2
2

16,732
16,732

11,604 11,604

6
6

48,355
48,355

40,306 40,306
35

Dry Cargo Tankers


1953

65,087

15 12
3

85,986
70,185 15,801 98,101 56,578

90,665

1
1

2,878 2,878

4,700
4,700

U
11
3

83,108
67,307 15,801

85,965

Dry Cargo
Tankers

67,940 22,725
123,045

63,240 22,725
120,645

32

30

1954

18
12 6 16

1 1

1,487 1,487

2,400
2,400

17
11 6

96,6L4
55,091

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1955

a, 523
64,295

60,381 62,664
80,271
31,912 48,359

a, 523
59,518

57,981 62,664

35

29

4,777
4,777

8,400

14
9
5

71,871 23,512 48,359


37

Dry Cargo Tankers


1956

11
5

32,477 31,818

8,400

27,700 31,818 27,339

29

7 7

27,339

20,040 20,040

7 7

20,040
20,040
40

Dry Cargo
Tankers

27,339

27,339

1957

2
1 1 3

13,706
5,438 8,268
19,015

16,873

2 1
1

13,706
5,438 8,268

16,873

Dry Cargo Tankers


1958

7,773 9,100

7,773 9,100
3

29,164
4,674 24,490

19,015

29,164
4,674 24,490
39 24

Dry Cargo Tankers

2,921 16,094

1 _ _ _

2,921 16,094

95

GERMAN FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH

1958

Total
Year Type of Ship
1949

s s e s

S c

ra

ppi

n g s

Number
1 1

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
6,450

Number
-

Gross Tons
-

Deadweight Tons
-

Number
1 1

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
6,450 6,450

Average Age Of Scrapping


(Years)

3,584 3,584

3,584
3,584

Dry Cargo Tankers


1950

6,450

40

1
1

3,063 3,063

5,452 5,452

1
1

3,063

5,452
5,452
36

Dry Cargo Tankers


1951

3,063

2,606

4,500 4,500

1
1

1,494 1,494

3,200
3,200

1
1

1,112
1,112

1,300 1,300
53

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1952

2,606

1 1

5,215 5,215

7,235

5,215 5,215

7,235 7,235 34

Dry Cargo Tankers


1953

7,235

14,704
LI, 704

22,032

1 1

6,368

9,552
9,552

3 3

8,336 8,336

12,480 12,480
46

Dry Cargo Tankers


1954

22,032

6,368

30,034
13,275 16,759

46,340
20,195 26, 145

1
1

1,986

3,575
3,575

8 6
2

28,048

42,765

Dry Cargo Tankers


1955

7
2

1,986

11,289 16,759
14,001

16,620 26,145

42 25

7 6 1
3

25,407
19,305 6,102

40,061 30,441 9,620


6,890
6,890

3
3

11,406
11,406

18,007 18,007

4
3

22,054
12,434 9,620
3,840
3,840

Dry Cargo Tankers


1956

1 1 1

7,899 6,102
2,495 2,495

40 28

4,401
4,401

1,906
1,906

3,050 3,050

2 2

Dry Cargo Tankers


1957

41

4
3

13,886

20,894

1 1

1,106 1,106

1,500

12,780

19,394
5,814 13,580

Dry Cargo
Tankers

4,789 9,097
59,833
52,532 7,301

7,314 13,580
92,397

1,500

2 1

3,683 9,097

49 38

1958

22

3 3

6,919
6,.919

10,340

19

52,914 45,613 7,301

82,057

Dry Cargo
Tankers

21
1

80,962 11,435

10,340

18
1

70,622 11,435

42 30

96

ITALIAN FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH
T o t a 1
L

1958

s e

r a p p 1 n g s

Year Type of Ship


1949

Number
3

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
29,625

Humber
-

Gross Tons
-

Deadweight Tons
-

Number
3

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Average Age Of Scrapping


(Years)

17,953
5,890 12,063

17,953

29,625

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1950

1 2

9,600 20,025

1 2
2
2

5,890 12,063

9,600 20,025

38 41

11
10 1
5

52,167

79,263
71,083 8,180

10,891 10,891

16,110
16,110

9
8

41,276
35,433 5,843

63,153
54,973 8,180 42 29

Dry Cargo Tankers


1951

46,324 5,843
40,167
40,167

1
5

45,444 45,444
-

40,167

45,444 45,444

Dry Cargo Tankers


1952

40,167

6 6

36,852
36,852

44,944
44,944

36,852

44,944 44,944
42

Dry Cargo
Tankers 1953

36,852

16 14
2

89,297
77,335 11,962

133,328 115,986 17,342

2
2

4,969
4,969

8,000

14
12
2

84,328

125,328
107,986 17,342
152,861
37 34

Dry Cargo Tankers


1954

8,000

72,366 11,962

22

1U,632
82,996 31,636

166,659
119,262 47,397

2
2

8,263 8,263

13,798 13,798

20 15
5

106,369
74,733 31,636
102,100

Dry Cargo Tankers


1955

17
5

105,464 47,397
155,487

46 37

24
10 14

117,334
35,314 82,020 47,062

178,404
50,907 127,497 35,107
35,107

4
4

15,234
15,234

22,917

20
6 14
3 3

Dry Cargo Tankers


1956

22,917

20,080 82,020
4,930

27,990 127,497
7,625 7,625

44
37

7
7

4
4

42,132
42,132

27,482

Dry Cargo
Tankers

47,062

27,482

4,930

57

1957

4 4

19,288 19,288

22,967 22,967

2
2

5,710 5,710

8,943 8,943

2 2

13,578
13,578

14,024 14,024
51

Dry Cargo
Tankers

1958

25

119,019
106,732 12,287

185,976 166,592 19,384

5 5

24,038
24,038

37,996 37,996

20
18
2

94,981
82,694 12,287

147,980

Dry Cargo
Tankers

23
2

128,596 19,384

42 39

97

JAPANESE FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958

Total
Tear Type of Ship

s s e s

S c

rappi
Gross Tons
_ -

n g

Number
2 1 1
3 3

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
11,740

Num-

ber
2
1

Gross Tons
8,097

Deadweight Tons
11,740
3,300 8,440

Number
.

Deadweight Tons
m -

Average Age Of Scrapping


(lears)

1949

8,097

Dry Cargo Tankers


1950

2,219 5,878
6,307

3,300 8,440
9,751 9,751

1 3
3

2,219 5,878
6,307 6,307

9,751
9,751
-

Dry Cargo Tankers


1951

6,307

11
10 1
9

20,440
19,400 1,040 31,121 31,121

31,126 29,626 1,500


47,040

6
6

13,465 13,465

22,494 22,494

6,975
5,935 1,040

8,632
7,132 1,500
38,300 38,300
34
36

Dry Cargo Tankers


1952

4
1
8 8

1 1

5,L48

8,740
8,740

25,973 25,973

Dry Cargo Tankers


1953

47,040

5,M8
9,670 9,670

1 1

9,670

U,505
14,505

1
1

14,505
Li, 505 -

Dry Cargo Tankers


1954

9,670

3 3

8,567
8,567

11,186
11,186

1
1

6,312
6,312

7,763
7,763

2 2

2,255
2,255

3,423
3,423 39

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1955

8 6 2
5
5

36,277

53,966

1
1

1,339 1,339

1,968

7
5

34,938
19,133 15,805
12,725 12,725

51,998 27,092 24,906


10,970 10,970
36 30

Dry Cargo Tankers


1956

20,472 15,805 19,228


19,228

29,060 24., 906

1,968

2
3 3

20,854 20,854

6,503 6,503

9,884 9,884

2
2

Dry Cargo
Tankers

19

1957

13,616 13,616

8,220
8,220

1 1

1,384
1,384

2,100
2,100

2 2

12,232
12,232

6,120

Dry Cargo
Tankers

6,120

38

1958

7
7

58,749 58,749

52,682

15,826
15,826

22,473 22,473

4
A

42,923

30,209 30,209
30

Dry Cargo
Tankers

52,682

42,923

98

LIBERIAN FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1952 THROUGH 1958

T o t a 1
Deadweight Tons
8,318 8,318

L o s s e 3 Deadweight Tons
8,318

S c r a p p i n g s

Tear Type of Ship


1952

Bomber
1
1

Gross Tons 5,250 5,250

Humhe r
1 1

Gross Tons

Number
-

Gross Tons
-

Deadweight Tons
-

Average Age Of Scrapping


(Years)

5,250
5,250

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1953

8,318
-

8 2

62,953
14,265 48,688

96,440

25,224
6,323 18,901

38,865
9,875 28,990

37,729
7,942 29,787
30,635

57,575 11,552 46,023


36
35

Dry Cargo
Tankers

6
5

21,427 75,013
58,692

1
2

4
4 1
3

1954

38,039
15,300 22,739 39,714 19,974 19,740
36,206
30,055 6,151

1
1

7,404

11,235 11,235

47,457
11,552 35,905
37 31

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1955

2
3

22,787 35,905
61,486 31,927 29,559 44,050
34,705 9,345

7,404

7,896 22,739

8
5

3 3

13,277 13,277

20,772
20,772

26,437
6,697 19,740
17,026
10,875 6,151

40,714
11,155 29,559
14,975
47

Dry Cargo
Tankers 1956

2
3

28

6
5

3
3

19,180
19,180

29,075 29,075

3
2 1

Dry Cargo Tankers


1957

5,630 9,345

42 27

4
2 2 6

43,235

68,416
15,377 53,039

32,819

53,039

2 2

10,416

15,377 15,377
27

Dry Cargo
Tankers

10,416 32,819 28,983

10,416

32,819
15,232

53,039 21,959
2

1958

41,502
41,502

13,751

19.543 19,543

Dry Cargo Tankers

28,983

15,232

21,959

13,751

38

99

NETHERLANDS FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958
T o t a 1
Ij o.

s s e s

r a p p

Ugs
Deadweight Tons
1,750
1,750 1,750
38

Year Type of Ship


1949

Number
1
1

Gross Tons 3,242 3,242

Deadweight Tons
1,750

Number
_

Gross Tons
.

Deadweight Tons

Num-

ber
1
1 1

Gross Tons
3,242

Average Age Of Strapping


(Years)

Dry Cargo Tankers


1950

1,750

3,242 3,242

5 5

19,272 19,272

29,167

1 1

2,130 2,130

3,500

4
4

17,142 17,142

25,667 25,667
35

Dry Cargo Tankers


1951

29,167

3,500

Dry Cargo Tankers


1952

4
A

21,807 21,807

17,057

4 4

21,807 21,807

17,057 17,057 39

Dry Cargo Tankers


1953

17,057

9
5

46,976
36,313 10,663

47,626
34,673 12,953
57,840 35,252 22,588

1
1

10,544
10, 544

9,933 9,933

36,432

37,693
24; 740

Dry Cargo Tankers


195*

4
11

4 4
10
3 7
3

25,769 10,663
42,758
24,236 18,522
9,797

12,953
55, 114

29 28

44,325

1
1

1,567 1,567

2,726

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1955

4 7
3

25,803 18,522
9,797

2,726

32,526 22,588

35

27

12,064

12,064

Dry Cargo Tankers


1956

3
5
5

9,797
Li, 219

12,064
15,197
15,197
1
1

9,797

12,064

18

6,410
6,410

8,830
8,830

4 4

7,809 7,809

6,367 6,367
30

Dry Cargo Tankers


1957

14,219

11 A 7
23

47,495 11,611 35,884


136,337

65,907
15,328 50,579
178,920

1 1

2,817

3,903 3,903

10
3

44,678
8,794 35,884
133,676 103,333 30,343

62,004
11,425 50,579
31
25

Dry Cargo Tankers


1958

2,817

7 1 1

2,661

2,397 2,397

22

176,523

Dry Cargo
Tankers

19 A

105,994 30,343

133,681 45,239

2,661

18 4

131,284 45,239

34 23

100

NORWEGIAN FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958

Total
Tear Type of Ship
1949

o s s e s

S c

rappi
Gross Tons
-

n g s
Deadweight Tons
-

Number
5

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
21,735 21,735

Number
5 5

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
21,735
21,735
j

Number
-

Average Age Of Scrapping


(Years)

12,834

12,834 12,834

Dry Cargo
Tankers

12,834

1950

11
9 2

30,372

47,153 35,988 11,165 38,221

8 8

21,507
21,507

34,529

3 1 2 -

8,865

12,624
1,459 11,165
-

Dry Cargo
Tankers

22,889 7,483
24,282
15,865 8,417

34,529

1,382 7,483
-

26 30

1951

6
5

6
5

24,282
15,865 8,417

38,221 25,771 12,450


19,525
19,525

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1952

25,771 12,450
27,175
27,175

4 4

16,437

3
3

11,766 11,766

1
1

4,671
4,671

7,650

Dry Cargo Tankers


1953

16,437

7,650

47

4 4

11,474
11,474

17,113

3,309 3,309

5,013
5,013

2 2

8,165
8,165

12,100 12,100
45

Dry Cargo Tankers


1954

17,113

16

75,063 26,708 48,355 67,660

110,684
39,273 71,411
103,595

2 2

6,641
6,641

8,750

14
8 6

68,422

101,934
30,523 71,411
101,095
39 34

Dry Cargo Tankers


1955

10 6
12
3

8,750

20,067 48,355
66,085
5,325 60,760

1 1

1,575 1,575

2,500
2,500

11
2

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1956

9
5

6,900 60,760

10,440 93,155

9
3
3

7,940 93,155
21,785

35

26

27,904
13,914 13,990 19,038

42,168
20,383 21,785
30,630 30,630

13,914
13, 914

20,383
20,383

13,990

Dry Cargo
Tankers

2
5 5

2
3
3

13,990

21,785

27

1957

16,488

26,630

2 2

2,550

4,000 4,000

Dry Cargo Tankers


1958

19,038

16,488

26,630

2,550

48

6
3

40,156

55,766 20,005 35,761

19,760
9,786 9,974

23,600
8,800 14,800

4
2 2

20,396

32,166
11,205 20,961

Dry Cargo
Tankers

16,458 23,698

1 1

6,672 13,724

43

29

101

PANAMANIAN FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958

Total
Year Type of Ship
1949 Number
25

o s s e 3

S c

rappings
Gross Tons

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
16,908
16,908

Number

Deadweight Tons
220,610

Average Age Of Scrapping


(Tears)

154,611
25,845 128,766
55,545

237,518
38,008 199,510
85,072

4 4

12,840 12,840

21
3

141,771
13,005 128,766

Dry Cargo Tankers


1950

7 18
13

18
3 3

21,100 199,510
66,847

32 31

12,305
12,305

18,225 18,225

10
8 2

43,240
29,570 13,670

Dry Cargo Tankers


1951

11
2
15

41,875 13,670

64,609 20,463
102,840
67,230 35,610
178,467

46,384 20,463
75,310 44,050 31,260
152,467

38
33

71,633 48,897 22,736


129,622

17,809

27,530

10

53,824
34,036 19,788

Dry Cargo Tankers


1952

11

4 1

U,86l
2,948
16,378 16,378

23,180 4,350
26,000

7
3

40 33

29
29

4
4

25
25

113,244 113,244

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1953

129,622

178,467

26,000

152,467

40

33

167,421

250,879
176,354 74,525
394,487 141,790 252,697

2
2

7,848
7,848

11,339 11,339

31
23 8
40

159,573

239,540
165,015 74,525

Dry Cargo Tankers


1954

25
8

118,041 49,380

110,193 49,380 231,895

39 31

45

257,431
96,984 160,447
104,593

5 5

25,536
25,536

35,659 35,659

358,828 106,131 252,697 111,209


31,137 80,072 24,080
9,730 14,350

Dry Cargo Tankers


1955

24 21

19 21 14
6
8

71,448 160,447
78,592

u
31

19 11
8

147,010

5 5

26,001
26,001

35,801
35,801

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1956

53,138 51,455

66,938 80,072 44,697


30,347 14,350
60,305

27,137 51,455 16,164


6,485 9,679

33

10
8 2

29,996
20,317 9,679 38,329

3 3

13,832
13,832

20,617

7
5

Dry Cargo
Tankers

20,617

43
33

1957

11
8
3

4
3

17,821
11,732 6,089 46,212

28,849
19,400 9,449

7
5

20,508
12,179 8,329
138,814
132,622 6,192

31,456

Dry Cargo Tankers


1958

23,911 14,418
185,026 178,834 6,192

38,008 22,297

2 30

18,608 12,848
193,663 183,763 9,900

46

24

41 40
1

265,384
255,484 9,900

11
11

71,721 71,721

Dry Cargo
Tankers

46,212

29 1

42 32

102

SWEDISH FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 THROUGH
T o t a
L

1958

L o
Deadweight Tons
6,900
6,900

s s e s

S c r a p p

n g

Year Type of Ship


1949

Number
3 3

Gross Tons

Number
3
3

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
6,900
6,900

Number
-

Gross Tons
-

Deadweight Tons
-

Average Age Of Scrapping


(Years)

4,706
4,706

4,706 4,706

Dry Cargo
Tankers

1950

1
1

1,140

1,500

1
1

1,140
1,140

1,500

Dry Cargo Tankers


1951

1,U0
8,425

1,500

1,500

6
6

11,790
11,790

5,091

7,530 7,530

3,334 3,334

4,260
4,260
57

Dry Cargo
Tankers

8,425

5,091

1952

3 3

4,2U
4,214

6,100
6,100

3
3

4,214
4,214

6,100 6,100
71

Dry Cargo Tankers


1953

20 19 1
13
13

49,464 43,964 5,500

74,085

7
7

26,567 26,567

39,620 39,620

13

22,897
17,397 5,500

34,465

Dry Cargo Tankers


1954

65,855 8,230
34,065 34,065

12 1

26,235 8,230

53 32

22,819 22,819

9,425 9,425

13,350

9
9

13,394
13,394

20,715
20,715

Dry Cargo Tankers


1955

4
6 6

13,350

49

16
15

37,926 31,994 5,932

59,052 49,235 9,817


35,425

18,984

30,095 30,095

10
9 1 8
8

18,942 13,010 5,932

28,957
19,140 9,817
19,065 19,065
54
55 35

Dry Cargo Tankers


1956

18,984

1
10 10

25,438
25,438

2
2

12,499
12,499

16,360 16,360

12,939
12,939

Dry Cargo
Tankers

35,425

1957

18,708 17,506 1,202

29,914

12,186

19,014
17,594 1,420

3 3

6,522
6,522

10,900
10,900
49

Dry Cargo Tankers


1958

7 1
10

28,494 1,420
35,245
35,245

4 1
2
2

10,984 1,202

21,512
21,512

4,699 4,699

7,290 7,290

8 8

16,813
16,813

27,955 27,955
45

Dry Cargo Tankers

10

103

UNITED KINGDOM FLAG SHIPS LOST AND SCRAPPED DURING THE CALENDAR YEARS 1949 TRHOUGH 1958
T o t a 1

L o s s
Deadweight Tons
314,036

S c

rappings
Gross Tons

Year Type of Ship 1949

Humber

Gross Tons

Number
11
11

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons
67,896
67,896

Number
33

Deadweight Tons
246,140
204,136 42,004

Average Age Of Scrapping


(lears)

44
38 6

252,738
225,176 27,562 289,058
273,182 15,876 130,750
109,284 21,466

57,279 57,279

195,459
167,897 27,562

Dry Cargo
Tankers 1950

272,032 42,004 330,617

27 6
35
33

33 35

44 41
3

9
8 1 6
6

46,787
39,383 7,404

70,563
59,813 10,750

242,271

260,054
246,760 13,294
116,596
87,445 29,151
37 38

Dry Cargo Tankers


1951

306,573 24,044
163,607
134,456 29,151

2 17
13

233,799 8,472
98,046

34 31

23

32,704

47,011 47,011

Dry Cargo Tankers


1952

19 4
38
36
2

32,704

4
2 2

76,580 21,466

270,827

298,623

8,193 8,193

11,797 11,797

36

262,634 248,984 13,650 406,822


201,305 205,517

286,826
270,775 16,051 520,997 34
45

Dry Cargo Tankers


1953

257,177 13,650 457,219


251,702 205,517 349,672

282,572 16,051
572,541

34 2
57 26 31

64
33 31
55

7
7

50,397 50,397

51,544

Dry Cargo Tankers


1954

257,334 315,207
418,205

51,544

205,790 315,207

32

29

6 6

24,598 24,598

37,697
37,697

49
30

325,074
189,988 135,086
136,880
80,235 56,645

380,508
177,680 202,828
33

Dry Cargo
Tankers
1955

36 19 31 23 8

214,586 135,086
161,345 104,700 56,645

215,377 202,828 216,231


130,844 85,387 155,237
115,537 39,700

19
6 6

29

24,465

36,680 36,680

25

179,551
94,164 85,387
112,146
35

Dry Cargo Tankers


1956

24,465

17 8 23

28

30
25
5

162,147
135,765 26,382

7
6
1

29,417 21,186 8,231

43,091

132,730

Dry Cargo Tankers


1957

30,873 12,218

19 4
38

114,579 18,151
280,736 227,170 53,566 324,399
148,136 176,263

84,664 27,482

36
33

42
33

299,457

311,751

4 4

18,721 18,721

25,890
25,890

285,861

Dry Cargo
Tankers

9
57
36

245,891 53,566

230,692 81,059
486,142
207,216 278,926

29 9
53 33 20

204,802 81,059
438,867 177,941 260,926

36

34

1958
Dry Cargo Tankers

355,444
166,903 188,541

4
3

31,045 18,767 12,278

47,275
29,275 18,000

21

34 23

104

FLAG TRANSFERS

1111(1
nO
rH CO
IT\
I
I I

Chilli
I

lr-llr-1

lllll lllll

>Hlr-|

CM

lllll

OOC-III rH

CM

O vv

C-H

r>

stlllll

NNOO 3

(0-4

st<M(^H

nO

0<-)nO

st>t

M
<*>
I

stM

Olllll
O
U <
CO
E-

CM

CO

IIIIH

lllll

00 rr\CM

CM

CM

W
PL,

H
CM
I

W
<: CO

nO

CO nO

lllll

lllll

Ir-llll

III

CO

W W> Xg

9 lilies

o^st

rr\

lllll

H CM

r-

CM

CM

p
pei

S3

5
pi,

Q z

^
CO

-P

00

rH -*

N^

On

CM

vO 00

iCQ

CD

CM

V C\
-vfvO

CM

CM

> H Pd 5s
Pi
_,

So u
o a W O b
>* CQ

-*

lllll
C- CM

lllll lllll

IrHllc^

lllll
I

rH

CM

vf

CM

C-- r-i

CM

SI

CM

III

O
Oh

PC!

CO CO
CM
E-"

IT>

CM rH ON

-J-ifNCMvOr^

CO

-vf

On CM

rr\

00 - CN, rH rH ON CM

cn.

~* CM CM CM

Pi*

8S

CO nO rH en nO

QnO

rH

Q O CO
CO
-J

rH rH

W CO
CO

a o
H -p

W >

IH

at

Xt

s f
-a
a) a)

ra

-a
<d

CO

a<iH
a)
ra

a
-P

3 c-5

O g

^ > ^ tH d O M S Ph t>

at fi a)
aj

-p
CI

rH
ed

rf

-?1
(d

*S
-p
<s

MH

MNri -H
i

mmo

OOoWh &
(D

g D O

a g

p<rH

oo3
(D

<d

a a u
c

P.
rl

a)

p.'Q be

Mr!

at

a>

p o o y -p M B -h K S
)
<

a
a)

Sr-i
a) p.,

fl t

a
CD

-P T3
pl,

Pn

i; Ph

o 5 5
cl,

p N ^ 5b S 3 Ip>
CD

co

107

UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS TRANSFERRED TO FOREIGN FLAGS FOR THE YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958
T o t a 1

Dry Cargo
Deadweight Tons

Tankers

Year Registry to Which Transferred Design


1949

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Total Panamanian
C3-S^A1 C3 Pass. & Cargo T1-M-A2

30
15
1

202,036
126,820

297,960
188,775
13,185 8,500 1,457 165,633

22. 107,165 154,600

11

94,871
94,871

143,360 143,360

4
1

31,949

45. 415

11

1 1 12
5

7,129 9,000 1,136 109,555


26,624
7,800
1,885

1 2
5

7,129 9,000
15,820

13,185 8,500

23,730 40,690
12,525 2,757 25,408

1 10

1,136 93,735

1,457

HI, 903

Italian
C3-S-A1
N3-S-^A2

40,690
12,525 2,757 25,408

26,624
7,800 1,885 16,939
19,975

1
1

1 3
3

16,939
19,975 15,600 4,375

3
3

Argentine
C3-S-A1

29,962 23,400 6,562


8,100

29,962

2 1
2

2 1

15,600 4,375

23,400 6,562
8,100
8,100

Danish

4,313 4,313
8,313 8,313

2 2
2 2 1

4,313
4,313
8,313

8,100

French

2 2

6,447 6,447

6,447 6,447
-

8,313

Mexican
Cl-S-Dl

1 1 1 1

4,826 4,826
3,088
3,088 8,077

7,239 7,239
4,632

4,826 4,826

7.239

1 1 1 1 1

7,239
4,632

New Zealand

3,088
3,088
8,077
8,077

4,632
12,115
12,115

4,632
12,115
12,115

Turkish
-

8,077

1950

Total
Panamanian
T2-SE-^1 C3-S-42

.22.

173,851
86,119

262,048

_7

34,294
7,800

52,714
12,500

ii
7 1

139,557

209,334 117,478
15,672
101, 806

8 1

129,978
15,672 12,500 101,806
43,275 43,275
22..093

78,319
10,448 67,871 28,850
28,850

1 6

10,448 7,800 67,871


28,850 28,850
14,363

7,800

12,500
6

Mexican

4 4
3 3

4 4
3

43,275

Z-ET1-S-C3
Israeli
-

43,275

14,363
14,363

22,093

14,363

22,093

22,093

108

UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS TRANSFERRED TO FOREIGN FLAGS FOR THE YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958 Continued
T

t a 1

Dry Carg
Deadweight Tons

Tankers

Year Registry to Which Transferred Design


1950 (Continued)

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

number

Gross Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Greek

9,628
7,243 2,385

14,366
10,864 3,502

2,385

3,502

1
1

7,243
7,243

10,864
10,864

Z-ET1-S-C3

1 1 2
2

2,385

3,502
2
2

Liberian

17,338

26,007

17,338
17,338

26,007 26,007

17,338
1,946

26,007

Canadian

2,919 2,919
11,700 11,700

1,946 1,946

2,919 2,919
11,700 11,700
1
-

1,946

1 1

Italian
C3-S-A2

1
1 1 1

7,800
7,800 7,807

7,800 7,800

Turkish
-

11,710
11,710
-

7,807
7,807

11,710

7,807

11,710

1951
Total
_8

47,655

72,929
14,730

_5_

21,155

31,803 14,730

_3_

26,500
_ -

41, 126

Honduran

2
2

9,366
9,366

9.366 9,366

_
-

14,730
14,243

2
2

14,730
14.243

Panamanian
Z-ET1-S-C3

2
1

9,710

9.710
7,163 2,547

7,163 2,547

11,000 3,243
2,830 2,830

1
1

11,000 3,243
2.830

Finnish

2,079
2,079
9,409 9,409 6,703 6,703
10,388

1
1

2.079
2,079

2,830
1

German

1 1

14,521 14,521
10.475
10,475
-

9,409
9,409 6.703
6,703

14,521

1
1

U,521
10,475
10,475

Greek

1
1

1
1

Liberian
-

1
1

16,130 16,130
-

10,388
10,388

16,130
16,130

10,388

109

UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS TRANSFERRED TO FOREIGN FLAGS FOR THE YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958~Continued

Total
Year Registry to Which Transferred Design
1952

Dry Cargo

TaniSers

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Total Panamanian

21
11
2 6 1 2
5 5

144,924

218,856

12
5

75,747
30, 014

113.516

_9

69.177 48,580

105,340

78,594
14,502 43,267 11,217 9,608 36,435 36,435 11,205

118,292

44,796

73,496

EC2-S-C1 Z-ET1-S-C3 T2-SE-A1

21,404 63,970 18,318 14,600


54,948 54,948 16,760

2 1
2

14,502 14,332

21,404 21,392
2,000

4
1

1,180

1
3

28,935 11,217 8,428

42,578 18,318 12,600


31,844

Liberian

15,838 15,838
11,205

23,104
23,104
16,760

20,597

2 2 1
1

20,597

31,844

Italian

2 1 1 1 1

EC2-S-C1

7,200 4,005
5,686 5,686

10,469 6,291
9,370

7,200 4,005
5,686

10,469 6,291
9,370

Israeli

1 1
1 1

9,370 8,830
8,830

5,686

9,370
8,830 8,830

Japanese

5,794

5,794

1 United Kingdom
1 1

5,794
7,210

5,794 7,210 7,210

10,656 10,656

1
1

10,656
10,656
-

Z-ET1-S-C3

7,210

1953

Total
Panamanian
EC2-S-C1 Z-ET1-S-C3 T1-U-BT2

2A. 111,783
12
8 2

148,571 120,433

10
10
8 1

83,647
83,647 57,963 7,177 18,507

105,561 105,561

A
2

28,136
10,435

43,010
14,872

94,082
57,963 14,362 3,250 18,507

1 1
2 1 1

85,554 21,327 4,205 9,347 28,138


16,738 11,400

85,554 10,660
9,347

1
1

7,185 3,250

10,667 4,205

Liberian

17,701
10,564 7,137

2
-

17,701 10,564 7,137

28,138
16,738 11,400

T2-SE-A1

1 1

1954

Total
Liberian

114
91

848,881 ]^68,288

70
65

488,125

715,201 669,282 537,099 44,100 54,305 9,540

44 26

360,756

553,087
307,033

658,937

976,315

454,780
360,938 26,800 36,071 6,756
24,215

204,157

EC2-S-C1 EC2-S-AW1 Z-ET1-S-03


Cl-B T2-SE^A.l

50

4
25 1 3 8

360,938 26,800 183,437 6,756 31,044 49,962

537,099 44 r 100 268,362 9,540 50,295 66,919

50

4
5

20
3 3

147,366

214,057
50,295 42,681

1
5

24,238

31,044 25,747

110

UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS TRANSFERRED TO FOREIGN FLAGS FOR THE YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1 9 58~ Continued
T o t a 1

Dry Cargo Deadweight Tons

Tankers

Year Registry to Which Transferred Design


1954 (Continued)

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Number

Grosa Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Panamanian
EC2-S-C1 C2-S-B1 Z-ET1-S-C3 T2-SE-A1

18
2 1

148,193

222,723
21, 840

4
2 1

27,659
14,420 6,125

36,549

U
7

120,534

186,174

4 4 4 4

14,420 6,125 50,632 41,768 35,248

10,507 74,101 66,069 50,206 53,800 53,800 15,450

21,840 10,507
4 50,632 41,768 28,134
74, 101

1
1

7,114
5,686
5,686

4,202 9,370
9,370

3 3 3

66,069 46,004
44,430
44,430
15,450

Honduran

32,799 32,799
8,952

27,113
27,113
8,952

Chinese
-

1 -

8,952

15,450

8,952

15,450

1955

Total
Liberian EC2-S-C1 Z-EC2-S-C5 Z-ET1-S-C3
T2-SE-r41

A
42 13 1 6 7
15

395,694
341,493

590,011

28 193,496
25 178,589 13 1 6
5

270, 180

21
17

202,198
162,904

319,831

504,608
139,862 12,410 69,739 114,723 167,874

247,659
139,862 12,410 69,739

256,949

93,921 8,557 47,055 72,156 119,804


34,605

93,921 8,557 47,055

29,056
7,215 7,215

25,648
10,920 10,920

7 10
3

72,156 90,748 27,390

1U,723
142,226

Panamanian
EC2-S-C1

4
1
3

55,924 10,920 45,004

45,004

7,215 27,390

27,390

45,004

Korean
C1-M-AV1

2
2 1
1

7,692 7,692
11,904

11,601 11,601 17,878


17,878

2 2

7,692 7,692

11,601
11,601
1

German
-

11,904 11,904

17,878

11,904

17,878

1956

Total
Liberian EC2-S-C1 T2-SE-A1

il
23
3

336,480

525,619

J2_ 1.39,072
7
3

209,727
53,888
32,276

21
16

197,408
144,662

315,892

181,522
21,645 83,957 75,920

287,379
32,276 132,861 122,242

36,860 21,645
15,215

233.491

12

4
2 2

21,612
21,600
21,600

8
5

83,957 60,705
52.746

132,861 100,630
82,401

Panamanian
EC2-S-C1 T2-SE-A1

7
2
5

67,247
14,501 52,746

104,001

14.501 14,501

21,600 82,401
71,020

52,746

82,401

Brazilian
C1-M-AV1

12

45,694

12 12

45,694 45,694

71,020
71,020
-

12

45,694

71,020

Ill

UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS TRANSFERRED TO FOREIGN FLAGS FOR THE YEARS 1949 THROUGH 1958 Continued

Total
Year Registry to Which Transferred Design
1956 (Continued)

Dry Cargo
Deadweight Tons

Tankers

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Korean
C1-M-AV1

6 6
5 5

22.992 22,992
19,025 19,025

36,128 36,128

6
6
5

22,992 22,992
19,025 19,025

36,128 36,128
-

Philippine
Cl-M^&Vl

27,091 27,091

27,091 27,091
-

1957
Tote!

68
60

559.826 843,062

Ji. 272,858
34

387,072

29 26

286,968
272,583

455,990
433,585

Liberian

520,228 800,582

247.645

366,997
303, 143

EC2-S-C1 VC2-S^AP2 Z-ET1-S-C3 T2-SE^&1

28 4
1

25

202,719 303, L43 30,484 42,326 7,219 10,558 261,285 415,434 18,521 29,121
12.552

28

4
1

202,719 30,484 7,219


7,223

42,326 10,558
10,970
25 1

261,285 11,298

415,434 18,151
19,947

Panamanian

2 1 1 2 2

19,947 16,540 3,407


8,550
8,550
2 2

2 1 1

12.552

T2-SE-^1

10,584 1,968
14,075 14,075 4.265
4,265 1.833

10,584 1,968

16,540 3,407

German

14,075
14,075
4,265

8,550 8,550 6,510


-

Peruvian

2
2

6,510
6,510

2
2

4,265

6,510
1 1
1,833

French

1 1

2,458
2,458
5,015

2,458
2,458

1,833

1,833

Swedish

1
1

6,873 6,873

1
1

6,873 6,873

5,015

5,015

5,015

1958

Total
Liberlan
Cl-ltt-BUl

.2.

71.927

96.007

A.
1
1

23,750
3,133
3,133

19.506

_5_

48,177
21,087

76.501
33,287 33,287

3 1

24,220
3,133 21,087

38.019
4,732 33,287

4,732 4,732

2
2

T2-SE-A1
United Kingdom

2
3 3 2

21,087

20,617 20,617
20.253

14.774 14,774 32.334

3 3

20,617 20,617

14,774 14,774
2

Panamanian

20,253

32,334
15,910 16,424 10,880
10,880

T2
T3-S-A1
Venezuela
-

1 1
1 1

9,854 10,399

15,910 16,424
10,880 10,880

1
1

9,854 10,399 6,837 6,837

6,837
6,837

;
-

1 1

112

<M rH

J
th

CG o o

g o in h

9 o
1

<?
1

o
ffl
1

<?
1

o
1

"?

O
1

o
1

o
1

c_>
1

o
1

ft -H ft p <J

Re>
1

OJ

P-l

OJ
1

OJ
a;

p?
1

PJ

Ji

a!

o
CD

t!

<

a!

a|

<

teO

3
fa

JJ

H
t-1

G
cd

G*
CO

Ph

>

CD

Oh

> H rJ

Ui tn

t=

M
t>

rt

-1

o
en

o o

G
ft

CO
.

9 M
CD

&
s
1

ft

O O G O

<m

a
t-i

o
-p

e o
h

o o

to
.
.

"I
CO

,
'C?

.
'-3
Mi-

to

OS

& E O O

P & H
>

O
CO

o
en
fn

o
p
c
m
CI)

O
t-.

^1

s
en <D

rj

rH
en
CD

en ID

en

Cm

i P
en

G
ctl f-i

a p
cd 0)

td

eel

c
CO t-1

c
u
t-1

V.
fe ^J
CO
(D

ft
&H
<*!

U
be,

CD

rH +^
a>
to CO

c
cd

* m

EM
ce)

rH
CD

a 8

,G

z z w < u W 33 H O Z 5 D Q Z o 3 b: o
fc

E G
cd
P-.

3
w CD G

G
CO

rH H

CO

u
CD

M
CD

S
B o H
Oh
r

>

CD

t
Cm <

3 W
o
r^

a M
CJ

3 W
O
r^

&

q X

o CD M M
CD

G M

&
G H
en ri
CD

<M
CO

c M G
su

ft

O o
teO

O O
;>>

O H
J-3

5*
o
H J=

o o
P, ^H

t-1

Ef

e d
ID

en

E
at

ft

G
rl

ft

G
CCj

& ft

-1

H JG CO
en en

a E O o
(~i

t-\

H _o
1

O O
rH H

+o CO

-0

CD

p
CO

CO 0)

H
-g

rH H
Si

O o p c
CD

CD

I
t:
CD

E
cS
<b

O o
cd

CO

Q U
OS
ce;

PU
,_^

W
Cn
rH

c o o o
CO

O s 5
o^

O $ -p H G &
r^
CO
r-<

TD
CD

3-8
>
CD CD

-P
H

+> H

s
C>
CO
r-i

O C o
CU >> JD
I-.

ft

c
c*

G
CD

CD

13
CD CD

P. G CO i<
*

P O

en

HA
CO rH

CTi

U"\

ri

rH

rt

3
CM
cri

EVS
CD CO

P n
J,

"
-a]

en

-H
teO

en

teO'H
fi

;>>

z <
OS

-P jg
tee)

mO
en

tD
ca

H X

-h
0)

c
o

o o

-o-

Q *H
o a u o
Eh
en co en

vU rH

4 H
l

CO CO

o
c rH
t>
C"\

o
u~\

o rH
H

l>
CJ
U"\

O in o
-J-

to

t> (N

CO CO

o
sr

Cm E)CO
H
CD

ft ft H

G
CD euu

C>
-et

4J

o rH

St

H
O
>i

X W P rH
ID

m CD E

-<f

</3

^?

85
(r\

-<t

e^
OJ

CO

en CO
CT>

XI CO vO

c^v

en
co-

C<>

&
sD

cn en

w o
boco
IrH't,"

G o

Bi P
CD CD

<

a j &

O H
ti CD

o rH
rH
<3 CM CO
'

vO

O
U
CD

!^
<a

r-

a
hi

C/3

tH CD t~{

u
CD

t-1

rH
a;

uo hh
CD

to
ri

tiD

vD

h < h CO

ft >> EH

en CD

G
cej

%1
cd

g
CD

co
iri

a
CD

^ri
CM
E-l

M
Cm
CD

teuT

d w
i

'-O

o
Cm

rH

CO en

P
s
ID

-p

C)
CD

<M
CD

ri -P
35 t"^
I

O > 3
Tl
cj>

CO

u o
"8

e
a,
CD

<M

O 3 >

E-"

EH
tr*

tH

CM
t-1

(H

H
c\
-<r

CO

CO
1

04

cn

04

OJ
t-1

rH

O
f-i

-P t>

-P Xk
CO

a
Cli

-P
c>
CD

p
!H
CJ

CD

P
rn

CM <m
cd aJ

>
c>

+>

C)

Q W
h
Cm

fH
cd

P H iH

X
O
0)

CD

O rH
c

c> -*

fr\

-J O H
CO
1

O
C\i

10

+3
cd

arH

4 o H
l

CM
c^i

o^
rH

H
1

c\ e>

IM

e>

H
ex>

O
r-i

l-r\

^O ^r arH

O
x:

M
ft

H &D

cm

ii

..h
f-t

g
O,

I
rj

T3

-P

H a 3 p O
Jj

S-i

CO
ir\
I

CO
1

<D

m
en
CV

00 en

CO

CO

CO
>

* 0=3

G
O
J? CD

u\

u"\
1

en

=M
en

ce)

G jd U
t-i

O OJ
1

Mj
OJ
1

H
1

en

rt
1 1

O rH
1

o
1

CM

(^

cr>

^>

en

M
CO

OJ rH

OJ rH

l-i

rH

C S & -P O w c H C o -P O cd -P o -p X ^ O fn O CD CD U 0)
0J

TD
CD

-.-(

03
G
Cm H

..-1

flj

(ri

P
O
cd

p
CD CD

CO
teD

^S O

rH

H
"S
ID

co
I

CO UA
1

CO
ir-.
l

O
1

<^h

CO en
1

CO
1

00

CO

en

en
1

OHccJ C >
H

cti

O
fl

H
ft o!

cm OJ
1

ej^

H
1

rH

-1
1

m
1
1

+J
Jj to

en
1

y\
1

CO CM

C >
a) <D

a)

t>

C -p

cd

*H
CD

-H

S^3

+J eO

ifl

c\j

OA

c*.

in

CO

CO

00

o
<-\

1^1

ft

M m

,ij

-H

IjJm

cO

^J

W Op,

ft H CO <H

O E
CD

O i 8 g n
OS

rH
CD

-P

o o
cej

s.
fc,

O CO a) w

1 3 6

5 a s
5 o
a;
t-1

H'H O *H
CD

aj

3 a 3 jj >

3 o n 3 tn
eJ"

CO

cd

> u

CD

CCi

(0

rH

a>

1 o Dh

113

ft

m o
CJ

bo

8
u u
CD 4-1 co

c H 1 EH
fa

p.

a b o o
H
CO

tn ri

o
>.

o
CO

O
CJ

"B
0}

O O
ft
^1

1H

ex

ft
t-.

o o
CD

o o
H

E
4*

^
CD

c
CO

>>

c o

bD
x:
CO

ft

ft

ft

EH 'P

a
CO

o
CO

a
CO

LH

g
CO

s
CJ
CO
.0

E
CO

.3 a. H ^3 CO
i

o o

H J2
CO

CD

3
H

p
CO

cO CD

p
f-i

CO

a s o o

p CO
M O
00 fa

05
CO

"8

P CO
p

CO CD

p
fa

ft

a ft H ft W
,

p
c 5
CD

p
S c
CD

fa

fa

a E O o

H -P

^ o
CO

3 M
O
CJ
crt

p
CO

h o
c Ch

aJ

fa

cS

<
E 3
CO
*

<
CO
ft ft ft
fn

'$

w
fa "8
fn

O o

o o
ft
a>

i-j

K
H

o
CJ QJ

0)

O
H

to 9 ft ft H
,3

>

o
00

O
CJ
CO rl
ID

c
c

>
a)
cd

<m

a
ft
E-i

I 3
CO

5
ft iH
c0

5 ft
H CO

p p
cJ

p
-p
in

S
i-l

tj

1*

rl

O
ft
CO CO CO
S-<

P
CO

ft
Fi

CO

>>
cJ

p CO
b o
cm
CD

03 CD

o bo h
CO

o O
CO

a e

o
to
fn to

a e
o
S
O
r3
<K

c
gj

O
c
ft

O
00

1
5
-P
10

t-< t-i

g B O

O
3

^
03

a
_d

Xi
CO

s
CD
CD

IH

CO

a
c
CO CD

fa

CQ

a a B 6 H
L>
U~\

3
-2

O
r?

rH

C
03

pa

a
<
rH

o
1

M
~S

ID

,^
TD -P

CO -p J3
CD

O H
~0

rH

o H

*
i-{

H H
ir\

"S
rH

H
if

rH

o
r-\

s-spa O
e
fcn

O
o H

~^\

O *n
t>

O vO
00

in
[>
rH

-J

O m ao rH

t>

Ol o

t>
\

**

c^ to

m
O H
in

O
ft
rH C-

o H
0"\

o
r-\

o rH
oOl

O
.-1

o H

O M
CO

sr
to

CO
to

CO

O H

? S o
^i

8 Oi
t>

in
t>

O t>
C*l

in
r-

m
o.'

-*

m CM
trH CJ
1

sf

in in
CM

o
iM

c\
Oi

m CM
C<-\
1

m O
CM

r^ fa

c
.9
CD

r~

1>

l>

t>

c-

t>

CO

ft
e-i

K8

CO tH
to

Q
H
-P rH

to U CO CH U CO &oOoO Ol CN w CJ
1
1
1

H o CO

rH CJ

o
O
1

C^l

CO

H o tl
o
1

JO

O
U
00

rH CJ
1

o
tiO

t-H

CJ
1

in

till)

CO

Ul

o 00
o
t.
1

o
u

o 00
03
fa

O 00
1

r-\

O
00

rH
CJ
1

fa

CO

*H

CO

in

1^

CO
1

u
CO

CO
1

li]
1 l

cS CM
CJ

Id

O CM O CJ 5 CJ o o Ol M w w
in
CT>

CJ

A ic5 o8o
fa

Ol CJ fa

CM OO
fa
c^i

p
c
CD

en

W
H s a
.a

d
PQ
60

o H

->*

rH

'3 3 o o rH

3 o rH

rH

5 o rH

in

o rH

-4-

3 o rH

ON
rH

m o rH

p
St O
r-i r-i
r~\

-sr

sf
in

H
fa

CO
fa

Cn CO t>

to in
1

00
I

m
Ol

00
ill
1

to
1

m
H
I

00
1

CO UA
1

to
i/\
1

03
I :\i

CO

CO 00 rH rH
(

.n
r-t

to in
1

CD

c^

P p^ O a Q fa
0)

tl -.

H
1

00

CO oi

~>

C"\

JD
Ol

t>1

CV

CM

O
1

<
I

in

00

o
I

H O
1

c~-

H
1

c a

r-{

Ol rH

1
Mh

as

O
+>
tiO

a d
ID

oo fa

H
fa
CO

4
tn

<H
to
03

G
-ri

m in
1

t>
1

-J in
i

t>
u*i
1

i> in
1

o
1 1

l^l

in
c*\

-<f

>*
in
l

nO
ef\

-<r
LCI

sr in

CO 0)

(H
i

CD

o
fa

tlD
O U

xO
i 1

-P

G O

sr

in

O rH

H O
1

o
1

O rH

rH

CM rH

o H O
r-t

<-l

rH

O V
1

-p
CD
+->

r*"i

CO

"8

03

+> fa
t=>

6
5 fa H CO
^H
fr-i

H >

OS

OS

O 3
fa

S w
fa at

cr;

o Q
r-l

8
CD

*
0)

a
1 s 5 fa

a
p.,

l
s g.

ch
^-\

o o
<!

o
<
p-.

fa

a fa

W fa

o H fa O
a;

g
rH rJ 3i

g s -i
j!

ol

g 3 a
ft

fa

>

Sr

O d ^

fl fa

tH

>
-J

114

**>
U">

rH -^

-J

C-

s M

<*i

tN

CJ

to

s
IQ

s eg
c.

<*\ -JC cr\

HH
1
1

rH

-jf

M0

oo cj CJ

n
-JO C"\

HH J\
r-v

r-l

CT\

rH

rj

rH

cm

CM

CM

00

CM

la-

i-l

r-l

rH

t-t

u
c^

2
CM
Si

s
en

t~

CM

m
1

CM

o-c

rl

f\n
I i

cj

ig ipim
1 1

CM

P.

o-c

CM

^
1

*$
O 4 n
CNi

CM

r-l

vO

Irt

rH

33
1 1

.H

rH -J

O rH n

CJ

rH CJ

TUI

rH

rH

r-H

S 1
w
tu pi
cm
c_>

~4

~J

u
'A cm o W

00

r-

HH

CM

->

10

->

CM

rH

->

-i

-4
cr-

CM

njj

H
| 1

3
1 1

CM rH v5

a- m}

rH rH

oo

o
HH
I/)

W Q

r*>

^t

UN

CJ

r-l

C-,

r-l

O
r-i

rH

.
i 1
1

-J

rH

rH

cm

In

rH

CM
(_>

,_,

t"

1
?
CM
i

CM

O
3 1 m o

r-i

mo

> 1

cm

fH CJ
10

l,J^

cr\

-4

cm

ou

CM

vr-

rH

rH

-Jf

IrH-jOC)

JJ JJ

r-\

-j

rj

en

P, <J

3
CM

CM

CM

00

-jr

^
{-

91

3
rH

W\ 8 a \0 * rH
r-i

CM f\

O"* rr\ i-l

u^
CM
--J

O O H CM O CM

c^ co c^ u^
a1-1

OH
CNC

h menjj JJ rH
\D
c>

y~\ i\ cr\ ir\

o H *o

aj

JJ

m>Jc^

C\

it

r\
<H

vj >J 0J Oj

<-l

3
|

a
o
H
c->

5
Ih

(0

-C
*->

o H <<
jj

d
?

o
10
OS
r-i

a
Or

o
;q
<0

1
rj

"fill

r-.

><

c H
is

i
tfl

id

*-.

CO

O
C_j

.c H
United Canada

Ze
India

s
Other

X M

U
-H

3
C
a>

cc

g
g
ft
a)
t>*

en

8
h
ft
it
r-i t-]

s
0,
r-> cj
CO t,

^
-a

ft
-rt

Union

3S^ Ct<-H
m
bo 60i-H

r-\

jo
ffl

3 o
1--

-r>

Neu

C
-rH

(0 -ri

icScfefie

uocSflnl

i, B a c 5 -o o +J to e eg o o p t b

ISM'S

B d
ft

rH rH
CO

c a
CO
CI.

ft

"rt t, CD

0r5
CJ CJ

O
rt

U
ft

o
X.

c-

O O HMr))*;H
+J
CO

j5
-rH

b O CO

x
**
ft i=-

s a
-: o.

b 5 O CO

a U
ft
1-,

Pl,

-H C H Sh -H n o ex 5 x w, CO to
CO

4>

o*

+J

p
Ej

to

3 1 -a

w1
.

4 O
1

as

115

SERVICE

-P

CO

0)

III
O
<DH

en CJ 43

OvO
--J l^.

to

-j r^ rj vO

OO

I ^SS
o
CM

CM

4US

enn^o O cn CM H -4 CM CM
rH

%0 t> CM

sO

en r>

CM

^5.

c?^

e> to to

S
cni

CM

043

OH
Si

CM 00

1
ml
r>
ip\|
I

^3$
rH 43

>
H

H
cm| sO en en CM sO

O
ctl

C0| 43

m Cr>,

to

ah
i

83 o
t.

ip,|

cm cm

vO

f>

C~ CM

vCi|fiOt^

H O
en

tP,

"S3
|J
CM

to

ON
jj|

O cm

'

-4

31

S:3

ip, p

-4
-4-

hI Ol

P.

-4 43

to oCM CM

r-H

-MVJ

M
.-)

en| en

i>

xl**-

cn-4 & OOH

r-

cn

^SS
"^ CO CO
CM

vO| CO
cm|

ip,

rn h

CM

Co in a*

O
Pf

x>

c^

oo

c-| col

ip.

mo en vf

C0| cm|

o cm

to

en CM

iP.

P-|

Ol

HO
--T

CM

Oil r>|

en

O cn O en
IT. LP,

w
i

-p

CO
(5

r*\

E-l
co

5b
<-*

<o

> H
P*

q
>
H -P

oS

g o

-4 43

CM (^ u^

mc

>o

om & CO H o cm r>
-4"
c^\

-<r
-sf

r-

o
CM

H O
u"\

S cm

C/

-4 3 mo QOO to riM> r^o m


CM
C*> c*S

a*
-it

cm r~

nO
H
'

Cr <^ cm O mO cn o
->

id e-t

CN

nT ~4

^o

^ vO
o-\

IC^

CO vO

H\
-4t%D o>p H c*>\o H

H
to

-4

c^^
to vO

r>

ip\

Q O CO H H H CO CM en O CO cn C> H
to

cm X)

O^o
C*P.

CMl -4 C-

r>

SPfg

-4 cn cn en en CM c|

H o

e*^

-4
tN

r-

c\

*nH 4C0rl
ip,

t*-

t>
li\

cn

43
CM

41 en

cn r43
LP,

4P.

cn

m h'
xt en
IP,

c-

ip.

43 iPv

H
43
co

o c fc o
Eh

< nO <ncH --tO


l^-

CM
cr*

cn t>

irv

to
to

H^0 ^? oMn(>
-J- p~\

CM ifvH B t> ,H H H t>

oiif^on

-* O or> roos -J-4-O

ip. IP,

e> en

\S
lp.|

c^ rj

to

--?-?

^
Hi
to
J

^^

H to o r~
ip.

ip.

O H en en O -4 o H co r>
en
CO
-4-

O^

u%-J

0^

o H O' r4/o H CM O co r-J-

4? w*

-4 f-4^

O S 43 43 -4 ip. m
to -4 en

H 43

-4
cm 00
IP

00

^t

LP.

en

CM
r- -4 -4

-<t

en

ON
IP.

-4 en

>4 cn
en O O en en
ip.

<i
1

o^
0)

,o

OO onso O H \D en
J

lp.

Hi
cni
r-t

o H H
^t

C^ --TOJ

o nto cm n o H
tr. o-v
*

CMI CO IP, \Q \t*\XO CA cm r- ^j-

* r^p^ a t> H CM H
r> ip, en cn en -4
to

cn o H
r
i

ip. ip.

en

vt er\

m OO

H o H

inO-O
en
vj ip.

43 en

O H
NO

niAiA

^ o
o H
-4
to

43 en

CO 43 cn 43 en 43 en

ejl^egi
t>|

ipj en|

4J CM

0|

en

-P

~^o

>

I)

H H|

HO
*

&
O

&O to h
t-i

t> r>
i-l

^Q

> o HC^H O
cr

oo H
CM

rH

O CM
CM c^ CM
ip.

o r> to o to o m -40 H H H CM
rr\

H H t> H

incn . *

o m

CN

6>
<y rH

UACOO
-4 CO
ip.

*
r-

4- i> en ^4 cm cn
CM
IP.

o CM

H
CM

r~ en cm
CM

4vD
00

O H CM CM O 43 CM t> H
E--

H CO H
sO CM

H HH
<
CM
ip,
sjj

CO

O HH
-4|

H HH
e>
tp.

-4t> H H 43 43 r> H hH
53;

cm

-4-

en

>| 0'.
r~-

OvD

c>

!* C-NH rh h'
cni

"C: S: t> Ujcnto

W a o
-

-P

c/i

^
C0|

O
a)

O
e

o c fc 5
E-<

43

H H

S
0|

?f
sQ CO vO CM CN CM

^ ^
f^t

^f t^-4-

u^H OH

to

CO| r^^O C<n cj to

S
IT! f*> "<t

CN

d i rt
ii

CO

H O -4 CO O o en <n \0 r> en H H H H
to

J?

*
r,'

H
CO

3
H

s
*1

H en ip,sO m r~ h CM HH
cm

CM col

HHH O CM (M -4 >
C-

^l

Ma
JOg
CM CO

oi to ip. -4- e> 3y* r

r>

sl

Ha
H

lH

to CO en 43 en r>

o
'

ip,

ho cn

-n cm

r-

OO
CMCNj

r*LP.

J
t>

rt

s H
-4
I

p?
CM

H
w
l

OO

3 ^

fc
ai .

#
o
CM

o
CM CM

CM CO CM

O
M H

s< en
r-T

crcoH

IPs

U\ CM

HH

CM

H
CM cm

8 r? sO M HS r-T H

c>?;3
rt C~

vO| cr CM t>

H
CO CM
CM

o CM O O H COCMl H
en|

4-IO

voi r>
*i Hi

OJ
cm!

h
CM CO
L

oo -4 O o* m H H c-
IP,
|

c- CM t> 00 CO CM -4 f-

O O

.-n

CM tr-T

43

r-T

-P 5b

<n|f^p
c

s
Crf

cj <u

m cn
t>

C- co

oi

O-rl

0) ~t

^ as HI H

c^ CM
to

dF^

o O fn CM s CM O H
l>
sO^
tp,

o o ^o *n r- o H CO h rH H
CCM CM

rH

fc

S*^ *
H o
cm r>

*,

tol

O H^H

-4 t> CM en ip.

Ol

en Up. I>
cm|

CM CM

ia4

enlo

3|^S
I

w
CM

>

H
o o
-P

f-IH-XJ

o G

o oo

v0
CM
CT*

<J

fc

H CO h

tf\ -J-

r~

H ^ -4 H
u-

CM -4

O^

vD sD
CM

to
CM

CM 0> H <m>
LP.

HO -4H H
ip.

t-t

-<t

O H

cn r-v> -4 stcoh

sOlWOO HHH r-l cm


4*
ip.

Hi
cmI

CM C-

HO h

CM|

r-\

IP.

E>
<f|

fc-

H Q -4
cn

en CM cn -4^o
cn|

LP,|0 IP. 00 CM 43

cm

h|

23

S
1

S 3

fc <D

C0|n0 CM cn cn|

.0

HO rf H O H H Q 1 H IV
to
r-

o qo H o^
c-

t> H O m ,5 fn * CO l> en cn CM sO vol H HH H


cni

Sd^ H
CM
IP.
ip.

Hi
cr-l

ip,

en en
ccm|

col cm

lp.

ah^'
CO
CM CM -40O HHO o HCOH H CM

uJ

ct

cn

T3

P ^ n Md
-H

43[ cm co 43
J

ID

O JH
W

CD

3 nst B Ro *n H HI
^J H -J O tf\CM!l> sfO
f^\
r^>

H O v0
o CM

S5
mHto H P\C--<
c^ (^

H sD CM O o O CM CM
-*
cn >o *

stojh
t>
CM

o s

HH f> CM H HH
CM

-4 cm en

u-\H

> & MO sO -4

iP. iP,

ip, IP.

cCM

'\

O H C^ H H
CM r~ O sO CO H t> O en H H H H
tp.

H sQ O CM CO O H H CO H CM H
CO t-

-4 enx>
CM

o
CM

-4cn-4

>

CM CO

> r> to

oh ^IT4 O
r>
CM cm ip.r>

ejv

-4

43

cm r> CM

cn

CO H H CO 43 CM CM 43 en

H aT H
CJv -4 \L) r> x> a XJ e> y,

CM

o H CO H
1

o HO H
H
Hi

O
CM

IP.

O hHh r>
CM iP. 43 cm c^ rCM CM TO

H -p

u\

8 a fc O
E-t

H H|
CmI Cn CM c-

* s
H W
u
-

-.

O H O CO ^HH

<f|-ilvDO
<f sO

o Up. fn

CO

IP,

HH o H
IP, ip\

--H

8 O
H

^J
vLJ

o X) Q
t>

0*^

H H

r- -4

c<\

CM

r> Uo CO -4

o e>vOift O NO o H
eni CM

u-,[C0
X)

cn43
IP. -4f

CM

43

Cto 43

OiH

s
r^ c- ^0
CM

^
o 8
CM

3
sroiA o"\ r<\

Ol

H
CM

to

r-T CM"

H H
cn CM

CM

JM
to

?i
ip.

-4]H h'
l>

h
H

CM

;iW
o H
CM
C^l

ra
J

5M Si

m.

H
-a)

m
CD

v\

CM|

o H

O O

to en

3
H

O C> CM H

3
H
CM

O CO CM

ip.

*P.H

e^

m O CM O CM 3 CM CO CO
CM

E-<

oT

H
C^^ -4sD *P
ChvO

H
CO -4ir\
ip, cn vf -<r

-4 H CM O H H o 00 rCM H
cni

8^^
CM E>

CM CO CCC 43 t> C-

-4JCr> f,
cmI

O H

cm r-

^ t-

cmI

Hi

H
C--

o Q
(D

43 O H m 1l MsOOO '.* O ol
1

-P

O OMA^J O O cr<\

CM O O l> H O -
y-\

-<f

-<r

-3-

EH

^
t^ CM
to

c- ^u

a
<>

3 ^"fi CM nO
n)

H H v0 cnO' h H

ifAHb-

cn

CO

&

O o

co

Oj
pfl

en to cm ip. cn CO -4

Oo

O t> sU o vD innb^
CM

[^ cn CO CO t> cn f> t>

sDOH
O

CV

H o
H
1

3
'rH CM

CO vO

^^
O
ip.

en

IT*

o H

OH sO] en O en
91

43 en 43 43

H O 43 O -4
r>

IP.

en

ip.

^
H
-4 cn

CM

43 in

&

-p

>

H
-P

0)

h|
in

8 3
fc

o
<<

vOJ CO CM r^r^ sO|

cm

oo cm
c*.

-4-

tc

HiAOJ >

^^a
S*
iTv

t>| IP.

^o
CM]

tncM to o r> -<fH

^
H

vO^OO ^ *$&
xO -4

en -4
sL>

H sO t> O CO O
vr\

0^1 vO 0^\ (**\

en

oi
ip.

IT* r-i

sol mJ cn t>

-vf

ipI H
1

O H

-4

O H
f"
iP-

cn

oM

m O
ip,

H ^j^s.^

ip.00 r> 00 -4

t0| sO vO IP. 43 en

on

T^
O O
ip.

r> CO rn43 en ir\ 43 t> ip, CO e^,


co|

cn

co"

O -4 O HSS^om -4 m
*P>

ml -4 -4

tO

fc

,a

sD OJ Hsflf, H o^>o H

iTv

a H

-JO

o H

-4 CM <^\ vD -4

CM CM

CM CM

cS

O -*4

u-\sO
ip,

r~r\i

CM X>

CM

t> 00 en

sjj

3
H

ip.

cn cn

O O -4
o H
cn r>
up.

c- cn

H
O
&0

H
o bO ^

o H

O H 43 cm cn
-4-

cni

r>

CO

o -4 to -4
up,

Ol

43 CM

0|H 0-4 43 c>|

en

-i

43 en

O
C*
cy

M U 6
oa

o
bo

O
00
^<

o
^0

o
00

O
rS
<& c3 <&

O
QD
fn fc

8
3
o>

8
<a

8
t3
0)

6 ^
tH

8
oa

s &
M

c3 =3
CD

c3

-c o -p -P

"p
fc

O
uj

<x
fc 0)

S
c a
a.

u
So

&0

G 4
Ph

So

^ H

O
CaJ

1
a]

c
0)
a) Q-k al

G
CD

G
CO CO

iH

C fc -P C J o O CD

CU

pj

ta
PL.

CU
V]
(1)

p..

fr.

Ph

ft
Ul

i
c
oi fc <D

D,
-G tQ
<-<

c
01

H P & H H

-P X, W)

w U
Q)

(1)

H U PP
Ql
*

c O

o w
H

U
0)

H
ql

G o n
fH <D

G o w n
(U

-P
til

P
H
e-

-H -P
ri

f-<

V
fc
CD

-y

p.
6-i

cH o ^ a

HofnH

O
H

o ^ OhH
oj

H W o i-s-s

-s

*5 E3 (D G o h d

tH

r>

9 H -S a a) ti HI O M ^ o &, es ol
*

-P bO
a)
!h

P
"

OJ
cn oj

H +3
cQ

^
+>

cn CD
trt

G O
H

U U
aj
E-i

c O
-H
ffl

CO
t-.

v\

CM

O H

9 ^ O O f^

3
9

9^ G J^
ir\| IPs

-^
jl

cn

t-t

* rH

H -^ a (dc O ^ uJ
(k,

tup

tn

U\
e>

<t\

i o O

-3

u
(it

9^-5 e c
ON

<a

EH

o O

o)

pB|

43 in

O Oh

P P 2 -G H E
*

ep 0) t-

O H -P
as

G
-P
cn

X
05 fc
<l)

-P
-H
CO

>
fc CD 0) d)

-H

Jit*9
r~|

is
CO
fc

t>

cJ

-^
ai

0)

t.

E O C o fc q]
Ct4

Eh

ip.

ej

6-t

gJOfaH

fSl O
(fl

119

EMPLOYMENT OF THE ACTIVE UNITED STATES FLAG


(Tonnage in
Thousands)

SHIPS 1949-1958

Total

Combination Passenger & Cargo

Freighters

Tankers

Year Area of Employment


1949 Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

111 62
49

926 562 364

1,142 631
510

11 11

181 181

120 120

100 51

745 380

1,022 511
510

49 37 34
3

364

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade


1950

1,101 627
38

436

8,892 4,910 372 3,608

13,407 7,126 601 5,679

331
303

289 270
18

644
502
2

4,566 3,685
866

27

140

6,713 5,382 19 1,311

420 91
36 293

3,994 920 359 2,714

6,404 1,472
582

4,349

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

49
27
22

451 276
175

483 245 238

10 10

163 163

112 112

39 17
22

287 112
175

371
133

_
-

238
6,085 4,535 48 1,501

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade


1951

1,050 553 66

431

8,587 4,397 644 3,545

12,957 6,359 1,031 5,566

35

31

317 282
34

280 256
23

583 425
5

153

4,157 3,138 34 984

432 97

61 274

4,112 976 610 2,526

6,591 1,567
982 4,042

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

643 612
5

26

4,725 4,520 36 169

6,736 6,439
53

10 10

163 163

111 111

633 602
5

244
15,272 8,175 1,162 5,933
38

26
363 329

4,562 4,357 36 169


5,609 4,594 49 966

6,624 6,327
53

_ -

244
8,263 6,745 74 1,444

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade


1952

1,262 736 77 449

10,142 5,637 725 3,775

34
4

302 281

34

21

785 628 7 150

439 74
70 295

4,163 714 675 2,774

6,704 1,149 1,088 4,467

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

141 133
8

1,086 1,041
45

1,416 1,354

8 8

131 131

92 92

133 125
8

955 910 45

1.324 1,262
62

62

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade


1953

1,212 695 47 470

9,894 5,394 472 4,028

M,S43
7,752 761 6,330

37 34
3

409 382
28

315 298
18

751 589
3

5.407 4,310
20 1,077

159

7.970 6,322 31 1,617

424
72

44 308

4.077 702 451 2,924

6.558 1,132 730 4,696

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

74 71
3

591 580
11

739
725
14

7 7

101 101

73 73

67

64
3

490 479
11

666 652
14

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade


1954

1,103 645 34 424

9,168 5,077 361 3,731

13,669 7,255 574 5,839

35

32
3

395 368
28

307 290
18

695 546
5

144

5,015 4,004 40 971

7,369 5,843 62 1,465

373 67 29 277

3,758 705 321 2,732

5,992 1,123 512 4,357

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

36 33
3

283 272

315 298
17

5
5

71 71

52 52

31 28
3

212 201
11

262 245
17

11

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trad-;

1,051 598 19 434

8,954 4,890 203 3,861

13,280 6,926 324 6,030

35

34
1

419 400
19

318 308
10

660
506

4,832 3,768
1,064

7,080 5,470 1,610

356
58

154

19 279

3,704 722 203 2,779

5,881 1,147 324 4,410

Note: The years 1949 through 1954 include the ships which were originally constructed as merchant type but were not available for commercial use since they were under the custody of the Defense, State and Interior Departments.

120

EMPLOYMENT OF THE ACTIVE UNITED STATES FLAG


(Tonnage *n Thousands)

SHIPS 1949-1958 Continued

Total

Combination Passenger & Cargo

Freighters

Tankers

Year Area of Employment


1955

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Number

Gross Tons

Deadweight
Tons

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

25

21
4 1,047

221 202
19

231
203
28

5 5

71 71

52 52

20 16 4

150 131
19

178 150

28

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade


1956

6U
18

415

9,029 5,015 201 3,813

13,372 7,095 322 5,955

34
33
1

4U
395

316 306
10

659 522
137

4,898 3,908
990

7,149 5,659
1,490

354
59 IB

19

277

3,718 712 201 2,805

5,907 1,130 322 4,455

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

58 53
5

472 438

595 547

5 5

71 71

52
52

53

48
5

401 366
34 4.966 4,067 899

542 495
48

34 9,036 5,098 167 3,771

48

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade


1957

1,039 623
15

401

13,342 7,183 267 5,892

35

34
1

435 416

334 324
10

668 539 129

7,238 5,883 1,354

336
50
15

19

271

3.635 615 167 2,853

5,771 977 267 4,527

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

a
39
2

333 31?
15

413

3 3

392

30 30

38 36
2

292 277
15

384 363

21
12,243 6,274 50 5,919
37 34
3
4.77

21
6.585 5,094 1,491 298 43
3

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade


1958

942 543
3

396

8,404 A, 519 31 3,855

421
56

347 317
30

607 466
141

4.561 3,556
1,004

252

3,366 540 31 2,795

5,311 862
50

4,399

Government Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

25

24
1 935 538 4 393

185 182

224 219 6 12,467 6,204


57 6,206

2
2

20 20

13 13

23 22
1

165 162

211
205
6

Privately Owned Foreign Trade Foreign to Foreign Domestic Trade

8,610 4,526 36 4,048

39
37
2

524 487
37

357 345
12

593

457
1

4,489 3,497
7 984

135

6.435 4,997 11 1,427

303 44
3

3,598
543

256

29 3,027

5.675 863 47 4,766

Note:

Tonnage figures are not additive since the detailed figures have been rounded to the nearest thousand c

121

NUMBER OF ACTIVE AND INACTIVE GOVERNMENT OWNED SHIPS UNDER BAREBOAT CHARTER AND GENERAL AGENCY AGREEMENT AS OF SPECIFIED DATES
Bareboat Chartered
Year Month
1955 January
Genera 1 Agency Agreement

Total

Active

Inactive

Total

Active

Inactive

February March April May


June

20 21 21 19 20 20
18 18 18 18 18 18

July August September October November December


1956 January February March

16 19 20 19 20 19 18
18 18 18
15 15

4
2

1
m 1 3 3

20 20 27
55 88

11 11 13

69
73 75 71
55 35 30

20 36 37 39 39 39 28 11 7

9 9 14 35 52

32 34 36 32 27 24 23

17 17 20
22 18 17

U
14 17 20
18 17 18

April May
June

3 3 3 2 m 1

32 30 32 29 47

49
48 38 28 36 35 40

7 7 7 14 27 33

25 23 25 15

July August September October November December


1957 January February March

19
2-4

31
28 23 17 11 6

28 33

49 69

24 27 31 32 51

1 2 17 18

20 16 17 10
5

19 24 34

April May
June

July August September October November December


1958 January

121 137 147 152 150 146 137 130 102 86


75 59

58

63
4.8

89 122 138 143

24 11
8 12 19 26 32 27 26 17 12 16

4
6 6 11 18 26 23
15

25 14

7
3

U3
133 123 87

4 7
15

19 7 2 6 8 8 6

4
11
5

66 45 37

20 30
22

12 2 2

10

14

February March April May


June

59 58

40 31
26 24 22

July August September October November December

21 21
22 22 23

3& 40 32 27 24 22 22 20
16 15 16 18

21
18 8

10 8 9

3 3
5

7
5

4
2 13 12 6

4 2 2 m 1
5

7 6
5

9 19 19 34 12 16 16 9
5

7 6 7
8 8 6

4
10 9

7
5 5

4
-

122

01

-4

a
rt

m ^ -4\0

cm encM P en cm

-4

rt

en

^4^ s

o
CM

vO
CM

m
cr-

oil

H
u

.Q

O
liij

r-T

Cn

I s a O P4 o H n
En IH

3
9
B

-4 en

rt

in cm en

S s
c5

1
CD

m
<M

-4

-4-^-35

c^ cm

in in -4

nrt

rt

^^^

it

Q
<D
' 1

si 9
II ao
s p n U
rt

3 -0 -^co

f- CM cm en

-o

-4

Oi (n

S s

CO aen

in cm co n in rt C--C
rt

rt en -4 -4 CO cm en cm

rt

-4

-4COOJ

rt

rt

l-t

in o
r-t

rl

en

&
.0

o M sa on<o H

XI

CO

rt

NO en
Pi

r\

u\ CM en

-*

-4

o o m en
PI tn Pi

(0

CM

CM

~i

1 o
C3
4-t

l>

C-

o -4

rt
rt

PS

CO CM en CM

mc^

-4

rt -4 00 0^ -4 6J

rt

en

o V
0) of

n
Crt

s 5

Pi

s in in o

vD CM CM CM

4 CMrtrt.

CM CO

tQ

a
1

CM CM

sO
CM

C^l

CM

10

Cn

m H C- -4 m invO

g SlenS

CO en co r> CM

en

a-

ejs

8
H P
01
fe

O rt

>H

fc

CI

a

co

o
bo

xt

3 a

o en

s g
n
Tl
a> (0
rt

o> en

CO

V\ CM

C\

e^\

en

r-t

rt

en

en

en

0,0

a,

&
6-4

o d I 3a H

c& 8 K IH
CO d>

l-i

vO
CM

rt

t~
i-\

in

nc-> en m-o

en cm en co r~ CM enrt

CO en co t> en CM

en
t>

o O CM CM
en en

CO

It
P
ho
ri

a x0 cno

vD CM CM CM

* cm

rt en

s*

in
rt

CM

en
v>

1 8

rt in in

en

en

cnn>o

-I

5 sss

in en oo -4 en

in
CO
CM CM

CO

|H

m o
^
rH

co

o
bo
!l

XI

Cn

OfcO

g 3

rt

Cn

CO

in CM

c\

en

en

-4

cn en en en

33

I o

3a | 5 3
<Sh

rt

IN

<0 en in en
rt

mco m^

p rt

00 rt rt en CM

en

m en oo

-4

s0
CO

g *
CM

a
vO

Kg
1

S
,

fc

S >o mo

C- CM CM <n

4 CMrtrt

in

rH

rt +>

g O a
a

I
rH

3
ft
.

3
fi

Ijh
5
a>

o
ri
>.

H 1 H

rt

1 * o H
O

a
H

a
|

o-~H +>
CP

I
E-i

1 %

IP If
tiO'd

Si* O
3

<D

II o w
3

|
6> *H
<D

o
o
60 DO H-rl
a) a)
4->

o
<d

1
1

1
&

1 H
*o
rt

Ep no -p rt -H ro
a> a>

n
a>

3 h
+J
(4

tu.1

fiU

-P

CD

a>

-H
Q)

n
CD

J
P.

CD

feife

Sb
1
8
Si

feg
Cx,

s fefeg
fc.

&,

S
-a

g fcfcO

SI H 9

fe
rt

ib

p 5

*h

rt

XI

CO

123

NUMBER OF

SHIPS IN

THE UNITED STATES MARITIME ADMINISTRATION'S NATIONAL DEFENSE RESERVE FLEET AS OF DECEMBER 31 FOR SPECIFIED YEARS
1946 1947
1418
13

Design Type
Total
Cl-Jl

1948 1966
13

1949 2189
12

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955
2111
12

1956 2003
12 38

1957

1958

1738
7

2104
12

H65
11 39
55

1974
11

2063
L2

2093
12

2036
12

2090
13 38 50 9 -

Cl-B C1-K-AV1 C1-S-AY1 Cl-S-Dl


C2

17 3S
_

26 21
7 17

36 48
5

38 61
5 1

40 66
9
1

40
54

39
57

9
1

9
1

u
10
l

9
1

39 66 9
1

39 71
9

38

61 9
3

49
9

1 3

4 1

6
1

4
-

C2-F C2-S C2-T C2-S-AJ1, AJ2, AJ3 & AJ5 C2-S-B1 C2-S1-A1 C2-S!
C3

2
2

.
2

2 1

2 1 3

2
1

17 19 -

15

_ _

_ _ _ _ 16 6

_ _
_

_
_ 1

_
1

1 2

4 -

12

_ -

. ..

_
2

2
2

6 _ 1
19

C3-E

C3-S-A2 A3 C3-S-CX1 C4-S-A1, A3 & Ci-S-la C4-S-B1, B2 & B5

26 6 2

11

_ 12

20
.

_ 21
-

18 8

_ 16
-

21
1

11

15 25
3

19
3

_ -

35
1

21
6

10

10

6
1395
-

EC2-S-C1 EC2-S-8a " EC2-S-22a * British Liberty N3-^-Al & ta


K3-S-AI & A2 F1-S2-L2 P2-SE2-R1 P2-S2-R2 Fass. & Cargo

851
-

782
-

1326 _

U84
35 13
8

1530 _
-

1010
-

1432
-

1441
-

1431
-

35
11

35 9 9
2

35 9 9
1

35
Li
5

35
13

35
9

2
2

1421 6 35 9
10
2

1387
-

1368
1

11 35
9 11
2

10 35 9 11
1 1 1

10 21

9
11 1

31
2

9
2

9
2

9
2

6
1

"
7 ~ 9 _ 1

5
5

5 n

6 -

R1_K_AV3 R2-S-8V1 Tl-K-Al & A2 T1-K-BT1 6 BT2 T2-A


T2-SE-A1, A2 & A3 T3-S-A1 T3-S2-A1 VC2-M-AP4 VC2-S-AP2

23 22

16
12 -

9
3

e 8

9 9 -

9
1

9
3
-

"

_ 1

9 1

9
1

172 -

28 1 59
8

_ 1

_ 1

_ -

9 1

34
1

36
2

38
2

4
1

4
1

19

49
9 56

L?8

155
56

75
9

103 15

148

157

155

118
34

133
34

158

VC2-S-AP3 VC2-S-AF5 Z-EC2-S-C2 & C5 Z-ET1-S-C3

46
60 34
11

60
23 36

26 35

60 40
X3

60 40
12

_ 60 35
2

60
35
2

39 60

U
59

45
52

40
2

38
2

34
2

60 30
2

60 27
2

46 86 26
2

MiscellaneouB

327

216

156

143

131

125

118

120

109

108

134

106

107

Note:

Shoun above are the original ship design types vith the exception of the EC2-S-CT conversions uhlch are starred.
Miscellaneous group is comprised of ships without design types; ships which were not constructed as merchant type; special types such a6 tugs, barges, etc. and ships under 1,000 gross tons.
Source
:

Division of Ship Custody

124

-P

3
-A

3^
3
^4j
t

33 w^
-CJ-,

-P

SB

*B
tH

d.

-P

-P

<m in
TJ

'A
-p

^ ^S3 HPhOW-3 cof4 s


*H
-rl

ii mm
g8

33 9 B W <
-a -a -p

9
a!

33
"O
0)

jy = g:

*H H

'

000
fl

a 3

-P

-p -p

m
-p

-p <j

.o

EBW
ffl

-P

"O

W
Q o

01

13

t*5

EE
O O

BBB I A B bVI II II if

:gg

O O

<d

1)

u S

^3
CO CO <q
<jj
aj

B o S S O -H O o O S O O OcOOOOOulO

8>fc

CO in C- -4
-4"

C*OmT\COu"\irvOONOCOt'-Ot>OH

H in v\ iH

iri

t~ to to l/\ co to

m a- vD co co to ep o en cm o en
*>

otom ^tnN t> on O


rH*

r>Omr>0-<fCMm

OH -*f OJ UMAO
H
r- cm

iH

CM OH3 "*-4

e>

ir

c- to

--3" tf~\

lt\

rf

r-Tr-f

T3
<D

CO

-P

c-vH CMNCMH CMCMHHinOI c-lcMCMH fncncnc>OOe>O^CMC>


to to

-4c*-4

-Hoi

959
Hc^O

(MriHcMHoli

,*
9s Q.

r-!O00rn 00CpirMrv(>\0r\cnfpiC\iC\i

nf- ChHvO

CM*-

t-

IT\>0 -*

-*

cwO

mom sad
H
CM rH
IT*

tXJr^CO-^u-NCOC^-H

CM^O^-Oc^HC-

SM

t! JP

n
ir\

i
co

\0

sJO iA too rr\ Ol


rH c^

20,256 16,991 21,329

S'CMm m r-JcMrHr-irHrHrHCMCM
r-TS"C>'r-H"rn

fj

H
-H

OOCOmtOCOr-lrH'-* CM
]

o H

cd

-*Jcm
s

s o**

pa

o^ o^ c* IHHriHioIHHrlrHHriHi
s s o** o**
cj**

r\ r\

cm

inr*m-4-cncn^l-<rir*cn
<y* cj*

CM C- CO CM en

-^

mCMiHCMt>COr-(v0

mtooo
s
-

O CM O O H O O

1T\

HHrlHHHHi

o^

HHHHHrii

oo

AS

125

tn

rH

^b"

5
>

s=

IE
I

PB
'B3
r
cc:

HI

Be
-p -p -p

^B
>
r^j

a,

M ^

a]

<3

?=
c3

^ S
a>

M 3d,
"4

CA
3_.=

^(vT^ttT

! +>
0]

hwB
'rj

XI

l^<f B B BSla 99g|

**
<!

o <
/-.

>
z,

^ .p >a>-Pwwcia><Dw(Da)
1

HBPSme B
?S :gggggg

" p ^! .H

o
+5 rH

So+3 x>

asm

<

SBEB
+> +> -p -p

&

* CO

o o
H *H -P -P -P

rrj

^+3

+3 -p

r^J

rtf

^
J'+T
3

WWH
n
s-c)

^H
>-p"-p" -o O fl

.+T-P"

o o o o o o H 8 -o o o o o o -o

H B
cd

-P

r>pq

E o o

O O soo

C/l

>Ot*a<D<D03OOoOO >o5i=E3Eoo30o
T>
OJ

-o T3

C C

ggg

o o o o OOOO

c a c a a o
C3

O H
i/j

O
n
: C

to

as

U
1

o
53 S5

> 5

O o i

o bs O BS
(

LU PS

s
o o o o o

c/l Bli

a O
5)

Xo
t/">

<

i/-j

<4
tt.

oo m >H < uH QU
< <<
CL,

dui ^oi
p.
o

p,' iH

p, p. O,

o p. S3

>

S"

aaaak H H H H rH

ww
en

a
In

P. CO

HlOO 5.3 5 -p +
q
to

o o

to

CO

b p 845.3.3

"3 a (0 CD CO

5
a
-s

o o o o o ririrlHri

o o o o o ooooo

S3

U
n-;

w
l/J c/>

rl TJ

A" A H
43

oe
O O 8 <4<qi

11 A3
CD

2 c e g g g
to
(L
0.

CO

UttJ
14 UJ -/

n
Ed

M e

&43
rH
t-1

M c

"l
i

o o

MM

<1>

0.'

<D

KKBWB
d>
(D

T3 tJ

"tJ (D

ty

< 2 aO<

-}(\|0|1TVOIN-^CM(MOOO
r-TrTrTi-T
t-Tr-T

\Hooc^uMAfloir\ioO\0
i-Ti-T

v>

rH -J-trjrH sD 00 tO rH rH tX) y> to CJ t^ O0 &>

cr^ IT\

ct^ fc ^0 vO

tno o

o cx o

IS!

\0 vO <N *T<V

00 CO Tv

rT

ZE
^3
<d

-p
r-*|c>H
|

ra

O u Q W

fatdrfaaaaaass
HvOCOO^i
b>.r^i

^Hc H^ N
, <

s:

rHC^rH

a
CM

r^as^s
IOOHi

~*rr,[

C; f^ Vf tOMrl

c^

'OxOHO^Ol
ririnflrii

~JrH MOO
c~i

HriHril
h
cd

a
f-

a*s*rf
\0
irv (J\

a*a*rf

rf

SPh"

rH ^|

^tOHCArHrHcrxC-OOCrf^oO
, ,

Hm

ir\xr\ir\c\li^n^ c\jcSl^ CNioi s N N N 0>CrOC7NU^ C7s O^O 0N

CM 00 00 rH

--

O00
Q\
-sfrH

CM

H 00

00 t> cr,^tcM

O O C> ririri

0>0>

V\ O o> &*
ITv

cr,00
^J-

126

5&
S

qi
<H

p
<4

cT-P B
-P
aS
ea g>

^ S
*
(

!B4i
(

H-gB
0)

<!
>

38 W
ca
a)

3
<H

W
4^ -P <^ -P -P -P g-

ql

ctf

J)

<$ CO <d

JS 3BB
.

K K -p 'o'-p

"^a
o
I

6K <
p
CO (d

-o
a)

bj

Bill
I

I I

cu

to

d
-

P
(0 cd

to

UO CO O00OO0OOOO OOO o ooooaosooooos ggggggggggg 5 ggggggggggggggggggg Bggggggggggggggg


>

^-p^-p"

.-p'

~-p

^-P+3'

..-P*

OO

OOOa

b= <a

s"

o Oo
+J
(0

rH H
cj ca

-P CQ (0 -

o o p o <H H c5 o WM
<c

fc,

3 Eb-p ^-"3^ C P iH
o
ai

ca

aJ

ci<h

TJ

O
aJ
tfi

o)

aj

-P

t-\

CD

to

B <
-D -p -p

itix; +J

T3U
-H
(71

H
Ul

V -H O O a a,
t, a)

3
co

H ^

+> +3

(D

^3

-p -p -p -p

MM

l-l

CO rH
CO,

ffl

iH

CO

OM

CO CO

cO

cO

CO CO CO

3
.ad

Mail

Mail

Mall

1 H H
11
O

8*
CO

Castle

Castle

Castle

^
Cd

-P
to

h"

"if! ,3

Union

Union

Union

<p

05 P

J 3 OP, t3
<"

sfvDH O O H O ^tOOHt'C^Of-OCMr -4 -4 O O O r^ rH O O OJ Ou~\irNvOOOC-rH m


ir\ ir\ *>
r"
-*4"

_
-^t

IT*

-4"

C\ -4

O^Or^ON-^ojf^vDc^ojvXi
tf\ C*C>i

r^\vO 'JO'sOHOvOH^OOOCM to to sO Q t> t> O OJ


tf\
*T\
r-i

n^ to
u-\

F-

E> H co

H H H H rH

rH
(1)

+>
<tl
till

h O bo N rH <

3
p.

T3

C
aJ

P
"S 43

qj

rH
CQ

gj

CQ

>

> O

V
a

tl)

+>

Sf

H H CO NNHOJHOJH^HHOJ^C\IWHRHHr\JHHHHOjH(Nl OIHHOIOJOJH oir\|o^r^r^wo^ojcQoir^Noicotcqcqt^io(>^^(^ocqo


OJ tb CO
CNJ

a
0> VI
to a>

01

rH

C -H a)H K rH v U rH ^ -P O > -H WKO


OJ Cd
.

t~i

T3

3 S

-P

<D

H C-i O O

J <D -s't-i <D

T3
aJ

w
CO

8 a

vOC^*T\-st01>OOO^r

C> CN H vO tO u~wO CO O rH cn t>


u~\ -<r r^\

ir\

C^rH^r^^^OJvOQvOCv)Lno-\t^HxniHC^-<J-COCVOO(>I>rH H sf^0J^0(>ot00^tXlC0O^nO(Vstr^0^0nC0I>C0C00

01 <u

tin

to

CO

u~\ irv

8a
M H P

>

M O
01

Of^vOOCMOtXJCOvOvDCO

O 0^C0C0^DMXlO^sfiAMl>\OCOinH (>^MCOOM3(^vOH
0^(^Cj^O^On O^C^C^O^O^C?^O^On O^On C^C_T^(^CJnC^

-J" it\

CV I>

ir\

I>

OO

>. .o
tl)

w p v o H 3 H C o ^ o c ^ a >H P at to A wx ^ T3
10
t>.

-H H TJ

O
-rl aJ

T3 a;

*
aj

a
aJ aJ

o o
-h
r-(

^4
at

G
t,

p
CQ
10

rH <h pa

<

01

tH CQ

rHHHr-tHHrHHHrHH

rHrHHHHHHHrH<-IHHHi-JHrHHrHHH<-IHHrHHHrHHrHHrHHHrH^

a
0)

0)

<m

a)

*<h

>o

O
ai

a)

H
01

fe

b
bll

ii fl

*
01

^
cj

(,

a]

P
01

g
c
at

oj

Ch-P -h -P to o p qj W) O -r; d h O C*-* C o u O -H -P -P


rt

-H

L,

Cj

MO
to

f, o >

rH
01

aJ

CO aj

-H
id

3 <

p,

CU

oOO

G. to

P -P t3 WW2
a. to aJ

*ri

c3c3
to

>h to

a.
co
c

MH
erf

-p CQ
,
t-1

so

AS

- 53 I g e I 8 a s ~HOO

SHpq^ o p
gj

pi o!

+> P M < o, o S c ca pa o o
0) id
01

< T3 WWS
01

p Ch

cy5 cy H

127

OWNERS

UNITED STATES OWNERS OF UNITED STATES FLAG OCEANGOING DRY CARGO VESSELS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1958 ARRANGED BY OWNER, LOCATION AND PRINCIPAL OFFICERS
AEOLIAN STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 0^ DELAWARE 60 Wall Street New York, New York
President - Riccardo San <J*nero Vice President - Riccardo San Venero, Jr. Secretary-Treasurer - Octavius Zeuli

AMERICAN PRESIDENT LINES, LTD. 311 California Street Sai Francisco A, California
President - George L. Killon Vice President - Arthur B. Poole, J.M. Diggs, George T. Paine, A. A. Alexander, E.D. Flaherty Secretary - George D. Wick, Jr.

ALASKA STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC, Pier 4-2 North Skinner Building Seattle U t Washington
President - D.E. Skinner Ex. Vice President - R.C. Anderson Vice President - R.J. Behnke Secretary - I.J. James Treasurer - R.J. Behnke

AMERICAN UNION TRANSPORT, INC. 17 Battery Place New York A, New York
President - E. Holzer Vice President - H.L. Arens Treasurer - H. Fischer

ALCOA STEAMSHIP CO., INC. 17 Battery Place New York 4, New York
President - W.C. White Vice President - F.K. Bell, W.H. Griffin, R.D. Weeks, F.A. Billhardt Secretary - W.H. Griffin Treasurer - R.D. Weeks

AMERICAN WATERWAYS CORPORATION 10 Columbus Circle New York 19, New York
President - Thomas A. Spears Vice President - Frank W. Higbie Secretary - Treasurer - Louis C Couphos

AMERICAN BANNER LINES, INC. 17 Battery Place New York U, New York
President - Arnold Bernstein Secretary - Anthony A. Sirna Treasurer - Frank D. Williams

ARROW STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. 26 Broadway New York U, New York


President - Michel Fribourg Vice President - W.S. Leinbundgut Secretary - L.T. Stovall Treasurer - Harry A. Sperling

AMERICAN COAL SHIPPING CO., INC. 17 State Street New York 4, New York
President - William C. Brewer Secretary - Joseph E. Moody Treasurer - Raymond Mildenberger

ASPIN SS. CO., INC. c/o Isbrandtsen Co., Inc. 26 Broadway New York A, New York
President - Jakob Isbrandtsen Secretary - Treasurer - R.F. Pierce
ATLANTIC CARRIERS, INC. 29 Broadway, Room 1025 New York 6, New York ATLANTIC OCEAN TRANSPORT CORPORATION c/o Stockard Steamship Corporation 17 Battery Place New York A, New York

AMERICAN EXPORT LINES, INC. 39 Broadway New York U> New York
President - Vacant Vice President - L.S. Andrews & W.H, McConnell Secretary - R.W. Bachelor

AMERICAN MAIL. LINE, LTD. 740 Stuart Building Seattle 1, Washington


President - A.R. Linter Vice President - L.W. Hartman, W.L. Williams, Lawrence Calvert, R.B. Bush Secretary - B.C. Grosscup Treasurer - R.B. Bush

President - T.W. Cullen Vice President - R.B. Williams Treasurer - R.B. Williams Secretary - L. Bornemann
BEAUREGARD, INC. 61 Saint Joseph Street Mobile 13, Alabama

131

BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION c/o Marven Steamship Corporation 25 Broadway New York A., New York
Chairman - Eugene G. Grace President - Arthur B. Homer Vice President - James H. Ward Treasurer - Donald T. Aikenhead Secretary - B.D. Broeker
BLIDBERG ROTHCHILD COMPANY
80 Broad Street New York 4-> New York

CENTRAL GULF STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 305 Hibernia Bank Building New Orleans 12, Louisiana
President - Niels F. Johnson Vice President - N.W. Johnson Secretary- Treasurer - Robert S. Labry

CHAMBERLIN, W.R. & COMPANY 206 Portland Trust Building Portland, Oregon

President - J.J. Tennant

President - Sylvester E. Rothchild Secretary - Charles L. Ferber Treasurer - Herman Heidicker

COASTAL SHIP CORPORATION 229 South State Street Dover, Delaware


COASTWISE LINE 141 Battery Place San Franeisco 11, California

BL00MFIELD STEAMSHIP COMPANY P. 0. Box 1A50 906 Cotton Exchange Building Houston 1, Texas
President - B.M. Bloomfield Vice President - Robert T. Lester, Robert A. Taylor Secretary - Wiley R. George Treasurer - Robert T. Lester

President - Robert Setrakian Vice President - D.J. Seid Secretary-Treasurer - D.J. Seid

COMPASS S.S. CORPORATION 26 Broadway New York U, New York


DE LAPPE, W.A. CO., INC. 17 Battery Place

BULK CARRIERS CORPORATION 80 Broad Street New York A, New York


President - T.J. Stevenson, Jr. Ex. Vice President - J.F. Shea Treasurer - Secretary - M.V. Gunson
BULL, A.H. STEAMSHIP COMPANY 115 Broad Street New York A, New York

New York U, New York

DOLPHIN STEAMSHIP CORP, OF DELAWARE c/o Triton Shipping Co., Inc. 26 Broadway New York A> New York
DORIC SHIPPING & TRADING 11 Broadway New York, New York

President - W.C. Brewer Vice President - J.E. Light, C.F. Heitmann Secretary - A.E. Sheridan Treasurer - Herbert E. Miebach
BURBANK, A.L. & COMPANY, LTD. 120 Wall Street New York 5, New York

EASTERN GAS & FUEL ASSOCIATES (Mystic Steamship Division) 250 Stuart Street Boston 16, Massachusetts
President - E.H. Bird Ex. Vice President - R.P. Tibolt Secretary - J.E. Eastham Treasurer - A.K. Wood Vice President - Graham Granger

Chairman - A.L. Burbank, Sr. President - Peter Burbank Ex. Vice President - E.B. Asbury Secretary - J.R. Link, Jr. Vice President - Forest L. Virtue, F.J. Gerham, Wm. C, Gray Treasurer - P. Caramella
CARGO SHIPS AND TANKERS, INC. 17 Battery Place New York U* New York

EASTERN MARITIME CORPORATION c/o International Navigation Co., Agents 29 Broadway New York, New York

EDISON STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 25 Broadway New York U> New York


President - A. Sideratos Vice President - Christos Daskal Treasurer - Anthony H. Manolakis Secretary - Angelo H. Manolakis

132

EFFORT S.S. CORPORATION c/o Ocean Carriers Corporation 26 Broadway New York 4, New York

GRAINFLEET, INC. 80 Broad Street New York 4> New York

ELAM SHIPPING CORPORATION c/o Tankship Management Corporation 44 Whitehall Street New York 4 New York
President - T.A. Margaronia Secretary - Matt Di Sanza Treasurer - George Andrews

President - Raymond Arar Secretary - E.V.N. Bissell, Jr. Treasurer - Rudolph DeWett Finsted
GULF & SOUTH AMERICAN STEAMSHIP CO., 821 Gravier Street New Orleans 12, Louisiana
INC,

EPIPHANY TANKERS CORPORATION 39 Broadway New York 6, New York


President - John E. Panoras Vice President - Edward M. Miller Secretary - Louis J. Dukas Treasurer - Edward M. Miller

President - Lewis A. Lapham Vice President - George Griswold Sec.-Treas. - Lloyd Strickland
HAWAIIAN TEXTRON, INC. 311 California Street San Francisco, California

President - Elmer J. Martin Secretary-Treasurer - J.M. Fisher


HERALD S.S. CORPORATION Seaways Shipping Corp., Agents 39 Broadway New York 6, New York

FALMOUTH STEAMSHIP CORPORATION c/o Starboard Shipping, Inc. Broadway New York 4> New York

President - James B. Stuart Vice President - Evanthie Stuart Secretary-Treasurer - R.S. Sturn

INTERCONTINENTAL LIBERTIES, INC. 61 Broadway New York 6, New York

FARRELL LINES, INC. 26 Eeaver Street New York 4> New York
Chairman - John J. Farrell President - James A. Farrell, Jr. Ex. Vice President - George Wauchope Secretary-Treasurer - C. Carlton Lewis

INTERCONTINENTAL TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. 61 Broadway New York 6, New York

President - Raphael Recanti Treasurer - Ran Hettena


INTER-OCEAN STEAMSHIP CO. c/o North Atlantic Marine Co., Inc. 60 Broadway New York 6, New York
ISBRANDTSEN COMPANY, INC. 26 Broadway New York 4> New York

FLYING ENDEAVOR, INC. c/o Is brand tsen Co., Inc. 26 Broadway New York 4> New York

FLYING FISH, INC. c/o Is brand tsen Co., Inc. 26 Broadway New York 4> New York
FLYING GULL, INC. c/o Is brand tsen Co., Inc. 26 Broadway New York 4 New York

President - Jakob Isbrandtsen Vice President - M.S. Crinkley, E. Hugh, Jr., A.E. Rising,Jr, W.M. Isbrandtsen and C.H. Betjemann Secretary-Treasurer - R.F. Pierce
ISTHMIAN LINES, INC. 71 Broadway New York 6, New York

FLYING HAWK, INC. c/o Is brand tsen Co., Inc. 26 Broadway New York 4> New York
GRACE LINE, INC. 3 Hanover Square New York 4> New York

President - A.E. King Vice President - James K. McCabe Secretary - G.W. Gow Treasurer - P. D. Barksdale

President - Lewis A. Lapham Vice President - James E. Magner, Ted B. Westfal Secretary - F.F. Moon Treasurer - B.G. Piper
133

LIBERTY NAVIGATION & TRADING CO., INC. c/o J.R. Winchester & Company 19 Rector Street New York 6, New York

MISSISSIPPI SHIPPING COMPANY, INC. 1300 Hibernia Bank Building, Box 316 New Orleans, Louisiana

President - Miguel J. Ossorio Vice President - Luis C. Ossorio, Jose M. Ossorio Secretary-Treasurer - G. Addison Porter
LONG QUINN & BOYLAN CO. 21 West Street New York, New York

President - H.X. Kelly Vice President - George C. Westfeldt,


G.H. Ireland, L.W. Seemann, C.T. Davis

Secretary - John M. Duffy Treasurer - G.H. Ireland


MOORE-McCORMACK LINES, INC. 5 Broadway New York J+, New York
President - William T. Moore Vice President - G.L. Holt, G.E. Donovan, A.F. Chrystal, K.C. Tripp, R.E.

LUCKENBACH STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. 120 Wall Street New York 5, New York

President - James Sinclair Secretary - J. A. Gibson Treasurer - Emil Mildenberger


LYKES BROS. STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. 1300 Commerce Building 821 Gravier Street New Orleans 12, Louisiana

O'Brien Treasurer - S.L. Barbara Chairman - Emmet J. McCormack Secretary - Albert F. Chrystal
NEW ENGLAND INDUSTRIES, INC. 120 Wall Street New York 5, New York

President - S.B. Turman Vice President - J.M. Lykes, Jr., J.T.


Lykes, Jr. Secretary-Treasurer - F.A. Nemec
LYONS, JANE S.

President - Jacob Michael Vice President - C.A. Goldschmidt Secretary - Karl J. Schumer Treasurer - Alfred A. Adrian
OCEAN CLIPPERS, INC. 61 Broadway New York 6, New York

Coos Bay, Oregon


MARINE BULK CARRIERS 60 Broadway New York, New York

MARINE NAVIGATION COMPANY, INo. 11 Broadway New York A, New York

OCEAN FREIGHTING & BROKERAGE CORPORATION 80 Broad Street New York A, New York

President - Vacant Vice President - C. Bosak, H.J. Maass Secretary - F.A. Dwyer Treasurer - G.D. Hawthorne
MART IS STEAMSHIP CORPORATION c/o Mar Trade Corporation 44 Whitehall Street New York A t New York

Chairman - T.J. Stevenson President - Kenneth H. Stevenson Vice President - Thomas J Stevenson, jr, Secretary-Treasurer - Frank A. Turner
OCEAN SHIPPING, INC. 52 Broadway New York 4, New York
President - Constantino Proios Secretary - Mark Xylas Treasurer - M. Troios

President and Director - Anthony G. Couloucoundis Secretary and Director - Peter Moraites Treasurer and Director - Athan Nazapis

OCEAN TRAMP, INC. c/o Ocean Carriers Corporation 26 Broadway New York I, New York
OCEAN TRANSPORTATION COMPANY, INC.
61 Broadway New York 6, New York

MATSON NAVIGATION COMPANY 215 Market Street San Francisco 5, California

Chairman - William P. Roth President - R. Sevier Vice President - R.J. Chandler, G.F.
Hansen, D. McBryde, E.J. Bradley Secretary-Treasurer - S. Powell, Jr.

President - Herman Merkin Secretary - Joshua Morrison Treasurer - R. Hettena

134

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. c/o Matson Navigation Co. 215 Market Street San Francisco 5, California

PANAMA CANAL COMPANY 21 West Street New York 6, New York

President - Randolph Sevier Vice President - N.S. Laidlaw Secretary - Stanley Powell, Jr. Treasurer - W.M. Roth
OLSON, OLIVER J.& COMPANY 121 North San Mateo Drive San Mateo, California

President - W.E. Potter Vice President - Hugh M. Arnold Secretary - W.M. Whitman PAN CARGO SHIPPING CORPORATION c/o National Shipping & Trading Corp. 10 Columbus Circle New York 19, New York President - Thomas A. Spears Secretary-Treasurer - Louis C. Couphos
PEGOR S.S. CORPORATION 26 Broadway New York 14., New York

President - E. Whitney Olson Ex. Vice President - George L.Olson Vice President - La Forest E. Phillips Secretary -Treasurer - Oliver J. Olson, Jr.
OLYMPIC STEAMSHIP CO., INC. Pier 28 Seattle, Washington
ORE TRANSPORT, INC. 1300 Leader Building Cleveland 14, Ohio

PENINSULAR NAVIGATION CORPORATION 17 Battery Place New York 4, New York


President - Joseph S. Someck Vice President - David Someck Secretary-Treaurer - Dionyssios Voutsinas PENNTRANS COMPANY Park Avenue New York 22, New York

President - Joseph H. Thompson Secretary - L.W. Spang Treasurer - Wm. C. Pieper


OWENS-PARKS LUMBER COMPANY, INC. 2100 East 38th Street Los Angeles 58, California
President - C.R. Melin Vice President - S.G. McDonald Secretary-Treasurer - C.E. Condee
PACIFIC FAR EAST LINES, INC. 141 Battery Place San Francisco 4, California

4.05

President - Nicolas M. Salgo Secretary - Anton Heinrich


PERMANENTE STEAMSHIP CORPORATION Kaiser Building 1924 Broadway Oakland 12, California

President - T.E. Cuffe Vice President - R.J. Pries, Howard C. Adams, A.L. Papworth Secretary-Treasurer - L.C. Ross
PACIFIC NAVIGATOR CORPORATION 26 Broadway New York, New York PACIFIC WATERWAYS CORPORATION 30 Broad Street New York 4, New York

Chairman & President - Henry J. Kaiser Ex. Vice President & Treasurer - E.E. Trefethen, Jr. Secretary - William Marks
PIER SHIPPING COMPANY, INC. 27 William Street New York 5, New York

POC0H0NTAS STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. 122 East 42nd Street New York 17, New York

President - Howard M. Pack Vice President - Joseph Kahn Secretary - Samuel Kahn Treasurer - Louis Brokaw
PACIFIC WIND CORPORATION 26 Broadway New York 4, New York

President - H.R. Hawthorne Secretary - Holly W. Sphar Treasurer - J. Carroll Corbet


PONCE PRODUCTS, INC. 160 Third Avenue Miami, Florida

President - Jose A. Ferre

PANAGOPULOS, EUGENE
80 Broad Street New York, New York

135

POPE & TALBOT, INC. 100 Bush Street & Pier 38 San Francisco k, California

STATES MARINE CORPORATION 90 Broad Street New York J+y New York
President - C.S. Walsh Vice President - P.V. Everett, L.H. Quackenbush Ex. Vice President - A.D. Frese Treasurer - P.D. Barksdale
STATES MARINE CORPORATION OF DELAWARE (Subsidiary of States Marine Corporation) 90 Broad Street New York A, New York

President - George A. Pope, Jr. Ex. Vice President - E.N.W. Hunter Vice President - C.T. Walker, H.

Lueddemann Secretary - Robert R. Hind Special Vice President - Charles L. Wheeler PRUDENTIAL STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 17 State Street New York 4, New York
President - E.D. Hardaloupas Vice President - J.E. Schmeltzer, Jr. Secretary - George Stavrides Treasurer - E.T. Hardaloupas

President - C.S. Walsh Ex. Vice President - A.D. Frese Vice President - P.V. Everett, L.H.

Quackenbush Treasurer - P.D. Barksdale


STATES STEAMSHIP COMPANY 262 California Street, Pier 15 San Francisco 11, California

ROCKLAND S. S. CORPORATION c/o North Atlantic Marine Co. 80 Broad Street New York A, New York
SEATRAIN LINES, INC. 711 - 3rd Street New York 17, New York
President - John L. Weller Vice President - David M. Brush Treasurer - D.M. Brush
SHEPARD STEAMSHIP COMPANY 31 Milk Street

President - J.R. Dant Vice President - R.G. Jubitz


SPERLING, HARRY 26 Broadway New York U> New York

STEVENSON & COMPANY, T.J. 80 Broad Street New York A, New York
President - T.J. Stevenson Ex. Vice President - John F Shea Secretary-Treasurer - M.V. Gunson
STOCKARD STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 17 Battery Place New York U, New York

Boston 3, Massachusetts
President - T.H. Shepard Ex. Vice President & Treasurer - H.W. Shepard
SPRAGUE STEAMSHIP COMPANY 10 Post Office Square Boston 9, Massachusetts

President - Horace B. Holland Vice President - George H. Seal Treasurer - J.T. Baldwin
STANDARD STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 601 Board of Trade Building Portland A, Oregon

President - L.N. Stockard Vice President - John 0. Wroldsen, Raymond H organ Secretary - C.G. Pandorf Treasurer - Edward M. Sloman
SWORD LINE, INC. 52 Wall Street New York 5, New York

President , Calvin N. Souther Ex. Vice President - K.C. Conyers Vice President - Garrett Fuller Secretary - William H. Kinsey Treasurer - J.W. Lipscomb
STAPLES COAL COMPANY 80 Federal Street Boston 10, Massachusetts

President - E.A. Hirs Secretary -Vice President - John J. McDonald Treasurer - E.A. Hirs

TAK SHIPPING CORPORATION 30 Broad Street New York A New York


President - Joseph Kahn Vice President - Samuel Kahn Secretary-Treasurer - Louis Brokaw

President - John Worcester Ex. Vice President - Nelson C. Smith Treasurer - Edward H. Owen

136

TENNANT, J.J. COMPANY 206 Portland Trust Building Portland U* Oregon

TROPICANA PRODUCTS, INC. Box 338 Bradenton, Florida

President - John J. Tennant Vice President - Arno H. Denecke


TERMINAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. c/o A.L. Burbank & Co., Ltd. 120 Wall Street New York 5, New York

President - Anthony T. Rossi Vice President - E.E. Price, Jr. Secretary - Mary Maxwell
UNITED FRUIT STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 80 Federal Street Boston 10, Massachusetts

President - Nathan H. Schine Vice President - Joel D. Schine Secretary - Herbert L. Cohen Treasurer - Harold L. Schine
TERRACE NAVIGATION CORPORATION 17 State Street New York 4, New York

President - Kenneth H. Redmond Vice President - Sam G. Baggett Secretary - Edward D. Toland, Jr. Treasurer - Edward D. Toland, Jr.
UNITED MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. 80 Federal Street Boston 10, Massachusetts

President - David W. Swans on Vice President - Ivo Matkovic Secretary - Henry P Molloy, Jr. Treasurer - A. E. Verdi
TRACY, M. & J., 1 Broadway

President - Kenneth H. Redmond Vice President - H. Harris Robson Sec- Treas. - Emery N. Leonard
UNITED STATES LINES COMPANY 1 Broadway New York 4 New York

INC.

New York

4,

New York President - J.M. Franklin Ex. Vice President - R.M. Hicks Vice President - G.C. Stedman, Kenneth F. Gautier Secretary - Walter E. Fox Treasurer - CD. Gibbons

President - William J. Tracy Vice President - Edward D. Kelly Secretary - Edward D. Kelly Treasurer - Michael P. Kelly
TRADERS STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 26 Broadway New York 4, New York

President - Nicholas A. Georgantas Vice Pres.-Sec- A. Mavrophilippas Treasurer - Costos M. Lemos Asst. Secretary - Katherine Felbinger TRANSFUEL CORPORATION 25 Broadway New York A New York
President - Harold E. Van Der Linde Secretary - Edwin Baldinger Treasurer - Victor Oberschall
TRANS-PACIFIC COMPANY 1100 Provident Trust Building 17th & Chestnut Streets Philadelphia 3, Pennsylvania

VERITAS STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. c/o Tankship Management Corporation 44 Whitehall Street New York U> New York
Vice President - D. Dritsas Treasurer - Robert J. Berran Secretary - Alex Loverdos

VICTORY CARRIERS, INCORPORATED 655 Madison Avenue New York 21, New York

President - Granville Conway Vice President - P. Spalding Secretary - E. Tinsley Ray Treasurer - Harold 0. Becker

WATERMAN STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 61 Saint Joseph Street Mobile 13, Alabama


President - J.K. McLean Vice Pres. - L.A. Parish, J.J. McDonald Secretary - Clara L. McLean Treasurer - E.A. Hirs

TRANSPORTATION UTILITIES, 85 Liberty Street New York 6, New York

INC.

President - Harry N. Moore

WEST COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY 601 Board of Trade Building Portland A, Oregon
President - Calvin N. Souther Secretary - William H. Kinsey Treasurer - James W. Lipscomb
137

WEYERHAEUSER STEAMSHIP COMPANY 1A1 Battery Street San Francisco 11, California
President - Donald Watson Vice President - L.C. Howard, L,J. Rogers Secretary - George S. Long, Jr. Treasurer - H.E. Nelson

WHITEHEAD STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 19 Rector Street New York 6, New York


President - S.G. Fassoulis Vice President - James M. Dunn
WORLD CARRIERS, INC. c/o World Tramping Agencies 26 Broadway New York U, New York

138

UNITED STATES OWNERS OF UNITED STATES FLAG OCEANGOING TANK VESSELS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1958, ARRANGED BY OWNER, LOCATION AND PRINCIPAL OFFICERS
AMERICAN COAL SHIPPING COMPANY 17 State Street New York A, New York
President - W.C. Brewer Secretary - Joseph E. Moody Treasurer - Raymond Mlldenberger

CALIFORNIA TANKER COMPANY 1200 State Street Perth Amboy, New Jersey
President - G. E. Lindley Vice President - B.D. Robertson, H.A. Ervin Secretary-Treasurer - F.W. Mayer
INC. CARRAS, J.M. 21 West Street New York 6, New York
,

AMERICAN OIL COMPANY 555 Fifth Avenue New York 17, New York
President - L.W. Vice President Secretary - F.X. Treasurer - R.A.
Moore John E. Kasch Mannix

President - J.M. Carras


JHEMICAL TRANSPORTER, INC. 17 Battery Place New York 4, New York

Arzinger

AMERICAN TRADING & PRODUCTION CORPORATION 555 Fifth Avenue New York 17, New York
President - Jacob Blaustein Vice President - L.C. Dunbar Secretary-Treasurer - J. Rothfield
ATLANTIC REFINING COMPANY 260 South Broad Street Philadelphia 1, Pennsylvania

President - Henry A. Gilbert Vice President - Robert B. Mitchell, Jr. Treasurer - James A. Olsen Secretary - Frederick W. Beckmann, Jr.

CITIES SERVICE OIL COMPANY 17 State Street New York 5, New York

President - Henderson Supples, Jr.


Vice President
H.G. Schad, D.T. Colley, H. W. Field Secretary - Richard Rollins Treasurer - C.J. Reller
-

President - E.L. Stauffacher Vice President - J. A. Kelley, E.G. Maddock, E.H. Wellemeyer Secretary - James W. Fry Treasurer - R.A. Cuthbertson

BAYVIEW S. S. CORPORATION 80 Broad Street New York U, New York


BERNUTH LEMBCKE COMPANY, INC. 420 Lexington Avenue, Graybar Building New York 17, New York
President - O.M. Bernuth Vice President - E.P. Bernuth, Charles M. Bernuth Asst. Secretary - Charles M. Bernuth Treasurer - G. Fields
BLACKSHIPS, INC. c/o Gulf Oil Corporation 17 Battery Place New York A, New York

CLARK STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 80 Broad Street New York U, New York

COLONIAL STEAMSHIP CORPORATION


c/o Orion Shipping & Trading Company, Inc. 80 Broad Street New York , New York

President - Constantino P. Goulandris Vice President - John D. Chinos Secretary-Treasurer - John D. Glinos
COMMERCE TANKER COMPANY, INC. c/o Sinclair Refining Company 600 Fifth Avenue New York 20, New York

Vice President

Joseph Oppe

Secretary - Richard 0. Duff


Broad Tankers Corporation c/o Tidewater Oil Company 17 Battery Place New York A, New York

COMMERCE TANKERS CORPORATION c/o Marine Transport Lines 11 Broadway New York, New York
DELSHIPS, INC. c/o Gulf Oil Corp. 17 Battery Place New York A, New York

President - David R. Grace

139

DENTON STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 60 Broadway, Room 1901 New York 4, New York
President - S.H. Wang Vice President - Stanley S. Unger Secretary - Stanley S. Unger

FIRST TANKER CORPORATION 555 Fifth Avenue New York 17, New York

President - D.J. Smith


GLOBE TANKERS, INC. 17 State Street New York, New York

DIESEL TANKER A. C. DODGE, INC. c/o Ira S. Bushey & Sons 764 Court Street Brooklyn 31, New- York
President - Francis S. Bushey Vice President - Francis S. Bushey Secretary- Treasurer - Raymond J. Bushey, Jr

President - K.F. Murchison Treasurer - G. Moser


GREENPOINT TANKERS, INC. c/o Circle Shipping Co., Inc. 2100 Hunters Point Avenue Long Island City, New York
President - H.L. Schwartz Secretary -Treasurer -B.D. Schwartz

EAGLE CARRIERS, INC. 250 Park Avenue New York 17, New York President - H.C. Vice President H.H. Secretary W.H. Treasurer

Lenfest W.H. Sieling Wasson Sieling

GULF OIL CORPORATION MARINE DEPARTMENT 17 Battery Place New York 4, New York
President Secretary
W.K. Whiteford Russell G. Connolly

EASTERN TANKSHIP CORPORATION c/o Tidewater Oil Co., Inc. 17 Battery Place New York 4, New York
President - M.A. Mathiasen Vice President - Treasurer-Thorvald Homestead Secretary - Benjamin F. Stahl

HARCON STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. 100 West 10th Street Wilmington, Delaware
President - J.C. Burns

EDISON STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 25 Broadway New York 4, New York


President - A Sideratos Vice President - Christos Daskal Secretary - Angelo H. Manolakis Treasurer - Anthony H. Manolakis

HERON STEAMSHIP COMPANY 80 Broad Street New York 4, New York


HESS TANKSHIPS COMPANY c/o Hess, Inc. State Street and Arthur Kill Perth Amboy, New Jersey

ESSO STANDARD OIL COMPANY 15 W. 51st Street New York 19, New York
President - William Naden Secretary - G.M. Buckingham

Vice President - Leon Hess Secretary - Treasurer - Harold N. Gast


HILLCONE STEAMSHIP COMPANY 311 California Street San Francisco 4, California

FAIRFILED STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 60 Broadway, Room 1901 New York, New York
President - S.H. Vice President - Stanley S. Unger Secretary - Stanley S. Unger

President - J.J. Coney Vice President - C.A. Ames Secretary-Treasurer - L.R. Kerdell

ISBRANDTSEN COMPANY, INC. 26 Broadway New York 4, New York


President - Jakob Isbrandtsen Vice President - M.S. Crinkley, E.
Huth, Jr. Secretary-Treasurer - R.F. Pierce

FIGUEROA TANKER CORPORATION c/o Union Oil Co. of California Union Oil Building Los Angeles 17, California
President - Thomas F. Troxell Vice President - Wilbur C. Dubois, August Belmont Treasurer - A.J. Gilles

KEYSTONE SHIPPING COMPANY 1000 Walnut Street Philadelphia 7, Pennsylvania

President - Charles Kurz Vice President - J.C. Kail, K.R. Kurz, A.B. Kurz Secretary - W.E. Rex Treasurer - F.W. Purdum
140

KEYSTONE TANKSHIP CORPORATION 1,000 Walnut Street Philadelphia 7, Pennsylvania

MOHAWK EXPRESS, INC. 80 Broad Street New York 4-, New York
MOORE McCORMACK LINES, INC
5 Broadway New York A> New York

President - J.C. Kail Secretary - N.G. Herb Treasurer - A.B. Kurz

KINGSTON STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 60 Broadway New York, New York


President - Stanley S. Unger Vice President-Secretary - Donald R. Ewen
Kurz & Company, Inc., Charles 1,000 Walnut Street Philadelhpia 7, Pennsylvania

President - William T. Moore Ex. Vice President - G.L., Holt Secretary - A.F. Chrystal Treasurer - S.L. Barbara

NATIONAL BULK CARRIERS, INC 380 Madison Avenue New York 17, New York

President - Charles Kurz Secretary - L.C. Krusen Treasurer - A.B. Kurz


KURZ TANKERS, INC. c/o Keystone Shipping Co. 1,000 Walnut Street Philadelphia 7, Pennsylvania
KURZ MARINE, c/o Keystone 1,000 Walnut Philadelphia
INC.

Chairman & President - D.K. Ludwig Ex. Vice President - W.W. Wagner Secretary - I.M. Halfpenny Treasurer - W.W. Wagner
NATIONAL MARINE SERVICE, INC. 21 West Street New York 6, New York
President - David A. Wripht Vice President - Edward K. Bachman, Frank C. Wright, Jr. Secretary - A.E. Van Why Treasurer - Edward K. Bachman
NAUTILUS PETROLEUM CARRIERS CORPORATION

Shipping Co. Street 7, Pennsylvania

ZU State Street
LOCUST TANKERS, INC. 611 Industrial Trust Building 10th & Shipley Streets Wilmington 1, Delaware
MARINE CARRIERS CORPORATION 25 Broadway, Room 104.0 New York U t New York
MARINE CHEMICAL TRANSPORT COMPANY, INC. c/o Marine Transport Lines 11 Broadway New York 4, New York

New York 6, New York

OIL CARRIERS JOINT VENTURE c/o Orion Shipping & Trading Co., Inc 80 Broad Street New York 4, New York

OIL TRANSFER CORPORATION 17 Battery Place New York U, New York


President - H.A.Gilbert Vice President - Robert B. Mitchell,
Jr,

President - H.J.Maass Vice President - Charles Bosak Treasurer - G.D. Hawthorne Secretary - F.A. Dwyer
MARINE NAVIGATION CO., INC. 11 Broadway New York U, New York

Secretary - F.N. Bickmann, Jr. Treasurer - J. A. Olsen

OIL TRANSPORT INC. c/o Joshua Hendy Corp. 612 South Flower Street Los Angeles 17, California
OLYMPIC TRANSPORT, LTD. c/o Cargo Tankship Management Corp. 80 Broad Street New York U, New York

Vice President - C. Bosak, H.J. Maass Secretary - F.A. Dwyer Treasurer - G.D. Hawthorne
METRO PETROLEUM SHIPPING COMPANY UU Whitehall Street New York A, New York

President - Th. J. Mitruw Vice President - Nicolas Kulukundis Treasurer - Manuel Kulukundis

OZARK NAVIGATION CORP. Room 1901, 60 Broadway New York A, New York

141

PAGO TANKERS, INC. c/o Keystone Shipping Co. 1,000 Walnut Street Philadelphia 7, Pennsylvania
Pre sident

PURE OIL COMPANY, THE Ocean Marine Department P. 0. Box 104.6 Nederland, Texas

Secretary Treasurer

Charles Kurz L.J. Gunson L.J. Gunson

PAN ATLANTIC STEMASHIP CORPORATION 61 Saint Joseph Street Mobile 13, Alabama
Chairman & President M. P. McLean Vice President - L.A. Parish Secretary - E.A. Hirs

President - R.L. Milligan Vice President - L.W. Sweet, K.A. Covell, R.B. Kelly, Secretary - A.C. Hutchinson Treasurer - R.F. Sturgis, Jr.
RED HILLS CORPORATION c/o Southoil, Inc. 1721 Franklin Street Jacksonville 6, Florida

PAN CARGO SHIPPING CORP. 10 Columbus Circle New York 19, New York

President - Gordon Duke Vice President - Robert Hope Secretary - Harry Hutson Treasurer - Gordon Duke

President Secretary Treasurer

Thomas A. Spears Louis C. Couphos Louis C. Couphos

PARAGON OIL CO., INC. 2,100 Hunters Point Avenue Long Island City 1, New York
President - H.L. Schwartz Vice President - R.B. Schwartz, A.A. Schwartz Secretary - Treasurer - B.D. Schwartz

RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION 555 S. Flower Street Lqs Angeles 17, California
President - Charles S. Jones Vice President - David E. Day, W.G.
King, Jr.

Secretary - N.F. Simmonds Treasurer - Cleve B. Bonner

PENN NAVIGATION COMPANY c/o Pan-Oceanic Nav. Corp. 25 Broadway New York, New York
PETROL SHIPPING CORPORATION c/o Mar Trade Corp. LA Whitehall Street New York 4, New York

SABINE TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. Box 1500 Port Arthur, Texas


President - M.T. Ball Vice President - H arley Eddingston, O.B. Hartzog Secretary - O.B. Hartzog Treasurer - Harley Eddingston SHEFFIELD TANKERS CORPORATION c/o Marine Transport Lines, Inc. 11 Broadway New York U, New York
SHIPS INCORPORATED c/o Cities Service Oil Co. 17 State Street New York 5, New York

PETROLEUM TANKERS INC. c/o Sinclair Refining Co. 600 Fifth Avenue New York 20, New York
PHILADELPHIA & NORTHERN STEAMSHIP CO. French & Water Streets Wilmington, Delaware PHILADELPHIA TANKERS, INC. 260 South Broad Street Philadelphia 1, Pennsylvania
President - H.G. Schad Vice President - J.W. Forgie Secretary - Richard Rollins Treasurer - Charles J. Raller
PICO TANKERS CORPORATION c/o Union Oil Co. of California Union Oil Building Los Angeles 17, California

President - B.S. Watson Vice President - G.H. Hill, Jr. Secretary - E. G. Christian Treasurer - E.G. Christian
SINCLAIR REFINING COMPANY, INC. Marine Department 600 Fifth Avenue New York 20, New York
President - T.B. Kimball Vice President - W.N. Damonte Secretary - J. Von Bevern Treasurer - E.H. Mutz

President - Thomas F. Troxell Vice President - Wilbur C. DuBois, August Belmont Secretary-Treasurer - A.J. Silles

142

THE SKOURAS LINES, INC. 233 West 49th Street New York 19, New York

TANKER "FOUR LAKES", INC. Texas City Refining Inc. (Operator) Texas City, Texas

President - Spyros S. Skouras Vice President - Spyros P. Skouras Secretary - George P. Skouras Treasurer - Evangelos P. Hardaloupas
S0CONY MOBIL OIL COMPANY, INC 150 E. 42nd Street New York 17, New York
President - Albert L. Nicker son Vice President - J.F. Seal Secretary - Arthur M. Sherwood Treasurer - V.B. Geibel

President Secretary Treasurer

F.F. Sweeton Wilmer G. Williams E.W. Hurst

TANKERS & TRAMPS CORPORATION c/o Cargo & Tankship Management Corp. 80 Broad Street New York 4, New York
President - Manuel E. Kulukundis Vice President - Nicholas E. Kulukundis, D. Dritsas Secretary - James A. Poll Treasurer - E.J. Demetriades

SOUTHERN CHARTERING COMPANY c/o Atlantic Refining Company 260 South Broad Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
President - Milton C. Jackson Vice President - Robert G. Stone Secretary - W.B. McKinney Treasurer - J.J. Higgins
STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 225 Bush Street, Standard Oil Building San Francisco 20, California

TERMINAL TRANSPORT CORPORATION 250 Park Avenue New York 17, New York
President - H.C. Vice President Secretary - H.H. Treasurer - W.H.
Lenfest
W.H. Sieling

Wasson Sieling

THE CABINS TANKER, INC. Texas City Refining Inc. (Operator) Texas City, Texas

President - T.S. Petersen Vice President - W.H. Beekhuis, Hillyer Brown, G.A. Davidson, W.W. Davidson, P.L. Fahrney, Gaga Lund, E.J. McClanahan, G.J. O'Brien, G.L. Parkhurst, E.R. Peterson Secretary - G.M. Foster Treasurer - H.C. Judd

President Secretary Treasurer

F.F. Sweeton Wilmer G. Williams E.W. Hurst

THE TEXAS COMPANY 135 East 42nd Street New York 17, New York
President - James W. Foley Senior Vice President - C.B. Barrett Secretary - Wallace E. Avery

STONEWALL STEAMSHIP COMPANY c/o Atlantic Refining Co. 260 S. Broad Street Philadelphia 1, Pennsylvania
SUN OIL COMPANY 1608 Walnut Street Philadelphia 3, Pennsylvania

TIDEWATER OIL COMPANY, INC. 4201 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles 5, California
President - George F. Getty Vice President - J.R. Getty

President - Robert G. Dunlop Secretary-Treasurer - J.C. Agnew


SWORD LINE, INC. 19Rector Street New York, New York

TIDEWAY STEAMSHIP CORPORATION c/o North Atlantic Marine Co., Inc 80 Broad Street New York 4, New York

President - E.A. Vice President Secretary - John Treasurer - E.A.

Hirs John J. McDonald J. McDonald Hirs

TRAMP SHIPPING & OIL TRANSPORTATION CORP. c/o Cargo & Tankship Management Corp. 80 Broad Street New York 4, New York
TRANSWESTERN ASSOCIATES c/o Tak Shipping Corp. 30 Broad Street New York 4, New York

143

TRINIDAD CORPORATION 30 Rockefeller Plaza New York 20, New York


President - J.H. Durbin Secretary - Treasurer - W.H. Egolf

WESTERN OCEAN TRANSPORTATION CO. c/o Union Oil Co. of California Union Oil Building Los Angeles 17, California
President - Hugh Jay Jacks Vice President - Georg C. Seward Secretary - Richard H. Valentine Treasurer - Donald R. Watts

UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION 30 East 42nd Street New York 17, New York

President - Howard S. Bunn Ex. Vice President - Howard S. Bunn Vice President - D.B. Benedict Treasurer - John F. Shanklin
UNITED VINTNERS LINE, 601 - ^th Street
INC.

WINCO TANKERS, INC. 580 5th Avenue New York, New York
President - John C. Hadges Vice President - Helen Hadges Treasurer - Sophie Hadjiyanis

San Francisco 7, California


President - Louis Petri
Ex. Vice President - Albert Petri Secretary - B. Mortara Treasurer - F.W. Schumacher

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
38 South Dearborne Street

Chicago 3, Illinois

Treasurer

- J.

Parker Hall

WALNUT TANKERS, INC. 611 Industrial Trust Building 10th & Shipley Streets Wilmington 1, Delaware

WARREN PETROLEUM CORPORATION Box 1589, National Bank of Tulsa Building Tulsa 2, Oklahoma
President - J.E. Allison Vice President - R.V. Phelps Secretary - Don M. Mattocks Treasurer - A.J. Murphy

WATERMAN STEAMSHIP CORPORATION 61 Saint Joseph Street Mobile 13, Alabama


President - J.K. McLean Vice President - L.A. Parish Secretary - Clara L. McLean Treasurer - E.A. Hirs

WESTERN HEMISPHERE CORPORATION c/o Tidewater Oil Co. 17 Battery Place New York, New York
President - M.A. Mathiasen Vice President - Thorvald Homestead Secretary - Benjamin F. Stahl

144

OWNERS OF UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER OPERATING ON THE GREAT LAKES AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1958
Owner Type of Ship

Number
of Ships

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

American S .S . Co . , Inc Bulk Carriers American Steel & Wire Division


United States Steel Corp a Bulk Carriers

20

145,286

214,382

4, 202

6,800

Amersand Steamship Corp. Bulk Carriers

13,803

17,700

Bethlehem Steel Corp. Bulk Carriers Bethlehem Steel Company Bulk Carriers
Bradley Transportation Line Bulk Carriers

65, 449

104,101

25,415

44,300

63,374

97,260

Brown S .S . Co Bulk Carriers Browning Lines, Inc. Bulk Carriers


Buckeye S.S. Co., The Bulk: Carriers
Cambria S.S. Co. Bulk Carriers

10,126

15,600

26,291

38,700

46,297

76,135

15,526

23,600

Cargo Carriers, Inc. Bulk Carriers

18,309

27,900

Chicago Duluth & Georgian Bay Transit Co. Combination Passenger & Cargo
Clark Oil & Refining Corp. Tankers

7,605

2,300

1,149

1,723

Cleveland Cliffs S.S. Co., The Bulk Carriers


Cleveland Tankers, Inc. Tankers

16

122,340

188,089

24,668

31,632

Ecorse Transit Company Bulk Carriers


Ford Motor Company Bulk Carriers
Gartland S ,S . Company Bulk Carriers Gulf Oil Corporation Tankers

4,871

7,300

28,452

47,253

26,767

42,175

2,752

4,470

Hanna Coal & Ore Corporation Bulk Carriers

25,519

38,900

145

OWNERS OF UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER OPERATING ON THE GREAT LAKES AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1958- -Continued
Owne r Type of Ship

Number
of Ships

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Hansand Steamship Corp. Bulk Carriers

12,217

19,800

Huron Portland Cement Co. Bulk Carriers


Inland Steel Company Bulk Carriers

2^,026

35,982

-45,003

68,000

Interlake S.S. Co., The Bulk Carriers

33

252, 864

402,521

International Harvester Co. Eulk Carriers


Jupiter S.S. Co., The Bulk Carriers

15,172

24,000

9,033

15,000

Kinsman Transit Co., The Bulk Carriers


Marine Iron & Shipbuilding Co. Bulk Carriers

30,286

45,300

5,298

8,267

Maritime Trades, Inc. Cargo


McCarthy, T.J., S.S. Co.

1,042

1,660
44,228 20,800 23,428

Cargo Bulk Carriers

3
3

28,280 13,776 14,504

Michigan Atlantic Corp. Bulk Carriers


Midland Steamship Line, Inc. Bulk Carriers

1,040

1,660

26,625

39,400

Motor Vessel Poling Bros. No. 9, Inc. Tankers

1,242

1,891

National Marine Service, Inc. Tankers


National Steel Corp. Bulk Carriers

2,935

3,790

55,617 36,723 13,407 23,316

89,454
57,362
20,653 36,709

Nicholson Transit Company


Cargo Bulk Carriers

11
3

Northwestern Mutual life Insurance Co. Bulk Carriers


Ogle bay Norton Company Bulk Carriers Tankers

42,053

75,295

21 20
1

120,887 119,517 1,370

189,888 187,468 2,420

Penn -Dixie Cement Corp. Bulk Carriers


Pioneer S.S. Co., The Bulk Carriers

2,172

3,500

17

113,074

173,680

Pittsburgh Steamship Division United States Steel Corp. Bulk Carriers

57

458,494

732,819

146

OWNERS OF UNITED STATES FLAG SHIPS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER OPERATING ON THE GREAT LAKES AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1958-Continued
Owner Type of Ship
Prima Lake Ship Co., Inc. Bulk Carriers
Pure Oil Company, The Tankers

Number
of Ships

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

A, 690

6,800

4, 068

6,100

Red Arrow S.S. Company Bulk Carriers Red land SS. Company Bulk Carriers
Reiss S.S. Co., The Bulk Carriers

4, 760

7,342

6,272

9,500

59,097

91,762

Republic Steel Corp. Bulk Carriers

10

69,154

102,554

Rockport S .S . Company Bulk Carriers


Sand Products Corporation Combination Passenger & Cargo

15,306

16,500

12,773

15,306

Shenango Furnace Co., The Bulk Carriers


Sinclair Refining Company Tankers Socony-Mobil Oil Co., The Tankers
Standard Oil Co. (Indiana) Tankers

17,206

25,200

6,129

9,207

7,013

11,474

19,499

25,567

Steel Products S.S. Corp. Bulk Carriers


Texas Company, The Tankers

3,719

5,600

3,827

5,700

Tomlinson Fleet Corp. Bulk Carriers

58,265

90,200

Toth Motors hips, Inc. Bulk Carriers


Waterways Navigation Company Bulk Carriers

1,669

3,196

4,046

6,800

Wayne S.S. Company Bulk Carriers

5,141

7,600

Wilson Marine Transit Company Bulk Carriers


Wisconsin & Michigan S.S. Co. Combination Passenger & Cargo
Wyandotte Transportation Company Bulk Carriers

16

109,000

166,125

4,272

2,300

14,895

19,775

147

OWNERS OF CANADIAN FLAG SHIPS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER OPERATING ON THE GREAT LAKES AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1958
Owner Type of Ship

Number
of Ships

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Algoma Central & Hudson Bay Railway Co. Bulk Carriers

23,715

37,1L4

Algoma Steamships, Limited Bulk Carriers


Bayswater Shipping, Limited Eulk Carriers
Beaconsfield Steamships, Limited Bulk Carriers

8,619

13,04-6

4-,

943

6,341

10

22,4.94-

37,213

Branch Lines, Limited Tankers


Eritish American Transportation, Limited Tankers
Canada Cement Transport, Limited Bulk Carriers Canada Steamship Lines, Limited

13,471

20,662

12,638

18,360

4,412

6,016
376,402

257,212
35

Bulk Carriers Cargo


Canadian Coastwise Carriers, Limited Tankers Canadian Oil Companies, Limited Tankers

23

197,318 59,894

298,098
78,304.

5,920

8,300

2,404

3,4.30

Canadian Pacific Railway Co. Combination Passenger & Cargo


Cayuga Navigation Co., Limited Combination Passenger & Cargo

7,781

4,800

2,196

500

Coastalake Tankers, Limited Tankers

7,374-

9,636

Colonial Steamships, Limited Bulk Carriers


Gayport Shipping, Limited Tankers
Gulf & Lake Navigation Co., Limited Bulk Carriers

31

119,826

195,713

13,860

20,025

4,056

6,255

Hall Corporation of Canada

2A.
12 2

30,290
26,279 4,011

49,892
43,132 6,780

Bulk Carriers Tankers


Hindman Transportation Co., Limited Bulk Carriers
Imperial Oil Limited, Marine Division Tankers

1,913

2,4XX)

18,885

26,305

Kelly Shipping, Limited Bulk Carriers

1,512

2,000

148

OWNERS OF CANADIAN FLAG SHIPS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER OPERATING ON THE GREAT LAKES AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1958-Con.
Owner Type of Ship
la Verendrye Line, Limited

Number
of Ships

Gross Tons

Deadweight Tons

Bulk Carriers
Lake Erie Coal Co., Limited Bulk Carriers

15,751

25,500

3,508

5,300

Lakeland Tankers, Limited Tankers

4,287

6,872

Leitch Transport, Limited Bulk Carriers

3,520

5,000

Marathon Corporation of Canada, Limited Bulk Carriers


Misener Holdings, Limited Bulk Carriers
Mohawk Navigation Co., Limited Bulk Carriers

2,196

2,741

1,900

2,700

4
1

26,988

39,390

National Sand & Material Co., Limited Bulk Carriers


Norris Grain Co., Limited Bulk Carriers

2,015

2,500

6,988

10,000

Northwest Steamships, Limited Bulk Carriers


Owen Sound Transportation Co., Limited Combination Passenger & Cargo
Paterson, N.M. & Sons, Limited Bulk Carriers
Pipe Line Tankers, limited Bulk Carriers

4, 023

5,260

1,435

758

36

118,112

181,156

13,274

18,418

Port Weller Dry Docks, Limited Bulk Carriers


Powell, K.A. (Canada), Limited Bulk Carriers

15,157

23,000

2,274

3,200

Quebec & Ontario Transportation Co., Limited Bulk Carriers

10

26,843

39,600

ReochS.S. Co., Limited


Bulk Carriers
2

4,114

5,740

Reoch Transports, Limited Bulk Carriers

2,335

3,650

Shell Canadian Tankers, Limited


Tankers

4,182

6,960

S.S. Texaco Brave, Limited Tankers S.S. Texaco Warrior, Limited Tankers

1,926

2,783

2,500

3,925

Upper Lakes & St. Lawrence Transportation Co., Id. Bulk Carriers
Valley Camp Coal Co. of Canada, Limited Bulk Carriers
Yarikcanuck Steamship, limited

20

86,082

126,073

2,878

2,678

Bulk Carriers

4,857

7,885

149

SHIPBUILDERS

UNITED STATES SHIPYARDS AND ADDRESSES SHOWING CHARACTERISTICS OF THE YARD AND THE SHIPS UNDER CONSTRUCTION AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1958
Albina Engine & Machine Works, Inc, 2100 North Albina Avenue Portland 12, Oregon
2 launching ways Building: 1 tanker of 2,550 deadweight tons

American Ship Building Company 2245 - 2357 Front Street Toledo, Ohio
Capacity: ships up to 736 feet long Number of Berths: 3 Building: 1 bulk carrier of 2-4,000 deadweight tons

Bethlehem- Sparrows Point Shipyard Sparrows Point 19, Maryland

Number of Berths : 9 Capacity: ships up to 750 feet long Building: 6 tankers of 4-6,000 deadweight tons each 1 tanker of 32,650 deadweight tons 6 tankers of 25,000 deadweight tons each 4 cargo ships of 11,000 deadweight tons each
Bethlehem Steel Co., Shipbuilding Division East Howard Street Quincy 69, Massachusetts
Capacity: ships up to 1,000 feet long Number of Berths: 8 Building: 2 tankers of 106,500 deadweight tons each 3 tankers of 65,000 deadweight tons each 6 tankers of 4-6,000 deadweight tons each 1 tanker of 16,200 deadweight tons

Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel Corp., Shipbuilding Division 20th & Illinois Streets San Francisco, California
Capacity: ships up to 650 feet long Number of Berths :11 Building: 2 tankers of 32,650 deadweight tons each 2 cargo ships of 12,750 deadweight tons each

Great lakes Engineering Works River Rouge 18, Michigan

Number of Berths: 5 Capacity: ships up to 800 feet long Building: 1 bulk carrier of 25,000 deadweight tons 1 bulk carrier of 23,000 deadweight tons
Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp. Pascagoula, Mississippi
10 launching ways - Length 700 feet; breath 80 feet 9 Outfitting docks for 700 feet long ships Building: 3 tankers of 32,000 deadweight tons each 1 tanker of 22,595 deadweight tons 5 cargo ships of 11,000 deadweight tons each

Manitowoc Shipbuilding, Inc Manitowoc, Wisconsin


Capacity: ships up to 600 feet long Number of Berths: 5 Building: 1 bulk carrier of 26,900 deadweight tons 1 bulk carrier of 23,800 deadweight tons

153

National Steel & Shipbuilding Corp. 28th and Harbor Drive San Diego 12, California
Capacity: ships up to 500 feet long 9 launching ways Building: 2 cargo ships of 10,200 deadweight tons each

Newport News S.B. & D J) Newport News, Virginia

Co.

Slipways: 3 sliding Capacity: ships up to 1,000 feet long 2 semi -submerged 2 submerged 8 outfitting piers Building: 3 tankers of 60,000 deadweight tons each 2 tankers of 4.6,000 deadweight tons each 1 tanker of 4-1,000 deadweight tons

New York Shipbuilding Corp. Camden 1, New Jersey


Number of Berths: 8 Capacity: ships up to 829 feet long Building: 4 tankers of 45>500 deadweight tons each 1 tanker of 35 > 000 deadweight tons 2 cargo ships of 10,200 deadweight tons each 1 passenger & cargo ship of 10,190 deadweight tons

Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. Drawer 540 Chester, Pennsylvania


Number of Berths: 8 Capacity: ships up to 650 feet long Building: 2 tankers of 47,750 deadweight tons each 2 tankers of 30,200 deadweight tons each 2 cargo ships of 10,450 deadweight tons each
Todd Shipyards Corp P.O. Box 231 San Pedro, California

Number of Berths: 3 Capacity: ships up to 550 feet long Building: 2 cargo ships of 10,450 deadweight tons each

154

GOVERNMENT

AID

UNITED STATES FLAG COMPANIES HAVING OPERATING DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY CONTRACTS WITH MARITIME ADMINISTRATION
AS OF DECEMBER
Company Design Type
31,

1958

Number of Ships
1
1 # 8

Trade Routes
- U.S. North Atlantic/Belgium and Netherlands.

American Banner Lines, Inc.


P2-Sl-ln

American Export Lines, Inc.


C2-S^A1
C3 C3-E C3-S-43

26 A
2
3

#10 #18

- U.S. North Atlantic/Med . and Black Sea. - U.S. Atlantic and Gulf/India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea.

Pl-Sl-DRl P3-S2-DL2

11 A
2

American Mail Lines, Ltd.


C2-SU C3-S-A2

8
3
5

#30

- Wash ington-Oregon/Far East.

American President Lines, Ltd.


Private C3 C3-A
C3-S-*A2

23 1

#17 #29

- U.S. Atlantic, Gulf & Pacific Ports/lndonesia-Malaya. - Call fornia/Far East, Rounc the W orId Service.

1
1 3

C3-S^A
CA-S-la CA-S-lh P2-SE2-R3 VC2-S^AP3

A A 2 1 A A
16
8 2 6

Bloomf ield Steamship Company

#21

- U.S. Gulf/U.K. and Continent.

C2-S-E1

Farrell Lines, Inc.


C2-S-B1 C3 C3-S-BH2
Grace Line, Inc.

#1A-1- U.S. Atlantic/Rest Coast Africa. #15A - U.S. Atlantic/South and East Africa.

28
1 1 2 6
3
5

#2
# A
#25

Bit. 1928 Act Cl-A Cl-B C2-S-B1 C2-S-AJ1 C2-S^AJ2 C2-S1-4JA C2-S1-DG2
P2-S2-l_la

- U.S. Atlantic/Rest Toast South America. - U.S. Atlantic Ports (Maine-Key West Inc.) Caribbean Ports. - U.S. Pacific/^fest Coast Mexico, Central & South America.

6
3

Gulf & South American S

Company, It ic.

#31

- TJJS. Qulf/lfest Coast South America.

C2-S-B1 C2-S-AJ1
Lykes Bros. Steamship Company, Inc. Cl-B C2-S-B1 C2-S-AJ1 C3 C3-S-BH1 VC2-S^AP2

A
A5

6 9

21 2
5

#13 #15B #19 #21 #22

- U.S. South Atlantic and Gulf/Med. and Black Sea. - U.S. Gulf /South and East Africa. - U.S. Gulf /Caribbean and East Coast Mexico. - U.S. Gulf/U.K. and Continent. - U.S. Gulf /Far East.

157

UNITED STATES FLAG COMPANIES HAVING OPERATING DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY CONTRACTS WITH MARITIME ADMINISTRATION AS OF DECEMBER 31, 19 58 -Continued
Company Design Type

Number
of Ships

Trade Routes

Mississippi Shipping Company, Inc.


Cl^A C2-F
C2-S-<AJ1

14

#14-2 - U.S. Gulf/foest Coast Africa. - U.S. Gulf /feast Coast South America. #20

6
1

4
3

C3-S1-BR1

Moore-McCormack Lines, Inc.


Cl-B C2-S C2-S-E1 C3 C3-M C3-S-A1 C3-S-A2 C3-S-A5 P2-S2-9*

40
2 2
5

# 1 # 6 #15A

#24

- U.S. Atlantic/East Coast South America. - U.S. North Atlantic/Scandinavia and Baltic. - U.S. Atlantic/South and East Africa - U.S. Pacific/TSast Coast South America.

1
3

VC2-6-AP3
Oceanic Steamship Company, Inc.

11 7 2 4

6 4 2
9
2

#27

- U.S. Pacific/Australia -New Zealand.

C2-S-AJ1 P2-Sl-lk
Pacific Far East Line, Inc.

#29

California/Far East.

C2-S-AJ1 C4-S-la
C/i-S-lf

4
3

States Steamship Company


C3

13

#29 #30

- California/Far East. - Washington-Oregon/Far East.

C3-M C3-S^A2 C4-S-la VC2-S-AP3


United States Lines Company

1 1
3

6
55

# 5 # 7
# 8

Passenger C2-S-B1 C2-S-AJ1 C2-S-AJ5 CA-S-la


P6-S4-15S1

1 21
13

# 9 #11
#12 #16

>

10 9 1

U.S. North Atlantic/United Kingdom and Ireland. U.S. North Atlantic/Germany. US. North Atlantic/Belgium and Netherlands. U.S . North Atlantic/Atlantic France and Northern Spain. - U.S. South Atlantic/United Kingdom, Europe, North of Portugal. - U.S. Atlantic/Far East. - U.S. Atlantic and Gulf/Australia-New Zealand*

Note:

The ships listed above are only those owned by the company which are eligible to receive operating differential subsidy.

158

00

-am
.

-a v.

& +>ii P'o 8

.I||l

-h

|.tl|l|| all
E S q Q 3
a [
jq D.
i

21*

a)

-H

D.6G ^

,s

..

-V

-!

ul

I?! |J|

I
I

3^5

33

m
J:

t,

O "

3
-S p

oo

. sp.sa II a 5 n o q rH a d -H U O
ca

*J

g o

3
S

a*
D.

**
fe --i
il

c
"5

o
ti
, ,

6
:.,

fe

a)

d 3

35
fl

ftj

-h -3

o ^

3
H

3 u n 3
-rj

M S ? u **o xJR^CiOC&S h ei
-

oi

O P

C
ij -^ > -h

1.2

5 O

In & >

-H

54S b a
6

O B.

4M
hb

S3 Is
+**
r-j

*r
*H
ra

Bou cera upnanmC--i


c
P
S.).

aaup
3 3

III
ja

hb3
tio

"3

1 o
: I

u o S 6

E -H M

M^ "^ M *> &s <m o-rira+JO. fesaa .s o


B.PC, h'S

-H

.
-H

ran
i

rH XI

S3
to
a 3 s

Eg

"5

rt

3 H d

Ml:

-P

EB:
!

o^ o.

Jsilsls
as^a^"
<

lira
a

31fJ*lJ p C<
-h
ra

-H

3 a^s
I

^ B

e 6

21
'35 s2i
g

8 'S'
'35
s.

t!

333
I

'

< 33 61 "^ a rag .c tj

M S

; ;

S3
R,

.it's

<

C/l

Ml k
-H
-

>&.

its.
W
*itsJ3 a" 0,-J-r' t*-H Tl H (

I'

ia&

i3i!
!

g"
pdnp. .? s&; o
-g
l

as,
6*8.

SK
o
+>
XJ

Ji .p
-O

2
HH -r -L.

3 h ^ii m of G -rt
to

-p

a *
IDF.1I
!

3
^

rt

llS
a)

XJ -H 5v.J, si^rjC m o a c^-ix: LiOoop

c o A

Qi-rt -^ x:

r>>
t~.

P m

x: -H

oi t;,

3 p 3

n
X)

d O >

(^

(M

-H
ti

ra 1

^J

H ^

6*a
O

^^s. a,

d p

x b O -P
p-

o at

t>

C
+j

>, -H

tn+jn-o
o-

e a

P.-P

fflp R-iJ3
d
v.

^l

-P

c
t,

-U -3
i-h

-H-^cm
-o

n
eg

p
a &
j

>> "<H +> -u & 3 &.( Cra h

8^ I h D. m rH D. H W-oda-H
d

8^

g B,2
<tl

i?

+j

I?

PraXuioip-ora MONk,Ap.O

to

52 B

G.E m

ra

<m

-S P

o S a
1*

ISs

'

0<m(j

U ^

al-

"SpH

-H

iOhd>gd+>
I <

xi -p

-H

j
I

P
fc.'S X)

o G xi h U p +> x>
<

XI -3
<**
f-

X)

t.

+^

"S ) m G o tiPdaio

% P

<D

a i si

(J

tj

lisll!f
s

" B-^a

H 5

11

STSo

&

a-

E-

CO

tio

11%

1 1 il

^3 &l

,o

a h

g5

(t bivi

S | 8 S.o

ffqt>-o-u

I|
G

x>

S-s

31 till
oi

tiUh
M
P,

"il
-P
J-.

-P

SB ?*S G P,
-

.3

-^tMP-fflx! +J
(\(

n H t H '^ P H|) ui Hbbbao u


1

e-<o C -P "H OH") 4J Ph ^-DOO-HraDXlX*


ra

rap

t>

bp-a

up
i

JM SV
-J

h
t*.

-a -J

> d

.-t

-h x: tj p. -a <c -H Vl

g g

b > g &

-p\h o 3
tl.'O

* -
(*,*-!

ra

rH

<n OJ

o c x> x;-h ^-rtXJOl +>+JrHX:

S3

"-815 'S'^HtfH

i. 5 o m PC-P6-HK o -h 3
x: x]

13"
*H
r-i

|2S
3'"^

d"&
8

^ri 3rt

in

+> <J -H +J x:

ra

y^

"C

% s3g.ll si

bp

D.O
a)

tie

-B-piOWJ

159

O
17^^
m

*S^^*^**S^^^

< 3 O O < > o CO m 5 CO


CO CO CD
Lu

_l

3 Q >
(/)

LU

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

to if)

CD

ro

CO lO

^^^SSKSSSSSS5SSSS**5^^

CO

O LU o 5 <
o
CO
CO

ro

If)

**Kss***S!*Kssa^^

c\j

CD

If)

S**K**S$a*N*NSKa**^^

CD

m
if>

S8SSSS58

cr>

1^-

CO
Q.

z LU
X 3 LU O O LU o ^ < CO < z N O 9 CO
CO CD

XSXS*}^NSNS>SS**NC*N*WK*N**NS**^^
(/)

rO cm

ir>
CT)

<
Ll)
ro
s

If)

>-

ssaS

00

<D

< o z
< o
_l

LU

CO CO

3 I Q LU
LU
C

LU

160

CARGO DATA

TABLE

I.

-CARGO SHIPMENTS FROM AND RECEIPT INTO THE UNITED STATES BY FLAG OF
(In thousands of long tons)

SHIP, 1921-1958

TOTAL CARGO
United States
34,390 36,394 31,813 32,542 29,477
31,743 31,794 33,434 35,486 30,864
23,552 18,367 16,851 18,555 19,697
19,283 22,012 19,446 17,426 23,204
N.A.

CARRIED OH DRY CARGO SHIPS

CARRIED ON TANKERS

Year
1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930

Total
70,554 75,450 79,096 80,234 80,610
100,206 84,027 87,799 92,764 81,734

Percent

Foreign
36,164 39,056 47,283 47,692 51,133
68,463 52,233 54,365 57,278 50,870

Total
47,212 49,854 54,275 54,520 57,459

United States
16,939 17,159 17,137 17,411 16,374 18,295 18,653 18,298 19,442 15,831
12,528 9,293 10,243 11,343 11,671

Dnited
Percent
35.9 34.4 31.6 31.9 28.5 24.3 31.6 31.3 31.7 30.8 30.8 30.3 31.5 31.4 29.3

Foreign
30,273 32,695 37,138 37,109 41,085 57,021 40,412 40,205 41,878 35,627

Total
23,342 25,596 24,821 25,714 23,151 24,890 24,962 29,296 31,444 30,276 24,617 21,424 18,220 20,215 21,092
23,062 28,926 30,526 30,501 24,920 31,418 17,855 22,943 32,284 33,881

States 17,451 19,235 14,676 15,131 13,103


13,448 13,142 15,136 16,044 15,033

Percent

Foreign
5,891 6,361 10,145 10,583 10,048 11,442 11,820 14,160 15,400 15,243 13,593 12,350 11,612 13,003 13,066 15,783 22,458 22,717 24,990 17,738
N.A.

48.7 48.2 40.2 40.6 36.6 31.7 37.8 38.1 38.3 37.8

74.8 75.1 59.1


58.8 56.6

75,316 59,065 58,503 61,320 51,458 40,711 30,708 32,530 36,122 39,783

54.0 52.6 51.7 51.0

49.7
44.8 42.4 36.3 35.7 38.1

1931 1932 1933 1934 1935


1936 1937 1938 1939 1940

65,328 52,132 50,750 56,337 60,875 64,868 82,970 74,597 77,991 75,962

36.1 35.2 33.2 32.9 32.4


29.7 26.5 26.1 22.3 30.5

41,776 33,765 33,899 37,782 41,178


45,585 60,958 55,151 60,565 52,758
N.A.

28,183 21,415 22,287 24,779 28,112

11,024 9,074 6,608 7,212 8,026

41,806 54,044 44,071 47,490 51,042


51,562 43,808 47,372 46,765 56,324

12,004 15,544 11,637 11,915 16,022


N.A.

28.7 28.8 26.4 25.1 31.4

29,802 38,500 32,434 35,575 35,020


N.A.

7,279 6,468 7,809 5,511 7,182


N.A.

31.6 22.4 25.6


18.1 28.8

1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950
1951 1952 1953 1954 1955

82,980 61,663 70,315 79,049 90,205


102,868 142,177
113,436.

30,023 44,680 53,760 61,736

48.7 63.5 68.0 68.4


65.3 57.6 52.7

31,640 25,635 25,289 28,469 35,701 60,276 53,649 58,803 67,302


94,952 103,853 106,940 112,563 152,827

21,418 31,664 31,036 39,932

48.9 66.8 66.4 70.9


65.7
55.8

22,390 15,708 15,729 16,392

8,605 13,016 22,724 21,804

48.2
56.7

70.4 64.4
64.5 62.8 64.8 65,5 53.6 45.8 38.3 33.0 30.0 23.1

9,250 9,927 9,560 12,077


11,716 13,424 12,746 14,289 23,724

113,306 117,216
166,233 161,189 151,601 155,974 199,921

67,167 81,901 59,787 54,503 49,914

48.1 42.6
42.9 35.6 29.5 27.8 23.6
20.5 17.8 11.7

69,895 106,119 77,193 71,833 66,080


109,997 99,490 85,938 91,142 125,674 156,674 175,509 145,592

45,910 59,267 36,290 27,319 22,502 45,531 33,718 22,964 23,935 29,964
33,366 33,855 22,906

47.0 38.0 34.1 41.4 33.9


26.7 26.3 23.8
21.3 19.3 15.7

23,985 46,852 40,903 44,514 43,578

32,973 36,058 36,243 41,473 51,136


56,236 61,699 65,663 64,832 74,247

21,257 22,634 23,497 27,184 27,412 25,750 23,618 21,697 19,476 17,130
18,185 16,392 6,242

71,281 57,336 44,661 43,411 47,094


51,551 50,247 29,148

64,466 65,772 62,974 67,207 95,710


123,308 141,654 122,686

30,486 38,081 43,966 45,356 57,117


76,877 89,625 98,159

1956 1957 1958


Note
:

251,736 281,526 249,993

200,185 231,279 220,845

95,062 106,017 104,401

19.1 15.5 6.0

a. Figures for 1942-1945 are by control of ship - not by flag.

b. c. d. e. N.A.

That is cargo carried by a foreign flag snip operating under the control of the United States would be listed under United States. Bureau of the Census figures omit "Special Category" items. Maritime Administration figures (1951-1958) include "Special Category" items. Military cargoes are excluded. Great lakes cargoes are excluded. Not Available
- 1941 - 1945 - 1950 - 1955 - 1958 - 1958

Source

1921 1942 1946 1951 1956 1951

Maritime Commission and predecessor agencies War Shipping Administration Bureau of the Census (Tankers) Bureau of the Census (Tankers) Maritime Administration (Dry Cargo) Maritime Administration

163

TABLE II.-CARGO SHIPMENTS FROM THE UNITED STATES BY FLAG OF


(In thousands of long tons)

SHIP, 1921-1958

TOTAL CARGO United States


13,884 12,426 12,621 13,835 12,958 14,009 14,628 14,548 14,015 11,320

CARRIED ON DRY CARGO SHIPS

CARRIED ON TANKERS

Year
1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940

Total
40,835 35,504 40,713 43,683 42,92a

Percent
34.0 35.0 31.0 31.8 30.2 23.2 31.0 30.9 29.8 28.0 27.5 26.4 26.3 25.1 23.2

Foreign
26,951 23,078 28,092 29,798 29,966

Total
34,855 29,064 31,225 32,626 32,556

United States
11,502 9,882 9,992 10,318 9,301
10, 211 10,536 10,200 10,368 8,075

Percent

Foreign
23,353 19,182 21,233 22,308 23,255

Total
5,980 6,440 9,488 11,057 10,368

United States
2,382 2,544 2,629 3,567 3,657

Percent
39.8 39.5 27.7 32.3 35.3

Foreign
3,598 3,896 6,859 7,490 6,711

33.0 34.0 32.0 31.6 28.6


21.3 31.2 31.7 32.1 31.1

60,274 47,223 47,096 47,030 40,366


32,702 25,853 26,559 29,799 30,517

46,265 32,595 32,548 33,015 29,046


23,720 19,018 19,571 22,322 23,446
24,334 34,738 36,497 37,294 31,334
N.A.

47,985 33,704 32,207 32,253 25,997


20,855 15,782 16,023 18,041 18,460
17,875 25,261 23,447 24,423 28,482

37,774 23,168 22,007 21,885 17,922


34,163 10,622 30,565 12,145 32,578

12,289 33,519 14,889 34,777 34,369


11,847 10,071 10,536 11,758 32,057

3,798 4,092 4,348 3,647 3,245 2,290 1,675 1,530 1,581 1,189
1,605 1,721 2,991 1,756 1,403
N.A.

30.9 30.3 29.2 24.7 22.6


19.3 16.6 34.5 13.4

8,491 9,427 30,541 11,130 11,324 9,557 8,396 9,006 30,177 30,868
11,771 16,830 18,546 18,730 9,960
N.A.

8,982 6,835 6,988 7,477 7,071

6,692 5,160 5,458 5,896 5,882


5,312 7,353 5,496 5,839 7,108
N.A. 10,242 16,221 16,485 24,707

32.1 32.7 34.1 33.2 31.9


29.7 29.1 23.4 23.9 25.0

9.9
32.0 9.3 33.9 8.6 32.3

31,251 43,812 44,984 44,889 39,845


37,263 37,205 42,647 49,299 55,002

6,917 9,074 8,487 7,595 8,511


N.A. 14,488 22,591 30,359 33,687

22.1 20.7 18.9


16.9 21.4

12,563 17,908 17,951 18,584 21,374


N.A. 15,839 11,420 11,734 12,228

33,376 3B,551 21,537 20,466 11,363


11,687 11,124 15,006 21,100 18,067

1941 1942 1943 1944 1945


1946 1947 1948 1949 1950
1951 1952 1953 1954 1955

38.9 53.0 61.6 61.2 63.0 52.6 42.9 38.4 36.3

22,717 20,056 18,940 21,315 23,006 43,899 32,189 29,716 22,480

25,576 26,081 27,641 28,199 36,935


50,526 80,789 47,504 40,794 28,888 71,988 61,712 42,604 46,175 73,098

39.3 58.7 58.5 66.9

4,246 6,370 33,874 8,980


5,324

38.2 42.4 65.8 49.7

6,878 8,636 7,226 9,087 6,552 7,351 6,116 4,502 3,505

62,202 92,636 56,319 48,272 35,303

39,196 48,737 24,130 18,556 12,823


33,679 22,4B8 12,605 12,560 15,620
18,963 21,336 13,785

34,072 44,241 21,431 15,580 9,913

67.4
54.8

45.1 38.2 34.3


42.0 31.5 23.2 23o3
19.3

16,454 36,548 26,073 25,234 18,975

11,676 11,847 8,815 7,478 6,415 11,331 30,902 30,690 8,294 9,273
15,445 20,976 9,821

4,496 2,699 2,976 2,910


3,434 3,069 2,727 1,794 1,486
2,305 3,087 1,790

43.9 38.0 30.6 39.8 45.4


30.7 28.2 25.5 21.6 16.0
34.9 34.7 18.2

83,119 72,614 53,294 54,469 82,371


111,182 129,037 90,302

40.5 31.0 23.7 23.1 19.0


17.1 16.5 15.3

49,440 50,126 40,689 a, 909 66,751 92,219 107,701 76,517

30,265 19,419 9,878 10,766 14,134


16,658 IB, 249 11,995

41,723 42,293 32,726 35,409 58,964


79,079 89,832 68,486

7,717 7,833 7,963 6,500 7,787


33,340 17,889 8,031

1956 1957 1958

95,737 108,061 80,481

17.4 16.9 14.9

Note: a. Figures far 1942-1945 are by control of ship - not by flag. That is cargo carried by a foreign flag ship operating under the control of the United States would be listed under United States. b. Bureau of the Census figures omit "Special Category" items. c. Maritime Administration figures (1951-1958) include "Special Category" items. d. Military cargoes are excluded. e. Great Lakes cargoes are excluded. N.A. Not Available

Source:

1921 1942 1946 1951 1956 1951

- 1941
1945 1950 1955 1958 1958

Maritime Commission and predecessor agencies War Shipping Administration Bureau of the Census (Tankers) Bureau of the Census (Tankers) Maritime Administration (Dry Cargo) Maritime Administration

164

TABLE

III.

-CARGO RECEIPTS INTO THE UNITED STATES BY FLAG OF


(In thousands of long tons)

SHIP, 1921-1958

TOTAL CARGO
United States
20,506 23,968 19,192 18,657 16,519
17,734 17,166 18,886 21,471 19,544 14,570 11,532 9,863 11,078 12,626 12,366 12,938 10,959 9,831 14,693
N.A.

CARRIED ON DRY CARGO SHIPS

CARRIED DN TANKERS
United States
15,069 16,691 12,047 11,564 9,446

Tear
1921 1922 1923 1924 1925

Total
29,719 39,946 38,383 36,551 37,686 39,932 36,804 40,703 45,734 41,368

Percent
69.0 60.0 50.0 51.0 43.8

Foreign
9,213 15,978 19,191 17,894 21,167
22,198 19,638 21,817 24,263 21,824

Total
12,357 20,790 23,050 21,894 24,903

United States
5,437 7,277 7,145 7,093 7,073

Percent

Foreign
6,920 13,513 15,905 14,801 17,830
19,247 17,244 18,198 19,993 17,705 14,020 10,793 11,722 12,634 15, 534

Total
17,362 19,156 15,333 14,657 12,783

Percent
86.8 87.1 78.6 78.9 73.9

Foreign
2,293 2,465 3,286 3,093 3,337

44.0 35.0 31.0 32.4 28.4


29.6 32.0 30.8 31.2 30.5 29.4 27.7 29.0 30.1 27.1 28.0 28.5 29.8 26.3 39.5

1926 1927 1928 1929 1930


1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940

44.4 46.6 46.4 46.9 47.2

27,331 25,361 26,296 29,067 25,461


19,856 14,926 16,507 18,081 21,323

8,084 8,117 8,098 9,074 7,756


5,836 4,133 4,785 5,447 5,789 6,692 8,191 6,141 6,076 8,914
N.A.

12,601 11,443 14,407 16,667 15,907


12,770 11,353 7,684 8,457 9,035

9,650 9,050 10,788 12,397 11,788


8,734 7,399 5,078 5,631 6,837 5,674 4,747 4,818 3,755 5,779
N.A.

76.6 79.1 74.9 74.4 74.1


68.4 65.2 66.1 66.6 75.7
58.6 45.8 53.6 37.4 42.6

2,951 2,393 3,619 4,270 4,119

32,626 26,279 24,191 26,538 30,358 33,617 39,158 29,613 33,102 36,117

44.7 43.9 40.8 41.7 41.6


36.8 33.0 37.0 29.7 40.7

18,056 14,747 14,328 15,460 17,732

4,036 3,954 2,606 2,826 2,198


4,012 5,628

21,251 26,220 18,654 23,271 21,424


N.A. 8,923 5,579

23,931 28,783 20,624 23,067 22,560 25,986 17,727 19,731 18,566 19,389
19,369 25,330 29,689 31,039 37,192 38,009 37,778 43,334 44,967 52,576

17,239 20,592 14,483 16,991 13,646


N.A.

9,686 10,375 8,989 10,035 13,557


19,731 6,731 7,937 11,184 15,814

4,171 6,280 7,778


N.A.

1941 1942 1943 1944 1945


1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958

45,717 24,458 27,668 29,750 35,203

15,535 22,089 23,401 28,049

63.5 79.8 78.7 79.7 68.8 66.9 62.4 55.3 45.3

6,349 7,154
12,695 16,377 21,460 29,087 44,822

11,176 15,443 14,551 15,225


11,838 15,026 14,859 11,739 12,589

63.0 78.3 78.4 78.5

6,551 4,288 4,015 4,164

4,359 6,646 8,850 12,824


16,133 18,138 20,798 24,208 24,502

64.8 83.7 79.1 81.1

2,372 1,291 2,334 2,990


5,164 6,073 6,630 9,787 20,219

40,666 49,541 57,117 65,034 81,913


83,114 88,575 98,307 101,505 117,550
140,554 152,489 159,691

27,971 33,164 35,657 35,947 37,091


37,602 34,848 32,056 30,851 31,474
32,588

61.1 59.3 50.0 37.8 33.8 40.2 37.9 30.2 29.3 30.1 27.4 23.1
16.8

7,531 10,304 14,830 19,300 24,603


22,743 23,479 30,248 31,798 36,746

21,297 24,211 27,428 33,995 44,721

75.8 74.9 75.8 71.2 54.8

45.2 39.3 32.6 30.4 26.8


23.2 19.0 9.6

45,512 53,727 66,251 70,654 86,076


107,966 123,578 144,328

15,266 14,299 13,086 13,169 15,830


16,708 15,606 10,911

45,105 50,797 54,973 56,538 64,974 79,617 85,041 94,580

22,336 20,549 18,970 17,682 15,644


15,880 13,305 4,452

49.5 40.5 34.5 31.3 24.1 20.0 15.6 4.7

22,769 30,248 36,003 38,856 49,330


63,737 71,736 90,128

28,9U
15,363

60,937 67,448 65,111

44,229 51,842 54,200

Note: a. Figures for 1942-1945 are by control of ship - not by flag. That is cargo carried by a foreign flag ship operating under the control of the United States would be listed under United States. b. Bureau of the Census figures omit "Special Category" items. c. Maritime Administration figures (1951-1958) include "Special Category" items. d. Military cargoes are excluded. e. Great lakes cargoes are excluded. N.A. Not Available

Source

1921 1942 1946 1951 1956 1951

1941 1945 1950 1955 1958 - 1958

Maritime Commission and predecessor agencies War Shipping Administration Bureau of the Census (Tankers) Bureau of the Census (Tankers) Maritime Administration (Dry Cargo) Maritime Administration

165

DOMESTIC OCEANBORNE AND GREAT LAKES COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES BY AREA OF TRADE IN SHIPS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER CALENDAR YEARS 1957-1957
(In tons of 2,000 lbs.)

IN
1951
Coastwise
16,605,328 10,233,282 4,491,334 461,822 1,418,890
1952
1953

DRY

CARGO SHIPS
1954
1955

1956

1957

16,144,290 10,127,547 4,040,120 323,294 1,653,329

13,804,447

13,052,636

14,040,011
7,791,123 4,208,115 381,470 1,659,303

12,794,572

15,176,972

Atlantic Atlantic/Gulf Gulf Pacific

7,515,217 4,499,138 252,770 1,537,322 4,506,144


6,402,766
587,926 3,094,750 2,720,090

7,100,200 3,973,927 524,523 1,453,986 4,490,475


5,973,068
518,975 2,969,193 2,484,900

6,359,677 4,291,401 373,450 1,770,044 4,235,448 7,093,416


461,332 3,575,443 3,056,641
154,515,390

8,076,789 4,955,013 530,821 1,614,349

Intercoastal
Non-Contiguous

4,158,584
6,054,535
871,438 2,703,608 2,479,489

4,146,037
6,247,258

4,606,022
6,763,008

4,213,171
6,849,505

Alaska Hawaii Puerto Rico


Great lakes

655,597 2,812,248 2,779,413


134,425,355

450,611 3,536,939 2,775,458


165,712,135

401,830 3,550,727 2,896,948


163,782,332

157,622,610

167,258,235

129,894,632

IN
Coastwise

TANK

SHIPS
141,113,844
10,300,577 91,730,399 11,475,688 27,607,180

134,821,830

132,465,790

135,259,330
11,918,899 83,997,367 10,393,855 28,949,209
1,354,563

137,728,890
11,459,373 86,989,143 10,230,364 29,050,010

143,915,651

143,395,489
15,208,078 94,397,968 9,195,098 24,594,345

Atlantic Atlantic/Gulf Gulf Pacific


Intercoastal
Non-Contiguous
Alaska Hawaii Puerto Rico
Great lakes

8,775,137 87,354,524 12,075,590 26,616,579


354.645

9,146,518 86,226,013 8,931,111 28,162,148

8,508,869 96,827,320 10,667,920 27,911,542


889,325

960,398
2,576,317
573,676 1,215,237 787,404

1,333,662

2,932,807
2,739,973

850,281

2,154,329
519,392 955,193 679,744

2^432^539

2,546,307
605,114 1,235,473 705,720

3,071,246
814,980 1,383,027 873,239

2,975,959
695,992 1,392,157 887,810

465,563 1,211,434 755,542


8,193,072

671,934 1,285,770 782,269


8,472,359

7,290,028

8,032,002

8,295,927

8,765,046

9,181,213

Note

Does not include Pacific Islands

Source: Basic data supplied by Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, Department of Defense.

166

LABOR DATA
SEAFARING LABOR DATA COMPRISES MANNING WAGES AND WORKING CONDITIONS FOR ACTIVE UNITED STATES FLAG OCEANGOING MERCHANT SHIPS OF 1,000 GROSS TONS AND OVER UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED.
(Excludes Ships on the Great Lakes and Inland Waterways and Special Types Such as Cable Ships, Barges, etc., and Merchant Ships Owned by any Military Force.)

MAJOR ORGANIZATIONS

IN

THE MARITIME INDUSTRY

1. International Organization of Masters r Mates and Pilots (MMP) . This organization represents ships' masters and deck officers. Collective bargaining between the MMP and ship operators are maintained on an industrywide basis for the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific Coasts, covering about 5,000 jobs on ships operated by some 200 steamship companies.
2. National Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association (MEBA). The Association represents ships' engineering Collective bargaining aofficers. greements between MEBA and ship operators are also maintained on an industrywide basis for the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific Coasts, covering about 5,500 jobs on ships operated by some 190 steamship companies,,

National Maritime Union of America 8. (NMU) . The NMU represents unlicensed personnel of the deck, engine, and stewards departments. Collective bargaining agreements cover approximately 195 steamship companies in the Atlantic and Gulf Coast District who operate merchant ships having an employment potential in excess of 2,4, 000 unlicensed jobs.

3. Brotherhood of Marine Officers (BMP). The BM0 represents both deck and engineering officers and has agreements with 2 large companies covering more than 600 positions on the Atlantic Coast.
4 American R adio Association (ARA). The ARA represents ships' radio officers. Collective bargaining agreements cover more than 600 jobs aboard ships operated by steamship companies en the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific Coasts.
5. Radio Officers Union of the Commercial Telegraphers Union (ROU). The R0U also represents ships' radio officers. Collective bargaining agreements cover about 400 jobs aboard ships operated by steamship companies on the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific Coasts.

Seafarer's itotgrjiational Union of, 9o North America (SIU) . The SIU Atlantic and Gulf District represents unlicensed personnel of the deck, engine, and stewards departments. Collective bargaining agreements are maintained with some 60 steamship companies operating from the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts with more than 8,500 jobs on approximately 225 ships. The affiliates of the SIU on the Pacific Coast are described below. Interchange of personnel from the membership of the various SIU affiliates provides an employment potential aboard ships other than those directly under contract to the SIU. Field offices and employment centers are administered jointly by the SIU affiliates on the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Coasts.
10. Sailors Union of the Pacific (SUPSIP) The SUP represents unlicensed personnel of the deck department on dry-cargo and passenger ships and all 3 departments on some tankers, while its affiliated labor organizations, the Pacific Coast Marine Firemen, Oilers, Watertenders and Wipers Association (MF0W-SIU) represents unlicensed personnel of the engine department and the Marine Cooks and Stewards Union (MCS-SIU) represents the stewards department personnel. Each of these affiliated seafaring unions retains its identity and autonomy while maintaining collective bargaining agreements with approximately 35 Pacific Coast steamship companies which operate about 200 ships with an employment potential close to 10,000 jobs in the 3 departments.
,,

6. American Merchant Marine Staff Of ficers" Association (AMMS0A) . The Association represents personnel of the purser's department. Collective bargaining agreements cover about 150 jobs on "ships operated by some 8 steamship companies, primarily along the Pacific Coast.
7. Staff Officers' Association of America (SOA) . This Association also represents personnel of the purser's department. Collective bargaining agreements cover about 220 jobs on ships operated by 7 steamship companies out of Atlantic and Gulf Coast ports.

Estimates of number of positions represent vessels engaged in the various deep sea trades only.

169

These unions represent their members in dealing with various employer groups. Most of the employing companies are represented by 2 large employer associations.
1. The American Merchant Marine Institute,. Inc. (AMMI). The AMMI represents

the majority of the shipping companies on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts in their negotiations with maritime labor unions. Several committees have been established within the AMMI to represent various employer groups around the bargaining tablej they are not, however, empowered to bind a company represented to a contract. Each company must concur and sign a final agreement individually. Any company may refuse to ratify a final settlement and is not legally bound to accept a contract agreed to be groups with the AMMI.
2. The Pacific Maritime Association (PMA). The PMA represents American flag companies on the West Coast in collective

Generally, current collective bargaining agreements in the industry stipulate that, upon request, unions dispatch qualified and competent men from the top of the rotary hiring list; that these employees must be satisfactory to the operators, who may turn down or discharge them, provided bona fide reasons are given for the action takenj and that neither the operators nor the unions may discriminate against anyone for union or nonunion affiliation.

The collective bargaining agreements, entered into by the different unions, for all practical purposes, are closely related, stipulating approximately the same wage scales, hours of labor, and other working conditions for the respective licensed and unlicensed seamen covered by the contracts. The basic difference among the various agreements relates to types of ships j i, e., cargo, passenger, or tanker Benefits gained by any one union are often incorporated in the other union agreements.
One important exception to the standardization of terms is found in the current Sailors Union of the Pacific (SUP) contract affecting hours of work and certain premium pay practices. In the 1955 negotiations, the SUP established a wage pattern unique in maritime history, which incorporated certain premium pay in the basic monthly wages. The previously established working hours at sea and in port were maintained, based on 56 hours at sea and 4.0 hours in port for watchstanders and 4-0 hours a week both at sea and in port for dayworkers, hours which are similar in all union contracts. Until this time, watchstanders were paid a penalty rate for all hours worked on Saturday and Sunday, The new contract eliminated the penalty pay for Saturday and Sunday as such and incorporated the average amount earned by watchstanders and dayworkers in a month into the basic monthly wage scale. The result was the elimination of the penalty pay rate from the agreement, and this pay was reflected in the new wage rates,. This new wage pattern did not actually affect the workweek, since all watchstanders work 56 hours at sea. What it did do was eliminate the extra-pay provision for Saturdays and Sundays while retaining the extra pay This agreement, however, still contains provisions for a special rate for certain specified items. Other agreements in the seafaring industry still provide premium pay for all hours over 4-0 per week, and all unions stipulate that watchstanders at sea work 56 hours per week.

bargaining with various seafaring unions. Unlike the AMMI, the agreements negotiated by PMA are binding on all companies authorized by PMA to bargain in their behalf and contracts are executed by PMA officials rather than by each authorizing company,

A third group, an informal Atlantic and Gulf Association, also exists to negotiate with the Seafarers' International Union, Atlantic and Gulf District,, Originally, the companies in this group were members of the AMMI, but bargaining difficulties caused the companies under contract with SIU to withdraw from the AMMIj until the end of the World War II, these companies then bargained individually with the SIU,
In 194-5, 10 of the companies having contracts with the SIU organized the Atlantic and Gulf Ship Operators Association to bargain with the SIU, The Association was dissolved in 1948. Even though the formal bargaining group went out of existence, group bargaining with the SIU has continued on an informal basis. When a union contract is reopened, the SIU invites all companies to join in the negotiations, and most companies send representatives for consideration of union demands and selection of a subcommittee to carry on negotiations. After the negotiating committee has met with the union, the full committee reconvenes to develop bargaining strategy. The negotiating subcommittee then resumes bargaining with the union. This committee has no power to bind any company to settlement , After the group agreement, the union concludes negotiations with each company separately.

170

DESCRIPTIONS OF SELECTED SHIPBOARD RATINGS

Master (Captain)
In command of ship; chief navigator; responsible for discipline and order, safety of ship, passengers, crew and cargo; is sole representative of ship's owner. In consultation with Chief Officer, arranges organizational assignments of duties for ship's operation, navigation, and maintenance.

Purser or Purser/Pharmacist

Maintains payroll data; records overtime reported by the Deck, Engine, and Stewards departments; keep ship's accounts; and prepares crew and cargo manifests and official documents for foreign port authorities.

Deck Department
Chief Mate (First Mate or Chief Officer)

When serving in the capacity of Purser/ Pharmacist, is responsible for medicine chest, first-aid treatment, and injury reports in addition to the other duties.
Bosun (Boatswain)

lets as Master's first assistant; in charge of all deck work and responsible for hull maintenance, cargo planning; assists with navigation, discipline, and order

Second Mate (Second Officer)


Assists with navigation and cargo work; in charge of mails; responsible for care and maintenance of all navigating equipment and charts; usually stands U to 8 watch in charge of navigating bridge.

Carries out orders for work details as issued by Chief Officer; lays out deck work and supervises seamen; directs maintenance tasks such as chipping and painting; splices rope and wire for rigging; handles lifeboats and canvas coverings.

Carpenter

Third Mate (Third Officer)


Responsible for maintenance of lifeboats and firefighting equipment; acts as signal officer in charge of all signaling equipment; assists with cargo work; usually stands 12 to U watch in charge of navigating bridge.

Under direction of the Chief Officer, shores up cargo or tightens cargo lashings; sounds bilges, fresh water and ballast tanks; bolts and unbolts tanktop covers. Stands by windlass when necessary; assists with general maintenance and repair vrork.
Deck Maintenance
Must be an Abie-Bodied Seaman. Performs duties in connection with maintenance of the Deck Department under the direction of the Chief Officer; sounds bilges and overhauls cargo gear as directed. Usually works an 8-hour day, Mondays through Fridays

Fourth or Junior Third Mate (Fourth Officer}


Assists in supervision of deck department activities and work details. In charge of navigating bridge when standing watch, usually 8 to 12.

Abie-Bodied Seaman (AB)


Performs general seamen's duties, rigs cargo booms; assists in readying gear for cargo loading or discharging operations; stands watch as lookout; acts as helmsman under direction of the officer on watch; must be a qualified lifeboatman able to take charge of a lifeboat crew. Two AB seamen stand on each of the 12 to U* U to S. or the 8 to 12 watch.

Radio Officer
Performs all duties required for the operation and maintenance of ratio and other electronic communications devices; maintains depth recording equipment and electronic navigational aids such as Radar and Loran Services emergency batteries and lifeboat transceivers. Handles all communications at the direction of the Master.

171

Ordinary Seaman (06)


Learns and assists in performing the duties of an Abie-Bodied Seaman, cleans, chips, paints, and washes downj coils and splices ropes. One 03 usually stands on each of the 12 to 4, 4 to 8. or the 8 to 12 watch.

Junior Third Assistant Engineer (or Fourth)

Works under the supervision of the First Assistant Engineer. Performs super* visory functions in the engine room during watch hours, usually 8 to 12 watch when he is responsible for operation and maintenance of the engineroom.
Licensed Junior Engineer
Works under the supervision of the Chief and First Assistant Engineers. Performs necessary functions in the engineroom during the period from 8 to 5 for the orderly maintenance of the engineroom.

Engine Department
Chief Engineer

In charge of and responsible for the operation and maintenance of all propulsion machinery, auxiliaries, and power generating equipment. Keeps logs on machinery performance, fuel consumption; responsibile for machinery repairs and prepares specifications for periodic overhall or repairs when in port. Instructs and trains where necessary.

Unlicensed Junior Engineer


Assists engineer on watch; performs engineroom duties while working for license; does maintenance work on deck machinery; care and maintenance of ship's plumbing; assists electricians when required.

First Assistant Engineer


Cooperates with and assists Chief Engineer with responsibilities for all ship's machineryj has direct responsibility for operations in the engine-room and supervision of engineroom personnel; in conjunction with Chief Engineer, plans and directs repairs, supervises maintenance of lubricating systems, electrical equipment and engineroom auxiliaries.

Electrician

Responsible for work assigned by Chief or First Assistant Engineers. Repairs and maintains all electric motors and electrical circuits. Activates circuits for electrical deck machinery and stands by when cargo gear is in operation.

Second Electrician (or Assistant) Second Assistant Engineer


Assist in the operation of ship's propulsion, auxiliary and generating machinery. Responsible for fuel and water; Supervises tank soundings and keep records of fuel and water consumption; may be charged with the responsibility for operation of ship's boiler, boilerroom equipment, feed water system, pumps and condensers; supervises oilers and firemen, water tenders for maintenance of proper oil and water temperatures and stem pressure; makes repairs including machining of replacement parts, usually stands U to 8 watch.
Works under the supervision of the Electrician. Assists in making repairs and providing maintenance of electric motors; keeps resister houses clean and tidy; maintains stock of electrical spare parts to meet repair or replacement needs.

Oiler

Third Assistant Engineer


Supervises operation and maintenance of engine room auxiliaries and ship's pumps; responsible for the operation of main engines when on watch; supervises engineroom personnel; keeps log of activities and machinery performance; makes repairs using machine shop equipment.

Qualified Member of the Engine Department (QMED). Oils and greases bearings and moving parts of main engine, auxiliary machinery and electric motors; checks oil pressures and flow; inspects journals, bearings, couplings; assists engineer in charge with repair and overhaul of machinery; may also be given the responsibility for maintaining boiler water at proper levels. One oiler stands either the 12 to 4, 4 to 8, or 8 to 12 watch.
Fireman, Water Tender

Qualified Member of the Engine DepartCleans oil burning equipment ment (QMED).

172

in the boiler room; cleans fuel oil strainers; checks boiler gauges for proper water levels j maintains specified steam pressure; regulates fuel oil valves as required for increasing or diminishing boiler fires; checks operation of evaporators and condensers and checks boiler water for salinity; may repack pumps, grind valves, renew piping. Fireman, Water Tender stands on each of the 12 to U, U to 8, and 8 to 12 watches.

Cook and Baker (Second Cook and Baker)

Works under the direction of the Chief Cook; bakes all bread and pies, prepares desserts, salads and night lunches; responsible for the safety and upkeep of galley utensils and equipment; keeps refrigeration spaces and storeroom neat and orderly; assists in general cleaning and maintenance of ship's galley.
Assistant Cook (Third Cook)

Wiper
Assists in keeping engineroom clean; wipes down machinery with cotton waste or solvents; cleans oil spills; helps dismantle and repair machinery under the direction of the engineer in charge; assists in general maintenance of engine room. One wiper is assigned to each of the 12 to U> U to 8, and 8 to 12 watches. May load engine department stores in port

Works under the direction of the Chief Cook; starts galley range fire; keeps working top and ovens clean; cleans and prepares vegetables for cooking; assists in withdrawing meats, vegetables, and other perishables from ship's refrigeration boxes; keeps
butcher shop and garbage disposal room clean and oderly; draws daily supplies such as foodstuffs. Cleaning equipment and linens for the galley.

Engine Maintenance
Assists Chief Engineer and other engineer officer personnel in repairing and maintaining propulsion, generating, and auxiliary machinery. Makes repairs, machining replacement parts under the direction of the Chief or First Assistant Engineer, installs new parts, makes adjustments, performs tasks of Oiler or Firemen, Water Tender as required.

Messman (Or Messman/Ptilityman)


Works under the direction of the Chief Steward and Chief Cook; sets tables, serves meals, washes glassware and tableware after each meal; draws table linens for the messrooms and dining saloon; disposes of trash and garbage from dining areas; scrubs pantry, messroom, and dining saloon decks; responsible for cleanliness of serving pantry;
cleans portholes, fans, and furnishings; maintains cleanliness of passages, stairways and corridors; makes up berths in officers' and crew quarters; keeps radio room and various ship's offices clean and tidy

Stewards Department
Chief Stewara

Supervises the operation and maintenance of service for living quarters, food preparation and messrooms; maintains inventory records of foodstuffs, linens, bedding and furniture; prepares requisitions for voyage requirements; in consultation with the Chief Cook, plans meals, supervises preparation and service of meals; issues necessary supplies and is responsible for the general cleanliness of passenger and crew living spaces and accommodations.
Cook (Chief Cook)
Prepares all meals and, in conjunction with Chief Steward, plans menus in advance of meals. Supervises Second Cook and tftilityman in food preparations and main* tenance of cleanliness in the ship's galley. Issues stores from ship's refrigerators and storerooms; butchers meats.

173

EMPLOYMENT PROCEDURES
International Organization of Masters Mates and Pilots (MBP)
1.
JfriPi National Marine Engineers' Eenefjejal Association (MEBA)

Preference of employment is given to members of the MMP when available and the employer agrees that when hiring new employees they shall be obtained through the offices of the MMP.
The employer has the right to select personnel considered to be qualified and satisfactory. The employer also reserves the right to select his own Masters (Captains) and Chief Officers. As first and second in command,' respectively, these individuals have a direct responsibility to the shipowner. Officer personnel not members of the MMP, must initiate membership in the Organization within 30 days after being hired by an employer in order to continue such employment or to be eligible for future employment. The employer may waive the requirement of obtaining licensed officers from the MMP if the available position is to be filled by a licensed deck officer who has been employed by the company for at least 6 months within the preceding 2 years and who has not been employed by any other steamship company except as a relief mate ( officer ),.

2.

3.

The employment procedures for marine engineers parallel those prescribed for deck officers. The 2 organizations, MMP and MEBA, complement one another in the formulation of procedures and practices of the industry in regard to the hiring of ships' officers. In reference to item 3 above, the MEBA accords the employer the right to select his own Chief Engineers and First Assistant Engineers because of the direct responsibility these individuals have to the shipowner.

American Radio Association (ARA)


1.

4c

The employer is obligated -to procure Radio Officers from a list of unemployed ARA members registered at the nearest employment office of the Association.
Preference shall be given to the Radio Officer longest unemployed, who is qualified, competent, and satisfactory and who can present proof of previous employment aboard ships of one or more companies under contract to the ARA or proof of at least 2 years' employment as a Radio Officer on U. S.fla* vessels not under contract to the Association*

5.

3.

6.

Any licensed deck officer who has been discharged for just cause without reversal of charges by grievance procedure, shall not be dispatched to the same employer for any future available position.

Upon written agreement between the employer and the Association, transfer of a continously employed Radio Officer between ships may be permitted.

Radio Officers Union of the Commercial Telegraphers Union (ROHJ


lo

7.

The employer shall have the unrestricted right to keep in continuous employment within its own fleet, any licensed deck officer provided such officer maintains membership in the MMP and the continued employment is mutually desired.

In the event of vacancies, the employer agrees to notify the Union of the personnel requirements.

When members of the Union are to be


hired, promoted, or transferred, the employer agrees to submit such proposals to the Union for clearance. The Union agrees to grant such clearance for the position to which the Radio Officer is to be assigned,,

8.

Each employing company shall adhere to the policy of promotion or demotion from within ranks of its licensed deck officers and seniority shall prevail unless necessary job qualifications take precedence.

174

Marine Staff Officers. Office and Allied


Paraomiftl.

(HBOOAP) SItJNA. Pacific"

1.

The Association provides the employer with names, experience, and qualifications of members who are unemployed to permit the employer to give consideration to such members when hiring pursers personnel to fill vacancies.
Applicants selected for employment must make application for membership in the AMMSOA within 30 days after date of employment. The Association shall inform an employer in writing, upon the termination of any employee's membership in the Association before an employer shall discharge an employee

Group 2. Those employed as unlicensed seamen aboard any NMU contracted ship prior to June 1, 1953, or since December 31, 1953. Group 2 applicants may not be referred for employment as long as applicants in Group 1 are available.
Group 3o Those employed as unlicensed seamen aboard any U. S. flag merchant ship not under contract to the NMU, since December 31, 1953. Group 3 applicants shall not be referred for employment as long as applicants in Groups 1 and 2 are available

2.

Group
3.

4-o

Staff Officers shall be bonded in accordance with the established policy of the employer and shall be considered unqualified if application for bond is denied by any surety company.

Staff Officers Association of America (SOA)


1.

Membership in the SOA shall be a condition ,of continued employment on and after the 30th day an employee is hired, and the company shall discharge any employee when notified in writing by the SOA, that such employee is not, or is no longer, a member in good standing.

Those who, upon application for employment, submit valid Coast Guard Documents or Merchant Mariners' identification but who have had no prior experience on U. S. flag merchant ships. Group U applicants shall not be referred for employment as long as applicants in Groups 1, 2, and 3 are available.

Seafarers' International Union of North America (SIU)


1.

2.

Staff Officers shall be bonded in accordance with the established policy of the employer and shall be considered unqualified if application for bond is denied by any surety company.

The employer shall recognize the organization as the sole and exclusive bargaining representative for all unlicensed personnel. The employer agrees that, as a condition of employment, all unlicensed personnel shall become members of the SIU within 31 days after being hired and shall remain members while employed aboard any vessels operated by steamship companies under contract to the SIU.
Assignments to jobs shall be made on the following seniority basis:
Class A

2.

National Maritime Union of America (NMU)


1.

The employer agrees that it will procure all Unlicensed Personnel in the Deck, Engine, and Stewards Departments from the employment offices of the NMU.
In the hiring of unlicensed personnel, the employer will prefer and the Union will refer competent and dependable applicants in the following order of priority:
Group 1

3.

2.

Those certified as belonging to the "Regular Employment Pool" and employed as unlicensed seamen aboard any NMU contracted deep sea tanker, cargo or passenger ship during the 7month period of June 1 through December 31, 1953.

This classification shall be possessed by all seamen with ratings above Ordinary Sea- .en, Wiper, or Messman who have been regularly employed aboard ships under contract to the SIU during the period commencing prior to January 1, 1952, up to December 31, 1954-. Class B. This next highest classification shall be possessed by all

175

seamen (including Ordinary Seamen, Wipers, and Messmen) who have been regularly employed aboard ships under contract to the SIU during the period commencing prior or after January 1, 1951, through December 31, 1954> and who do not have a Class A seniority rating.
Class C

Sailors Union of the Pacific (SUP) -Cont inued


(MFOW)

This next highest seniority classification shall be possessed by all unlicensed per' sonnel who do not have a Class A or B seniority rating.

The employer agrees to give prefer1. ence of employment to unlicensed engine department personnel having attained seniority through employment during the period of October 1, 1953, to September 30, 1955, with any company under contract to the MFOW, and those applicants who are thereafter employed by such companies for a period exceeding 6 months.
The employer agrees to secure all 2. unlicensed engineering personnel from and through the offices of the MFOW.
(MCS)

4-.

Unlicensed personnel possessing a Class B seniority rating shall be entitled to a Class A seniority rating after having been regularly employed for a period of 8 years aboard the ships of any employer under contract to the SILT,,
Unlicensed personnel possessing a Class C seniority rating shall be entitled to a Class B seniority rating after having been regularly employed for a period of 2 years aboard the ships of any employer under contract to the SIU

The employer agrees to secure all 1. stewards department personnel through the hiring halls of the Marine Cooks and Stewards Union.
MCS agrees to furnish the employer 2. with capable, competent, and physically fit personnel where and when required.

5o

Sailors Union of the Pacific (SUP)


The SUP together with its affiliates for unlicensed personnel in the engine department and the stewards department follow employment procedures which vary slightly from one another, as follows
(SUP)

All personnel seeking employment 3. must he capable and competent to the satisfaction of the employer.
No person shall be eligible to U* register for employment unless he has been eligible for hiring on Pacific, Coast ships since October 1, 1952, and has sailed for at least 6 months in such employment.

The employer agrees when hiring 1, personnel, to prefer applicants who have previously been employed as unlicensed members of the deck department on vessels of Pacific Coast steamship companies
Applicants with 3 or more years 2 of such employment shall have preference over applicants with less than 3 years of service
3 The SUP agrees to furnish competent and dependable employees through the facilities of its employment offices.

176

o tO o .CM o US o o o US J to os usa o 43 A
C~-

rH

OS
72,985 62,115 68,050 97,630 70,850

66,350 58,600 56,329 58,185 53,537 51,640

OOQ NO
.k *k

CO rH C- ~* CM <! *4

cs

o
>
o

<t
f

^t*

-gj

us us
frN,

QN
*k

NONaa
VI

<M3
v5 on
k

OnC-

O Q C^ CM US rH O Q US USnO C- rH On USrH C^ NO O USnO nO nO US US US US


-st
.. #\
l

..

~-t r-i

rH

^3S
O
k
I

CM

b<!o * -^t OSS a


-oj

OS

oo us us
t~#i i

Q O to rH
* ^
>

OS CM
#i

] q <u on

gSSN-SSgfe.
^ ^
t~- rH nO l> nO rH NO nO US US US US

v,

-p

8
o
o

a a a osh on c-

oo
k *k \

OS

nO sf

tOOS^rH
os

On us to vO

-p 0.
GO

C^nO On CVI k k k k nO OSnO H H


C~ no no On c-

QOOOO Oo

O US

r-j OS CM ON rH l> r-i CNJ i C ^ * *. *t ON CM C-- l> NO rH NO NO US US US US

O Q CM nOnO OOO O

-<*

OOQooo iflOOrifflri rKOOtONsf


V
k *k
*

r-1

us
-a

oncm om-h c-^-

us

-^t

us

OS
to osnO

sj

aj

-4-

<^

r1

oo US Q OS
ffk

C~nO to -JUS ~* C- nO nO US CM ON ~* t~- tXJ


k >

OO O

us os -sttq

00
C- to
S3

HS rlHH

aaa I
rH

^ ^

*\

CO

on cm to t>

~- l~- tO On l> NO US US US ~t

rH OS

O O H CM
H rH
rH rH

in

On On On OS On ON
rH rH

000 On us NO US NO
Ck

3j

OS

e
j)

s]

<!

no us
i
*i

OO

oowcMa
k *k

V.

8
58,780 54,000 54,380 55,100 56,150 57,200

^r^r^rl

a a a no to

O Q OS C~ CM CM Nt^NfOOn ^ d ^
<H V

O OnO

OS US CM

vt
t-

CM OS

ONO

if-

US USnD US

t-

w*

~tf

1
us us to
rH CM OS--tf

8
OS
USnO
OS OS OS OS OS os

CM On US

US

O Q O O O US IA O
C~-

^rHr^rH

00

O H H to C-<t\0 C-nO

OSnO

us us t> to
*k

O O l> CM ONUS O On -J-H USH O us


** Ok .k

v.

*.

CM OS > P~ rH rH

O nO US USnO

US

1
O en
~-

O O O O to O O us US OS OS O vO -* H ~J CM
k k

US US rH CM rH vf CM --* J ON CM <JN rH

H OS
.1!

OO
e\ *

cm os a a a to to

O Q -* OS o O US vJ-On -t H^ CM* OS 00 US OS O
r-i
*

CM -*!>nO r-i r4 C- NO US USnO US

*k

ff

9k

#t

US USvO vO NO nO

OOQQ
.O vt^}
(2 CM CM CM CM CM OS Q\ s 0n s on on rH rH rH iH rH

PS

I|

"!

us us
k

^ to to
v

usvO

c^iao^o

us to us nO rH US
rH
r-i

ft

a a a to cm o ON

OQ Hn a

OS OS -s+nQ us us os C- no -it OSnO nO C-- XO


r>

rH CM -4nOnO 1--NO US USnO US

A n

(i

CO CM CM

OS

HHNvOK nO rH US US
.

=\ IN

OOOQ O O OS CM <!
,-{

H PS
1

us us us NO us CM * cm to us

oOQo o
#1
V
>)

^ H tO Con i> no r- s
CM

9k

O USnO On to Q O CM ON vfr-*rH US CM NO ON ^ USnO H NO us nO NO CM O us US C^-

-it
Ok

SS

i-{r-\

CO

CM rH ON CM OnnO CM 1

3|

<!

US

<

f- ON
us" to S^ On

oo Q

t-- -if CJn

O USnO OS CM t-t US O
^
V\
IN

j?

aaa

Srt:

t--

USnOnO O NO us us On OS us us

V,

ON to

rH

,0

.
r-1

<

< .88 tO
.
-*,

C~-

to pl> US OS US CM rH tO nO tO CM nO
Ok *k .1 k

OO Q

CM -<t OS US

US

O -* rH a H H nO

a* a* a* cnTc^ t> ON

^ ^ O USnO NO CO OS 1>nO US US US US

o-v ~<t ~* -4-

usvo c-*
s

to ON
~3-

On ON
t~\ r~\

H On On
r-i r-i

-<t -<f

^t us US US ON On On On On
rH rH
t-\

O rH

CM

OS-^ USnO
H rH rH

t-i

US US US US US US ON ON ON QN ON ON
r-i t-i r-i

f--

00

177

JOB DISTRIBUTION BY

SEAFARING EMPLOYMENT POTENTIAL RATINGS-OFFICERS AND UNLICENSED PERSONNEL ABOARD ACTIVE SHIPS AS OF JANUARY 1, 1959

Type
Job Distribution

Of

Ship
Refrigerated
IS
18

Passenger

Dry Cargo
598
598 -

Tankers
303 303

Total

Number of Ships

40
40
9 201 146
13

959
959 9 3,639 1,059 13 976 318 229 22 90 28 7,966 3,001

Masters Executive Officers Deck Officers (Mates) Radio Officers Deck Yeomen Bosun and Bosun" s Mates Carpenters and Carpenter's Mates Quartermasters Master at Arms Fire Watchmen Deck Storekeepers Able Seamen/Deck Maintenance Ordinary Seamen

2,212
598

66
IS

598

18

1,160 297 285

75
57

130 22 90 28 514 197

252 6 -

4,777 1,853

9 _ 150
54

93

2,525 897
5,560
54

Deck Department Totals


Pursers and Clerks Medical Staff Personnel Concessionaires a/

1,522
225 99 330

10,894
253 253
598

333
IS

18,309
550 99 330

2*L
18

Staff Department Totals: Chief Engineers Executive Engineers Assistant Engineers Electrical Engineers licensee Junior Engineers Unlicensed Junior Engineers Refrigeration Engineers Electricians Engine Dept. Yeomen Engine Storekeepers Machinists Plumber /Machinists Machinists/2nd Pumpmen Maintenance/2nd Pumpmen Pumpmen Engine Maintenance/Utility Refrigeration Oilers Oilers Firemen Firemen/Water Tenders Wipers
1

654

54
303
-

979 959
5

40
5

239
5

2,763 162 114 115 960

120

41
66 345 13 29 56
.

69 27
54

1,428
-'

4,499
5

56 14

74 18

11

36 _ -

338 196 235 1,215 13

47
82 67 24

82

382 126 1,798 _

6 36 54 54 54

24

47
509

47
509

79 21 170 81 144
168

898

467
183 2,920 81 2,924 2,809

882 888

1,844 1,699
10,572

Engine Department Totals:


Carried Forward:

1,422
3,598

408 759

5,223

17,625 36,913

21,719

10,837

178

JOB DISTRIBUTION

SEAFARING EMPLOYMENT POTENTIAL BY RATINGS-OFFICERS AND UNLICENSED PERSONNEL ABOARD ACTIVE AS OF JANUARY 1, 1959 -Continued

SHIPS

Type
Job Distribution

Of

Ship
Refrigerated
18

Passenger

Dry Cargo
598

Tankers
303

Total
959

Number of Ships

40
3,598
54

Carried Forward:

21,719
598

759
18 -

10,837 286
-

36,913 956 91 30 77 45 86 166 82 532


17 105

Chief Stewards b/ Assistant Stewards Stewards Yeomen Storekeepers Idnenkeepers laundrymen Public Room Stewards Deck Stewards Room Stewards Bath Stewards Bartenders Printers Stewardesses c/ Telephone Operators Elevator Operators Bellboys Night Stewards Officer' s Stewards Crew Stewards d/ Headwaiters e/ Waiters Waitresses Messmen Mes smen/AJtilitymen Porters/Utilitymen Miscellaneous Ratings f/
Catering Department Totals:
Chefs gJ

91
30 77 45 86 166 82 532 17 105

40
183 28

40 201 87 111 109


58

794 284 318 470


54

3,617 -

117 135

1,898 -

40
183 28

40 201 87 111 109


58

794 284 318 5,632 470 54

4,062
62 9 290 155 33 135 95 273 24

4,215
_ 598 595 595 -

2,184
_ -

10,596
62 9

Chef s Yeomen
Cooks Assistant Cooks Second Cooks/Bakers Confectioners Bakers and Assistants Butchers and Assistants Pantrymen Silver and Glass Men Galley Utilitymen

_ 18 18 18

471
1,547
5,609

320 119 303 -

1,226 887 916


33

742

135 95 273
24

471

Galley Staff Totals:


Steward's Department Totals:
Grand Totals: Footnotes: a/

1,788 6,003

Jk
189
948

4,131
14,727 51,640

2,926
13,763

9,207

27,722

b/
c/ d/ e/
f/

g/

Includes Shop Attendants, barbers, beauticians, valets, photographers, musicians, entertainers, etc. Includes Chief Stewards in various passenger classes. Includes Children's Nurses and Matrons, Includes Crew Chief Stewards, Includes Wine Stewards. Includes Gym and Pool Attendants, kennelmasters , locksmiths, upholsterers, etc, Includes Sous Chefs and Assistant Chefs.

179

3 V*

P\

3 c^ K
W) r^

C~-v**0\QOOOC0 C*-^t-d-^-<fo^cvoo r^rHHc^cMr-Jf-iSj


S
8
U~V

t> co

-* -j
i-\

CM
"\

rH

O o>
r~\

CM

to

-*

& CM
IA
oj

C~ H

CO

~J

R
<T\ r-(

CO

CM

CO

Qs

s>

>Ti

C"\

a*

Iji

3
a a

O
' '

U"\

CM

U\ O n (^

Pi

s s
I
I

II

sO

O
,

-*
00

to

St

^>

p>

a
I

<H

CM

CO

CO

CO

-<t

<^s.

y>

vO

C?\

C*-

CM

lf\

IT*

0"\

'

'

'

c?
I

'

3
sD

'

-4"

O f^
i

vO
CM

O CM
i

CM CM

M H

I*-

CM

H
i

tN

CM

H
i

CO

n>

rH

sf
CM

s?

T\

9 O

9
I

m
I

\0

sO

v>

vO

CO

O
f\

00

CO

u"\

s
CO

$ s
C<-\

cm

cm
r<"\

\0
r-t

v\
cv

u~\

*A

^
-4"

OJrH^Oo-vfvHrHrHrH
O
Z
<

-J

CO

-**

CO

v>

CO

dl

ai|

C-vO
to

sf

-4-

-<f

st

c^

sO

^-str^r^o^n^r^fnf^
Sf

<
O

^
*4-

nJ

Nt

vO

f\

1A

z <: j

OO^COOOCOCOCOiAOCOCOirviA
rH CM CM CM
CM
r-t

in

in

ir\

ir\

<*

-^

v\

v\

us

v\

D
CL.

<T\

r-t

CM

C^

CM

CM

C<\

O H
H
rH CO CM

1
CO

<? CO

a
rH CO
CM

3
n-\
rr

M
C^ CM

CM CO CM

CM CO
CM

\D

cn

r^\

CM

S3

M
5.

co

fi
"S.

<

180

sj

ft

CO

g
o 3
i

CM

S3 S3

in

S3
ft

0^
rH

9
o Q O

ct

CO CO

C-

en

vO en

en st

o
C

A
r-

CO rn

v0

en

sO
fH

CM

r-i

C~- M

O m
v\
00

rV

3
SO

ft
inll

ss

5
i

en

st o

rH CM

t>

S3
rH

CM
IT-

m
I

vO O-

0^

CM

st ~o

t> CM

p-

CM

en

CO

^
CM
CM
1

CO sr CO
CM

$ o
i

vO

rH
L

II

00

en
CO

o]\

mil
1

'

'

in

en

CM
CM

s
en to
I-

CM "
1

st

9
1

S3

m H
1

CM

S3
rH

CM

8
c-^ r^\

'

CM

en

st en

t-i

Si
CM

CM ts CM

in
>"H

eo
i 1

'I

fH

en
ft
cm

H
CM
1

ft

CM

8
CM

c~ CM

o 5
cS

MD
CM

st
S3 u

^"1 r-i

in

in

3
CM

8
in
rH
rH

o a
CO

CO
CM

s 8
o CM

CO en

en en

St en
CM
CM

CM

CO

CM

en

en
i-i

4 m o J
st
rH

SO

tf

in

1
S3 en
CM

SI
ft
CM
1

8 4
A
1

9
i

m St

S
i

8
i

Cr-

S3 en

S3 en

en
r-l

g
in

en
CM

rH

tf

a-

r-i r-l

rH

O en
st

SO
Cr-

a-

en

8 CM
3
S3||

rH

rH

CH
'

rc-

s5

en

o
1
i

oil

a a o sf
1

S3

o
1

'

n ts
C--

'

m
c II

CO

'

en
'

en

rH

IT*

CM

rH

ll
ftll

ft
1

S3

CJN

-4

rH

H
CM

CM

'

rH

O sT

9 ^
en
CM
i 1 1

11

9*

S3

cm

CO

CM

o
st

'

en

rH

<T-

in

Pi CO

H
1

H
I

CO

a
rH

m o
1

o
cr1

H
|

C-

H
1

g
Vfl

8
i

11

m
i

f-i

H O
^+

CM

rH

H
1

C-

en
in
cs
CM
1

op rH

11
i

S3
rH

S3

H
1

o H
1

in g m
1
i

in

H ON
A
CM

311
i 1 1

$ a
r-i

in

"\
1
l

SI
i 1 I i

S a
i

S3
Pi

sf
CM

in st
1

v\
v\ sf

m 0'
00 CO

COM

o cmI
CM

CO
CO in

-J

st
CO rH

rH

o
1

in S3

a
i

in

o
st

in

Q
1

m
I

st

m
1

in en

o
ft

st

q s}
1

o A
1

in

rr-

ft

4
CMll

S3 fi

S3
rH

9
i

c~ en
1

in in

in O

8 CM
1

CM CM

CM
coll

CO
1 1

in

tf

S3 en

in

CM CM

B
rH t>

o CO
in

IT*

en
r-i

00 en C-

st

m S3
<*% <-\

in
rH

n
c~

in -^

in

9
CM
n~\

st

ITi

o st
st en

in

st
\

o
rH

in
rH

o>
rH

a
CM

en
en

en

cn

S3 en

rH

st

en en

in en

<"!

st

4
rH

m CM

m CM

CM

en

m en
"i

en
t*\

CM

en

CCM

fCM.

CM

en

st en

CM

en

'II
II

>
rH

"51

rH

rH

H
rH

rH

'

H H
in

rH

H H
st

.*

^
rH

.3)

r-i

'II

H
C-

rH

rH

H
CO

rH

rH

rH

rH

H
st

H
st

H
in

M
^o

H
in

rH

rH

H
u\

rH

rH

r-\

H
in

1 1
II

S3

CO

vO

IT*

in

4
st

in

S3

in

in

in

st

in

'II

S3

m
T-i

LA

m
Or,

4
CM

in

st

in

st

st

m
en

in

m
CM

in

in

st

en

in

in

in

st

in

m
en

ft

CM

a
CQ
0)

S3

st

rH

CM

r-l

rH

H
CM

rH

CO

Us
(3N

sf

CM

s
ll

m
u

CM

?
"i

m
K

r-i

H
"i CM "i

o
CQ

1 EH
"l
?

H
It rH EH

ft
Eh

0)

fr\

en

st

in
ft

"} rH

i
r-i a-i

< CM
Eh

3
i

H
1

in

"! CM
E-i

u
"t 6h
;
E-"

!
t rH O O
1 H

1
& o

CM
E-i
i

1
?

rH
1

"i

m EH

-4

^
r-i E-i

4
Eh

in
Eh

Hi c

W
Si

&3

^
ba CO

6h
H,

M
CO
E-i

3*
a)

J
<<
F3
t-i

r3

a
CO

a o

8
O

s EH g s

rH

M
Eh

CO

II
alii

181

^
5
-OiOir-ir-ir-iC<l<X)'-iCr\?Q lf\ Qs Ci 00 00 C-\Oi-iiH ^f

O^C^OJOJ sfO0 ^NgvJDiA

Soocom s* -4 CM
0"*

^ a s a -* o
a

C^OJ

OJHHHWCOONOv

vOO^CM0^tC"-C*\-<tOOOO

So o

to c-

t*-

O *n sD \0 \D
OJ c>

ir\r-10Q'-lcy\Or-IC--C00 u^-<t--t(?\-4 -4-r^iNO >r\\)


,

f^H

sOifN-vtO^O^OQ-J-O^OOOOr^ f\rH>ArHs0-3-Q*y0000OJ C^tfN-^-^r--4CJfr\t^-C^00

r^CM IN Oi

gr Cr-

*A
<r\

8QOOQ\OO^HO^vO tf^irNOO^OC-OiOOO*

^t^ou^omb-O^oooo^
sO^-dO^-^OQ-^OCMCM-^CM c>

0^0^

CM

-4" CM OvOvDvOf^HOMnai OQC^COU^^^^OCMCMC*-

CO t-

in

Or-O^NOf^CVrHirvHOH
C^-^-sfr^C-c^CACM
C- C- C-

O 00

^-^00

CM

rH

a
r-

S
ft

hntO>Af^H)

rr\<

0000 CVO^O^V^NOr-i^O

F- C- O^ nO C^ CM rH

C^-^^o^c^tno^c^cMCMCM

lAQCOH *4-<H

-*C*-Ov>cnf\rH0^000Q V* J>-Nt-4T^c^c^)T\c\i cm cm (S3

c\ c-

"* r^i

<8
ovOn^notOTiNOO o^ir\o^vO r^ cm tnoo C- u"*oo
cm

3l
P\

C^-^mc-vcAc^c^cM^r^uS

w^o*sovDsotQu >c>f~N>
>

H CO

-*c\<
i

H H

O
eg

rH

V>
CM
U"\

rH

cm cm cm cm

rIM

~*

P
v>0^CMCO-*rHQ^-tfrHc>-

a|

O v\

ir\

cm

OiAOO^coo^
-4-CO\CSC^C-iCMCMCMCMCM
rH CO -*cr\c*\ CO WiCNCM CM CM CM CM rH

CMOM31CN^JC\OCOC--nOC<-\

O-stnncrNncncMCMCMrH

o
o o S o H rH -4
r-

HriOO^ffirtOtOlAvOO
CM-JfC>CNCMCMCr\COIN><M
N*>~*c^c^vOrr\C\iC\lvOvD^O

CO

rH CO ~t C\ U-i C^i CM '25 CM CM CM CM rH

v<)

o\

U"\

1M
(M

a
U
CD

Hi -P

CM^-O^i^CMCMf^CQC^CMO
S-3cr\rr\cncr\fr\CM
CM CM rH

v)-4-c^f^c^cncMCMrviCMCM

r-i co CO Ql

C"\ CM C* CM CM CM CM rH

-inn

<

TJo'Gl'El-p

c c c

0) ei

sq

U P-P+' S3 S3 S2 <S <d 3


+5 +5 +5
at

P th n o
iH Tl
co CO
(-,

B 3 rl c
^h -p

fr
ft.

i
I>j

CD

co

j3
S3

+>

IS
I<

a
f-i

to <jJ

H
CO co

iH

CO oj

H a OS n-DW H
CO

u a +j
ai

fi

IS
&+> o
CD CO PI . *
UJ>

JO-ri

CD

a>

O m c\ c *
oj
fl>

a I

aoHwn^owHofcs
rHr-trHiHHrHrHrHcVNOr^

Tj +>

>rj

W
-O

" "Tl

-H -a

MlrH

US

U>

CO

o>

P.

T3

id A! H u o n

MHrtHHNrtHHnnn

IScS-SiS iririHri^O

182

^
)

\<D -4"\0
iH f> vO

CO vO CM

mm

O CM

mo m

H H

COvOC\H:
.V

OvO
ij
i,m

it*

CO CO vO

cv

CM

in
oi

tJ

U"*

yv

r~i

iv ui

tj^

(,\t

SO O -r m r^ H
mcq
-J-

vO vO
cm

UN vO

-4 -

f*S

vO

/
7

ft

O CM
(OvDf^rl 0^0\V\(

H
CM

H r> vO

~ ArH CM J2

^-3 En mvo

-s*

<n en cm

O
O

f> vO "A

ITM/MA st r\ tn

n
O
CM

s-

to vo

H h c> n o to to o m trCO\O00->dTHrH-4-

/>
1 1

mm-i

tv
v)

r>

n uiy\i i^O^^stOOi
IT" vjj

*U iv

O O Ti co en vO H O m -**-^ -4 env)
-3-

(^ *"
-7

tl

f'N

^H
<

covO
rH

r^H

cjv cjv

mo

<

i>vov\mmm-<fcnfncM

OC^vOmmmm-^rnrnm

SO O r^ -4
U"\ -*

rH

CO cm -<( CCM

^t

^
CNi

OrHmQvO -U~\0<
s

OC^C>^QCMCJvtOCv< OvO mmOm-^-mcjvC

en

cjv

co cv

-<f

CM

OrHmOvoc-minrnto

en

O H vO O O^rMO nf^H

-4 en cm ov vo en co cm "\

r^

-4

cv

M en O C- H rH Q HCNjtfMHsOQiHOl OvO m m -4- in m -<f

-vO (V
I

rHtO^rHC^QvinNOcnrnCM
CM CM
cjv

oo o-\ CO t>

vo inmcjv^j-^frrncjvcjvco

mr-4tnCJv\OvO-vt<ftO

QHHOP\ Ov vO \D H in

*
OnO inm-^mm-^cncnt
CM CM
Cjv

4 3 CO a

C CC-H-H-H-H *H tH^H-H tibtlbtipM'CI P rt a aw w w w +? +J-P+J-P

at

a c c c c

a)

MMbpaCCC

xi

Is o
ra CO

CO

CO
f-i

co

co

>H

-H Tt

o
eg rjv nvO -4 -st rH \5 C^^bvOrl rids vO nm-<t-Nj-Nj-rncncncM

m <n vO en cm en rn
Cjv v)

OHHO
1

u
<d

tn

Ao o
c

<-<

XI -P -P CO -P

H T3
1

a,
to

c>en^t^^cjvcMcncnQ

o
-stf-

CO m m m m
-<t

rHtC^rHC^QvnvOfnrnC\i cMCMinrHmovvOvO^-.^oo
-stv

0\OifHf>0'StsfnOO 'CO
,

vO

vO vO H in en en en en -4
Cjv

OH

rH

Om

CO

id
t-1

U C
rH

*H

CO -H -H -H -H

d 3 3 u u u u a q o a
a)

-p

O
c> en *<K!0 cm

m --

wwww

Ovu-\.cn*<i-\OcMOr>^J--vl'<n

v\(>w

HH o

OvO inn^^in^cncnCM

OvO

mm-4--<i--<fcncncncM

rH rH O O vO vO rH
Cjv

CM
-<+

rn <n rn en cm

^
c>cn^to^nQvcM
51

c>vu^rn^CMCMOr-cMc\(cjv

t^np

O^O

m in -^ m m -<f\

OvO

"A A O^ >* st f>

^ (M

O rH rH Q m en en en m vO vO rH in
Cjv

-sf

0>

*ncocnOC-rHrHQ<n-tf-dHW lAH^OHOst-ri-sT OvO inin^u^in^cncnCM

Cjv

(Two ir\in-<f-s^-<fc^\r^r^(vj

m vO vO H cm <n en <n

O rH

rH

CM

-J-

co

i
a)

in

X3

*H T3

bprH


h
Q,

Z83
OrHrHrHrHrHrHrHrHCM;\Ocn

t-H H O

CO * Cm

ma ^** n M D
-ri ID

HrHrHrHCMfHrHrHcncncn

SHHriHvD

'Sccqcaccqp t^ M ) a^ q) w
-3) >?Jvo)

183

^
On
C\
c >

o o
^t-

c^
(^

T\

O^0v*v\-*vMt?ic"v\>coc>

c>

Os\0*ri*no-sj--^*r^<

r^f\cM

cm

-<f

0^

-tf

m ON
a

&
p

I
CM

CJlTM-HvSc-f^-itOOOO

\>

cmcm0ncmo^i^OuS-3-cm

C-

-^ScNOCQr^r-NOHfH

O O'f^^O CO

, u-\4--<t--s3--*tKt'V v<r\p~\cM

(>CJ fV OJ N OCO^ACNi fV tO O O^OiCO-J-C-C^-^tQOCQ 00 tfNin-^-^^t^c^f^r^vcQ

c?\

C> C~-vO cm

O OOOOQCMOQOQ O mir\000AOOOO
<^\rHir.iH00CNirHs5fn<Vcg

^1
s

\D CO nO O^ A CO

-4-

O 0^

o~\

$
o^ cfwo co c\ c- ^o u^ on cm c\j cm rn

ON CO
CM

oo

rH

CO

rH
<-i

v\
rH

vO

< u <

80QQ00NQ0QQ
d
OS

tvnOoo^
r-

-<t

un to ^*o^cr*rC\ Ot CM CV CM

vOn-*otftQC-O^CMCM

-^ lAHinHCO^HWsOvOCirN-st-^r^xJ^fo^ojcM cm

co cm
CO

C"-v\\Otf\ir\owNV*T\
"*>

Koomo
CM C\CO H CO CM CM CM T>CO CM
?>
l-H -^-

O
Cs CO

CO^^^vOiAH^OMH

O "O HCQCJOvNChNOCOsf^n
>
C^-

V\\>P~\V\U*\\0

P-*

C\

OH
hC zc St
CO
*r\

EC

CCO

COf**0^vOtf\Ht>-^0

i7\oir\ir\C0O>rO*rO C-O^OoNi-lCMvO-tftOvp

<ncq co v\

\c? cJof of

cr\ CO rH ^f CQ WN W\ on cm cm cm c\i
C\f

^1

8
r-i

CO
/

JQvO^COHstxDOQ' \Q So vO>5>*J>Soo<
vO
v -** f*N on.

\\D CM
t

%f>

UN

^v> ^d" ON.

\5

on.

on cm e- C^>

CM CM CM CM

Ct)

o a

9
a*
CM
ON.

un^cm

>

3$;
C\nO CM vO
>

C- -J-ONON.ON.ON.ON.CMCMCMrH

QvOWN-^OQQOnOvO UNO^\OONONONCT'W CMtO

CM CM CM CM CM

vO vD -*^3 00
cm -* c^ -4
ff cf\

S
c-\

~*

SO88
>TV
tf\

-D
-* M5
c^i

i^ "^ c^ m cQ c^ cm & C^ 5^ (n CM
-35

o a* c- -^ c- to cp co

a-

i-h

- co --too

~}r\mM>n^M)M!'S

-+

co <r\t^\CM >5 CM CM CM CM rH

"^ -JO-IWOHOQOO \0\0^fvoeoo^oooo CN Q O CO O O \0 CM -<y>rN CM <n CM CjMTl CM CO nn P-KM CM CM R


r-i

CO * CM

>T\

OOO
vD CO ~*cq <n CO n mcM O^
CM CM CM CM rH

C-\

>>

vC

v)niM^PMnt\ICM

^f :'

1 C

h o

r-l

&|8i|
flH-H O B (D g M M o m dj 3oooi!S
rH
aj

.h

<D

^5 H

Eh

rHrHrHCMrHrHrHCM*\cr

H rl H i-i>C

184

s|
CO

Qf-Q(No-<tOOOQ

On
CM
cOJ
1

M
a)

mor-qNtoopooo t 0-v0CMi-HC0O>?N>r\o0ir\
m rH CM SvP^tMnHH^O CO OC'-NOmOmm^i-HHO A
i-T i-T

On

0
rH

QM>00-}-inc}tC-NOininuSNOmONCOrH

K8080 S^88^
lf\

in

NO
ON,

CN.

On

U^

*T\

IA >w
OJ

EH

3 5

H
<V

1MH

r-Tf-Ti-r

CO

-*

r-T

"ScjflotoooKoS
I
>->

!>N5CMr=JaNOSUSOON

CO
OS

0>0-00-J-cfri)l> mrHCMC-r*N.CONaHnr~C~

rH
r-T

^NOmminNOm-^-^-cN,

CMOOONOQ-d-vfOO-* l/NrHCMtScnNOCMCriF-t^ln OOvOfMAtnin^t^ntn


rT

88888 S#88P
\t\ ir\

v\

ir\ t*\

*<s

CO

QOQCMC0-*QOQQ
OC~OnOOOn~H/CN.COO

On
CM

rH

C^NOCMrHcOOWMrvOOlfN

On
?H
r-T

5 o
EH

CO
rH rH

CO ft

c^NOmminmmONCOH
CM rH

NOM^riQ-JstOOn inHCMC^NONOCMcnrHrHNO
rH

moc-ovfoooooo 4 o
-J-

<*
CO

OC*-NOmomm~H;rHr-io rH ririH

o,
ou as

S8888 CO^OOst omooS


ITv l/N

O in
NO 1>
tr\

IA

Cf\

CM CM

s
3 1-3

OhOWW^QOOQ stJHU.toOOlOO
l>Nomminmin-^^fr*N,
r-T

mQOOCMOOOQQO C~-NOCMrHONOmmOOm
mHCMf-rnNOCMmc^C-'n UN"AinifS^(^P\(>
Ol>N0
r-T

-rl

-P

i-H

no rr, fin in in in

Ntooo O

O OO mOQQO

^
rH l> rH

H COnOCMC-QCnQQQQ 0>flM^(0O)OOOO
CM
rf.

S
in
CM

NOeONOCMvrOOOQOQ rHr^c^CNr-OOOinmo
CN,OrHN0rHrHC-CMrHrHC0 Or-t>->JO(^t>rl ifMAO Os\Oiair\o
i

NO -*
UA o\ CO

OQOQO OOOOO
OnnO -* ^t^f <r\

8
t-

On

3 o
Eh

OHvOOCOvOC-vOcqCNOininminin-4-cor>0
CM rH

r-ON-jo-4-crieqmHc--

vO

Ast<000
rH rH rH

O C- Ciaia-^-4H

T>

tf
-*l

rH

aJ

rH

CM

H
1
tf
Hi >-3
;
;

*
rH
CM

OC^C^C^vCOOCOOOOO
Q>

OONOCMOQmQOQQ
t

nOCOnOCMC-OOQOQQ
CN.OrHNOQrHc~-CM.QONO ONOaN^tOcrxONrHuSlfNtn
OnnO

OQOQO OOOOO
ON NO
cn,

-i

Q)

H +>

OrHN0Q00N0C-C0c<N.ON r~ON-Ht O~Hk c N.CQCM iAlf\ NOVN.tnminm~3'-^^toN,

mmmm^^.CN.CN.OA

O C~ in in -4

~-t ^t- CJN


Cn-

in

C AW -P
(D

hD

hP -P -P +^ -P -P
(0 10
10

-4- <r\

o
nH

<*-i

q>

Q C C d aJ cd w m n

*.a

-P *H -H H H

rH

1-rJO W
*<
1

<

ID

W
<U
cn

cd

OhXJ
co

CM CM

rH

>0~J'flM^OOOO -sfo-v-^-mcomOOOO
CM

ON
5>,

-J-C-Ovt-CMOQQOOQ ON-^rN,~4-HoOOrmO
CMCMmrHcrvONNOCOCPCO-*
OnnO irvtfNON-^^H/CrxONONON

CM

vO

m
on

5 O H

r-\

(M IAHMJH OlftOnO ONOmm^muS^JCOmO

On
CO CO

HC0-4-rHl>NO-^rvCMCMCM

OJ

O
t

ir\

ON.

OQQOQ OS5 C^ Q O O -J"-T rt


(VN,
fTN,

8
CM

.p +i +j +j
cn

-p -p

co

l> co
<">!

rH

po d
I

t-(

as

as

aj

cm

r-T

.2 S3

r>

h
d)

*
*H +>

c-o-4^C"-c\gooo -ln-}Miio5oOO m to NtHtOrt H 1AO tn"A rH NIArj^OHOIfiON^ NOmm-^min^-<i--*tcN, O


cm CM rH

Ovj^NtiAOOOKMrio
rHC0~trHCONO-H;ir\t^i>^f

88888
C> OA

On
I

bis

bb ho

CMCM*nrHNOONNOC0CMCMH

OnnO ir\VN*4-->t-<rcr\rr\o"\ctN

OO

fr\ Cr\

-j;

-4 -* C\ ~J -3* ^ aJ 3 P rH <D OJ CD ej oj a o oj O O -H -H H

m m

.www

^.S

CM CM rH

i>0-h*''^>i><v

-sj-o^^JmcomooOO
rH

\OQQO

On

-^C-OvfCMONNONOOOON
HC0*<);rH(>OC0Ar-(>VN
OJ

m m on
rH
r-T

r-\

maXHtOrHHtOCMWO CM mrHMDHOC-vQHi-l

K
to

HMO
CM

-^nB -^n3
-H;

CO 1> CO vO

s^
-.

H-HCh
C,h
C*-<

ChCh
C^
f*.

Eh rH

s t O

0NNOUN.lTVON-^-H;Cr\CjNONC0

cyiAHCMN-tANtOOvO

C-

OnO
rH

r^ in S< NO
cm!

a^

%
>
inNO co ~*n2
-J-

OOOOO
<t-t

n,,

<Vh

<H V.
OJ -rj
OJ 7-1

OJ

OJ

CD

iH -H -H x: ^:

^
cu

1 o S
tl
CD

CM

stn~JMi)inooBo

ON^(-cr\^JirNONi>-ON-<i-^i-in

-*C-OvfNOONNONOOOcr,

i>--(

CM

rj

^ -H
-P

mcO^frHCQrHi-HCOrHCMON
rH

CMmrHNOrHOC^rnOON, O no mm-<tmmcN,mc<\cM

hw stHto oatmcv cmco fM0iifiri\0><nNt0OO


On*) lTNVr\^-H;^-rr\Cr\Cr\CM

co 1>

rH <d

(H oj

01

0) CO

-P -p -p
to CO

1>

NfHffliN-tn
cn CM CM CM
l,

NO On C-

-P Hp
52

^J iJ iJ
CD CD CD

f*~\

"a

rT

oj

JS J^ P> +^ -P -p -p

Dxx:^

O O -P -P -P -t-> -p Tj XI -C -d T3 'H -H -H
-ri -ri

000
d
ff)

a)

cd

aJ

P. P. tx
0) CO
CO

a, P.

s
H?
neer neer neer

m n m X -h -h P, >H -H H dOOO'Q-Ntl s t\ rr\H OrJ


a)

>

Engi

S p w
fc

an

p
c o g o
o a
rH P.

P
tmen

o OtHOvHCo
as as
Offi

o o a
(.

<d

a as o a <d S a o 3 fl c o) c 3
OS

s
fn

ri-ri-ri 00 W) tiO+>

WWW
ginee
tment istan
istan

c c c c a
<U

C
as

t3

u)

SH-P-P-PMOiHO
Assi
istan

-P vH

tl a]

o C
as

a
0)

P
Water

o
0)

>; +>
Xl

i
rH

T3
odie

OS

ectri

ctric

ainte

-P

B U

3
<p

h
0) (3

OH O -H
-pp
aJ <d

cocococowtocora

i-i

Off

Offi

Off /Fha

Offi

aint

r-i

ry

P<-P OUUmT\2i<D'r\ o OWiHC'HdfH'binOrH'O

3(1)<MH'0-P<U0C

fl

$ o
Eh

En
Depar

Ass Ass Ass


3rd.

El

M
Ele
Firemen-

3
t-i

HOOOOOOOOOO
03'D 't:'0'D'0'C O fi'D'Uxi'O'Oxixi'axi ji
^
^

$ q o
Engine Oilers
Wipers

a>

co
(D

u
0)

<a +j

6H

10

Al 'H
ra
id

R
co
aj

P O
Eh

at

tU)-H
ui

-H H -H
u1
i?

Chief

Chief

2owSh(HH-<c3 A!
<B

1st.

2nd.

3rd.

2nd.

C t) -h

>-i

ne

Jr.
1

hflXl

c ;

1?

OHHHHHHHHOI^f\

TjjDrHrHrHrHCMrHrHrHr"N,crN

<
r'N,

; *<

Q)

H rH rH rH

\)

< 55-5

rHlcMl

C-)^in)NOlMco)ONlo]

185

HOURLY OVERTIME, PENALTY TIME AND NON-WATCHSTANDERS PAY RATES AS OF JANUARY 1


Atlantic & Gulf Coasts

Pacific Coast
Overtime Rate

Year

Overtime Rate

Penalty Rate
$ -

Non-Watchstanders *
Pay Rate

Penalty Rate
$ -

Non-Watchstanders * Pay Rate

MMP - Deck Officers 1947 1948 1949 1950


1951 1952 1953 1954
1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

$1.60 1.60 1.70 1.74


1.85 2.95 3.10 3.29

$ 35.00 35.00
44.20-

_ 1.97 2.07 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46

45.30
48.19 51.00 102.69 108.85
108.85 108.85 115.38 122.30 122.30

$1.60 1.60 1.71 1.75

_ 1.97 1.97 2.19

$ 35.00 35.00 44.20 45.30

1.86 2.95 2.95 3.29 3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

48.19 51.00 98.24 108.85


108.85 108.85 115.38 122.30 122.30

3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46

KEBA - Engineer Officers 1947


1948 1949 1950

$1.60 1.70 1.74 1.74


1.85 2.95 3.10 3.29

$ -

_ 1.97 2.07 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46

$ 35.00 37.40 45.30 45.30

$1.60 1.71 1.71 1.75


1.86 1.96 3.10 3.29

$ -

$ 35.00 37.40 44.20 45.30

1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

48.19 97.80 102.69 108.85


108.85 108.85 115.38 122.30 122.30

2.07 2.19
2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46

48.19 98.24 102.69 108.85


108.85 108.85 115.38 122.30 122.30

3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

ARA - Radio Officers 1947 1948 1949 1950

$1.50 1.69 1.74 1.74


1.85 1.95 3.10 3.29

$ -

_ 2.07 2.19

_ _
-

$1.50 1.65 1.70 1.75


1.86 1.96 1.96 3.29

$ -

_ -

_ -

1951
1952 1953 1954

2.19 2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46


(

1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46

3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

_ -

ROU - Radio Officers


1947 1948 1949 1950

$1.60 1.70 1.74 1.74


1.85 2.95 3.10 3.29

$ -

_ 1.97 2.07 2.19 2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46

_ -

MSOOAP - Staff Officers $1.25 $ 1.60 1.60 1.75


1.86 2.95 2.95 3.29 _ 1.97 1.97 2.19

_ -

1951 1952 1953 1954


1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46

_ -

* In addition to the basic monthly wages, a stipulated sum in lieu of overtime is paid to each Master,

licensed Deck Officer, Chief Engineer and to each assistant Engineer who does not stand watch and whose normal hours of work at sea are 40 hours per week.

186

HOURLY OVERTIME, PENALTY TIME AND NON-WATCHSTANDERS PAY RATES AS OF JANUARY 1 -Continued
Atlantic & Gulf Coasts
Overtime Rate

Pacific Coast
Overtime Rate

Year

Penalty Rate

Non-Watchstanders* Pay Rate

Penalty Rate

Non-Watchstanders * Pay Rate

SOA -

Staff Officers
1947 1948 1949 1950

$1.60 1.60 1.70 1.70


1.85 2.95 3.10 3.10

$ -

_ 1.97 2.07 2.07

_ -

_ -

1951 1952 1953 1954


1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

_ -

3.29 3.29 3.49 3.70 3.70

2.19 2.19 2.32 2.46 2.46

_
-

In addition to the basic monthly wages, a stipulated sum in lieu of overtime is paid to each Master, Licensed Deck Officer, Chief Engineer and to each assistant Engineer who does not stand watch and whose normal hours of work at sea are 40 hours per week.

Note:

MMP - National Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots of America


MEBA - National Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association

ARA - American Radio Association


ROU - Radio Officers' Union of the Commercial Telegraphers Union

MSOOAP - Marine Staff Officers, Office and Allied Personnel, SIUNA - Pacific District
SOA - Staff Officers' Association of America
Source: Collective Bargaining Agreements.

187

SEAFARING WAGES AND OVERTIME, 1918-1958 1


Year
1918 1920 1935 1937

Monthly Basic Wage


$ 75.00

Basic Hour3y Rate


$ .33 .40 .25 .32
.44 .64 .89 1.2S

Regular Overtime Rate


1 .60 .60 .60 .70 .85 .90 1.00 1.22

Penalty Overtime Rate


None None None None
None None None None

90.00 57.00 72.50


90.00 345.00 162.50 248.50

1941 1945 1946 1950

1951 SUP
NMI

288.00 262.89

1.66 1.52

2.35 1.29

$1.63 None

1952 SUP NMU 1953 SUP NMU

302.40 302.32

1.75 1.75

2.47 1.63

1.71 None

302.00 334.41

1.74 1.82

2.47 1.94

1.71 None

1954 SUP NMU


1955 SUP NMU

302.00 314.41

1.74 1.82

2.47 1.94

1.71 None

423.00 334.41

2.44 1.82

2.65 1.94

None None

1956 SUP NMJ 1957 SUP NMJ


1958 SUP NMJ

453.00 353.27

2.61 2.04

2.81 2.06

None None

478.00 353.27

2.76 2.04

2.98 2.18

None None

478.00 353.27

2.76 2.04

2.98 2.18

None None

1/ For able bodied seamen. Note; SUP - Sailors Union of the Pacific NMU - National Maritime Union of North America

Source:

U.S. Archives, Maritime Administration records and Seafaring Union Agreements.

188

IN

TABLE -MONTHLY BASE WAGES OF LICENSED DECK DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL EFFECT ON CLASS "B" AND CLASS "C" UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATELY OWNED FREIGHT FOR SPECIFIED PERIODS FROM 1918 TO 1958
I.

SHIPS

Master

First Officer (First Mate)


Class B

Second Officer (Second Mate)


Class B
Class C

Third Officer (Third Mate)


Class B Class C

Fourth Officer* (Fourth Mate)


Class B
Class C

Effective Dates

Class B

Class C

Class C

May
Jan.

4, 1918

July Aug. Aug.


Feb. July July July July

1919 28, 1919 1, 1920 1, 1921


1,

$270.00 337.50 371.25 371.25 355.00


285.00 305.00 305.00 305.00 305.00 274.50 1/ 345.00

$260.00 325.00 357.50 357.50 320.00


270.00 290.00 290.00 290.00 290.00

$160.00 200.00 235.00 235.00 200.00


170.00 190.00 190.00 190.00 190.00

$155.00 193.75 228.75 228.75 195.00


165.00 185.00 185.00 185.00 185.00

$145.00
181. 25 206.25 206.25 175.00

$140.00 175.00 200.00 200.00 170.00


145.00 165.00 165.00 165.00 165.00 148.50 150.00 165.00 175.00
170.00175.00 201.25

$130.00 162.50 182.50 182.50 155.00


130.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 150.00

$125.00 156.25 176.25 176.25 150.00


130.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 150.00

$115.00 143.75 158.75 158.75 135.00


115.00 135.00 135.00 135.00 135.00
121.50

6, 1922

1923 1, 1925 1, 1926 1, 1927


1, 1, 1933 1, 1935 1, 1937

150.00 170.00 170.00 170.00 170.00


153.00 1/ 175.00

July
Nov. Nov.

June June Apr.


Apr. June Oct. Jan. Oct.

1, 1939
1,

345.00
340.00.

1940

1, 194.2 1, 1943 1, 1944 1, 1945

345.00 345.00

y
440.00 485.00 530.00 610.00
640.50 640.50 680.85 685.33 721.70
721.65 732.96 732.91 732.96 787.50

4, 1946 26, 1946 (Both Coasts)

261.00 280.00 315.00335.00 335.00345.00 330.00335.00 335.00345.00 335.00 415.00 460.00 505.00 581.00
610.05 610.05 648.48 652.75 687.39 687.35 698.11 698.07 698.11 750.50 750.63 794.00 912.90 833.70 912.90 967.67 967.67 1042.61 1042.51 1105.06

171.00 180.00 205.00


205.00

166.50 175.00 190.00


190.00
190.00-

135.00 150.00 160.00


1/
1/

135.00 142.00 150.00 162.00


150.00155.00 184.00

1/
140.00

1/
1/

1/
1/
1/ 1/

205.00
266,00 266.00 266.00 311.00 326.00 375.00 393.75 393.75 418.56 421.31 443.67

200.00 230.00 244.00 254.00 299.00

U
1/ 232.00 277.00 287.00 330.00

195.50 195.50 214.00 259.00 264.00 304.00

3U.00
361.00
379.05 379.05 402.93 405.58 427.11

210.00 220.00 265.00 275.00 316.00

192.00 202.00 247.00 252.00 290.00

197.00 242.00 1/ 278.00

185.00 230.00 230.00 265.00


278.25 278.25 295.78 295.78 313.53

June Oct. Mar. Mar. Oct.

15, 1947 (Pacific)

& Gulf) 15, 1948 (Atlantic & Gulf) 30, 1948 (Pacific Coast) 1, 1948 (Atlantic & Gulf)
1, 1947 (Atlantic

346.50 346.50 368.33 370.75 390.43 390.40 396.52 396.49 396.62 430.00

331.80 331.80 352.70 355.03 373.86


373.85 379.69 379.68 379.69 412.00

319.20 319.20 339.31 341.54 359.67 359.64 365.28 365.25 365.28 396.50 396.56 419.00 481.75 439.95 482.49
510.66 511,44 545.50 546.32 578.23
579.10

304.50 304.50 323.68 325.81 343.10


343.08 348.45 348.43 348.45 378.50

291.90 291.90 310.29 312.33 328.91 328.88 334.04 334.01 334.01 363.30
363.33 384.00

Oct. 1, 1948 Apr. 1, 1949 June 1949 4pr. 21, 1950 Sept. 1950

(Pacific) (Atlantic & Gulf) (Pacific) (Atlantic & Gulf) (Pacific Coast)

443.64 450.59 450.56 450.59 487.50 487.32 515.50 592.69 541.28 592.90
628.25 628.47 670.14 670.38 710.35 710.60

427.08 433.77 433.74 433.77 469.50

313.53 318.42 318.40 318 .42 346.69

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Mar.

21, 1950 (Atlantic & Gulf) 1, 1951 (Atl. & Gulf & Pac.) 1, 1952 (Atlantic & Gulf) 1, 1952 (Pacific) 1, 1953 (Pacific) 28, 1953 (Atlantic & Gulf) 1, 1953 (Pacific) 16, 1956 (Atlantic & Gulf) 16, 1956 (Pacific) 16, 1957 (Atlantic & Gulf)
16, 1957 (Pacific)

787.70 833.00 957.75 874.65 957.75


1015.22 1015.22 1092.91 1092.91 1158.49
1158.48

469.42 496.50 570.85 521.33 571.15


605.10 605.42 645.60 645.94 684.34

429.80 454.50 522.56 477.23 522.92


553.91 554.30 591.34 591.76 626.82

411.89 435.50 500.71 457.28 501.16


530.75 531.23 566.79 567.30 600.80

378.66 400.00 459.90 420.00 460.72

UI.92
403.20 442.04 467.99 468.56 500.27 500.87 530.29
530.92

346.71 366.00 420.81 384.30 421.85

July
Oct. June June June

487.49 488.36 520.94 521.86 552.20


553.17

446.06 447.16 477.02 478.19 505.64


506.88

June
Note:

1105.06

684.70

627.27

601.34

Ships are classed according to "Power Tonnage", which is Gross Tonnage plus Indicated Horsepower, as shown in List of Merchant Vessels of the United States" published by the U.S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Customs.
Power Tonnages of Class "B" and "C" ships are as follows Class

B
C

Single Sc. ew 12,001 to 20,000 7,501 to 12,000

Twin Screw 9,001 to 15,000 5,501 to 9,000

1/ Wage data for period not available. * This rating not carried regularly on Class "C" freight ships.

Source:

U.S. Maritime Administration records; Annual Report of Commission of Navigation, Department of Commerce; Collective Bargaining Agreements.

189

IN

TABLE EFFECT ON CLASS

II.-

"B"

MONTHLY BASE WAGES OF LICENSED ENGINE DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL AND CLASS "C" UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATELY OWNED FREIGHT FOR SPECIFIED PERIODS FROM 1918 TO 1958
Chief Engineer First Assistant Engi neer
Class B

SHIPS

Second Assistant Engi neer


Class B Class C

Third Assistant Engineer


Class B

Fourth Assistant* Engi neer


Class B
$
-

E ffectivc Dates
1918 1919 July 30, 1919 Nov. 1, 1920 May 1, 1921
May-

Class B

Class C

Class C

Class C

Class C
$

Jan.

1,

1215.00 268.75 346.25 346.25 295.00

$200.00 250.00 332.50 332.50 285.00


240.00 260.00 260.00 234.00 250.00 285.00 300.00 384.00 429.00 469.00
539.00 565.95 601.60 605.57 637.70

$160.00 200.00 235.00 235.00 200.00


170.00 190.00 190.00 171.00 180.00 180.00 205.00 266.00 311.00 326.00 375.00 393.75 418.56 421.31 443.67 443.64 450.59 450.56 450.59 487.28 487.32 504.27 504.23 515.68 515.72
592.95 628.53 628.47 670.44 670.38

$155.00 193.75 228.75 228.75 195.00


165.00 185.00 185.00 166.50 175.00 175.00 193.75 254.00 299.00 314.00

$145.00 181.25 206.25 206.25 175.00


150.00 170.00 170.00 153.00

$140.00 175.00 200.00 200.00 170.00


145.00 165.00 165.00 148.50 156.00 150.00 165.00 220.00 265.00 275.00

$130.00 162.50 182.50 182.50 155.00


130.00 150.00 150.00 135.00 150.00
140.00 160.00 214.00 259.00 264.00

$125.00 156.25 176.25 176.25 150.00


130.00 150.00 150.00 135.00 142.00 135.00 150.00 202.00 247.00 252.00

Feb.

July July July


Nov.

6, 1, 1, 1, 1,

1922 1923 1927 1933 1935

250.00 270.00 270.00 243.00 1/


295.00 310.00 396.00 441.00 481.00
553.00 580.65 617.23 621.30 654.26

_ -

V
155.00 175.00 232.00 277.00 287.00

June Nov. June Oct. Jan.


Oct. June Pec. Dec. July

1, 1936 1, 1937

1944
1, 1945

4, 1946

& Nov. 1946 (Atl.& Gulf & Pac.) Both Coasts) 1947 Atlantic & Gulf) 15, 1947
16, 1947 16, 1948
(

Pacific Coast) Atlantic & Gulf)


Pacific) Atlantic & Gulf) Pacific) Atlantic & Gulf) Pacific)

361.00 379.05 402.93 405.58 427.11


427.08 433.77 433.74 433.77 469.40 469.42 485.75 485.73 496.76 496.78
571.17 605.44 605.42 645.96 645.94

330.00 346.50 368.33 370.75 390.43


390.40 396.52 396.49 396.52 429.76

316.00 331.80 352.70 355.03 373.86


373.85 379.69 379.68 379.69 411.88

304.00 319.20 339.31 341.54 359.67


359.64 365.28 365.25 365.28 396.53

290.00 304.50 323.68 325.81 343.10


343.08 348.45 348.43 348.45 378.64

278.00 291.90 310.29 312.33 328.91


328.88 334.04 334.01 334.04 363.30

265.00 278.25 295.78 297.73 313.53 313.51 318.42 318.40 318.42 346.69

Oct. 28, Dec. 15, June 15, June 16, Sept. 30,
Oct. June June July July
15, 16, 16, 15, 15,

1948 1948 1949 1949 1950 1950 1951 1951 1951 1951

654.23 664.47 664.44 664.47 714.81

637.37 647.65 647.31 647.65 696.59


696.95 721.19 720.82 737.19 737.57

Atlantic & Gulf) Atlantic & Gulf) Pacific) Pacific) Atlantic & Gulf)

714.84 739.71 739.67 756.47 756.51 869.80 921.99 921.94 993.21 993.16
1052.80 1052.75

429.80 444.71 444.75 454.85 454.81


522.96 554.34 554.30 591.80 591.76

411.89 426.21 426.22 435.90 435.89


501.18 531.25 531.23 567.32 567.30

396.56 410.36 410.32 419.64 419.68 482.53 511.38 511.44 546.37 546.32
579.15 579.10

378.66 391.83 391.81 400.71 400.73

363.33 375.94 384.47 384.51 384.47

346.71 358.75 366.90 366.92 366.90 421.87 447.18 447.16 478.21 478.19
506.90 506.88

June June June June June

16, 1952 16, 1953 16, 1953 16, 1956 16, 1956

Both Coasts) Atlantic & Gulf) Pacific) Atlantic & Gulf) Pacific)
Atlantic & Gulf) Pacific) I to Changes

848.02 898.90 898.43 968.73 968.74


1026.85 1026.33

460.74 488.38 488.36 521.88 521.86


553.19 553.17

442.09 468.62 468.56 500.93 500.87


530.99 530.92

June 16, 1957 June 16, 1957 1958


Note:

710.67 710.60

684.72 684.70

627.31 627.27

601.36 601.34

Ships are classed according to "Power Tonnage" which is Gross Tonnage plus indicated horsepower, as shown in "List of Merchant Vessels of the United States'* published by the U.S. Treasury Department, Bureau of Customs.
Power Tonnages of Class "B" and "C" ships are as follows Class B
C

Single Screw 12,001 to 20,000 7,501 to 12,000

Twin Screw 9,001 to 15,000 5,501 to 9,000

1/ Wage data for period not available. * This rating not carried regularly. Source
U.S. Maritime Administration records; Annual Report of Commission of Navigation, Department of Commerce; Collective Bargaining Agreements.

190

TABLE

III.

-MONTHLY BASE WAGES OF LICENSED RADIO OFFICER ON FREIGHT FOR SPECIFIED PERIODS FROM 1919 TO 1958
Privately Owned
1/

SHIPS

Effective Date
Jan. 1, 1919 Aug. It 1919 June 16, 1921 Feb. 6, 1922 July It 1923

Government Owned

1/
1/

1/
1/

$110.00 125.00 107.00 90.00

1/
105.00 105.00 103.00 94.00 90.00

Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Oct.

If 1, 1 1, 1,
1, 1,

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934

$100.00 100.00 96.00 91.00 89.00


97.00 108.00 117.00 128.00 132.00

1935 1936 1, 1937 1, 1938 1, 1939


1, 1940 1, 1941 1, 1942 It 1945

89.00 99.00 101.00 126.00 121.00


125.00 127.00 172.50 217.50

130.00 139.00 172.50 217.50

Effective Date
Oct. Jan. Apr.

A.R.A. (Pacific Coast)

A.R.A. (Atlantic & Gulf Coast)


$ _

RfO.u, (Atlantic & Gulf Coast)

1946 1947 1947 June 16, 1947 June 19, 1947


1, 1, 1,

$254.00 269.24 282.70


_

269.24

282.70
-

$254.00 269.24 282.70


-

Dec. Dec. Mar. July Aug.

15, 16, 10, 16, 16,

1947 1947 1948 1948 1948

294.01
-

300.51 318.54 _ 323.51 352.13


_ 364.38 372.66 411.66 -

_ 300.51
-

318.54

Dec. 3, Dec. 15, July 1, Sept. 30,

1948 1948 1949 1950 Oct. 15, 1950

323.41 352.02 _

_ 323.51 352.13 -

Oct. 21, June 16, July 15, Sept. 1, Oct. 1,

1950 1951 1951 1951 1951

364.26 372.54 411.52 473.31


-

411.66
_ 473.31 501.71
536.83

June Aug. June Jan. June

16, 1952 27, 1952 16, 1953

1954 16, 1956


1,

501.53 536.83

473.31 501.71
536.83

June 16, 1957 June 16, 1958 Oct. 1, 1958

569.04 664.04
-

569.04 664.04
-

569.04 664.04

1/ Wage data for period not available.

LEGEND: A.R.A. - American Radio Association (CIO) formerly American Communication Association. R.O.TI. -Radio Officers Union of Commercial Telegraphers Union (A.F. of L.
Note
:

Rates shown are for freight ships manned with one radio officer. No information is available on wages for the period 1924 - 1929. Wages from 19301941 are averages taken from Annual Reports of Commission of Navigation, United States Department of Commerce. From 1942 to 1952 wages are the same for Operators on privately owned and Government owned ships.
U.S. Maritime Administration Records; Annual Reports of the Commission of Navigation, United States Department of Commerce; U.S. Archives; Collective Bargaining Agreements.

Source:

191

IN

TABLE IV. -MONTHLY BASE WAGES OF UNLICENSED DECK DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL EFFECT ON UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATELY OWNED FREIGHT SHIPS (10,000 GROSS TONS AND UNDER) FROM 1918 TO 1958
D E C K

D E P A R T M E N T

Boatswain
Effective Date
Private

Carpenter
Private
1/

Seaman (AB)
Private
$ 75.00

Seaman (OS)
Private

Government
$ 85.00

Government
$ 90.00

Government
$ 75.00 85.00 90.00

Government
$ 55.00 65.00 65.00 52.50 52.50

May July May May


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan, Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

4, 28,

1918 1919 1, 1920 1, 1921 1, 1922

y
2/
* 67.50

1/

95.00 85.00 80.00 80.00


65.55 75.00 74.00 74.00 74.00

i/ 1/

$71.88
67.22 78.00 74.00 75.00 72.00

100.00 100.00 85.00 85.00


69.16 80.00 78.00 72.00 74.00

85.00 85.00 72.50 58.12

72.50 72.50
55.00 63.00 62.00 62.00 79.00

y y 40.

1/

y
14

1923 1924 1925 1, 1926 1, 1927


1, 1, 1, 1,

64.88 74.00 72.00 73.00 72.00

49.44 60.00
59.00 60.00

77.00
60.00 64.00 61.00 60.00 56.00
52.00 52.00 55.00 60.00 64.00

37.33 45.00 44.00 45.00 44.00

40.00 48.00 47.00 47.00 47.00


47.00 47.00 47.00 47.00 46.00

1,
1,

1,
1, 1, 1,

1928 1929 1930 1931 1932

73.00 74.00 74.00 74.00 69.00 64.00 65.00 70.00 73.00 82.00 85.00 85.00 85.00 85.00 95.00
102.50 112.50 157.50 175.00

75.00 75.00 75.00 74.00 74.00


68.00 67.00 70.00 68.00 78.00

76.00 68.00 77.00 77.00 73.00


66.00 69.00 72.00 V6.00 83.00

79.00 80.00 80.00 79.00 76.00 72.00 73.00 74.00 73.00 79.00 85.00 85.00 85.00 85.00 95.00
102.50 112.50 157.50 175.00

62.00 62.00 62.00 63.00 61.00


58.00 56.00 57.00 58.00 66.00

45.00 45.00 45.00 45.00 41.00


38.00 38.00 41.00 44.00 49.00

1, 1, 1,

1933 1934 1935 1936 1937

43.00 42.00 42.00 41.00


50.00 55.00 55.00 55.00 55.00 1/

Nov. Oct. Jan. Jan.

1, 1937

31,
1, 1, 1,

1938 1939 1940

May
Feb. Jan. Oct.

1940

85.00 85.00 85.00 85.00 95.00


102.50 112.50 157.50 175.00

10, 1941

April

1942 1945 1, 1946


1, 1,

y y y y y y 112.50
157.50 175.00

72.50 72.50 72.50 72.50 1/ 90.00 100.00 145.00 162.50

72.50 72.50 72.50 72.50

y
57.00 56.00 59.00

90.00 100.00 145.00 162.50

61.00 82.50 127.50 145.00

72.50 82.50 127.50 145.00

Effect. lvb Date

Boatswain
NMU
SID

Carpenter
SUP
NMU SIU

Utilityman or Maintenanceman
SUP
NMU
$

Seaman (AB)
SUP
NMU
$

Seaman (OS)
SUP
NMD

SIU
-

SIU
-

SIU

SUP'

June
Oct. Jan. Feb. June Oct. Dec. March March July

15,
1,

1,

1,

16
1,

1946 1946 1947 1947 1947


1947 1947 1948 1948 1948
1948 1948 1948 1949 1949 1950 1950 1951 1951 1951

$205.00 $ $205.00 205.00 217.30 217.30 217.30 228.17 228.17

$205.00 $ $205.00 $187.50 205.00 217.30 217.30 198.75 217.30 228.17 228.17 208.69
_ 249.81 255.04 _ 242.54 -

187.50 198.75 208.69


_

$187.50 $172.50 182.85 198.75 191.99


208.69 220.00
_

172.50 182.35 191.99


_ 210.01 -

$172.50 $150.00 $ $150.00 150.00 159.00 159.00 182.85 159.00 166.95 166.95
197.50 210.00 _ 226.00 _ 177.47 189.97 193.47 193.47 _ 213.79 221.23 226.26
-

15 1
10]

_ 255.12 -

_ -

240.00 255.00
-

235.00
-

250.00
-

260.44
-

16
17
3,

285.44

_ 290.00
-

_ 270.00
-

_ 221.84 234.34 _
-

221.84 -

204.09
-

222.51
_

_ 177.47 -

160.00 170.00 186.00 -

Aug. Dec. Dec. June June


Sept. Oct. June July
Oct.

15 15 16

_ 288.94 288.94
_

285.44 288.94 288.94


_

_ 258.54 258.54
_ 283.01 292.86 299.51 _ -

255.04
258.54 258.54 _

237.84 237.84
_

234.34 237.84 237.84 _

250.00 274.00
-

226.01 226.01
_

222.51 226.01
-

226.01

189.97 193.47 193.47


213.79

30
15 16 15 1

315.35 326.32 333.73 _ -

315.35 -

Nov.

April June
Nov. June
Oct. Oct. Oct.

1 27
16, 18,

16 1 1 1 16
1 1

1951 1952 1952 1952 1953

June Oct.
Oct. Oct. June Oct. Oct. Oct. Sept.

1953 1953 a/ 1953 b/ 1956 1956


1956 1956 1957 1957 1957 1957 1958

378.00 400.68 _ 445.92 -

333.73 378.00 -

316.50 360.00 _ 378.00 _

283.01 299.50
-

295.00 -

260.99 270.07 276.21


-

337.00
_

260.99 276.20 -

_
-

353.85
-

375.08
_ -

353.85 375.08 -

353.85 _

315.00 _ 330.75

248.41 257.05 262.89 _ 302.32


-

_ 248.41
-

262.89
-

400.68 -

447.00 378.00
-

429.13

552.00 487.00 582.00 514.00 -

408.18 432.67 -

401.71
_ -

386.00 354.00 -

330.75 343.98 _ -

330.75 343.98 368.40


_ -

302.32
-

375.22 -

331.00 428.00

314.41 _ 333.27 353.27 -

248.50 288.00 302.40 302.00 453.00


-

206.00
-

239.40
-

226.25 -

239.40
-

314.41 336.73
_ -

244.19 -

228.00 239.40 -

244.19 -

239.00 -

258.84 -

261.53

359.00
_
-

a/

_
-

1 16
1 1 1

b/
a/ b/

472.68 -

436.46

433.85

482.00 455.00 508.50 408.00 -

274.37 -

_
-

397.73 -

451.50 -

397.87

363.67

478.00 -

282.45

379.00 -

1/ Wage data for period not available, a/ For ships of 9,001 to 15,000 Gross Tons, b/ For ships of 9,000 Gross Tons and Under. Source: U.S. Maritime Administration records; Annual Report of Commission of Navigation, Department of Commerce; Collective Bargaining Agreements.

192

IN

TABLE V. --MONTHLY BASE WAGES OF UNLICENSED ENGINE DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL EFFECT ON UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATELY OWNED FREIGHT SHIPS (10,000 GROSS TONS AND UNDER) FROM 1918 TO 1958
E N G I N E
D

EPARTMENT
Coal Passer or Wiper
Oiler

Fireman
Effect ive Date

Water tender*

Private

Government
$ 75.00

Private
1/ 1/ 1/ 1/ 66.88 $

Government
$ 80.00 90.00 95.00 80.00 80.00

Private

Government
$ 65.00
1/

Private

Government
$ 80.00

May
July-

A, 1918 28, 1919

1/
1/
1/

May May
Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Oct. Oct. Jan. Jan.

1920 1, 1921 1, 1922


1,

1/
$ 62.13

90.00 90.00 75.00 75.00


57.50 65.00 65.00 66.00 65.00

1/ 1/

1/
1/ 1/
1/ $ 66.88

1/
1/
1 54.88

1/ 65.00 65.00
50.00 58.00 58.00 58.00 53.00

90.00 95.00 80.00 80.00


63.33 73.00 71.00 72.00 72.00

1, 1, 1, 1, 1,

1923 1924 1925 1926 1927

52.33 63.00 62.00 62.00 62.00

58.43 69.00 68.00 69.00 68.00

65.00 73.00 73.00 72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00 65.00 62.00 63.00 65.00 75.00 82.50 82.50 82.50 82.50 92.50
100.00 11D.00 155.00 172.50 177.50
Coal Passer or Wiper

42.11 54.00
52.00 53.00 52.00

58.37 70.00 67.00 69.00 68.00

1, 1928

1929 1, 1930 1, 1931 1, 1932


1,

63.00 63.00 64.00 63.00 59.00


54.00 55.00 56.00 61.00 65.00

65.00 65.00 66.00 66.00 65.00

70.00 71.00 70.00 71.00 66.00 59.00 61.00 64.00 68.00 75.00
_ 84.00 84.00 77.00 -

53.00 55.00 55.00 53.00 49.00

58.00 58.00 58.00 59.00 55.00


53.00 50.00 51.00

69.00 71.00 70.00 70.00 67.00


61.00 61.00 64.00 69.00 75.00
_ 84.00 84.00 85.00 -

72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00 72.00


67.00 62.00 65.00 66.00 75.00

1933 1934 1, 1935 1, 1936 1, 1937


1, 1,

60.00 57.00 60.00 59.00 66.00


72.50 72.50 72.50 72.50 82.50

45.00 45.00 46.00 49.00 53.00


_

47.00 51.00
60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 70.00 77.50 87.50 132.50 150.00 175.00

21, 1937 31, 1938

May
Feb. Oct. Oct. Apr. June

1939 1940 1940 1,


1,

1,

_ 75.00 75.00 78. OC 89.00 110.00 155.00 177.50 177.50

64.00 64.00 65.00 68.00 87.50 132.50 175.00 175.00

82.50 82.50 82.50 82.50 92.50


100.00 110.00 155.00 172.50 177.50

10, 1941 23, 1941


1, 1,

1945 1946

15, 1946

90.00 110.00 155.00 177.50 177.50

89.00 110.00 155.00 177.50 177.50

89.00 110.00 155.00 177.50 177.50

Effect ive Date


NMD
Jan.
1,

FiremanWa ter tender*

Oiler
SIU

MFOW
$188.15 197.56 205.46

sin
8188.15 197.56 -

NMU
$ 185.50

MFOW
$185.50 194.78 202.57
_ 223.05 -

NMU

MFOW
$188.15 197.56 205.46
_ -

SIU

June June Dec. Dec.

16, 19, 15, 16,


10, 16, IV,

1947 1947 1947 1947 1947

1188.15 197.56 210.01 _ 222.51 226.01 _

210.01 222.51 226.01


_ 226.01 -

194.78 207.05 -

$185.50 194.78 -

$188.15 197.56

210.01 _ 222.51 226.01 _

$188.15 197.56 -

March July
Aug. Dec. Dec. Apr. June June June Sept.
Oct. June

1948 1948 1948 3, 1948 15, 1948


4, 15, 16, 24, 30, 15, 16, 15, 1, 16, 16, 18, 16,

_
-

226.01
-

_ 219.55 223.05 _ 223.05 -

207.05 219.55 223.05

226.01 233.51 233.51 248.50

210.01 222.51 226.01


_ 226.01 -

1949 1949 1949 1949 1950

226.01
-

233.51 233.51 248.50

230.55 230.55 245.50

_ 223.05 -

226.01
-

245.26 259.55 -

July
Nov. Dec.

1950 1951 1951 1951 1951

248.41 257.05 262.89 302.32

_
257.

262.98

262.98
302.32 -

248.41 262.89 -

245.26 253.79 259.56 288.53

_ 269.03 274.79 274.79


288.53 -

248.41 257.05 262.89 302.32 314.41 333.27

_ 257.14 262.98 262.98


302.40 -

248.41 262.89 _

June Nov. June


Oct. June

1952 1952 1953 1, 1953 16, 1956

314.41 333.27 _ 353.27


-

_ 302.32 314.41

_
288.53 294.30 -

336,73 363.67

294.30 311.96 _
330.68

302.32 314.41 -

Oct. June Oct. Sept.

16,

1956 1957 1, 1957 1, 1958


1,

350,50 370.00 -

336.00 354.50 -

315,20 340.42

_ 353.27 -

350,50 370.00 -

336.73 363.67

1/ Wage data for period not available. * Beginning January 1, 1947 the ratings of Fireman, Watertender and Fireman-Watertender are interchangeable. Source: Merchant Marine Statistics, Bureau of Navigation, Department of Commerce; Collective Bargaining Agreements.

193

TABLE VI.-MONTHLY BASE WAGES OF STEWARDS DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL IN EFFECT ON UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATELY OWNED FREIGHT SHIPS (10,000 GROSS TONS AND UNDER) FROM 1918 TO 1958

STEWARDS
Chief Steward
Effec tive Date
Dec.
30,

DE

P A R T M E N T

Chief Cook

Second Cook

Messboy
Private

MesB Steuard-Messman or Utility Man

Private
1/ 1/ 1/ 1/

Government
$120.00 135.00 130.00 135.00 105.00
120.00 129.00 130.00 122.00 122.00 120.00 121.00 121.00 120.00 120.00 116.00 118.00 119.00 113.00 119.00

Private

Government

Government
_
-

Government
$ 55.00 65.00 70.00 65.00 35.00

Private
1/

Government
$ 60.00

May
Aug.

May
Feb.

1918 1919 1, 1919 1, 1921 6 S 1922


1,

V 1/
1/ 1/ 1/ $108.00 111.00 102.00 102.00

1/

1/

$100.00 115.00 110.00 115.00 90.00


100.00 113.00 109.00 100.00 97.00
100.00 100.00 100.00 95.00 99.00 111.00 90.00 95.00 89.00 99.00

y
2/
1/ 1/

_ -

1/
1/ $ 42.00 42.00 41.00 41.00

V 1/
1/

1/ 1/

70.00 80.00 70.00 45.00


52.00 47.00 47.00 47.00 48.00

July
Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

1923 1924 1, 1925 1, 1926 1, 1927


1, 1,

1/
1127.00 131.00 124.00 125.00
122.00 122.00 123.00 120.00 116.00 111.00 112.00 121.00 125.00 128.00
1/

42.00 43.00 42.00 42.00 42.00

$ 48.00

48.00 49.00 47.00 47.00 49.00 51.00 48.00 43.00 40.00 40.00 41.00 46.00 52.00
1/ 62.00 63.00 63.00 -

1928 1929 1, 1930 1, 1931 1, 1932


1, 1,

100.00 100.00 100.00 99.00 95.00

42.00 42.00 44.00 43.00 39.00


36.00 35.00 36.00 40.00 50.00

42.00 43.00 42.00 43.00 41.00


39.00 38.00 39.00 38.00 47.00
55.00 55.00 55.00 55.00 -

48.00 51.00 47.00 47.00 46.00 43.00 42.00 43.00 42.00 51.00
60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 70.00 77.50 87.50 132.50 150.00 150.00

1933 1934 1, 1935 1, 1936 1, 1937


1,

1,

92.00 93.00 97.00 101.00 102.00


1/ 111.00 119.00 117.00 -

_
-

$ 90.00

Oct. Oct. Jan. Jan.

May
Feb. Oct. Oct. Apr. June

21, 1937 31, 1938 1, 1939 l, 1940 1, 1940


10, 1941 23, 1941
1, 1, 15,

133.00 139.00 141.00 146.00 147.50 202.50 202.50 220.00

120.00 120.00 120.00 120.00 130.00


137.50 147.50 192.50 210.00 220.00

105.00 105.00 105.00 105.00 115.00 122.50 132.50 177.50 195.00 205.00

90.00 90.00 90.00 100.00


107.50 117.50 162.50 180.00 185.00

1/ 56.00 58.00 59.00 61.00 -

1945 1946 1946

124.00 182.50 182. 50 205.00

56.00

66.00 132.50 132.50 150.00

Effec tive Date

Chief Steward
NMU

Chief Cook
SID

Second Cook Second Cook & Baker


SIU

Mess Steward-Me ssman or Utility Man


NMU

MCS
$233.20 244.86
-

NMU

MCS

NMU

MCS

SIU

MCS
$159.00 166.95 173.63
_ 193.47 -

SIU

Jan. June June Oct. Dec. Mar.

1,

16, 19, 15, 16, 10, 16, 17, 2, 15,

1947 1947 1947 1947 1947

$233.20 244.96 260.29 _ 278,25 281.75 _

254.65
_

$233.20 244.86 265.75 278.25


-

$217.30 228.17 242.54 _ 255.04 *.

$217.30 228.17 237.30


_ 258.54 -

$217.30 228.17 242.54 255.04 258.54

$196.10 205.91 218.88 _ 231.38 -

$196.10 205.91 214.15


_ _ 234.88 242.38

$196.10 205.91 218.88 231.38 234.88


_

$159.00 166.95 177.47 _ 189.97 193.47 _


-

$159.00 166.95 -

177.47 189.97

July
Aug. Dec. Dec.
Apr. June June Sept. Oct.

1948 1948 1948 1948 1948

286.29
-

234.88

193.47

281.75
_ 281.75 -

258.54
_ 266.04 283.01

A, 1949 15, 1949 16, 1949 30, 1950 15, 1950

289.25
307.70

293.79 -

312.50
-

307.70

266.04 283.00 292.84 299.49 _

_
258.54

_
242.38

258.00

234.88
-

283.01
_

200.97

257.84
266.81 272.87 312.76 325.27 344.79 365.48 -

266.97 273.03 -

257.84 _

213.79
221.23 226.26 237.57 -

200.97 214.00 221.44 226.46 _ 237.78

193.47

213.79 _ 226.25

June July Nov. June Nov.

1951 1951 1, 1951 16, 1952 18, 1952


16, 15, 16, 1953 16, 1953
1, 1, 16,

318.40 325.63 368.16 390.25 434.87 460.96 -

323.37 330.71 _ 347.25


-

_
325.63 368.16

292.86 299.51 340.74 361.18 393.45 417.06

299.50 340.74 _

272.87
312.76

237.57

June Mar. Oct. June Oct. June Oct. Sept.

1953

16, 1956

1956 1957 If 1957 If 1958

539.00

568.50

. 390.25 429.13 463.46

_
286.68 474.00

3U.46
506.00

361.18 392.18

_ 325.27
348.36

242.32 -

_ 242.32 259.52

534.00 -

423.55

500.00

376.23

256.86 272.87 -

359.00
379.00 -

280.28

1/ Wage data for period not available. Note: Wages for the period 1924 to 1941 are averages.

Source:

Merchant Marine Statistics, Bureau of Navigation, Department of Commerce^ Collective Bargaining Agreements.

194

LONGSHORE MONTHLY WAGE RATE-1946-19S8 FOR THE PORTS OF NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, AND BALTIMORE
General Cargo 1/
Bulk Cargo

Effective Dates

Wet Hides Creosotes Poles

Kerosene Gasoline Naptha 2/

Handling and Stowing in Reefer Space

3_/

Explosives

Damaged Cargo 4/

10-1-46 Straight Time Overtime


10-1-47 Straight Time Overtime 8-22-48 Straight Time Overtime 10-1-50 Straight Time Overtime
10-1-51 Straight Time Overtime 10-1-52 Straight Time Overtime
10-1-53 Straight Time Overtime
10-J.-54

$1.65 2.475

$1.70 2.55

$1.80 2.70

$1.80 2.70

$ -

$3.30 4.95

$3.30 4.95

1.75 2.625

1.80 2.70

1.90 2.85

1.90 2.85

3.40 5.10

3.40 5.10

1.88 2.82

1.93 2.895

2.03 3.045

2.03 3.045

3.76
5.64

3.76 5.64

2.00 3.00

2.05 3.075

2,15 3.225

2.15 3.225

4.00 6.00

4.00 6.00

2.10 3.15

2.15 3.225

2.25 3.375

2.25 3.375

4.20 6.30

4.20 6.30

2.27 3.405

2.32 3.48

2.42 3.63

2.42 3.63

2.47 57 3.705

4.54 6.81

4.54 6.81

2.35 3.525

2.40 3.60

2.50 3.75

2.50 3.75

2.55 3.825

4.70 7.05

4.70 7.05

Straight Tine Overtime


10-1-55 Straight Time Overtime

2.42 3.63

2.47 3.705

2.57 3.855

2.57 3.855

2.62 3.93

4.84 7.26

4.84 7.26

2.48 3.72

2.53 3.795

2.63 3.945

2.63 3.945

2.68 4.02

4.96 7.44

4.96 7.44

10-1-56 Straight Time Overtime


10-1-57 Straight Time Overtime
10-1-58 Straight Time Overtime

2.66 3.99

2.71 4.065

2.81 4.215

2.81 4.215

2.86 4.29

5.32 7.98

5.32

7.98

2.73 4.095

2.78 4.17

2.88 4.32

2.93 4.395

2.93 4.395

5.46 8.19

5.46 8.19

2.80 4.20

2.85 4.275

2.95 4.425

3.00 4.50

3.00 4.50

5.60 8.40

5.60 8.40

Footnotes

1/ Applies to general cargo of every description including barrel oil when part of general cargo. 2/ In cases or barrels.

2/ When transported at temperature of freezing or below, rate paid to entire gang. (J Sound cargo in separate compartments shall be handled at the regular rates.
5_/

Rate approved late in December 1952 by Regional Wage Stabilization Board to be effective 11-1-52.

SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT BY YEARS, 1947-1948 TOTAL PRODUCTION EMPLOYEES IN THOSE MAJOR SHIPYARDS HAVING FACILITIES TO BUILD OCEANGOING SHIPS 477 FEET L.O.A. BY 66 FEET
DECEMBER 1947
Grand Total

DECEMBER
1948

DECEMBER 1949

DECEMBER 1950
31,838 25,237
3,755

DECEMBER 1951

DECEMBER 1952
57,916

DECEMBER 1953

DECEMBER 1954
39,237

DECEMBER 1955
35,378

DECEMBER 1956
47,427 32,302

DECQiBER 1957
53,221

DECEMBER 1958
51,997

46,688
30,853
10,413
5,422

43,924 33,136
5,443 5,345

33,886
28,600

42,325 34,331
3,023

49,934
37,526

Atlantic Coast
Gulf Coast
Pacific Coast

45,777
8,048
4.-

26,551
7,646
5,040

25,047
5,473

33,333
13,965
5,923

36,142
10,904

3,643
1,643

7,389
5,019

9,426
5,699

2,846

4,971

091

4,858

4,951

Note:

Employment shown is the average for the month of December.

Source: 1947 - 1954 Shipbuilder's Council 1955 - 1957 Bureau of labor Statistics Bureau of Ships, Department of the Navy 1958

195

Q < O <
UJ

UJ

o
0>

< 2 CO h- -j Z o < o X o o (T
(/)

tr

(T> If)

UJ

0)
i

5 UJ z a: 3 < 5 Z> O UJ or H <


C/>

ro
if)

to

<
UJ
>CD

U_

</>

(0

UJ h-

a < z < Q < or o


< Z> Q < CC O
LL

2
c

O 5

CO

Us

u.

o
or bJ CD

ce uj

m 5S
Z<>

o o

o o

o o
ro

O O

O O

196
(rU.
S.

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1959

528579