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Menus for babies 8-12 months Wow!

Your little one is quickly moving onto new foods, more meals and greater
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The baby feeding menus below are designed to give you an idea of what babies may be eating from 8 months to 12 months of age.

independence. By this stage/time, she has now been introduced to a wider variety of foods but please remember the 4 day wait rule.

There are still a variety of foods that your baby has not tried and adverse reactions are still possible. At this point, you may have been gradually increasing the amount of solids your baby eats as baby gets older and becomes accustomed to eating solid foods. Offer your baby 1 or 2 food cubes of each item when your baby indicates she is ready for more. You may also think about introducing finger foods and more textured "table" foods at this age range.

It is important to note that even at this stage, not all babies between the age of 8-12 months old will be eating the same amounts nor will they be eating the same foods. Again, due to the differing ages that babies start solid foods, some 10 month old babies still may not have had dairy products for example. There are many infants that do not start solids until 8 months of age and thus, this particular menu sample would not be appropriate. Following any chart or offered schedule may not be suitable for your baby. Our menu sample is for example and idea purposes. The menus are geared to give you ideas of what types of food you could serve at different meal times to get a good balance of nutrients and variety. These menu suggestions assume that you have introduced the stated foods and that you have waited the proper time period to detect an allergic reaction.Do NOT feel as though your baby should be eating solid foods according to any schedule. Your baby will eat as much solid foods as your baby needs - trust your baby's cues.

Breast Milk and/or Formula are THE MOST IMPORTANT sources of nutrition for your infant up to 12 months old. Do NOT replace a nursing or bottle-feeding with a solid food meal and do not feed the solids first until your pediatrician indicates this is right for your baby.

When you look at our sample menus, dont think about serving adult sized portions. Your little one surely could not eat 1 cup of oatmeal with of a banana mashed into it along with cup of yogurt for example. However, your little one might be able to eat cup of oatmeal with a wee bit of banana mashed in with a small drizzle of yogurt to stir in. We do not note amounts of foods because, as we say, all babies are different and will be eating differing amounts of foods.

What is a Food Cube serving? A "food cube" is an ice cube sized serving. Each ice cube is equal to approximately 1 ounce. There are approximately 2 tablespoons in an ounce.

Read the page How Much Should My Baby Be Eating to learn why your baby may eat more or less than others. All babies are different and your baby may eat more or less than what is shown on these example charts. How Will You Know When Your Baby is Ready to Eat Solid Foods?
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Is Your Baby Ready for Solid Foods? Learn About Baby's Signs of Readiness for Solid Foods

There are many signs that might lead you to believe that your little one is ready to begin eating solid foods. But how exactly do you know if your baby really is ready for solid foods? Has your baby doubled her birth weight? Does your baby have good head control? Your baby may be 3 months old or 4 months old when you start to feel she may need "something more" than formula or breast milk. Maybe she is beginning to awaken more often at night or eat more often than "usual" and you wonder if introducing solid foods may be what she needs.
The best advice when considering starting solid foods for your baby is to "Watch the Baby Not the Calendar" This is true for both breastfed and formula fed infants. Follow your baby's hunger cues and you'll never go wrong.

A Growth Spurt May be Confused with a Readiness for Solid Foods


Please keep in mind that a growth spurt will occur between 3-4 months of age. Your baby may begin to wake more frequently at night for a feeding and/or may begin to eat non-stop (cluster feed) as she once did as a newborn. This growth spurt often accounts for the increased hunger in your baby and it should not be taken as a sign that your baby needs solid foods added to her diet. You may try offering your baby more frequent nursing sessions and/or bottle feedings instead of solids; you will find that within a week or two, your baby is oftentimes over the growth spurt and back to feeding "as usual".

Here are a few "signs" that may indicate your baby is ready for Solid Foods:
Loss of tongue-thrust reflex - This allows baby to drink and swallow liquids with ease; with the tonguethrust reflex still present, baby may simply drink in liquid purees or push the food back out. According to Dr. Jim Sears, in the first four months the tongue thrust reflex protects the infant against choking. When any unusual substance is placed on the tongue, it automatically protrudes outward rather than back. Between four and six months this reflex gradually diminishes, and that glob of cereal actually may have a chance of making it from the tongue to the tummy! Ability to let you know she is full from a "meal" with signs such as turning away from the bottle or breast. This is important so that baby is able to self-regulate the amount of food being eaten. This helps stop baby from accidentally overeating as parents may continue to feed baby thinking that she is still hungry. Ability to sit up and hold head up unassisted Interest in your food (I tend to disagree with this one as when a baby reaches the age of 4-6 months, he is interested in putting everything in his mouth.) Doubling of birth weight Frequently waking in the middle of the night when a solid sleeping pattern had been established. This may not be the best indicator that your baby is ready for solids. Please keep in mind that a growth spurt will occur between 3-4 months of age, 6-7 months of age and also 9-10 months of age. Your baby may also be waking due to an illness or teething.

Won't My Baby Sleep Through the Night If We Start Solids?


Some parents believe that if they start solids "early" then their infants will sleep through the night sooner. As your baby grows, his sleeping patterns as well as eating patterns change continually. Around the time a few parents begin to offer solids early is just about the time that an infant may be sleeping for longer periods at a time. This is a natural progression as an infant ages and it oftentimes

coincides with the addition of early solids. This coincidence perpetuates the dangerous myth that early offerings of solid foods will help an infant sleep "through the night". To further this explanation, let us recall that between 6-8 months old, baby is often back to waking at night for a feeding. By this time baby should be eating solids and it appears that those solids are no longer helping baby sleep through the night. In reality, baby is hitting another growth spurt and may wake again during the night for more feedings regardless of eating solids. This really is "normal" and your baby may wake again during the night for more feedings regardless of eating solids.

I know many babies who began to eat solids "Early" and people are telling me to start my baby early - should I?
Many parents say that their own pediatricians or their friends' pediatricians have said that it's fine to start solids (typically cereal) at 4 months of age. It is still common for pediatricians to just say "start solid foods when your baby is 4 months old" because this has been the norm for many years. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) acknowledges that there are no "strict" age guidelines on introducing solid foods to your baby. However, "The AAP Section on Breastfeeding, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Academy of Family Physicians, Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, World Health Organization, United Nations Children's Fund, and many other health organizations recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life.2,127130 Exclusive breastfeeding is defined as an infant's consumption of human milk with no supplementation of any type (no water, no juice, no nonhuman milk, and no foods) except for vitamins, minerals, and medications.131 Exclusive breastfeeding has been shown to provide improved protection against many diseases and to increase the likelihood of continued breastfeeding for at least the first year of life. 2005 http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics;115/2/496 This ensures optimal nutritional exposure and may stave off food allergies amongst other issues. Further studies have shown that an infant's gastrointestinal tract has not or may not have matured enough to properly digest/utilize solid foods until around 6-8 months old. There is a "conflict" between the AAP Breastfeeding et al and the Committee on Nutrition as regards starting solids. The Committee on Nutrition says babies may be started on solid foods "between 4 and 6 months" of age. The Committee does not recommend 4 months of age as the absolute starting age however. "At approximately four-to-six months, you can begin adding solid foods. "Most babies are not ready for solids before this time, as they have not lost their tongue-thrust reflex at that age," Dr. Greer says. Dr. Greer is with the Committee on Nutrition. Studies show that babies are highly individual in developing a readiness for solid foods. One baby might seem to be ready for solids at 4 months, while another shows no signs of readiness until around 6 or 7 months. Just because your friend's baby may have began eating solid foods at 3 or 4 months of age does not mean that your baby should. Don't be pushed into starting solids and don't feel like you are a "bad Mommy" if you feel your baby is ready prior to 6 months of age.

**Please keep in mind that "outward" signs of being ready for solids do not mean that your baby's inner digestive system is mature and ready. You should thoroughly discuss starting your baby on solid foods with your baby's pediatrician. If your pediatrician insists that you start your 4 month old infant on solids and you don't feel baby is ready, ask the pediatriician to explain the benefits of starting solids early. And remember, you never HAVE to begin introducing complementary foods simply because your pediatrician has suggested that you do so; unless there is some medical need. Only when you have thoroughly discussed the pros and cons of introducing solid foods with your pediatrician will you be able to have a better grasp of just when you should begin offering baby solid foods. My Parent's Insist That My Baby Needs "Real Food" Some parents may be tempted to give in to relatives, grandmothers and sometimes even their own mothers, who say "Give that baby some real food, she's starving." or "Nursing that baby isn't enough, he needs some real food". Remember that "real food" is breast milk and/or formula and these contain all the important nutrients that an infant needs to develop properly. Breast milk in particular, and/or formula, will be enough to sustain your baby's nutritional needs for up to age 1 year old. In fact, introducing solids too early may displace the important nutrition your baby needs to receive from breast milk and/or formula.

Learn about feeding baby first solid foods and the different stages of solid foods

Feeding Your Baby First Solid Foods or Jump to Solid Food Feeding Stages Most Important: Offer your baby only those foods that are appropriate for the age of your baby. You're baby will be more interested in solids when he/she is a little hungry but not starving - offer breast milk and/or formula first and then offer solids. If you are trying to feed a baby solids when she is very hungry, she may be more likely to resist. Solid foods are a new experience and sometimes, baby may just be too hungry to want to sit for the new experience. She may not want to accept the spoon, the new tastes and the new textures. Remember, solid foods are not meant to provide for baby nutritionally in the first few months, breast milk and/or formula fill this role. ALWAYS ensure that your baby is sitting upright. If he cannot sit upright unassisted and does not have proper head control, it may not be the right time to begin solid foods. When he in a highchair or other infant-specific chair then he is less likely to choke. Never leave your baby unattended when he eating. Introduce New Foods During the Morning or Early Afternoon

Introduce new foods during the morning or early afternoon. This will enable you to deal with any adverse reactions when your pediatrician is in office. Should an adverse reaction occur during the morning/early afternoon, it will cause the least amount of disruption in baby's fragile routine. Further, you should always introduce new foods after a nursing or bottle feeding. Your baby still receives his main source of nutrition from either breast milk or formula up to the one year old mark - do not let solids interfere with liquid intake. Make it a Family Affair! Why not feed baby with the whole family instead of all by himself in his highchair? Place the highchair or feeding seat at the family table. Allow baby to sit at the family table even if baby is not going to be eating. This will help baby become accustomed to mealtime routines. Your baby will enjoy being part of the "action" at the table. Use a Comfy Utensil When Feeding Your Baby Ensure you are using a soft comfy spoon. Remember baby's gums may be tender from teething and a hard metal spoon may aggravate baby's gums. If she refuses the spoon or if the spoon seems to make baby uncomfortable, use your finger. Many parents begin offering their babies solid foods by using their (clean and washed) finger as a spoon. Don't Make a Fuss Over the Feeding Session Don't make a fuss over the food - talk about the food you are offering and make some "yum yum" sounds however, ensure that you are not overwhelming your baby with your words and sounds. This may distract baby's attention from the food and over-stimulate baby. Follow your baby's cues and allow him or her to explore the dish, utensils and the food itself. We always gave our babies their own spoon and a little bowl of food as we fed them. Don't Force Your Baby to Eat Don't force foods on your baby. If your baby does not open his or her mouth for the food immediately, wait for baby to open his mouth when food is offered. Always let her eat at her own pace and on her own terms. When baby turns her head away or stops opening her mouth, this probably means she had had enough; respect that and stop offering the food. You don't want to continue to offer foods and run the risk of overriding her own appetite control system. It's ok if baby does not finish a "meal". When baby signals she is done, then trust your baby's instincts. Read How Much Food Should My Baby Eat? for more information. Offer a Variety of Foods and Colors & You'll be Offering all the Nutrients Needed! Offer your baby different foods once you have begun to introduce several foods. Use different ways of preparing those baby foods and be willing to have a huge store of patience. Dont give up on a new food because baby wont eat it the first time; continue offering the food or wait another day or week. HAVE FUN and Don't Sweat the Mess

SOLID FOOD FEEDING STAGES: Below is a short example of Feeding Stages a baby may go through. Please keep in mind that the ages shown are age ranges. It is impossible to accurately reflect specific foods and feeding patterns for all infants; infants begin solid foods at differing ages and thus their progression into solid foods may differ greatly. Always remember that solids do not replace the necessary nutrients or breast milk and/or formula in the first 12 months of life. (4)6-8 Months - Baby Let's Begin to Eat "Baby" cereal and soft cooked thinly pureed fruits and veggies should be baby's first solid food experiences. Single ingredients only and at a space of 4 days apart with introducing each new food. You may skip the cereal and begin with a fruit like avocado or begin with a veggie like butternut squash or sweet potato. 8-10 Months - We're Moving On Bring on some spices and the softly mashed, or chopped into fine pieces of fruits, vegetables, meats, pasta and dairy such as yogurt and cheeses. Pasta, veggies, and fruit should all be soft cooked and possibly mashed with a fork or masher. (Bananas need only be mashed.) Raw fruits are often introduced at this stage. Meats and proteins such as egg yolk, should be cooked and pureed or chopped into small soft bits. If offering Tofu, you need not cook it first. Ensure dairy offered is easily manageable. Remember, baby will not have molars until sometime around the 12-18 month age range. Foods should be easily mashed between the gums. 11-12 Months - We're almost Toddlers now and we want to eat grown-up foods. By this stage, your baby should be just on the brink of or is already eating "table foods". She may already love self-feeding and may enjoy a variety of spices in her cuisine. Encourage a healthy exploration of foods, tastes and textures as well as eating utensils. Always keep in mind that certain foods may still pose an allergy or other type of reaction risk.

Learn about feeding baby first solid foods and the different stages of solid foods

Feeding Your Baby First Solid Foods or Jump to Solid Food Feeding Stages Most Important: Offer your baby only those foods that are appropriate for the age of your baby. You're baby will be more interested in solids when he/she is a little hungry but not starving - offer breast milk and/or formula first and then offer solids. If you are trying to feed a baby solids when she is very hungry, she may be more likely to resist.

Solid foods are a new experience and sometimes, baby may just be too hungry to want to sit for the new experience. She may not want to accept the spoon, the new tastes and the new textures. Remember, solid foods are not meant to provide for baby nutritionally in the first few months, breast milk and/or formula fill this role. ALWAYS ensure that your baby is sitting upright. If he cannot sit upright unassisted and does not have proper head control, it may not be the right time to begin solid foods. When he in a highchair or other infant-specific chair then he is less likely to choke. Never leave your baby unattended when he eating. Introduce New Foods During the Morning or Early Afternoon Introduce new foods during the morning or early afternoon. This will enable you to deal with any adverse reactions when your pediatrician is in office. Should an adverse reaction occur during the morning/early afternoon, it will cause the least amount of disruption in baby's fragile routine. Further, you should always introduce new foods after a nursing or bottle feeding. Your baby still receives his main source of nutrition from either breast milk or formula up to the one year old mark - do not let solids interfere with liquid intake. Make it a Family Affair! Why not feed baby with the whole family instead of all by himself in his highchair? Place the highchair or feeding seat at the family table. Allow baby to sit at the family table even if baby is not going to be eating. This will help baby become accustomed to mealtime routines. Your baby will enjoy being part of the "action" at the table. Use a Comfy Utensil When Feeding Your Baby Ensure you are using a soft comfy spoon. Remember baby's gums may be tender from teething and a hard metal spoon may aggravate baby's gums. If she refuses the spoon or if the spoon seems to make baby uncomfortable, use your finger. Many parents begin offering their babies solid foods by using their (clean and washed) finger as a spoon. Don't Make a Fuss Over the Feeding Session Don't make a fuss over the food - talk about the food you are offering and make some "yum yum" sounds however, ensure that you are not overwhelming your baby with your words and sounds. This may distract baby's attention from the food and over-stimulate baby. Follow your baby's cues and allow him or her to explore the dish, utensils and the food itself. We always gave our babies their own spoon and a little bowl of food as we fed them. Don't Force Your Baby to Eat Don't force foods on your baby. If your baby does not open his or her mouth for the food immediately, wait for baby to open his mouth when food is offered. Always let her eat at her own pace and on her own terms. When baby turns her head away or stops opening her mouth, this probably means she had had enough; respect that and stop offering the food. You don't want to continue to offer foods and run the risk of overriding her own appetite control system. It's ok if baby does not finish a "meal". When baby signals she is done, then trust your baby's instincts.

Read How Much Food Should My Baby Eat? for more information. Offer a Variety of Foods and Colors & You'll be Offering all the Nutrients Needed! Offer your baby different foods once you have begun to introduce several foods. Use different ways of preparing those baby foods and be willing to have a huge store of patience. Dont give up on a new food because baby wont eat it the first time; continue offering the food or wait another day or week. HAVE FUN and Don't Sweat the Mess

SOLID FOOD FEEDING STAGES: Below is a short example of Feeding Stages a baby may go through. Please keep in mind that the ages shown are age ranges. It is impossible to accurately reflect specific foods and feeding patterns for all infants; infants begin solid foods at differing ages and thus their progression into solid foods may differ greatly. Always remember that solids do not replace the necessary nutrients or breast milk and/or formula in the first 12 months of life. (4)6-8 Months - Baby Let's Begin to Eat "Baby" cereal and soft cooked thinly pureed fruits and veggies should be baby's first solid food experiences. Single ingredients only and at a space of 4 days apart with introducing each new food. You may skip the cereal and begin with a fruit like avocado or begin with a veggie like butternut squash or sweet potato. 8-10 Months - We're Moving On Bring on some spices and the softly mashed, or chopped into fine pieces of fruits, vegetables, meats, pasta and dairy such as yogurt and cheeses. Pasta, veggies, and fruit should all be soft cooked and possibly mashed with a fork or masher. (Bananas need only be mashed.) Raw fruits are often introduced at this stage. Meats and proteins such as egg yolk, should be cooked and pureed or chopped into small soft bits. If offering Tofu, you need not cook it first. Ensure dairy offered is easily manageable. Remember, baby will not have molars until sometime around the 12-18 month age range. Foods should be easily mashed between the gums. 11-12 Months - We're almost Toddlers now and we want to eat grown-up foods. By this stage, your baby should be just on the brink of or is already eating "table foods". She may already love self-feeding and may enjoy a variety of spices in her cuisine. Encourage a healthy exploration of foods, tastes and textures as well as eating utensils. Always keep in mind that certain foods may still pose an allergy or other type of reaction risk.

Combined Baby Food Menus for babies from birth to age 12 months.

When you read through these, or any other, sample menus, it is important to note that not all babies will be eating the same amounts as others, nor will they be eating the same foods. This is due to the differing ages that babies start solid foods as well as the fact that all babies are not the same. Do NOT feel as though your baby should be eating solid foods according to any schedule. Your baby will eat as much solid foods as your baby needs - trust your baby cues. Learn more about how to tell if Your Baby Is Ready For Solids

Breast Milk and/or Formula are THE MOST IMPORTANT sources of nutrition for your infant up to 12 months old. Do NOT replace a nursing or bottle-feeding with a solid food meal and do not feed the solids first until your pediatrician indicates this is right for your baby.

It cannot be stressed enough - all babies are different and your baby may eat more or less than what is shown on these example charts. This menu and sample schedule outlines examples and shows ideas for solid foods only. It does not account for, nor does it list, total daily Breast Milk or Formula intake. See a "Suggested "Milk" chart below. As always, you should feed your baby according to his or her cues and needs. Always consult your pediatrician if you are worried that your baby is not receiving proper amounts of either milk or solid foods. Many breastfeeding moms supplement with formula as their milk supply may be low for a variety of reasons. We give kudos to those moms who continue to hang in there and offer their babies breast milk while supplementing. Hooray for you. You will find our menu samples include the use of both breast milk and formula, separately and together as a total "meal" solution.

Baby Menu Sample for Babies 0-3 Months of Age


Breakfast - Breast Milk and/or Formula Lunch - Breast Milk and/or Formula Dinner - Breast Milk and/or Formula

Notes: The 3 basic "meals" have been included for example purposes only. This is not meant to be taken as a suggestion, nor is it implied, that you should limit your infant to 3 meals per day. ** At this age and stage, most infants are hungry continually and thus are fed "around the clock" and on demand. The best way to feed your infant is as often as your baby needs "on demand".

Baby Menu Sample for Babies (4) 6- 8 Months of Age


Early Morning Awakening - Breast Milk and/or Formula Breakfast - Breast Milk and/or Formula first.

Infant Cereal (Optional) - 1 food cube or 1-2 tablespoons Fruit or Vegetable (Optional) - 1 food cube or 1-2 tablespoons - serve mixed into the cereal or separately
Lunch - Breast Milk and/or Formula first.

Infant Cereal (Optional) - 1 food cube or 1-2 tablespoons Fruit or Vegetable (Optional) - 1 or 2 food cubes (2-4 tablespoons) of each, or mix the cubes together. Example: apples and carrots are delicious together. Feed with or without the cereal Snack/Dinner - Breast Milk and/or Formula first. Fruit or Vegetable (Optional) - 1 food cube or 1-2 tablespoons

3 meals a day at this age? Many babies are not ready to eat 3 "meals" per day until well into the 9-10 month range. There are however many babies who do begin to eat 3 "meals" at 7-8 months old. Feeding Hints: Start out slowly, preparing a tablespoon sized portion of whatever food you have chosen to begin with. You will probably only manage to have baby eat 1/2 of the tablespoon sized portion the very first times you begin solids. As your baby becomes accustomed to eating solids, you will gradually increase the portion sizes. Pushing Food Out of the Mouth: Many parents find their babies will push the food out of their mouths on the first few tries. This is normal however, it may also indicate that your baby is not yet ready for solid food; only you know your baby and will be able to decide if baby is truly ready for solids. ** (Optional) accounts for the fact that not all babies between (4)6-8 months of age will be eating "meals" of any or all of the suggested foods at a given mealtime **

Baby Menu Sample for Babies 8-12 Months of Age


Early Morning Awakening -Breast Milk and/or Formula

Breakfast - Breast Milk and/or Formula first. Infant Cereal - 1 food cube or 1-2 tablespoons Fruit or Vegetable - 2 or 3 food cubes or 4-6 tablespoons total Dairy (Optional) - Yogurt - 1 or 2 food cube sized portions (or about 2 tablespoons) Read about Introducing Yogurt to Your Baby
Lunch - Breast Milk and/or Formula first.

Infant Cereal or Other Grain - (Optional) (i.e. pasta, rice) - 1 or 2 food cubes or 2-4 tablespoons Meat/Meat-Protein Alternate - (Optional) 1 or 2 food cubes or 2-4 tablespoons Fruit or Vegetable - 2 or 3 food cubes or 4-6 tablespoons total of each or you can mix the cubes together with the Grain

Example: Rice mixed with Peas served with Pear Sauce on the side Dairy (Optional) - Yogurt or Cheeses *A Lunch of Fruits, Veggies and a Protein without grains is an option. A Lunch of a Grain with Fruits and Veggies without a protein is also an option. Snack/Dinner - Breast Milk and/or Formula first. Grain (Optional) (i.e. pasta, rice) - 1 or 2 food cubes Meat/Meat Alternate - (Optional) - 1 food cube Fruit and/or Vegetable - 2 or 3 food cubes of each or mix the cubes together Example: Tofu mixed with Avocado served with Applesauce & Blueberries on he side Dairy - Yogurt or Cheeses (Optional) Notes: 3 Meals a Day? Keep in mind that even at this age group, many infants are still not ready to eat 3 "meals" per day until well into the 9-10 month range. Please keep in mind that many infants do not begin solids until 6 months of age and not all babies will be eating the same amounts or food items. There are many infants who may eat 4-6 ounces of food per day at 6 or 7 months old while others who are just starting solids will be within the 1-2 ounce range. You should follow the menu ideas in keeping with your infant's development and eating habits as well as your pediatrician's advice.

Your Baby Should Be Eating as Much Solid Baby Food as Your Baby Will Eat.
You're wondering about the above statement aren't you? Ask the vast majority of pediatricians and they will all say, "Feed your baby as much as your baby will eat". One of the caveats when feeding your baby solid foods is that that you ensure that your baby is still receiving proper amounts of breast milk and/or formula. Solid foods in the early stage are meant for practice. Solids are not meant to provide for baby's nutrition as breast milk and/or formula are.

Follow Your Baby's Cues When Feeding Your Baby Solid Foods
Following your baby's cues during feeding time will ensure that your baby is eating the proper amounts of food for him or her. There is no "set-in-stone" guideline or chart of exactly how many jars of baby food or how many 8 ounce bottles of formula each baby should be receiving. This is simply because each and every baby is different. Babies will eat as much food and drink as much breast milk and/or formula as they need. For example: You may wonder how it is possible that your friend's 7 month old baby is eating 2 whole jars of baby food (8-9 oz) in one day while your 7 month old baby barely manages to eat 3 or 4 baby food cubes (3-4 oz) of food per day. You may also wonder why your baby nurses every 2 hours at 7 months old while your friend's baby may only nurse every 3 or 4 hours. Again, each baby has different food and milk needs and these needs are just right for the individual baby.

How much solid food a baby will be eating depends on a variety of different things.
Don't forget that your baby is a little human being, and like all of us, she has her own appetite. This will influence to how much solid foods she will be eating. As with adults, some babies will eat more than others due to their individual appetites. Below are a few key points to remember when feeding your baby. A baby who began solid foods at 4 months of age will most likely be eating more solid foods than the baby who began to eat solid foods at 6 months old. A baby who is eating soft diced foods as beginner foods may seem to eat less than the baby who is being spoon-fed pures. A baby who is ill or teething may eat less than what has been typical for a few days and then suddenly the typical appetite comes roaring back. An infant who is busy exploring the carpet or the new soft-book she has received may be miffed when she is put into a high chair and offered food. The natural slow down of growth that babies go through will also influence how much they eat. They may be ravenous for a few days or a week or two and then suddenly, they are barely eating. Babies who are coming out of a growth spurt will tend to eat less than they were during the growth spurt.

How do I know if my baby is eating enough solid food?


As all pediatricians will tell you " Your baby will never starve himself or herself! " The majority of healthy babies will eat just the right amount of foods that they need. Resist the urge to offer "just one more bite" when baby indicates she's finished. You do not want to accidentally override your baby's developing ability to self-regulate his or her feeding by continuing to try and feed your baby. It is important to pay close attention to your baby's cues as your baby's feeding patterns will change daily and may be affected by the goings-on around him. Offering a well balanced diet of solid foods will help ensure that your baby is eating the right amount of the right nutritious foods.

Example feeding "schedule" of solid foods


1 ounce equals approximately 2 tablespoons 4-6 Months: Always offer solids after bottle or breast. Baby may eat anywhere from 1-3 tablespoons of food at 1 or 2 "meals" 6-8 Months: Formula and/or Breast Milk is still most important at this age and stage. Babies in this range may be just starting solids so the above for 4-6 Months would apply. Some babies may be eating up to 8 ounces of solid foods between 2-3 "meals" during a day. 8 Months and on: Many babies will be eating 3 "meals" per day at this stage; including a grain, fruit, veggie and a meat or protein source such as eggs. Again, pay close attention to your baby's cues as your baby's feeding patterns will change daily and may be affected by the goings-on around him. Your baby will eat just the right amount for YOUR baby.

Here are a few things to watch for to ensure that you are not over or under feeding your baby:
Signs that baby may want to continue to eat

Leaning in for the spoon Opening the mouth Grabbing for food and trying to put it in the mouth

Signs that your baby may be full


Closing of the mouth as the spoon comes close Spitting out the food that is being fed Turning the head away as the spoon comes closer

A healthy well-fed baby should be producing wet diapers regularly as well as producing a bowel movement or two during the day. Ensure that you take your baby to the well-child visits as scheduled so that your pediatrician may weigh and measure baby to ensure that your baby has good sustained growth. If you are ever uncertain about the foods and the amount of solid foods you are feeding your baby, always consult your baby's pediatrician. Your pediatrician should be able to assist you in validating your feeding routines and also help allay your fears.

Creative Baby Food Combinations & Meal Ideas


Making baby food combinations is one of the most fun things about cooking homemade baby foods. At this stage, you are able to combine several foods to make really tasty "recipes" such as apples, pears and sweet potato. Don't shy away from mixing food that your palate thinks should not be mixed together, your baby's palate is a clean slate and she won't know any better. Please insure that your combos are age appropriate for your baby - while there are suggested age ranges noted, you should determine if they suit your baby's needs. Do I still need to follow the "4 day wait rule" when I make baby food combinations? You can begin making combinations when you have introduced at least one of the foods separately and have checked for food allergies. When you have introduced your baby to a variety of foods and you know that no allergies are present, you are free to begin combining different foods together. For example, if you have introduced apples and acorn squash, you can combine them and add one new food to the combination. In this example, should your baby have a reaction, you would know it was the new food added to the "old" foods that may be the culprit. (See Also Meals for Fingers & It's Mealtime Baby. links)

Vegetable Baby Food Combination Ideas Baby Food Combinations For Beginners Squashy Sweet Potato Blend acorn or butternut squash together with sweet potatoes Squashy Apple Sweet Potato Blend apples, acorn or butternut squash together with sweet potatoes Green Beans and Apples or Pears Blend green beans with apples and/or pears Baby Food Combinations For Intermediates Spicy Squash or Sweet Potatoes Add some cinnamon and/or nutmeg to baby's squash or sweet potatoes Green Beans and Potatoes Blend white potatoes and green beans together - add a bit of pear or applesauce for extra Yum Sweet Pea Stew Mix Peas and Carrots with Applesauce, Rice or Oatmeal and Yogurt. Carrot Stew

Mix Apples and Carrots with Rice, Oatmeal and Yogurt. Sweet Potato Pie Mix sweet potato, yogurt, cereal and a dash of cinnamon, top with powdered Cheerios - mix well

Fruit Baby Food Combination Ideas (you may cook some of the fruits together or blend already prepared fruits.) Baby Food Combinations For Beginners Apple Cereal Blend applesauce together with oatmeal or rice cereal Pumpkin Cereal Blend pumpkin puree together with oatmeal or rice cereal Banana-'Cado Blend Avocado and Bananas for a great meal or add the blend to baby's cereal. Apple-Pear Sauce Blend Apples and Pears (yummy when both are cooked together.) Pumpkin Bananas Blend pumpkin puree together with bananas Pumpkin Bananas Applesauce Blend pumpkin puree together with bananas and applesauce Baby Food Combinations For Intermediates Creamy Apple Pie Combine cereal, yogurt and applesauce together adding a dash of cinnamon, top with powdered Cheerios mix well Pumpkin Pie Blend pumpkin puree together with cereal, yogurt and add a dash of cinnamon or nutmeg, top with powdered Cheerios - mix well Blueberry (Yogurt) Medley Mix Blueberry, Apple, and Pear Sauce. Add yogurt if appropriate. Sprinkle with Powdered Cheerios (optional) are better for health and the environment.

Meats and Protein Baby Food Combination Ideas

(8 months and Older unless advised by your pediatrician) Add rice, noodles, or barley for a "hearty" meal. Turkey/Chicken/Beef Dinner Blend turkey or chicken or beef with applesauce and squash for a yummy meal. Blend turkey or chicken or beef with sweet potatoes and/or applesauce Blend turkey or chicken or beef with sweet potatoes and carrots Blend turkey or chicken or beef with applesauce and/or carrots Blend turkey or chicken or beef with pumpkin and squash Tofu Dinner Blend tofu, applesauce and squash together for a yummy meal. Blend tofu, avocado and pears together Blend tofu, blueberries and bananas together

Click here to print a No-ad version of the Combination Baby Food Recipes page

Salt and sugar are never needed when making baby food. Omit these items, preferably at ALL times, in your baby's everyday meals. Other spices such as cinnamon, garlic powder, pepper etc.. may be introduced as early as 7 months with your pediatricians consult.

When Can A Baby Eat Yogurt [and Cheese]? Why are Yogurt and Cheese Ok for Baby Before Age 1 Year Old?
Why is it ok to give my baby Yogurt (and Cheese) before she is 1 year old? Is there something special about the dairy aspect of yogurt and cheese? You can also learn about Greek Yogurt on the WBF Blog Yogurt and cheese are a bit special when it comes to introducing these 2 foods considering that they are dairy products. While there is no great magical mystery in Yogurt or Cheese, the most common reasons for yogurt and cheese being fine to introduce to a baby prior to the age of 1 year old are:

Unlike Whole Cow Milk beverage, your baby is not at risk of formula/breast milk being replaced by Yogurt or Cheese. The medical community worries that if Whole Cow milk is introduced to an infant prior to 1 year old, that parents would stop formula and/or breastfeeding and use Milk as the replacement. This would possibly be dangerous to your baby's health! They, however, neglect to specify the difference between baby drinking milk and eating yogurt and/or cheese. Lactose is broken down with the culturing of the yogurt or cheese and milk proteins are either semi-removed or limited. The culturing makes yogurt and cheese easier to digest. Many people with lactose intolerance often are be able to eat cheese and/or yogurt without trouble. The same is often true for some people with a milk protein (either to the casein or the whey) allergy.

So why do doctors say "No Dairy Until After 1 Year" if Yogurt and Cheese are Ok?
As noted above, the medical community fears that parents may stop formula/breastfeeding and start their kids on whole cow milk earlier than 1 year old - unless they were told not to. Many pediatricians do not explain that yogurt and cheese are ok for your baby from 8 months old and on.

When Can My Baby Start to Eat Yogurt?


Most pediatricians recommend starting your infant on Yogurt around 7-8 months of age. Some pediatricians also recommend yogurt as a great first food (from 6 months+). Selecting a Whole Milk Yogurt is the most beneficial to your infant as babies need fats in their diets for proper growth. You can buy Plain Whole Milk Yogurt made by such companies as Stonyfield Farm, Cascade Fresh and Brown Cow. You can also Make Your Own Homemade Yogurt. Stonyfield Farm makes the YoBaby brand that many parents know and love. However, using a large container of Plain Whole Milk yogurt will save you money (and save on added sugar) and give you the flexibility of adding your own flavorings to baby's yogurt.
Visit our Blog post about Why We Recommend Plain Whole Milk Yogurt

Tasty ways to serve your baby yogurt - Baby Yogurt Meals


As long as baby has already had any fruits/veggies that you wish to mix in with Yogurt, you are unlimited in what types of yogurt meals you create. There is no need to buy "that" brand of yogurt mixed with fruits & veggies! Some of my favorite yogurt meals & mixes: Yogurt with applesauce and a dash of cinnamon Yogurt and Blueberries

Yogurt with peaches and bananas together (and separate) Yogurt with Wheat Germ and no other addition Yogurt and mashed avocado Yogurt blended with any fruit and water to create a baby-smoothie (using water makes for a thin mix that may slide through a Sippy Cup with ease) Yogurt mixed with sweet potato and cinnamon Yogurt and green beans and pears Yogurt mixed with carrots and peaches Visit the Baby Smoothies page for more great yogurt ideas! And speaking of "that" brand of yogurt marketed to babies (between the ages of 8 months and 12 months old), the YoBaby brand does contain natural organic sugars. The sugar content is less than in a brand such as Dannimals and it is natural and not refined or chemically processed sugar. There are no additives such as starches, fructose syrup, gelatin etc in the Stonyfield YoBaby brand either.

Yogurt is a great source of protein! Because of it's culturing process, the protein is easily digested!

Yogurt does contain sugar even if it is not added directly to the yogurt!
You may be surprised to learn that all yogurts, even the Plain yogurts, will contain sugar. The sugar occurs naturally in dairy products is called lactose. This "dairy" sugar is not an additive and we feel that is an important distinction to make.

Traveling with Homemade Baby Food is easier than you may think

Traveling with Homemade Baby Food is easier than you may think. At the same time, it does take some pre-planning and calculation. Depending on where you are going, how long you are staying and what types of "creature comforts" will be available, you may not have to rely on a single ounce of commercial

baby food. Our tips below address camping, air travel, day trips and restaurant outings. A good hint that will help ease traveling with baby - with or without homemade baby food, is to try to serve some meals at room temperature. Serving meals at room temperature will allow your baby to become accustomed to food that is not "hot". You never have to worry about a meal being rejected because it is not heated.

"Homemade" Baby Food to Go - The Traveling Trio


Many parents feel that if they make homemade baby food, then they will be restricted to staying home because it would be difficult to travel with homemade food. We become so accustomed to cooking, pureeing and storing that we often think of toting along containers of cubes. I find that the many parents don't even think of the easiest method of taking homemade baby food to go - the banana, the container and the fork. Think of it as the traveling trio! If you are going on a day trip, or on a plane, the traveling trio is probably all that you will need for your little one. So grab your small food tote and toss in a banana, a fork and a container with a lid. When it comes time to feed baby, peel the banana, mash it in the container with a fork and VIOLA, fresh baby food to go! You could also take along an avocado or even a prebaked sweet potato to mash up for baby's meal. ** Taking fresh food through an airport security check point might be a bit difficult however most shops within the departures terminal will have bananas for sale.

Travel with Frozen Baby Food Cubes - Storage and Packing


For those of you who are adventurous enough to go camping with your wee one, take along a mini-cooler packed full of the frozen food cubes you will need. This will require you to plot out how many cubes of each particular food you will feed to your baby during the given time frame you will be away from home. If you have been using the freezer bag storage method - simply take out each freezer bag of food cubes and arrange in the cooler with ice packs. As the cubes are already frozen, they should be able to withstand a journey of 6 hours with minimal thawing. You can also take your cubes to a hotel as many hotels provide mini-refrigerators. The food cubes should keep for approximately 5 days if stored in a refrigerator. Baby Food Cubes do travel well and may be thawed/heated as you do at home if appliances are available OR may be thawed over a gas stove or camp fire via the submersion method. If using a camp stove or camp fire - warm a pot of water over the fire and place the number/types of food cubes needed into a container that will not melt and thaw the cubes. Be sure to keep a close watch on the cubes as they are thawing so as to avoid overheating.

Travel with Other Types of Foods for Feeding Baby - Storage and Packing
Cereals will also travel well and you may either take your ground grains and cook as needed or take cereal that has been frozen in ice trays and prepare as usual.

Fruits are a bit tricky when taking along on a vacation. Unless they are already pureed and frozen into cubes, be sure to purchase fruits that are "almost" ripe. If you take along fully ripened fruits, you may find they will rot or go bad before you are able to use them. Vegetables will travel well and if you will be preparing them during your stay, we recommend peeling, and if possible, cutting/dicing prior to leaving your home. Store them in an airtight freezer bag and if possible, fill the bag with some water to help maintain freshness. This method works will if you will be going on a camping trip. Another option is to purchase fresh vegetables wherever you will be staying and prepare them as needed. Dairy/Eggs should be of the dry powdered kind, especially if you will be camping and won't have access to refrigeration. If you will have full refrigeration where you are going to be staying, purchase your needed dairy and eggs at your destination and point of stay.

Air Travel, Day Trips and Restaurant Outings: Air Travel with Baby Formula, Breast Milk, Juice, and Other Liquids
"The TSA (Transportation Safety Administration) has outlined the following regulations when traveling with infant related items: Medications, baby formula and food, breast milk, and juice are allowed in reasonable quantities exceeding three ounces and are not required to be in the zip-top bag. Declare these items for inspection at the checkpoint. All items including formula, breast milk, and juice will be inspected, however, you or your baby or toddler will not be asked to test or taste breast milk, formula, or juice. Our Security Officers may test liquid exemptions (exempt items more than 3 ounces) for explosives. Click here to learn more about TSA restrictions." You may also pack your baby food cubes in a container with ice and check the container in at the airport. Please be sure that you let the ticket-agent know that your container has ice and baby food cubes in it. Ensure that the container may be easily opened and inspected if needed. We do not recommend taking frozen baby food cubes with you when traveling outside of the United States to a foreign country. Many foreign countries have restrictions on bringing food items such as fruits and vegetables into their countries.

Travel with Homemade Baby Food - Most Recommended Tools You May Need
Manual Food Grinder will allow you to grind as you go. This is great for when you will be eating out in restaurants as well. You will be able to order fruits and veggies and grind them up fresh right there. Extra Storage Containers/Freezer Bags for when you leave your quarters to go day-tripping. It is also good to have extras if you need to divide servings and save them for another feeding. Whisk or Potato Masher in case you need to further mash or mix up foods to the right

consistency. If all of these Tips seem too overwhelming or cumbersome, don't hesitate to pack jars of commercial baby food and boxes of commercial cereal. If you decide to go this route, we suggest serving your baby some commercial baby foods a week or so prior to your journey.

There are babies that will refuse to eat commercial baby foods, especially if they have been brought-up thus far on only homemade baby food. You do not have to use only commercial during this time, simply offer either a fruit or veggie or cereal for one meal along with your homemade baby food. Happy Traveling! * I have traveled with homemade food cubes, enough for 4 days of feedings for 7 month old twins. The journey itself was 5 hours by car and the accommodations were Trailer Camping with a gas stove, several industrial sized coolers and a Fridge powered by ice blocks. There were no problems or issues encountered other than those that are typical when lacking all the creature comforts of home.

Baby Constipation - It's heartbreaking when your baby is constipated.


Your baby hasn't had a bowel movement for 3 or more days - is this normal or is this constipation? Your baby's infrequent bowel movements are hard and dry - is this normal or is this constipation? Find answers to these questions and learn all about constipation and babies. There are many causes of infant constipation. One of the most common causes of constipation in babies is the introduction of solid foods.

Common Causes of Infant Constipation are:


Introduction of solid food(s) - breastfed babies may be more prone to constipation when solid foods are introduced. This is because their tiny tummies are used to processing the easily and highly digestible mother's milk Diets low in fiber Diets of excessive dairy products (yogurt, cheeses, milk) Foods such as Bananas, Applesauce, Cereals, Breads, Pasta and White Potatoes may contribute or cause constipation
A change in diet usually relieves a baby with constipation. The following tips may also help the constipated baby get things "moving".

Remedies and How to Treat Constipation in Babies


There are many things you can do to help relieve baby's constipation. You can change baby's feeding pattern and/or engage in some physical exercises. Exercises to Help Relieve Infant Constipation include: Tummy Massage - Gently massage and rub baby's tummy in a clockwise direction. Place your hands at baby's navel and massage in a circular motion, moving your hand(s) out and away from the center of baby's belly. Bicycle Legs - Place your baby on her back and lightly hold her legs in a half-bent position. Gently begin to move your baby's legs as if she is riding a bicycle. Alternate "Bicycle Legs" with Tummy Massage. *"Bicycle Legs" also may help to relieve a baby who is gassy. A Warm Bath - Some medical professionals suggest giving your constipated baby a warm bath. The thought is that this may help relax baby and "get things moving" again. Give a tummy massage as you are drying baby.

Relieving Constipation in Babies Younger than 4 Months:


Try giving one to two ounces of diluted fruit juice such as grape, prune or apple-prune twice daily and practice some of the above exercises. (Always consult your pediatrician about the appropriateness of new foods/liquids to help alleviate constipation) Learn about Fruit Juice in your baby's diet.

Relieving Constipation in Babies 4 Months to 12 months + by Changing the Food Diet


Adding more fiber to baby's diet may help get things moving again. Try strained foods that contain high fiber such as: apricots prunes peaches plums For older infants who are just beginning solid foods, you may want to avoid baby foods such as rice cereal, applesauce and bananas as these may aggravate constipation. pears peas spinach

Get the BRAT Out!


If your baby is constipated, reverse the BRAT diet

The BRAT diet is used for the treatment of diarrhea in infants because these foods help firm up stools. An easy and natural way to remember how to help alleviate baby's constipation is to cut out the foods that contribute to it! BRAT stands for Bananas, Rice, Applesauce and Toast If you ever forget which foods to cut out, remember BRAT and cut out those foods! Barley or oatmeal cereals, prunes, peaches, plums, apricots and most vegetables are preferred when baby has constipation. Juices are helpful, especially apple or prune, but use in moderation, as they are not as nutritious for babies as formula or breast milk.

Why can I give my baby apple Juice but NOT applesauce when baby is constipated?
There is a difference in the amount of sugars and pectin in apple juice and applesauce: Apple juice contains more sugars and liquids so it helps relieve constipation. Applesauce is the whole of the fruit. It may contain a higher level of pectin - which firms up stools and may thus lead to constipation.

"Apple juice also has a mild laxative effect that may help provide relief from constipation commonly experienced by little ones." About Apple Juices Apples contain pectin, which will add bulk to your stools, and their cleansing action will encourage bowel movements. They have a laxative effect yet are also used for to help people get back on a regular diet after suffering bouts of diarrhea. The pectin in the apple fiber apparently is why whole apples will firm up bowel movements. Think of Kaopectate - a popular over-the-counter diarrhea remedy. Kaopectate , actually contains an oxidized form of pectin. Also, that same fiber pectin is what dietitians have been telling us for decades is necessary to keep us regular and to prevent constipation. While it will help prevent constipation by helping to keep the bowels regular, it will not help alleviate constipation. When it comes to bowel regularity, apples contain two types of fiber; insoluble and soluble. The insoluble fiber works like roughage, while the soluble fiber (pectin), which is found primarily in the skin, acts as a stool softener by drawing water into the stool and increasing stool bulk. Because pectin firms up an excessively loose stool, its also used to treat diarrhea. For more information see: US Apple Association

Stage 1 Baby Food Recipes - Make Fresh, Delicious Stage 1 Homemade Baby Food

These Stage 1 Homemade Baby Food Recipes are age appropriate for those babies who are between 4 months and 6 months. Many babies start solid foods between 4 months and 6 months so we have included fruits and veggies that your 4 month old beginning eater will be able to tolerate. Of course these recipes are also just yummy for babies who are older as well! Please keep in mind that current recommendations advise that babies should start solid foods at or closer to 6 months of age. Enjoy the delicious and nutritious Stage 1 Baby Food Recipes Ideas as found below.

Some Commonly Offered Stage 1 Baby Foods:


Stage 1 Fruits:
Apples | Avocados | Apricots | Bananas | Mango Nectarines & Peaches | Papaya | Pears | Plums & Prunes | Pumpkin

Stage 1 Veggies:
Beans (Green) | Carrots | Peas | Sweet Potato | Squash

Stage 1 Grains:
Rice | Oatmeal | Barley

What is "Stage 1" baby food?


(4) 6-8 Months - Baby Let's Begin to Eat "Baby" cereal and soft cooked thinly pureed fruits and veggies should be baby's first solid food experiences. Single ingredients only and at a space of 4 days apart with introducing each new food. You may skip the cereal and begin with a fruit like avocado or begin with a veggie like butternut squash or sweet potato. Stage 1 Baby Food is a term that applies to baby foods that are highly pureed and strained. These foods are appropriate for babies who are just being introduced to solid foods. The foods in this range are targeted to babies who are between the ages of (4) 6 to 8 months old. Stage 1 baby foods are thin and runny and are foods that are the lowest on the allergy scale. Stage 1 baby foods are typically those foods that are also more easily digested by a tiny tummy. Some of these foods

include, sweet potatoes, butternut or winter squash and carrots. The term "Stage 1" was introduced by the Beechnut Baby Food Company to let parents know that these foods are appropriate for their infants who are just being introduced to solid foods.

There is a growing trend of parents skipping "stage 1" foods that are thin and runny purees. Many parents are turning to a more baby-led weaning approach and are offering soft cooked small bits of age-appropriate foods as they begin to introduce solid foods. Your baby might just be interested in this feeding approach!

Stage 1 Homemade Baby Food Recipes - Cereal, Fruits & Veggies

Rice Cereal 1/4 c. rice powder (brown rice ground in blender or food processor) 1 cup water 1. Bring liquid to boil in saucepan. Add the rice powder while stirring constantly. 2. Simmer for 10 minutes, whisking constantly, mix in formula or breast milk and fruits if desired 3. Serve warm. Oatmeal Cereal 1/4 c. of ground oats (do NOT use instant or Quick Cook), ground in blender or food processor 3/4 c. water 1. Bring liquid to boil in saucepan. Add the rice powder while stirring constantly. 2. Simmer for 10 minutes, whisking constantly, mix in formula or breast milk and fruits if desired 3. Serve warm. Barley Cereal 1/4 c. ground barley (barley ground in blender or food processor) 1 cup water 1. Bring liquid to a boil. Add the barley and simmer for 10 minutes, whisking constantly 2. Mix in formula or breast milk or juice and add fruits if desired 3. Serve warm Did you know that baby's first food does not have to be a commercial infant rice cereal? Many pediatric resources are acknowledging the fact that avocado, banana and sweet potato make great first foods for baby. For More Information About Homemade Baby Cereal, visit Our Homemade Baby Cereal FAQ

Feeding Baby Stage 1 Baby Foods


Start out slowly, preparing a tablespoon sized portion of whatever food you have chosen to begin with. Some parents begin offering their babies solid foods by using their (clean and washed) finger as a spoon. They say that this helps their babies take to solid foods because the "new" spoon and the "new" food all at once seem to confuse baby. You will probably only manage to have baby eat 1/2 of the tablespoon sized portion the very first times you begin solids. Don't fret if your baby does not "finish" a meal.

Apricot Puree 6-8months+ (using dried un-sulphured apricots) Vitamins: A, C, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Calcium 1 pound dried apricots 2 cups of white grape juice, pear or apple juice. Plain water is ok but the puree may be a bit bitter. 1. Bring liquid and fruit to a boil and simmer for 15 minutes. 2. Reserve any left over liquid to use for the puree 3. Place into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. 4. Add the reserved liquid as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin puree or 5. Add cereal (if desired) to thicken up 6. Note: puree will not freeze solid, but into slightly soft/slightly frozen cubes.

Have you ever Baked Fruits? If not, I highly recommend it. Baked fruits are naturally sweet, soft and oh so very yummy. Apples/Applesauce (4)6 months+ Try Gala, Braeburn, Rome or Macs) Vitamins: A, C, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Magnesium, Calcium This recipe is written so that you may use any amount of apples you wish. 1. Peel, core and cut apple into slices/chunks 2. Place slices or chunks into a pan with just enough water to slightly cover apples 3. Boil/steam until tender; be sure to check on the water level and stir, T hat's It. Easy Peasy. 4. Apples may be mashed with a potato masher to achieve a smooth applesauce consistency. If your masher will not achieve a puree type of consistency, then follow steps 5 - 7 5. Reserve any left over water to use for thinning out the apples 6. Place into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing.

7. Add the reserved water as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin puree 8. Add cereal (if desired) to thicken up the 9. Ask your pediatrician about adding some cinnamon for new tastes. You may also buy an "Adult" jar of Natural applesauce from your local grocers. Make sure you buy Natural Applesauce however. Read the labels if you are unsure. The only ingredients should be apples and water or just apples. A few companies may add ascorbic acid (vitamin C) or citric acid to their Natural Applesauce; this is fine.

Avocado (yes, avocado is a fruit.) (4)6 months+ Vitamins: A, C, Niacin, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Iron, Magnesium, Calcium 1. Peel and take out the pit of a ripe avocado - do not cook 2. Cut meat out and mash with a fork 3. There should be no need to use a machine as just like bananas, avocados have a very soft consistency and texture. Avocados do not need to be cooked. Visit the Avocado Baby Food page for more recipes and Information Baked Apples 6-8months+ 1. Core apple and leave peel on 2. Place a wee bit of butter (if baby is ready for or has had dairy) on the inside of the cored apple (sprinkle a bit of cinnamon in the apple if your desire and if baby is ready for or has had cinnamon) 3. Place in a pan with just enough water to slightly cover apples about an inch of water 4. Bake in a 400-degree oven for 30 minutes or until tender; be sure to check on the water level. 5. Once baked, either cut apple into little bits and serve as a finger food or mash as directed above in the Apples/Applesauce recipe. Banana Applesauce Mush (4)6 months+ 1 apple 1 ripe banana 1. Peel, core and cut apple into slices/chunks 2. Place slices or chunks into a pan with just enough water to slightly cover apples 3. Boil until tender; be sure to check on the water level. 4. Apples may be mashed with a potato masher to achieve a smooth applesauce consistency or you can puree in an appliance as shown above 5. Peel a ripe banana and mash in a bowl with a fork (heating in the microwave for approximately 20 seconds will soften the banana up if needed) 6. Add applesauce to the banana and sprinkle with wheat germ* or crushed cheerios* 7. Puree if necessary but mashing with a potato masher will typically get this mix smooth *8months+

Back to Top Bananas (4)6 months+ Vitamins: A, C, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Selenium, Magnesium, Calcium 1 Banana or however many you wish 1. Peel ripe banana - do not cook 2. Place banana in a food processor/food mill or blender and puree 3. You can also mash the banana in a bowl using a regular fork heat in microwave for 25 seconds prior to mashing for extra softness 4. Add formula/breast milk or water to thin or add cereal (if desired) to thicken up. Mango Madness 6-8months+ Vitamins: A (1262 IU in one cup.), C, E, K, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium 1 Ripe Mango Peel, de- seed and chunk the mango Place mango chunks in a blender or food processor Add Formula, Breast Milk, or Water and blend or mash until the proper consistency for your Infant is achieved.

How to Cut A Mango:


Cut the mango lengthwise, along the side of the mango pit. You will be cutting off its flesh from one side then repeating the same process on the other side. You will then cut the ends off the mango pit. Cut the remaining flesh from the pit. Use a small sharp knife peel the skin from the flesh. Dice or cube as desired. It is easier to make your cubes/dices prior to removing the skin. Make sure you don't cut through it. Once you have made your cube/dice "pattern" simply turn the skin skin inside out and slice the pieces away.

*Mango does not need to be cooked as it is typically introduced at an age where baby can tolerate raw fruits. Mango may be steamed to tender and then mashed if you prefer without harming it. You may use mango as a great Baby Finger Foods. Simply peel, de-seed and then cut into dices or chunks that are manageable for your baby. You may wish to coat the mango pieces with "cheerio dust", wheat germ or another cereal "dust" to help baby easily pick up the bits. Papaya 6-8months+ Vitamins: A, C, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Calcium

1 ripe papaya Peel, de-seed and chunk the papaya Place papaya chunks in a blender or food processor Add formula, breast milk, or water and blend or mash until the proper consistency for your Infant is achieved.
Some parents who have infants with sensitive tummies will give fruits a gentle steaming to help break down the sugars and fibers for easier digestion. If you feel this is the case for your infant, chunk the papaya and then steam for 5-10 minutes until very soft.

Pears, Plums, Peaches and Nectarines too


Pear (Great for Constipation.) (4)6 months+ Vitamins: A, C, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium

Peel and cut into chunks so as to avoid the little seed portion. Steam gently until tender if baby is under 6 months. Place in a blender/food processor and puree until smooth; yYou may be able to just use a fork! Use the leftover cooking water if needed but Pears tend to be very runny and watery without adding liquid. Add some baby cereal to thicken if needed. Plums (4)6-8months+ Vitamins: A, C, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium 2-3 ripe plums Peel and pit the plums Cut into chunks Steam until tender in a scant amount of water if baby is under 6 months. Puree using the leftover cooking liquid. You may need to mix in another fruit as plum pure has a tendency to be rather tart and/or bitter Peaches (4)6-8months+ Vitamins: A, C, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium You may steam or bake peaches; these methods work for nectarines, plums and pears as well. I HIGHLY recommend giving baked peaches a try at least once. You will find they are more tasty when baked. Steam Peaches - Method 1 1. Scrub fruit clean and carve an X into 1 side of the fruit 2. Place X side down in a pan with an inch of water 3. Bring water to a boil and steam until soft and tender

4. Peel skin from fruit and remove pits and/or seeds 5. move to step #6 below Steam Peaches - Method 2 1. Peel fruit 2. Pit the peach 3. Cut the peach into dices 4. Steam until soft and tender then 5. move to step #6 Bake 1. Halve the fruit and place "open" side down in a pan filled with 1 inch of water 2. Bake at 400F until soft and tender and/or puckering of the skin appears. 3. Peel skin from fruit and remove pits and/or seeds then 4. move to step #6Moving to Step 6 6. Reserve any left over water to use for thinning out the fruits 7. Peel off skin then place into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. 8. Add the reserved water as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin puree 9. Add cereal (if desired) to thicken up. Back to Top Prunes 6-8months+ Vitamins: A, C, Folate Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium 1 small bag of dried prunes (try to use unsulphured dried fruits whenever possible!) 1. Soak dried prunes in warm water until they plump up or steam gently. 2. Once plump and tender, toss into food processor or blender and begin to puree. 3. Add liquid without sparing any. Prunes tend to become a pasty gluey consistency when pureed and the more water you add, the easier it is to puree to a texture your baby will tolerate. Pumpkin (4)6-8months+ Read more about Pumpkin on the Pumpkin Baby Food page Vitamins: A (12230 IU in 1 cup.), C, K, Folate, Niacin Minerals: Potassium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Calcium, Iron 1 medium sugar pumpkin, no heavier than 5 pounds 1. Cut sugar pumpkin (the kind meant to be baked and eaten.) in half, scoop out seeds 2. Place an inch of water in a baking pan, then place the halves "face" down in the pan. Check on water level while baking 3. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 40 minutes or until the shell/skin puckers and halves feel soft then scoop squash meat out of the shell 4. Place pumpkin "meat" into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. 5. Add water as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin consistency.

6. You can also peel the pumpkin, scoop out the seeds and then cut into chunks and boil/steam until tender (like when boiling potatoes for mashed potatoes) then follow steps 4 and 5.

You may also buy a can of pumpkin from your local grocers. Make sure you buy Pumpkin and NOT Pumpkin Pie mix however. Read the labels if you are unsure. The only ingredients should be pumpkin and water or just pumpkin. You do not need to cook canned pumpkin. You may thin the pumpkin with whatever liquid you prefer and then serve or warm and serve. You may also freeze canned pumpkin in ice cube trays if you wish.

Green Beans (4) 6 months+ (this method may be used for Peas as well)* Vitamins A, C, K, Niacin, Folate Minerals:Potassium, Sodium, Phosphorus, Iron, Magnesium, Calcium 1. If using Fresh Beans, snap the ends off the beans and wash the beans. If using Fresh Peas, open the pods and scrape out the peas from the pod. If using frozen of either Peas or Green Beans, cook according to package directions. 2. Place fresh beans into a steamer basket in a pan with a just enough water to slightly show through in the basket. 3. Steam until very tender; be sure to check on the water level. 4. Reserve any left over water to use for thinning out the beans. 5. Place into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. It is best to use the setting that makes the finest liquid purees - green bean and pea skins are rather difficult to completely puree. ***Using a blender rather than a food processor or stick mixer might be better as well. *** 6. Add the reserved water as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin consistency 7. You may wish to push the green beans (or peas) through a sieve or mesh strainer to get rid of any remaining skins. Carrots* 6-8months+ Vitamins A (19,152 IU), C, Folate Minerals:Potassium, Sodium, Phosphorous, Iron, Magnesium, Calcium 1. Peel carrots and cut into small chunks 2. Place chunks into a steamer pan with just enough water visible through the steamer basket 3. Steam until tender 4. Do not reserve any left over water to use for thinning out the carrots if baby is under 8 months old as Nitrates may seep into the cooking water 5. Place into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. 6. Add water as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin consistency

*(See Our article on Nitrates) Garden Vegetable Combo 6-8months+ after all vegetables have been introduced following the 4 Day Wait Rule Green Beans, Summer Squash, Peas and Carrots 1. Combine fresh or frozen green beans and peas, summer and/or zucchini squash and small pieces of chopped carrots. 2. Add enough water to just cover the vegetables. 3. Cook until tender, reserving water. 4. Puree vegetables in blender or food processor, 5. Adding reserved water from the vegetables until mixture is of the desired consistency. Peas Vitamins A (4533 IU), C, Niacin, Folate Minerals:Potassium, Sodium, Selenium, Phosphorous, Iron, Magnesium, Calcium, Zinc 1. If using Fresh Peas, open the pods and scrape out the peas from the pod. If using frozen type of either Peas or Green Beans, cook according to package directions. 2. Place fresh peas into a steamer basket in a pan with a just enough water to slightly show through in the basket. 3. Steam until very tender; be sure to check on the water level. 4. Reserve any left over water to use for thinning out the peas. 5. Place into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. It is best to use the setting that makes the finest liquid purees - green bean and pea skins are rather difficult to completely puree. Using a blender rather than a food processor or stick mixer might be better as well. 6. Add the reserved water as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin consistency 7. You may wish to push the peas (or green beans) through a sieve or mesh strainer to get rid of any remaining skins

Why cant I get peas and green beans to puree smooth?


If you are using a Food Processor, try the Blender. The Blender seems to work the best for getting Peas into a more fine puree. Peas and green beans are very hard to get pureed into a very fine, smooth consistency. You can put them in a strainer and work out the skins if using fresh or you can use frozen for a smoother consistency and minimal effort to work out the skins.

Another method for getting beans and peas smoother is to immediately plunge them into ice cold water once you remove them from the stove top. Once cooled, puree as usual. You may also use beans/legumes (kidney beans, lentils, split peas etc..) if your doctor says it is ok for babys age. Please keep in mind that you will never be able to achieve the consistency equal to that of the baby food that comes in jars. Some parents choose to leave green beans and peas for later introduction, when baby enjoys texture and is able to eat them as Baby Finger Foods

Squash (Winter - Butternut, Acorn, Hubbard) (4) 6 months+ (nutrient info for squash of all types may be found at the Squash for Baby page) 1 medium sized butternut or acorn squash 1. Cut acorn, hubbard, or butternut squash in half, scoop out seeds 2. Place an inch of water in a baking pan, then place squash halves "face" down in the pan. Check on water level while baking 3. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 40 minutes or until the shell/skin puckers and halves feel soft then scoop squash meat out of the shell 4. Place squash "meat" into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. 5. Add water as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin consistency. 6. You can also peel the squash, scoop out the seeds and then cut into chunks and boil/steam until tender (like when boiling potatoes for mashed potatoes) then follow steps 4 and 5 Squash (Summer/Zucchini) 6-8months+ nutrient info for squash of all types may be found at the "Tips on Squash" page 3-4 small to medium sized yellow squash or zucchini 1. Choose yellow squash or zucchini that are somewhat small in diameter, as these are the most tender. 2. Wash squash thoroughly and cut into small slices or chunks. Do not remove skins. (*You may remove skins however an infant over the age of 8 months old should be able to digest squash puree with skins on) 3. Steam until tender then place into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. 4. Add water as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin consistency Yams/Sweet Potato (4)6 months+ Learn why a Yam really is NOT a Yam. Vitamins A (24,877 mg ), C, Folate Minerals:Potassium, Sodium, Selenium, Phosphorous, Magnesium, Calcium 1. Wash and poke holes in sweet potato with fork then wrap sweet potatoes in tin foil - do not peel for baking/microwaving. (you can also do this in the microwave - only use plastic wrap and cook for 8 minutes on high or until tender) 2. Place in a 400 degree oven and bake for 30 minutes or until soft 3. OR 4. Peel sweet potatoes and cut into small chunks 5. Place chunks into a pan with just enough water to slightly cover potato 6. "Steam" boil until tender, be sure to check on the water level. 7. Reserve any left over water to use for thinning out the sweet potatoes 8. If you have baked your sweet potato, remove skins and use liquid from your preferred source 9. Place sweet potato into your choice of appliance for pureeing and begin pureeing. 10. Add the reserved water or other liquid as necessary to achieve a smooth, thin consistency

Finger Foods
Finger foods are any small size food bites that your baby can pick and eat by themselves. This is one thing that we keep thinking about giving our kids and keep thinking when to start. Finger foods can be started as early as they can hold any thing in their hand and can eat. That would be around 7 to 9 months. Initially to start with you can start with 1> Murmura Or What You Can Say Puffed Rice. 2> Parle G Biscuits or marie biscuits Broken Into Small Pieces I prefer to start with puffed rice because they get mushy in their mouth immediately when they put in their mouth and cant chock them. As they master to eat then we can try lot more stuff like 1> Potato cut into fingers and baked or boiled 2> Boiled carrots, green beans , sweet potatos 3> Toasted brown bread with cheese 4> Small cut fruits like apple banana 5> Roti cut into small pieces 6> Soup sticks , Rusk or toast which we eat with tea 7> Small cut pieces of paneer/tofu and cheese 8> Nicely boiled pastas.. they come in nice different shapes Posted by Swapna 1 comments Links to this post

Daliya ... Broken Wheat!!!


For most of us who wonder what daliya is and can we give it to our kids/babies must know that daliya is nothing but broken wheat or the rava form of wheat . it is high source of energy and a easy dinner for kids/babies. Wheat can be introduced to babies as early as 6 months but better consult your docter. My doctor was always fine me giving any thing for my son from 6 month only to make sure he does not chock himself. I give this as a dinner for my son and he loves eating it. Making food enjoyable is the key aim as they get fussy after they normally turn one and start getting a fussy eater. Posted by Swapna 4 comments Links to this post

Sweet Daliya Pongal


You will need : cup of daliya 2tbsp if ghee Jaggery water Method :-

Take around 1/2 cup of daliya roast well in around 2tbsp of ghee on a slow flame in a pressure cooker. Till you get a nice aroma. Add jaggery to it around same quantity or as per taste your kid takes. Let it melt. Add 3-4 cups of water and cover the cooker and cook for at least 2 whistles on fast and 2 on slow flame. Open once cool it should be like smooth and shiny formation. You can either serve this like this only or with milk it is great source of energy and kids who love sweet simply love this.

Posted by Swapna 0 comments Links to this post

Veggie Daliya
To make you need:Veggies ...French Beans, Onions, Tomatoes, carrots, spinach, potatoes, Gourds, tomatoes ...etc...All Grated 2tbsp Daliya green gram dal soaked or normal moong dal 1/2 Tbsp- Ghee 1 Tsp - Chili Powder(Optional) 1 Tbsp - Cumin Seeds Salt To Taste

Method:Take half spoon of ghee in a cooker,Add cumin seeds after it spluters now add daliya(dont wash daliya) to it and roast it for one minute,when it starts changing color,add washed dal,and vegetables to it,and add 4 times water the amount of daliya+dal to it,add pinch salt .cook on sim flame in cooker for 6-7 minutes and here is nutritious and tasty daliya ready.....

Diet for children 6 - 12 months old should contain all the essential nutrients, like protein, fibers, minerals, vitamins, carbohydrates, iron, etc.

A child between age 6 to 12 months age needs 108 cal, 1.65 g protein, and 500 mg calcium each day. The child should get these nutrients from a variety of foods. Healthy Diet Plan Articles Diet for Infants, 0 - 6 months old One year Old Baby Diet Diet for Sick People Jain Foods, Namokar Mantra Low Cholesterol Diet Low Carb Foods 1200 calorie Diet Fertility Diet Pregnancy Diet Diet for Breastfeeding Lactating Mothers Weight Gain Diet In India, 70% of children in the age group of six to 9 months are suffering from anaemia because of inadequate intake and absorption of iron from cereal based diet and inadequate consumption of green leafy vegetables. The Government has declared on 6th March 2008 that children 6 months to 5 years

would be given 100 mcg folic acid and 20 mg iron supplement in liquid form. Children in the age group of 6-10 years would be provided with 250 mcg of folic acid and 30 mg iron.

A child's diet should include a wide variety of foods, both solids and liquids. Give different baby cereals, fruit juices, and strained fruits (apples, apricots, bananas, melon, pears, and peaches) and vegetables (carrots, beans, beets, green peas, potatoes, carrots, sweet potatoes, and squash). Give only unsweetened fresh juices without added sugar. Check if your baby shows any signs for allergic reaction to any fruit or vegetable. Citrus Foods: Do not give citrus fruits like limes, lemon, grapefruits and oranges until baby is 12 months old due mostly to the sensitivity of the child to the acidity of these fruits which may cause diaper rash, skin rashes and tummy pains. You should also avoid pineapple although it is not a citrus food, but it can be acidic. You may give your baby 2-3 teaspoons of dalia (daliya) or khichari (khichadi) or patolia (without rice) Corn Ghat. The consistency and amount of foods may be gradually increased as your child tolerates.

Teething foods, such as toasts, rusks, unsalted crackers, bagels, pieces of cooked vegetables (carrot, broccoli, squash), soft fruits (melon, peach, pear), and biscuits may be given when the child is 7 -8 months old. If you are a meat eater, offer strained and finely ground meats, meat sticks, or frankfurters when the child is 7 -8 months old. You can give egg yolk 2-3 times a week. When the child is 1 year old, you can give him egg white and watch for any allergic reactions. Avoid hard chunks of uncooked vegetables, fruits, and other food items that may cause choking. You may give diluted fruit juices. To avoid tooth decay, do not give juices in a bottle at bedtime.

The consumption of breast milk or formula will go down as the child takes more and more solid foods for his source of nutrition. Your 9 months old baby may take 2 -3 solid meals (1/2 to 1 cup or 125 to 250 g) in addition to 4-5 breast or bottle feeds each day. When the baby is 9 months old, ensure that each meal includes a variety of foods including cereals of oat, wheat, rye, or barley, bread, roti, fruits, vegetables, legumes, lentils,cheese, etc. and meat, fish (if you are a meat eater). You should watch for any allergy for these food items. Most first time mothers feed their child every half or one hour thinking that he is hungry all the times. Over-feeding will make the child uncomfortable, he may even vomit, he may have stomach pain or too much gas problem; and you may not be knowing.

Soyabean Dosa
Ingredients: Soyabean-soaked in water for 8 hours, followed by sprouting which increases their vitamin E content. Ginger jeera

Salt Chillies (optional) Rice Flour-1-2 tsp, Method : 1. Grind the soyabeans in a grinder, with ginger, jeera, salt and chillies to taste. 2. Add water till the consistency is of idli-atta. 3. Heat the coated pan. Pour soyamixture on the hot pan, about 2 large spoonful. Spread with a spoon. Cover. Cook for 2 min, on medium heat. 4. Invert and cook other side, without cover. Additions: Adding Onions, Tomatoes, Grated Carrots, Grated Raddish, Cumin seeds make the dosa more delicious. Oil can be sprayed on pan while cooking, but is not a must. Posted by Swapna 5 comments Links to this post

SPINACH DOSA
Ingredients Par-boiled rice: 1 1/2 cups Chana dal, Tuvar dal, Moong dal and Urad dal (combined) : 1 cup Curry leaves: 5 Jeera 1tsp Dry red chillies: As per taste(optional can be made without them too) Spinach : 1/2 cup, chopped Onion: 1/4 cup, finely chopped Salt: to taste Method: Soak rice and dals seperately for 4 hours. Grind rice and spinach and make a smooth batter. Coarse grind the dals along with curry leaves, jeera and dry red chillies. Mix dals, finely chopped onion to the rice batter. Then make dosas (pan cakes) out of it. Posted by Swapna 5 comments Links to this post

Palak soup
Ingredients: 1 cup of palak, 1/2 potato 1/2 onion 1 clove of garlic salt to taste half tsp butter pepper little 1 tsp cream for garnish

Method: wash and cut the palak, potato and onion into small pieces and pressure cook them with some salt and water and garlic for 2-3 whistles. After it cools blend them and let it boil with some butter and pepper for 5 mins. The spinach soup is ready.. serve it with some cream on top of it. the potato in the recipe helps the soup to get thick. You can serve this with a toast of brown bread or rice. Posted by Swapna 0 comments Links to this post

Mixed Vegetable soup


Ingredients: Half carrot 1 potato 1 Onion 3-4 pods of garlic 1 tomato 1 small size floret of clauliflower small piece cabbage small piece of lauki(bottle gourd) few leaves of palak salt to taste half tsp butter pinch of black pepper Method: Cut all vegetables in small pieces. Put them in pressure cooker along with salt and water (water level -so much that all vegetables are soaked) Pressure cook for 3-4 whistles. Allow to cool put the content in the blender along with water and make a puree.Let the puree boil in an open vessel(u may add water if u feel the soup is thick) once boiled, check for salt, if needed add more along with butter and black pepper. the soup above is a very good option for the bigger children as they fail to eat vegetables normally even half a cup of this soup would be great for the child's nutrition. It is not always neccessary that all the above vegetables should be there you can add or substract any veggiee ... you can add any number of vegetables to this soup. Posted by Swapna 0 comments Links to this post

PEA'S SOUP
Ingredients: 500 gm shelled peas or you can use frozen ones 1 onion finely chopped 2.5 cup vegetable or chicken stock 1 tbsp olive oil 2 tsp fresh creamsalt and pepper to taste

Method: Heat some ghee in a pan then add the onion and saute till pink. Then add the peas and saute or a further 5 minutes. Add seasoning and vegetable stock. Boil and simmer till the peas are cooked. Puree in a grinderor if your kid is a little older you can just mash it with a laddle and serve. Serve hot topped with fresh cream. Posted by Swapna 0 comments Links to this post

Daliya ... Broken Wheat!!!


For most of us who wonder what daliya is and can we give it to our kids/babies must know that daliya is nothing but broken wheat or the rava form of wheat . it is high source of energy and a easy dinner for kids/babies. Wheat can be introduced to babies as early as 6 months but better consult your docter. My doctor was always fine me giving any thing for my son from 6 month only to make sure he does not chock himself. I give this as a dinner for my son and he loves eating it. Making food enjoyable is the key aim as they get fussy after they normally turn one and start getting a fussy eater. Posted by Swapna 4 comments Links to this post

Sweet Daliya Pongal


You will need : cup of daliya 2tbsp if ghee Jaggery water Method :Take around 1/2 cup of daliya roast well in around 2tbsp of ghee on a slow flame in a pressure cooker. Till you get a nice aroma. Add jaggery to it around same quantity or as per taste your kid takes. Let it melt. Add 3-4 cups of water and cover the cooker and cook for at least 2 whistles on fast and 2 on slow flame. Open once cool it should be like smooth and shiny formation. You can either serve this like this only or with milk it is great source of energy and kids who love sweet simply love this.

Posted by Swapna 0 comments Links to this post

Veggie Daliya
To make you need:Veggies ...French Beans, Onions, Tomatoes, carrots, spinach, potatoes, Gourds, tomatoes ...etc...All Grated 2tbsp Daliya green gram dal soaked or normal moong dal 1/2 Tbsp- Ghee 1 Tsp - Chili Powder(Optional) 1 Tbsp - Cumin Seeds Salt To Taste

Method:Take half spoon of ghee in a cooker,Add cumin seeds after it spluters now add daliya(dont wash daliya) to it and roast it for one minute,when it starts changing color,add washed dal,and vegetables to it,and add 4 times water the amount of daliya+dal to it,add pinch salt .cook on sim flame in cooker for 6-7 minutes and here is nutritious and tasty daliya ready.....

Posted by Swapna 0 comments Links to this post

Ragi Idly

You will need:Whole Ragi Grain- 1 cup Idli rice (parboiled) 1 cup Whole skinned Urad dal cup Methi seeds -1 tablespoon Salt to taste Oil- to grease idli moulds washes soak the ragi for 3-4 hours (longer than you soak the rice) Soak the rice, urad dal and methi seeds in separately 4-6 hours or overnight. In a mixie /blender, grind the urad dal till light and fluffy. A test for fluffiness is to keep a bowl ofwater and drop a tiny pinch of batter. If it floats, it is light enough. Then add and grind the Ragi grains and Methi and finally the rice. The rice should not be ground too smooth. It should be of Rava consistency. Alternatively, you can use rice Rava instead. Take the batter in a vessel, add in some salt to taste and leave it to ferment. Next morning, lightly stir the well-fermented batter. Grease Idli moulds and steam in a pressure cooker for 12-15 minutes till done. Posted by Swapna 2 comments Links to this post

SPROUTS kichidi
Ingredients 2 tablespoons rice, washed 2 tablespoons sprouts (moong or matki) 1 teaspoon onion, chopped 1 small clove garlic, chopped 1/4 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera) 1/2 teaspoon ghee a pinch asafoetida (hing) salt to taste Method 1. Heat the ghee in a pan and add the cumin seeds. When they crackle, add the asafoetida and garlic and saut for a few seconds. 2. Add the chopped onion and salt and saut again for 2 to 3 minutes. 3. Add the rice, sprouts and 3/4 cup of water and pressure cook for 3 whistles. 4. Coarsely mash the khichdi and serve lukewarm with fresh curds or raita