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The Atlantic
4 min read

Shazam for Mosquitoes

It was late on a Friday night, and Haripriya Mukundarajan was trying to record the annoying buzz of a mosquito’s wings. To fight mosquitoes and the diseases they carry, you need to know where they are—which species, in which places. Everything else flows from that. A lot of labor goes into trapping, counting, and identifying the insects, but Mukundarajan figured there might be an easier way. Mosquitoes give themselves away through the vexing whine of every wingbeat. If Mukundarajan could find an easy way of tracking that sound, perhaps she could develop an easy mosquito-detector. So there she
Nautilus
2 min read
Science

Meet Seven Extraordinary Women Scientists: A neuroscientist turned designer has created a unique celebration of women’s history month.

Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya, a former neuroscientist-turned-designer, wants to galvanize us to safeguard science. Her solution? Put a human face on it. “To encourage the next generation of young minds to take on tomorrow’s challenges and opportunities,” she says, “we should celebrate that our world was built not just by men, but by brilliant women of all backgrounds.” And so, in honor of women’s history month, she created a series of 32 posters drawing attention to a few remarkable women scientists. Her project, called “Beyond Curie,” pairs photos of each scientist along with typography and graph
TIME
3 min read
Food & Wine

What 3 Things Can I Do to Extend the Length of My Life?

JEFFREY KLUGER SOMEWHERE OUT THERE IS A BUNCH of people who are going to live to be 100. In the U.S. alone, there were more than 77,000 centenarians in 2014. Still, that number is very small: centenarians represent less than a quarter of 1% of the entire U.S. population. So how do you get to be one of them? You could invent a time machine, start your life over and do everything they did, or try to find a way to borrow their genes. Failing that, here are three things that longevity researchers recommend you start—and keep—doing. STAY CURIOUS. Once you’ve got a few years on you, it’s easy to