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Oracle9i RAC

for SAP Customers


Agenda
 Driving Forces
 Oracle9i RAC Architecture
 Oracle9i RAC Scalability
 Oracle9i RAC High Availability
 Oracle9i RAC and SAP’s MCOD
 Oracle9i RAC & Low Cost Technologies
 Oracle9i RAC Release Strategy
Driving Forces
Driving Forces
 Increased competition
– Customers do not tolerate downtime
– Management needs real-time information
 System evolution
– Growing amount of data
– Changing workloads
– Increasing complexity of IT landscapes
– Increasing interaction between different systems
Driving Forces
 Economic slowdown
– Decreasing earnings
– Need to improve margins
– Less money available for investments
The Problem
Increased
Competition
Economic
Slowdown
System
Evolution

More IT investments Less IT investments


The Solution
 Get most out of existing resources
– Opimize resource usage
– Implement high availability solutions
– Minimize administration costs
 Protect existing, minimize new investments
– Look for modularity and scalability of system
components
– Look for low cost technologies
 Simplify IT landscape (“consolidation”)
The Solution
 For several years, consolidation was the only
strategy to reduce costs.
 Modularity, scalability and low cost
technologies require distribution.
 This means, that we need a new concept of
systems design: Consolidated and integrated
systems should be distributed to cheap and
standardized components.
Oracle9i RAC
Architecture
Standard Oracle Architecture

Instanc Database
e
Shared Nothing Architecture

Database
Instance
1
Table A

Database
Instance
2
Table B

Database
Instance
3
Table C
Shared Disk Architecture

Database
Instance
1

Table A
Database
Instance Table B
2
Table C

Database
Instance
3
RAC Architecure
High Speed Interconnect
Database
Instance
1

Table A
Database
Instance Table B
2
Table C

Database Mirrored Disk


Instance Subsystem
3

Cache
Fusion
Oracle9i RAC
Scalability
RAC Scalability
 In the past, clustered databases (OPS)
scaled well for specific types of applications:
– Data Warehouse
– Parallel-enabled OLTP
 RAC with Cache Fusion delivers transparent
scalability to all types of applications
(including SAP applications)
RAC Scalability and SAP
 In the past, the only way to scale the
database server was to replace a small
system by a larger system (“scale up”)
 Oracle9i RAC provides an other option:
add more small systems (“scale out”)
 Benefits:
– Protection of existing investments
– Less new investments
mySAP.com Scalability

Presentation Application Database


mySAP.com Scalability

Presentation Application Database


mySAP.com Scalability

Presentation Application Database


mySAP.com/RAC Scalability

Presentation Application Database


mySAP.com/RAC Scalability

Presentation Application Database


mySAP.com/RAC Scalability

Presentation Application Database


Parallel SD Benchmark
 Oracle9i RAC running on HP (Compaq) Tru64
 3-tier system
 Finished: December 2001
 Certified: June 2002
(2002029, 2002030, 2002031)
 Goal: Prove scalability with max. CPU
utilization
Parallel SD Benchmark
12.000

10.000

8.000

6.000

4.000

2.000

0
1 node 2 nodes 4 nodes

Scalability: 1.8 Scalability: 1.8


Oracle9i RAC
High
Availability
Parallel Workload Study
 Oracle9i RAC running on Windows 2000
 2-tier systems
 Finished April 2002
 Not intended for certification
 Goal: Prove scalability under conditions as
close as possible to real world environments
(CPU util. between 33% and 70%)
RAC Scalability
100 SAP SD Users
+ Oracle Instance
1

100 SAP SD Users


+ Oracle Instance
2

100 SAP SD Users


+ Oracle Instance
3

100 SAP SD Users


+ Oracle Instance
4
RAC Scalability + High Availability
133 SAP SD Users
+ Oracle Instance
1

133 SAP SD Users


+ Oracle Instance
2

134 SAP SD Users


+ Oracle Instance
3

100 SAP SD Users


+ Oracle Instance
4
Parallel Workload Study
Throughput Scaling
Configuration Users (Dsteps/Hour)

Phase 1: Scalability
1 node 100 SD 35,364
2 nodes 200 SD 70,320 1.99
3 nodes 300 SD 103,482 2.93
4 nodes 400 SD 133,840 3.78

Phase 2: High Availability


3 nodes 400 SD 124,812
Parallel Workload Study
400%

350%

300%

250%

200%
Total Throughput
150% Throughput/Node

100%

50%

0%
100 200 300 400 400
Users Users Users Users Users
1 Node 2 Nodes 3 Nodes 4 Nodes 3 Nodes
Oracle9i RAC
& SAP’s MCOD
MCOD
 SAP requires more and more databases for
their different modules.
 The SAP modules in a mySAP.com landscape
are not independent, e.g. SAP SD, SAP CRM
and BW interact and share data.
 To guarantee the required consistency within
all these databases, SAP has developed
MCOD (“Multiple Components in One
Database”)
Typical mySAP.com Landscape
SAP R/3 Oracle
Instance Instance
1 1

SAP R/3 Oracle


Instance Instance
2 2

SAP CRM Oracle


Instance Instance
1 3

SAP BW Oracle
Instance Instance
1 4
mySAP.com and MCOD
SAP R/3
Instance
1

SAP R/3
Instance
2

Oracle
SAP CRM Instance
Instance 1
3

SAP BW Oracle
Instance Instance
4 2
mySAP.com, MCOD & RAC
SAP R/3 Oracle
Instance Instance
1 1

SAP R/3 Oracle


Instance Instance
2 2

SAP CRM Oracle


Instance Instance
1 3

SAP BW Oracle
Instance Instance
1 4
mySAP.com, MCOD & RAC
 With Oracle 9i RAC, nodes can be optimally
customized for dedicated workloads
(e.g. CRM, HR, SD, Retail, etc.).
 With Oracle 9i RAC, OLTP, BW and
batch-centric modules can be fine tuned
without affecting each other.
 Only running all related SAP modules in
one database guarantees the consistency,
especially for backups.
Oracle9i RAC
& Low-Cost
Technologies
Blades
 Up to 600 CPUs
per 19“ rack
 Decreased space
requirements: up to 7 times less
space compared to classic servers
 Decreased power requirements:
up to 5 times less power consumption
 Decreased cooling requirements:
up to 5 times less cooling
 Decreased price per CPU: up to 20 times less $/CPU
compared to a classic 32-way server
Blades: Expected Savings

Company 1 $500,000 to $1,000,000 per rack

Company 2 60% per server,


90% of data center space (15m2 vs. 156m2)

Company60%
3 of data center space (19,000m2 vs. 48,000m2)
= € 7,000,000

Company 4 reduction from $54 to $31 per user


Blades & Oracle9i RAC
 Blades have a high potential to cut cost
 Oracle runs on blades
 800 SD users with Oracle on a 2-way,
Intel PIII, 800MHz, blade
 With Oracle9i Real Application Clusters
(RAC), blades can be clustered as instances
of one database because of Oracle‘s shared
disk architecture
 Only Oracle 9i RAC can run on more than one
blade with SAP
Grid Computing
 Without Grid, systems have dedicated tasks.
 Each system has to be sized for worst case
peak load of his task.
 Under normal conditions, systems run over
hours with low load.
 Potential CPU power is wasted, because
unused.
Grid Computing
Example 1: Retail idle
 Within the normal business
hours the system is under
low load. Retail

 After business hours POS


upload starts, new batch idle
calculation starts, data
collection and transfer to
Retail
the BW systems starts. The
system is now, but only a view
hours, under the load it had to
been sized for.
~ 50% idle
Grid Computing
idle
Example 2: CRM
 Within the normal business CRM

hours, the system is under


load it was sized for.
 After business hours it runs
with low load till the next idle

business day.
CRM

~ 50% idle
Grid Computing
Grid to minimize unused resources.
 Because different systems have different
resources requirements at different points in
time, free resources can be shared.
 With Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC),
additional database nodes can be added up
on demand.
Example: Remove a database node from the
CRM system and assign it to the Retail
system for POS uploads.
Grid Computing
idle idle

idle Retail

CRM
CRM
Retail

idle idle
idle CRM
Retail
Retail
CRM

~ 50% idle ~ 25% idle


Centralized Storage
 Storage Area Network (SAN) or Network-
attached Storage (NAS)
 Separates storage from the traditional server
and puts it on special appliances
 Provides a common storage pool that is highly
scalable and flexible
Centralized Storage
 Centralized storage matches the capabilities
offered by blades and RAC:
– Small computing units without local disk
– Shared disk storage (RAC)
 No Oracle Cluster File System required, if
NAS is used
Linux
 What is it?
– Open-source operating system.
– Supported by many hardware vendors.
– Supported by many software vendors.
– Increasing market share as server
operating system.
Linux
 Why can it save money?
– Low-cost operating system.
– Low-cost third-party software.
– Homogeneous SW environment for
heterogeneous HW (e.g. Linux on Blades or
nearly any Intel based HW).
– Low-cost training.

Source: IDC White Paper “Maximizing the Business Value of Enterprise


Database Applications on a Linux Platform” (2002)
Linux
 Today Linux scales very well in SMP systems up
to 4 CPU’s.
 Linux on 8 CPU’s is still competitive, but between
4way and 8way systems the price per CPU
increases significantly.
 For SMP systems with more than 8 CPU’s, classic
Unix systems are the best choice.
 With Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC),
small 4 or 8way systems can be clustered to cross
the today’s Linux limitations.
 Commodity, inexpensive 4way Intel boxes,
clustered with Oracle 9i RAC, help to reduce TCO.
Linux
 Oracle has a strong commitment to support
Linux.
 Oracle 9i RAC for SAP certification on
Linux has already been started by HP, Dell,
Fujitsu-Siemens.
 Oracle 9i RAC for SAP will be certified for
RedHat and Suse.
Release
Strategy
Release Strategy
 SAP has
– agreed to adopt, distribute and support Oracle9i
RAC (May 2002)
– certified a series of SD Parallel benchmarks
using Oracle9i RAC on HP (Compaq) Tru64 Unix
(May 2002).
 RAC will be generally available for customers
on HP (Compaq) Tru64 Unix within 6 months.
Release Strategy

Windows Benchmark Pilot Customer(s) Avail

Solaris Benchmark Pilot Customer(s) Avail

HP-UX Benchmark Pilot Customer(s) Avail

AIX Benchmark Pilot Customer(s) Availability

Linux Benchmark Pilot Customer(s) Availability

True64 Benchmark Pilot Customer(s) Availability