You are on page 1of 11

WORD STRESS

Regular Transition of Stress from Nouns to Verbs


An accent - ksnt A concert knsert A conflict knflict A contest kntest A contract- kntrct A contrast- kntrst A convert knvert A convict knvict A desert dzrt A discharge- dischrj to accent - ksnt to concert knsert to conflict knflict to contest kntest to contract kntrct to contrast kntrst to convert knvert to convict knvict to desert dzrt to discharge- dischrj

An incline An insult An object Perfect A permit A present Produce Progres A project A protest A rebel A recall A record A reject Research Subject Survey A suspect

to incline to insult to object to perfect to permit to present to produce to progress to project to protest to rebel to recall to record to reject to research to subject to survey to suspect

Advocate Animate Alternate Appropriate Approximate Articulate Associate Deliberate Discriminate Duplicate Elaborate An estimate Duplicate Discriminate Elaborate Estimate Graduate Intimate Moderate separate

Regular transition of Nouns/Adjectives and Verbs


Advocate Animate Alternate Appropriate Approximate Articulate Associate Deliberate Discriminate Duplicate Elaborate An estimate Duplicate Discriminate Elaborate Estimate Graduate Intimate Moderate Precate separate

Discriminate Duplicate Elaborate An estimate Duplicate Discriminate Elaborate Estimate Graduate Intimate Moderate Precate separate

Regular Transitions of Adjectives and Verbs


You need to insert a paragraph on this newspaper insert. How can you object to this object? Id like to present you with this present. Would you care to elaborate on his elaborate explanation? The manufacturer couldnt recall of thered been a recall. The religious convert wanted to convert the world. The political rebels wanted to rebel against the world. The mogul wanted to record a new record for his new artist. I fyou perfect your intonation, your accent will be perfect. Due to the drought, the fields didnt produce much produce this year. Unfortunately, City Hall wouldnt permit them to get a permit. Have you heard that your associate is known to associate with gangsters? 13. How much do you estimate that the estimate will be? 14. The facilitator wanted to separate the general topic into separate categories.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Stress in Two-Word Phrases


First Word set phrases streets Co. or corp. nationalities of food nationalities of people light bulb Main Street Xerox Corp. Chinese food French guy

TWO-WORD PHRASES Descriptive Phrases


Nouns are heavier than adjectives they carry the weight of the new information . An adjective and noun combination is called a descriptive phrase. In the absence of a noun, you will stress the adjective, but as soon as a noun appears on the scene, it takes immediate precedence and should be stressed.

Stress in Two-Word Phrases


Second word descriptive phrases new information

Sentence Stress with descriptive phrases.


Adjective 1. Its short. 2. Its chocolate. 3. Its good. 4. Its guarded. 5. Its wide. 6. Therere four. 7. It was small. 8. Its the best. Noun and Adjective Its a short nail. Its a chocolate cake. Its a good plan. Its a guarded gate. Its a wide river. There are four cards. It was a small spot. Its the best book.

Descriptive Phrase Story


There is a mother duck. She lays three eggs. Soon, there are three baby birds. Two of the birds are very beautiful. One of them is quite ugly. The beautiful ducklings make fun of their ugly brother. The poor thing is very unhappy. As the three birds grow older, the ugly duckling begins to change. His gray feathers turn snowy white. His gangly neck becomes beautifully smooth. In early spring, the ugly duckling is swimming in a small pond in the back yard of the old farm. He sees shimmering reflection in the clear water. What a great surprise! He is no longer an ugly duckling. He has grown into a lovely swan.