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INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT

PRODUCE A VIDEO OF LABORATORY WORK PROCEDURE FOR PAVEMENT


DESIGN AND DETERMINE ITS APPLICATION IN JKR/SPJ/2008-S4
MUHAMMAD AFIQ BIN ROSLAN
CF140286
SECTION 4
PREPARED FOR: PROF. MADYA DR MOHD EZREE BIN ABDULLAH

INTRODUCTION

AGGREGATES GRADING TEST


The test can be run on either dry or washed aggregate.
The washed sieve analysis takes longer but produces a more accurate gradation,
particularly the percent passing the No. 200 (0.075 mm) sieve since the washing helps
remove these small particles from the larger particles.
The dry sieve analysis procedure is often used where rapid results are required.
The basic sieve analysis consists of weighing an aggregate sample and then passing it
through a nest of sieves.
The nest of sieves is made up of a stack of wire-cloth screens with progressively smaller
openings from top to bottom.
The material retained on each sieve is weighed and compared to the total sample mass.
Particle size distribution is expressed as a percent retained or percent passing by weight
on each sieve size.

OBJECTIVE
To determine the particle size distribution of samples aggregates
and fillers.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

PROCEDURES
1. Obtain an aggregate sample of adequate mass from one of the
following locations: aggregate stockpiles, bins, dump trucks,
conveyor belt, or the roadway.
2. Mix and reduce the sample to an amount suitable for testing.

FIGURE & VIDEO

Figure 6: Splitting a large aggregate


sample.

Video 1: Splitting a large aggregate sample.

PROCEDURES
3. Dry the test sample to a constant mass and determine the
samples dry mass.
4. If using the washed procedure, place the dry sample in a
container and cover with water. Agitate the sample to
completely separate all particles finer than the No. 200 (0.075
mm) sieve from the coarser aggregate, and to bring the fine
material into suspension. Immediately decant the wash water
containing the suspended solids over a nest of sieves consisting
of a No. 200 (0.075 mm) sieve and an upper sieve with openings
in the range of No. 8 (2.36 mm) to No. 16 (1.18 mm)

FIGURE & VIDEO

Figure 7: Washing the aggregate sample.

Video 2: Washing the aggregate sample.

PROCEDURES
5. If using the washed procedure, repeat step 4 until the wash water is
clear.
6. If using the washed procedure, return the material retained on the
nested sieves to the washed sample by flushing with water. Dry the
washed sample to a constant mass and allow to cool. Determine mass of
the sample after washing.
7. Select applicable sieves to obtain the information required by the
specifications covering the material to be tested. Assemble the sieves in
order of decreasing size of opening from top to bottom and place the
nest of sieves over a pan (Video 3).

FIGURE & VIDEO

Video 3: Assembling the sieve nest.

PROCEDURES
8. Pour the sample into the top sieve in the nest (Figure 8).
9. Sieve the material in a mechanical sieve shaker (Figure 9 and
Video 4).
10.Determine the mass of the material retained on each sieve size
(Video 5). Record the cumulative mass retained for each sieve
size (the mass retained on a specific sieve size and the mass
retained on all sieves with larger openings).

FIGURE & VIDEO

Figure 8: Pouring the aggregate sample into the sieve


stack.

Figure 9: Shaker for use in a gradation analysis.

FIGURE & VIDEO

Video 4: Shaking an aggregate sample.

Video 5: Weighing an aggregate sample after


shaking.

CALCULATION
1. Calculate the mass retained on each sieve as a percentage of the
original dry mass (M1). For the mass of material passing the
finest sieve, add that passing during washing (M1-M2) to that
during the dry sieving.
For example:M(10mm) = 100/M1
2. Calculate the mass of the sample passing each sieve as a
cumulative percentage, from the general relationship:
(% passing this sieve) = (%passing previous sieve) (% retained
on this sieve).
3. Plot the grading as a curve on a semi-log chart.

APPENDIX

Working sheet

Semi-log graph

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