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DIVINE WORD COLLEGE OF LAOAG

SCHOOL OF BASIC EDUCATION


HIGH SCHOOL

HUMAN
PAPILLOMAVIRUS

(HPV)

HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS
(HPV)
Human papillomavirus (HPV)
is the most common sexually
transmitted infection in the
United States. Some health
effects caused by HPV can be
prevented with vaccines.
HPV is a different virus than HIV
and HSV (herpes). HPV is so common that nearly all sexually active
men and women get it at some point in their lives. There are many
different types of HPV. Some types can cause health problems
including genital warts and cancers. But there are vaccines that can
stop these health problems from happening.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most


common sexually transmitted diseases in the
United States. Some estimates put the figure at
one million new cases each year and a
prevalence of 20 percent to 40 percent of
sexually active women. Because HPV infection
can have few or no symptoms, a majority of those
infected may not even be aware that they have
the virus.

CAUSES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS


HPV infection occurs when a virus enters your body
through a cut, abrasion or small tear in the outer layer of
your skin. The virus is transferred primarily by skin-to-skin
contact.
Genital HPV infections are contracted through sexual
intercourse, and sex and other skin-to-skin contact in the
genital region. Some HPV infections that result in oral or
upper respiratory lesions are contracted through oral sex.
Its possible for a mother with an HPV infection to transmit
the virus to her infant during delivery. This exposure may
cause HPV infection in the babys genitals or upper
respiratory system.

SYMPTOMS OF HPV
In most cases, HPV goes away on its own
and does not cause any health problems.
But when HPV does not go away, it can
cause health problems like genital warts
and cancer.

Genital warts usually appears as a small


bump or group of bumps in genital area.
They can be small or large, raised or flat,
or shaped like a cauliflower. A healthcare
provider can usually diagnose warts by
looking at genital areas..

Cervical cancer usually does


not have symptoms until it is
quite advanced, very serious
and hard to treat. For these
reason, it is important for
women to get regular
screening for cervical cancer.
Other HPV-related cancers
might not have signs or
symptoms until they are
advanced and hard to treat.
These include cancers of the
vulva, vagina, penis, anus
and oropharynx (cancers of
the back of the throat,
including the base of the
tongue and tonsils.)

HOW IS HPV SPREAD?


You can get HPV by having vaginal, anal, or oral
sex with someone who has the virus. It is most
commonly spread during vaginal or anal sex. HPV
can be passed even when an infected person has
no signs or symptoms.

HPV is spread through sexual contact. Genital warts


resulting from HPV infection can be found around
the anus, vulva, or cervix of women and around the
anus and shaft of the penis in men. Visible warts
are usually harder to see in women than in men.
However, not everyone infected with HPV will
develop warts.
It should be kept in mind that while the risk of
transmitting the virus is the highest when there are
visible warts, transmission can be spread when no
outward signs of HPV are present. Another thing to
keep in mind is that HPV can lay dormant for years.
Even in long-term monogamous relationships ,
genital warts or cervical changes can occur without
an obvious infectious event.

I HAVE HPV WHATNOW WHAT


SHOULD I DO?
For women the most important thing to do is to get a
yearly Pap Tests. About 90% of cervical cancer can be
defected early through a Pap Smear.
Other things you should do include: Report to your
doctor any vaginal bleeding, flank pain or fever.
Inform your physician if you know you have or think
you may exposed a partner to HPV. Notify your
partner that you have HPV and make any decision
about sex, protection and your health together. Use
condoms in each and every anal, vaginal or oral
sexual encounter. Suggest that your sexual partner(s)
get a medical evaluation and a HPV screening.

WHAT DOES MY FUTURE


HOLD?
Once you are infected with HPV, you will probably
carry the virus for life. Remember you can spread
the virus when you have visible warts and you
may be able to spread the virus when no warts
are visible.
Women should have yearly PAP test. Early
detection is the key to a good prognosis. The
presence of HPV or cellular changes of the cervix
should not interfere with a womans ability to bear
children.