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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, DESIGN, ART AND

TECHNOLOGY- MAKERERE UNIVERSITY.


PRESENTATION ON
HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE (HSC)
[CIV 7108: ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DESIGN]

DEPT. OF CIVIL & ENV. ENG.


STUDENT
REG NO.:1. EKITUI Cecil Zebedde 2016/HD08/576U
2. SANYA Raymond
2016/HD08/609U
3. WAMALA Isaac Samson 2016/HD08/617U
4. DENGA Yosia
2012/HD08/991U

LECTURER
DR. MATOVU MOSES

Group Assignment #1: Scope


Having done a group literature study on High-Strength
Concrete (HSC), this presentation has been prepared to
appreciate the following:
Precisely, what is High-Strength Concrete?
How does HSC differ from High Performance
Concrete?
What are the constituents of HSC ?
What are the mechanical properties of this type of
concrete?
How different are stress-strain relationships of HSC
when compared to types of concrete?

1.0 Brief on high strength concrete


Definition is based on time and geographical location
(ACI 363R, 1997).
Generally, High-Strength Concrete (HSC) refers to
concrete in excess of 6000psi (41MPa) at 28 days
Wight and MacGregor (2012).
Admixtures such as super plasticers among others
used to improve the dispersion of cement in the mix
and produce workable concrete with much lower
water cement (w/c) ratios of 0.4 or less.
HSC is only one type of HPC

Applications of HSC
Long span bridges
Tall buildings
Industrial floors

2.0 Constituents of HSC


Similar to conventional but must be of higher quality and
properties should be tested by use of trial mixes.
Cement (Type I V) (ASTM C150)
Workable concrete with low w/c is made possible through
the use of large amounts of super plasticizers. High cement
contents can be expected to result in high temperature rise
within the concrete (ACI 363R, 1997).
However, when the temperature rise is expected to be a
problem, a Type IV low heat of hydration (low C3S) is
recommended provided it meets the strength-producing
requirements.

Constituents of HSC contd


Aggregates
Fine aggregates with a fineness modulus below 2.5 gives a
sticky consistency however a modulus of 3.0 gives the best
workability.
Aggregate strength becomes increasingly important as
target strength increases, particularly in the case in the case
of high-strength concrete (Caldarone, 2009) ITZ
In conventional concrete; common for aggregates to be
stronger and stiffer than the paste. Aggregate strength not a
critical factor! Reverse is true for HSC

3.0 Mechanical Properties


Typical Stress Strain curves for high, moderate and
conventional strength concrete
Less Internal microcracking for HSC
Normal concrete
0.75fc
HSC 0.85fc
Approximate critical
stresses at which
internal micro-cracking
starts
HSC failure by
fracture of aggregate
on relatively smooth
planes parallel to
(Adopted from:
direction of applied
Caldrone, 2009, p.
stress
101)

3.0 Mechanical Properties Contd


Modulus of elasticity
Equations for modulus of
elasticity
Normal concrete
Ec = 4731 fc 0.5 . Eqn
(3-1)
High-strength concrete
Ec = 3320 fc
(3-2)

0.5

+ 6900Eqn

Varies as a function of the


modulus
of coarse
(Adopted
from:
aggregates
Caldrone,
2009, p.
101)

3.0 Mechanical Properties Contd


Modulus of rupture
Equations for modulus of
elasticity
Normal concrete
Ec = 0.689 fc 0.5 . Eqn
(3-3)
High-strength concrete
Btn 0.623 fc

0.5

to 0.996 fc

0.5

(Adopted from: (ACI 363R,


1997)

3.0 Mechanical Properties Contd


Tensile Splitting Strength
Methods of determining tensile splitting strength
1. Direct tension. Pure tensile force , free from eccentricities, difficult to
achieve
2. Indirectly by splitting tensile. Most commonly used
3. Flexure (modulus of rupture) - Used as well
Notes for tensile strength Dewar (1964):
Normal concrete
10% of compressive strength
High-strength concrete
10% of compressive strength up 84MPa but may be reduced to
5% for higher strengths

3.0 Mechanical Properties Contd


Fatigue Strength
To the extent that is known, the fatigue strength of highstrength concrete is the same as that for concretes of lower
strengths (Bennet and Muir, 1967)
Shrinkage and Creep
According to test data the creep coefficient, Ct, for high
strength concrete is considerably less than normal concrete
(ACI 363R, 1997). The creep of high-strength concrete made
with high-range water reducers is reported to be decreased
significantly.
Shrinkage of HSC is similar to that of conventional concrete.

REFERENCES
1. ACI 363R (1997) Report on High-Strength Concrete, Manual of Concrete Practice American
Concrete Institute, Farmington Hill, Miami, 55pp.
2. Bennett, E.W., and Muir, S.E. St. J., (1967) Some Fatigue Tests of High-Strength Concrete in
Axial Compression, Magazine of Concrete Research (London) 19 (59), pp. 113-117.
3. Caldarone, M.A (2009) High strength concrete, A practical guide, Taylor and Francis, New
York.
4. Dewar, J.D. (1964) The Indirect Tensile Strength of Concretes of High Compressive Strength,
Technical Report No. 42.377, Cement and Concrete Association, Wexham Springs.
5. Mindess, S. (2008) Developments in the formulation and reinforcement of concrete,
Woodhead Publishing Limited and CRC Press LLC, England.
6. Parrot, LJ. (1969) The Properties of High-Strength Concrete, Technical Report No. 42.417,
Cement and Concrete Association, Wexham Springs, 12 pp.
7. Swamy, R.N., and Anand, K.L.,(1973) Shrinkage and Creep of High Strength Concrete, Civil
Engineering and Public Works Review (London), 68(807) pp. 859-865, 867-868.
8. NRMCA (2001) Concrete in practice. What, why and how? National Ready Mix Concrete
Association.
9. Wright, K.J. and MacGregor J, G. (2012) Reinforced Concrete, Mechanics and Design, sixth
edition, Pearson, New Jersey.
10. Zia, P., Ahmad, S. and Leming, M. (1997) High-Performance Concretes A State of-Art Report